Hospitality - Fast Food, Cafe and Restaurant Industry - A Guide to Risk Management(2)

  • Published on
    26-Nov-2014

  • View
    105

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

Workplace Health and Safety in the Fast Food Caf & Restaurant IndustryA Guide to Risk Management

April 1999

ContentsHazards ...................................................................................................................... 3 Risks .......................................................................................................................... 3 Control Measures - ................................................................................................... 3 Food Industry Hazards ............................................................................................. 4 1. Manual Handling .......................................................................................... 4 2. The Work Environment................................................................................. 4 3. Plant ............................................................................................................. 4 4. Heat ............................................................................................................. 4 5. Electricity...................................................................................................... 4 Other hazards include: ............................................................................................. 4 Risk Management in the Food Industry .................................................................. 4 1. Storage................................................................................................................. 5 1.1 Manual Handling .......................................................................................... 5 1.2 Work Environment........................................................................................ 6 2. Kitchen ................................................................................................................. 7 2.1 Manual Handling .......................................................................................... 7 2.2 Work Environment........................................................................................ 8 2.3 Plant ............................................................................................................. 9 2.4 Heat ........................................................................................................... 10 2.5 Electricity.................................................................................................... 11 2.6 Gas ............................................................................................................ 12 2.7 Fire ............................................................................................................. 12 3. Service Delivery ................................................................................................ 13 3.1 Manual Handling ........................................................................................ 13 3.2 Work Environment...................................................................................... 14 3.3 Heat ........................................................................................................... 15 3.4 Personal Security: Violence At Work.......................................................... 15 3.5 Noise .......................................................................................................... 16 4. Clean-up............................................................................................................. 17 4.1 Biological Hazards ..................................................................................... 17 4.2 Sharps - Skin Penetrating Injuries .............................................................. 17 4.3 Hazardous Substances .............................................................................. 18 Further Information................................................................................................. 19

Guide Division of Workplace Health & Safety Fast Food Caf & Restaurant Industry Page 2 of 19

gde40v1.pdf

If you're in business...any business, you know about managing risk. Your survival depends on it!Property insurance, worker compensation insurance, bank overdraft.., all involve carefully calculated risk. But what about workplace health and safety? Just how risky is the fast food, cafe, and restaurant business? What risks are people in your establishment facing every day? As an employer, you should know. You have a legal obligation, under the Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995, to ensure the health and safety of everyone in your workplace...staff, customers, and visitors. This guide will help you to identify and assess the risks to health and safety in your workplace, and if necessary, to eliminate them, or reduce them to an acceptable level.

Then, if necessary, you must take steps to reduce the exposure of everyone in your workplace to the chance of injury; i.e. you must control the risk, either by eliminating it, or reducing it to an acceptable level.

Control Measures The Hierarchy of ControlTo control the level of risk posed by a hazard in your workplace you have a number of options: In order, these are. Elimination The most desirable option. If you eliminate a hazard you completely eliminate the associated risk. Substitution You can substitute something else (a tool or a process) that has less potential to cause injury. Separation You can separate workers from the hazard (by safety screens, soundproofing, etc). Redesign You can redesign a process or equipment to make it safer. Administration You may be able to reduce risk by upgrading training, changing rosters, or other administrative actions. Personal Protective Equipment The least desirable option. When you can't reduce the risk of injury in any other way, use personal protective equipment (gloves, goggles, etc) as a last resort. In practice, several control options are often used in combination. In the case of kitchen knives, for example, personal protective equipment (steel mesh gloves) may be used in conjunction with administrative controls (proper training in their safe use, cleaning, maintenance and storage). Review: When you have put a control option (or a combination of control options) into practice, you must review it after a period of time to make sure it is actually reducing the risk.

HazardsThe Macquarie Dictionary defines a hazard as "a potential source of harm." There are hazards in every workplace. In a kitchen, for example, a knife is a hazard because it is sharp. A cutting board is a hazard because it can harbour bacteria.

RisksThe Macquarie Dictionary defines a risk as "exposure to the chance of injury or loss." In a kitchen, when a knife is properly used, for the purpose for which it has been designed, by someone who knows how to use it, there is very little chance of injury. The risk is Iow. On the other hand, if the knife is carelessly or improperly used by an untrained person, the risk of injury is high. If a cutting board is kept clean and in good condition, the risk of infection from salmonella and other bacteria is Iow. If kitchen hygiene is poor, the risk of infection is high. The level of risk depends on the way the situation is managed. As an employer, you must know the hazards in your workplace. You must assess their potential to cause harm. Some pose a significant threat to health and safety; others are relatively Iow risk.

Guide Division of Workplace Health & Safety Fast Food Caf & Restaurant Industry Page 3 of 19

gde40v1.pdf

Food Industry HazardsPeople who work in the food industry have identified five major hazards. They are: 1. Manual Handling Any activity requiring a person to use force to lift, lower, push, pull, carry or otherwise move or restrain an object. Manual handling tasks include: lifting heavy cartons repetitive or forceful movements work carried out in awkward postures. Injuries may happen as a result of a "one-off" event, but more often they are the result of stress and strain over a long period of time. 2. The Work Environment The characteristics of the area where you work. Elements include floors and other surfaces, noise, lighting, temperature, ventilation, accessibility and housekeeping. The most common causes of injury arising from the work environment in the food industry are slips, trips and falls, and heat stress. 3. Plant The term "plant" refers to both powered and non-powered equipment. Caterers, chefs and kitchen staff use many items - slicers, mincers, knives, mixers, etc - which have the potential to cause injury. You should consider the following issues: guarding moving parts the power source (e.g. electricity) the risk of fire or explosion noise vibration radiation stability (how well plant is mounted or secured) the use of pressure vessels (e.g. espresso machines).

4. Heat Burns are very common in the catering industry. Many operations involve contact with hot food, equipment, surfaces and liquids. Heat is a risk when: cooking food taking food from ovens, bain maries etc making beverages using hot equipment or steam 5. Electricity Electrical equipment is widely used in the food industry. Because of frequent use and cleaning, its electrical safety may be compromised, exposing workers to the risk of shock, burns, or fatal injury. Electrical accidents are usually caused by: using faulty equipment working with damaged leads unsafe work practices, or a combination of the above.

Other hazards include: Gas Noise Fire Personal security and violence at work Biological hazards Sharps - skin penetrating injuries Hazardous substances (chemicals)

Risk Management in the Food IndustrySome work areas in the food industry, and some tasks, are obviously more hazardous than others. For risk management purposes, we suggest that you consider your workplace under the following categories: 1. Storage 2. Kitchen 3. Service Delivery 4. Clean-up

Guide Division of Workplace Health & Safety Fast Food Caf & Restaurant Industry Page 4 of 19

gde40v1.pdf

1. StorageHere the main hazards are Manual Handling and the Work Environment.

1.1 Manual HandlingWorkers are at risk when they are: lifting cartons from a vehicle carrying cartons stacking shelves pulling items off shelves Assess the risk in your workplace. To manage it, apply the hierarchy of controls. Elimination Avoid manual handling wherever possible. Here are some ideas: Arrange for suppliers to restock refrigerators on a needs basis. As well as eliminating unnecessary handling, this will minimise stock levels. Provide storage facilities for perishable foods on the loading dock. This will reduce the distance goods must be carried. Arrange for food to be prepared before arrival at the loading area; e.g. potatoes washed and peeled. Arrange for delivery drivers to unload their vehicles. Substitution Use an alternative method of handling. Ideas include: Use forklifts or pallet jacks to unload vehicles Buy smaller or lighter cartons of stock. Separation Separate the hazard from the workers. By definition, impossible to apply to manual handling!

Redesign Redesign the workplace layout, processes or equipment. Suggestions include: Make storage facilities readily accessible. Provide shelving that allows easy access to most items; i.e. between knee and shoulder height. Store items according to usage: mostused in the middle shelves, lighter goods on top shelves. Provide access equipment (e.g. ladders) close at hand. Administration Change work practices. Some ideas: Organise workers so that they share tasks such as lifting. Arrange set times for delivery of goods so that enough workers are available to handle them. Display charts to identify location of goods easily. Purchase by demand. This will save storage space, reduce stock levels, double handling and clutter and provide better access. Provide training in preferred lifting methods. Provide training in company work practices. Validate the training by competency test, and make sure only trained and competent workers perform the task. Personal Protective Equipment Consider all other control options first. Provide workers with non-slip shoes to reduce the risk of slips, trips and falls. Gloves may improve grip

Guide Division of Workplace Health & Safety Fast Food Caf & Restaurant Industry Page 5 of 19

gde40v1.pdf

1.2 Work EnvironmentHere, workers are primarily at risk of slips, trips and falls, and heat stress. Assess the risk in your workplace. To manage it, apply the hierarchy of controls. Elimination Avoid walking on slippery floors whenever possible. Substitution Review the type of floor surface and replace with non-slip material or non-slip mats if required. Use floor cleaning products which remove oil and grease. Separation Provide roofing in the unloading area to keep rain and heat off workers.

Administration Have documented procedures so that spills are cleaned up immediately. For example, post signs close to the work area to remind workers. Have clean-up equipment stored close to the place where it is likely to be used. Provide training in safe work practices. Develop a maintenance program to check and fix equipment (light bulbs, fans, etc) regularly. Ensure that only workers performing a task (e.g. unloading a van) are in a work area (e.g. a loading bay). Personal Protective Equipment Consider all other control options first. Provide non-slip shoes or recommend and encourage a style of non-slip footwear, preferably rubber soled (an electrical insulator). If people are unloading outdoors, provide sunscreen and hats.

Redesign Provide adequate lighting in delivery and storage areas. Provide plenty of room for workers to move about without restriction. Minimise moisture build-up on floors. Provide smaller (non walk-in) cold rooms. Ensure that vehicles can park close to loading docks to minimise slips and falls from the dock. Design the area so that unloading is done as close as possible to storage.

Guide Division of Workplace Health & Safety Fast Food Caf & Restaurant Industry Page 6 of 19

gde40v1.pdf

2. KitchenWork in the kitchen includes preparation and cooking of food, cleaning, and disposal of rubbish. Workers face many hazards, including: Manual Handling Work Environment Plant Heat Electricity Gas Fire

Substitution Instead of carrying armfuls of plates, cutlery and drinks, use trolleys and trays. Place rubbish bins on trolleys that can be easily wheeled outside, and use mechanical bin lifters to transfer the rubbish into industrial bins. Reduce the size (and therefore the capacity) of pots and pans. Reduce the size (and therefore the weight) of rubbish bins. Install self-cleaning units for deep fryers. Replace utensils with heat resistant equipment. Separation Install a gravity feed chute to feed oil waste directly into an external waste receptacle. Have pr...