Health Literacy: Moving From Awareness to Action.

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<p>PowerPoint Presentation</p> <p>Health Literacy:Moving From Awareness to Action</p> <p>WELCOME!ListCEUs evaluation formMaterials on Table: name tents, (or name tags), pens, markers, basket of fun items such as mini puzzles, clappers, stress balls3x5 cards or post it notes, helpful to have water or other refreshments available, helpful to have large post-it flipcharts availablePlease Sign in Attendance List (generated from registrations)</p> <p>1ObjectivesDefine Health LiteracyAssociate literacy, health literacy and health outcomesKnow the 10 Attributes of Health Literate Organizations (Brach et. al., 2013)Know tools for creating an Organizational Health Literacy Action Plan and applying an Organizational Health Literacy Action Plan to: PHAB Accreditation, National Patient Safety Guidelines, and Patient Centered Medical HomesUnderstand the Health Literacy Champion Tool, and related resourcesIntroductionsPlease introduce yourself- let us know who you are, what organization your are from and what you do. Other alternative introductions:1. Creatively pair people from different organizations (ie. Put a name of a Disney character on one name tag, and the corresponding movie on a different name tag. The movie character finds the movie. Make sure you give them time to pair up.)2. Use a seating chart</p> <p>3Health LiteracyThe degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.(Healthy People 2010)1.) Patient skills and Experience 2.) Provider Skills and Experience 3.) Literacy Demands of Systems and Organizations three overlapping circles</p> <p>Health literacy has nearly 2 dozen definitions, but many of us in Health Literacy Nebraska like this one because it emphasizes the roles in successful communication played by:individual patients, individual providers, and the organizations (like cancer centers)</p> <p>What health care consumers can and cannot do. andThe burdens providers and health care systems put on their patients/clients/users.</p> <p>allows the public and personnel working in health-related contexts to find, understand, evaluate, communicate, and use information. Draft definition proposed by Andrew Pleasant and colleagues (2008)</p> <p>And now we are also including the demands that health systems place on that interaction and on those patients.NavigationLive person answering the phoneForms etc. </p> <p>4Health Literacy in America (NAAL 2003 Data)</p> <p>Proficient (12%): Define medical terms from complex document, calculate share of employee health insurance. Intermediate (53%): Determine healthy weight from body mass index (BMI) chart, interpret prescription and over-the-counter drug labels.Basic (22%): Understand simple patient education handout.Below Basic (14%): Circle date on appointment slip. Understand simple pamphlet about pre-test instructions.</p> <p>(Kutner, Greenberg, Jin, &amp; Paulsen, 2006 )5The 2003 study included scales that looked specifically at HEALTH literacyso we could check some of the assumptionslimited literacy and limited health literacy are closely related. </p> <p>NAAL Study had abut 18,000 participants </p> <p>Out of balance now. Demands exceed the skills and abilities of the majority of patientsWe are focused on the yellow and orange area of the graph. That is where most of the adults are. We dont have to worry about the top 12%, theyll be ok, and will certainly benefit from health literacy efforts, and the bottom 14% may be beyond our capacity to assist. Those in the red zone may be disabled in some way, and health literacy efforts will most not likely change their ability to understand.Health LiteracyIncludes the ability toSpeakListenReadWriteDo mathAll impact a patients ability to navigate the healthcare environment, how they communicate with providers, how well they can self-advocate, how well they can act on health information</p> <p>Demonstrates how intricate communication is and how many skills are needed.All are used in how health information is communicated and processed. The ability to do math is called numeracy (see the root NUMER- remember number and youll remember!)</p> <p>6Impact of Health Literacy Predictors of Health StatusLiteracy SkillsAgeIncomeEmployment StatusEducational LevelRacial or Ethnic GroupTaken from: The Report on the Council of Scientific Affairs, Ad Hoc Committee on Health Literacy for the Council on Scientific Affairs, AMA, JAMA, February 10, 1999. If health literacy is the primary predictor of health status, then someone with LOW health literacy will be more likely to have unfavorable health related outcomes. People with low health literacy have Increased medication errors (Davis, 2007)Increased hospitalizations (Baker, et. al., 2005)Increased hospital readmission Increased risk of death (Baker, Wolf, Feinglass, Thompson, Gazmaraian, 2007)Increase cost (Weiss, 1999)Decrease use of preventative services (DeWalt, Berkman, Sheridan, Lohr, Pignone, 2004)Poor disease self management </p> <p>7Health Literacy is NOT StaticInfluenced by underlying literacy skills ANDFearUnfamiliarity with informationDistractions of the momentFeeling ill in the momentand more</p> <p>In cancer care and treatment, as well in other settings and with other disease processes, patients are dealing with all of these factors and more.</p> <p>Remember the color chart? We may move within that yellow and orange zone because of some of these factors.8</p> <p>Ask an audience member to explain how common it is for people to have health literacy problems. </p> <p>Ask them to think about the people they see in the clinic, or interact with on a daily basis. How many of those people fully understand whatever it is they were trying to communicate, on any given day? </p> <p>Anecdotally- most providers (and other staff, such as billing, scheduling, insurance, lab) will informally validate the statistic mention in the slide.</p> <p>Point to the fact that this is an iconarry which is very effective is showing percentages. (health literate best practice. http://www.iconarray.com/</p> <p>9</p> <p>Making information doesnt mean we are dumbing it down. </p> <p>Research shows that everyone prefers clear, simple language, regardless of their education level. No matter where you are in the color zone, we want language we can use.</p> <p>Refer to PUSH sign. Use these doors when our hands are full? When we are pushing a stroller? Use ramps then too. </p> <p>There are times we dont need help, but all of us will have a time when we arrive at that appointment with our hands full. Most of us will have our hand full most of the time. Health literacy is about being ready.</p> <p>When we dont put health literacy into practice, as providers and organizations, it is like greeting patients with a heavy, manual door. Even those of us who have one or two boxes could really use that button! </p> <p>So, we utilize what is know as Health Literacy Universal Precautions (Just like we use universal precautions to prevent the spread of infection. It benefits everyone.) </p> <p>http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/quality-patient-safety/quality-resources/tools/literacy-toolkit/</p> <p>What Are Health Literacy Universal Precautions?Health literacy universal precautions are the steps that practices take when they assume that all patients may have difficulty comprehending health information and accessing health services. Health literacy universal precautions are aimed atSimplifying communication with and confirming comprehension for all patients, so that the risk of miscommunication is minimized.Making the office environment and health care system easier to navigate.Supporting patients' efforts to improve their health.</p> <p>We will now look at several specific best practices, that could be implemented in a Universal Approach.</p> <p>1010 Attributes11.</p> <p>Hand out the graphicPass out the example to everyone.</p> <p>12Health Literacy Guidebook Unity PointHealth Literacy Assessmenthttps://www.unitypoint.org/health-literacy-guidebook.aspx</p> <p>Organizational Action PlanOrganizational Action Plan</p> <p>Understanding the 10 Attributes will help inform the next steps or organizations change and the desired end state.Now, lets take you to a great resource that will help you get started. </p> <p>Show website/ hand out</p> <p>It is always good to begin with some sort of base line. We recommend that you have your organization complete this assessment tool and discuss the results. The discussion will lead to more insights, and will help give you an idea of strengths and opportunities.. </p> <p>13Health Literacy ChampionA framework for successhttp://nalhd.org/resources-HL-Champion.html</p> <p>14Organizational StandardsNational Patient Safety Guidelineshttp://www.jointcommission.org/standards_information/npsgs.aspxPublic Health Accreditation Standardshttp://www.phaboard.org/wp-content/uploads/SM-Version-1.5-Board-adopted-FINAL-01-24-2014.docx.pdf</p> <p>Susan Ferrone, Project Director402-904-7946OPIHLprojectdirector@nalhd.org </p> <p>Susan Bockrath, NALHD Executive Director402-904-7946susanbockrath@nalhd.org </p> <p>WELCOME!ListCEUs evaluation formMaterials on Table: name tents, (or name tags), pens, markers, basket of fun items such as mini puzzles, clappers, stress balls3x5 cards or post it notes, helpful to have water or other refreshments available, helpful to have large post-it flipcharts availablePlease Sign in Attendance List (generated from registrations)</p> <p>16Put the most important information firstUse the simplest, most straightforward words to express an ideaAvoid jargon, abbreviations, acronymsUse living room language, kitchen table wordsUse stories and analogiesUse picturesUse examplesPlain Language About AttributesHand out IOM article- longer explanationPaper, markersIf there is time, have groups/pairs pick an attribute that they will teach to the rest of the group, using plain language.</p> <p>Put the most important information firstUse the simplest, most straightforward words to express an ideaAvoid jargon, abbreviations, acronymsUse living room language, kitchen table wordsUse stories and analogiesUse picturesUse examples</p> <p>17</p>