67
UNFCCC/CCNUCC CDM – Executive Board Page 1 PROJECT DESIGN DOCUMENT FORM FOR CDM PROJECT ACTIVITIES (F-CDM-PDD) Version 04.1 PROJECT DESIGN DOCUMENT (PDD) Title of the project activity Methane emission avoidance through treatment of municipal solid wastes in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India Version number of the PDD 01 Completion date of the PDD 15.06.2012 Project participant(s) Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt. Ltd. Host Party(ies) India Sectoral scope and selected methodology(ies) Sectoral Scope 13: “Waste Handling And Disposal” Approved Methodology: AM0025 “Avoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processes” Version: 13/EB 65 Estimated amount of annual average GHG emission reductions Average emission reduction of 82,729tCO 2 /annum

Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

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Page 1: Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 1

PROJECT DESIGN DOCUMENT FORM FOR CDM PROJECT ACTIVITIES (F-CDM-PDD)

Version 041

PROJECT DESIGN DOCUMENT (PDD)

Title of the project activity Methane emission avoidance through treatment of municipal solid wastes in Lucknow Uttar Pradesh India

Version number of the PDD 01 Completion date of the PDD 15062012 Project participant(s) Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd Host Party(ies) India Sectoral scope and selected methodology(ies) Sectoral Scope 13 ldquoWaste Handling And

Disposalrdquo Approved Methodology AM0025 ldquoAvoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processesrdquo Version 13EB 65

Estimated amount of annual average GHG emission reductions

Average emission reduction of 82729tCO2annum

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 2

SECTION A Description of project activity A1 Purpose and general description of project activity gtgt Description of the project activity Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd is in the process of installation of a solid waste treatment facility to produce compost and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) by aerobic treatment of municipal solid wastes (MSW) in Lucknow The objective of the project activity is to avoid methane emissions from anaerobic decomposition of MSW through aerobic treatment of the wastes in the solid waste treatment facility The installed facility would have a capacity to treat 1300 TPD of municipal solid wastes Pre-Project Scenario At present the management of municipal solid waste in Lucknow is not sound structured and the reason behind it is lack of awareness among the citizens as well as inactions of the civic bodies responsible for handling and management of the MSW The waste processing and disposal mechanisms in Lucknow are majorly unscientific and involve mainly open dumping at identified sites without any preprocessing There are no measures for landfill gas capture and or destruction The open disposal leads to uncontrolled anaerobic decomposition of wastes causing a number of environmental and health hazards in addition to unabated release of methane into the atmosphere which is one of the prominent greenhouse gases Also the leachate generated in the landfill seeps into the soil and pollutes the ground and surface water This scenario identified above in the pre-project scenario is the baseline scenario for the project activity Project Scenario The project activity involves installation of a waste handling and processing plant for treatment of waste under aerobic conditions to produce composts and refuse derived fuel (RDF) Both these products are saleable in the market The project activity through scientific processing of wastes under aerobic conditions will result in avoidance of methane generation which would have taken place due to anaerobic decomposition of the wastes in landfill the existing scenario of waste disposal in the city of Lucknow Thus the project activity results in the emission reductions to the tune of 82729 tCO2annum on an average over 10 years of its crediting period Contribution of the project activity towards sustainable development Government of India has stipulated following indicators1 for sustainable development in the interim approval guidelines for CDM projects The sustainability aspect of the project activity has been dealt under the following four pillars of sustainable development Social Well-being The project activity will improve the local sanitary conditions of the inhabitants of the city by facilitating an eco-friendly disposal of MSW The project activity by avoiding the decay of MSW in unscientific and ordinary landfills helps in improving the health moral and sanitary conditions of the local people Jyoti

1 httpwwwcdmindiainapproval_processphp

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 3 Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has also committed to dedicate 2 of the revenue derived from CER towards development of local community The monitorable plan for the same has been detailed in Appendix A in the later section of this PDD Economic Well-Being The project provides employment to the community directly at the MSW processing facility and indirectly through waste collection transportation of compost and RDF to the end user Thus the project provides fresh job opportunities to the local people and helps in upliftment of the economic stature of the society Environmental Well-being Composting of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is an attractive option for resource recovery and environmental improvement In contrast to the anaerobic decay of biodegradable waste that occurs in the landfill sites which results in methane generation among other landfill gases the MSW processing project will contribute in mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through aerobic decomposition and mechanical treatment of the municipal solid waste Due to the proposed project activity dumping of given waste is prevented resulting in reduction in land requirement for waste disposal leading to improved environmental conditions and a replicable model Technological Well-being Successful implementation of this project would lead to further diffusion of MSW processing technology for treatment of waste generated in India A2 Location of project activity A21 Host Party(ies) gtgt India A22 RegionStateProvince etc gtgt Uttar Pradesh A23 CityTownCommunity etc gtgt Lucknow

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 4 A24 PhysicalGeographical location gtgt The proposed project activity will be implemented in Shiveri village in the district of Lucknow in the state of Uttar Pradesh Lucknow is the capital of one of the largest states of India Uttar Pradesh It is located at latitudes 26deg 51 402rdquoN and longitudes 80deg 4952rdquoE Lucknow is accessible from every part of India through air rail and road It is directly connected with New Delhi Patna Kolkata Mumbai Varanasi and other major cities by Amausi airport

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 5 A3 Technologies andor measures gtgt Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd follows a scientific waste management approach which includes aerobic treatment of bio-degradable solid waste to produce compost and refuse derived fuel The waste reaching the processing plant will be received in two separate parts biodegradable and non-biodegradable The biodegradable part of the wastes would be processed to produce compost and RDF while the inert materials in non-biodegradable wastes will be delivered to the sanitary landfill The collection of waste is estimated to be 1300 TPD The scope of project activity includes

bull Aerobic processing and mechanical treatment of the waste The collection vehicles that bring in the

waste from the transfer station to the MSW processing site will be weighed in a weighbridge at the entrance of the facility every time the vehicles come in and go out and the respective weights will be recorded This will be done to have a record of the incoming MSW quantities by weight Thereafter the vehicles carrying wastes will be directed to the specified points for unloading The inert waste will be unloaded at the identified site for sanitary landfill and the recyclable materials will be segregated for sale to scrap dealers The rest of the waste ie the biodegradable wastes will be unloaded at pits which mark the start point of the waste processing line A seepage line is present at the bottom of each pit which connects with the similar lines from other pits This is meant for collecting the leachate that is generated from the waste deposition at the pits

Each pit has a hopper adjacent to it The wastes collected from the pit by the EOT crane is fed into the hopper through a conveyer belt The hopper leads the waste into a pre-sorting section and thereafter through a conveyer belt into a rotary screen trommel where the waste is screened The wastes below 100mm as screened in the trommel are led to the composting area whereas those screened above 100 mm are led by another conveyer belt to the area for production of RDF a) Production of compost The trommel is a rotary screen that separates the waste on the basis of size The biodegradable wastes fed into the trommel is further screened to segregate wastes below and above 100 mm size The wastes below 100mm are undergone composting The waste is collected by the EOT cranes and led to the curing and drying area where the waste is heaped and biological inoculum are sprayed at regular intervals In this area the moisture of the waste is dried up and maintained at 5-10 The heaps are turned at scheduled intervals to ensure a proper aerobic processing of the waste The heap of waste thus accumulated is further led to the composting pads The waste is processed for duration of 20-25 days In the course of this time through monitored processing the waste is transformed into a brown colored mass resembling humus Further the waste is passed through 3 more stages of trommel for screening the mass of waste successively into 35mm 16mm and finally to 4 mm At this stage the waste is fed into the finishing area Finishing area comprises of sheds where the final product of waste processing compost is packed and made ready to be sold in the market b) Production of Reduce derived fuel (RDF) Wastes screened at the trommel above 100mm are directed to a conveyer line carrying them to an adjacent area where the waste will be processed to produce reduce derived fuel (RDF) The waste is passed through a vibrating conveyer where a blower segregates any plastic material from the waste The rest waste is then passed through the conveyer into the RDF producing machine The production of RDF involves processing of the waste by magnetic shredders and subsequent homogenizing of the

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 6

waste in homogenizers Thereafter the uniform mass of waste thus prepared is compressed by hydraulic systems to produce RDF units resembling the shape of soap blocks The lifetime of the project equipments is specified as 25 yrs 00 months Also it is to be noted that the project does not involve any technology transfer from Annex 1 countries The training required for the persons for operation and maintenance of the equipments would be provided through capacity building sessions by the technology provider and would be frequently organized by the project proponent

Brief description of type of monitoring equipments For monitoring the various parameters of the project the following equipments would be used Sl No Parameter Description of equipment type 1 Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 2 Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 3 Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the

project activity Energy meter

4 Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Belt scales 5 Raw waste quantity Weigh bridge Further details on the same have been furnished in Section B71 under section ldquoData and parameters to be monitoredrdquo The various monitoring points in the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 7 A4 Parties and project participants

Party involved (host) indicates a host Party

Private andor public entity(ies) project participants

(as applicable)

Indicate if the Party involved wishes to be considered as

project participant (YesNo)

India(host)

Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd (Private entity)

No

A5 Public funding of project activity gtgt The project has not received any Official Development Assistance (ODA) from Annex I countries

SECTION B Application of selected approved baseline and monitoring methodology B1 Reference of methodology gtgt Title of the approved baseline and monitoring methodology ldquoAvoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processesrdquo Version 13 EB 65 Sectoral Scope 01 and 13 Reference ldquoTool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Version 0600 EB 65 Methodological tool for ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 ldquoTool to calculate the emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo Version 0221 EB 63 Methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 B2 Applicability of methodology gtgt The project meets all the applicability criteria as set out in the methodology The applicability conditions of the methodology AM0025 Version 13 for the project activity have been justified as below Sr No

Applicability Conditions as per AM0025 Version 13

Justification

1 The project activity involves one or a combination of the following waste treatment options for the fresh waste that in a given year would have otherwise been disposed of in a landfill (a) A composting process in aerobic conditions (b) Gasification to produce syngas and its use (c) Anaerobic digestion with biogas collection and flaring andor its use The anaerobic digester processes only the waste for which emission reductions are claimed in this methodology If the biogas is processed and upgraded to the quality of natural gas and it is distributed as energy via natural gas

The project activity involves a combination of the waste treatment options a) A composting process in aerobic conditions d) Mechanical treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) The project activity does not involve the use of RDF Also the project activity does not involve any thermal operation In the absence of the project the fresh waste would have been disposed off in a landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 8

distribution grid project activities may use approved methodology AM0053 in conjunction with this methodology In such cases the baseline scenario identification procedure and additionality assessment shall be undertaken for the combination of the two components of the project activity ie biomethane emission avoidance and displacement of natural gas (d) Mechanicalthermal treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) and its use The thermal treatment process (dehydration) occurs under controlled conditions (up to 300 degrees Celsius) In case of thermal treatment process the process shall generate a stabilized biomass that would be used as fuel or raw material in other industrial process The physical and chemical properties of the produced RDFSB shall be homogenous and constant over time (e) Incineration of fresh waste for energy generation electricity andor heat The thermal energy generated is either consumed on-site andor exported to a nearby facility Electricity generated is either consumed on-site exported to the grid or exported to a nearby facility The incinerator is rotating fluidized bed or circulating fluidized bed or hearth or grate type

2 In case of anaerobic digestion gasification or RDF processing of waste the residual waste from these processes is aerobically composted andor delivered to a landfill

In RDF processing of waste the residual biodegradable waste is aerobically composted and the remainder ie the inert portion is delivered to the pre-identified sanitary landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

3 In case of composting the produced compost is either used as soil conditioner or disposed of in landfills

The compost produced in the project activity will be sold in the market that will be used as a soil conditioner This justifies the applicability criteria

4 In case of RDFstabilized biomass processing the produced RDFstabilized biomass should not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 9

This justifies the applicability criteria

5 If RDFSB is disposed of in a landfill project proponent shall provide degradability analysis on an annual basis to demonstrate that the methane generation in the life-cycle of the SB is below 1 of related emissions It has to be demonstrated regularly that the characteristics of the produced RDFSB should not allow for re-absorption of moisture of more than 3 Otherwise monitoring the fate of the produced RDFSB is necessary to ensure that it is not subject to anaerobic conditions in its lifecycle

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be disposed in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

6 In the case of incineration of the waste the waste should not be stored longer than 10 days The waste should not be stored in conditions that would lead to anaerobic decomposition and hence generation of CH4

The project activity does not involve the incineration of waste Hence this condition is not applicable

7 The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity can be determined in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity

The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity will be determined as per the process described in section B72 of PDD in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity This justifies the applicability criteria

8 The project activity may include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation from the biogas syngas captured RDFstabilized biomass produced combustion heat generated in the incineration process respectively from the anaerobic digester the gasifier RDFstabilized biomass combustor and waste incinerator The electricity can be exported to the grid andor used internally at the project site In the case of RDFSB produced the emission reductions can be claimed only for the cases where the RDFSB used for electricity andor thermal energy generation can be monitored

The project activity does not include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation Hence this condition is not applicable

9 Waste handling in the baseline scenario The MSW 2000 rules stipulated by GoI mandated

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 10

shows a continuation of current practice of disposing the waste in a landfill despite environmental regulation that mandates the treatment of the waste if any using any of the project activity treatment options mentioned above

the municipal bodies to treat the municipal waste in a scientific manner 2 However despite the rules the common practice of handling the waste in the country is continuation of current practice of dumping the wastes in a disposal site 3 In addition no single municipality or local body has complied with the guidelines stipulated by MSW Rules 2000 in the country4 Further the present scenario of solid waste management in Lucknow is highly unsynchronized and inadequate and entails dumping of waste in open areas5 This justifies the applicability criteria

10 The compliance rate of the environmental regulations during (part of) the crediting period is below 50 if monitored compliance with the MSW rules exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit since the assumption that the policy is not enforced is no longer tenable

The compliance rate of Indian MSW Rules 2000 is below 50 No single municipality or local body in India has complied with the guidelines stipulated in the MSW Rules 20006 However a conservative value of 45 is taken for ex-ante estimations of emission reductions7 This justifies the applicability criteria

11 Local regulations do not constrain the establishment of RDF production plantsthermal treatment plants nor the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material

There is no such regulations that constrain the establishment of RDF production nor any regulation for the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material This justifies the applicability criteria

12 In case of RDFstabilized biomass production project proponent shall provide evidences that no GHG emissions occur other than biogenic CO2 due to chemical reactions during the thermal treatment process (such as Chimney Gas Analysis report)

The project activity does not involve any thermal treatment in case of RDF production The process involved is purely mechanical treatment Hence this condition is not applicable

13 The project activity does not involve thermal There is no waste incineration in the proposed

2 httpenvfornicinlegishsmmswmhrhtml 3 httpwwwnswaicomimagesnewslettersjun2010pdf 4 Sunil Kumar Bhattacharyya JK Vaidya AN Tapan Chakrabarti Sukumar Devotta Akolkar AB Assessment of the status of municipal solid waste management in metro cities state capitals class I cities and class II towns in India An insight pg 3 Waste Management journal homepage wwwelseviercomlocatewasman 5 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf Page 26 Paragraph 34 describes the present scenario of solid waste management in

Lucknow 6 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 8

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf 7 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 9

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 11

treatment process of neither industrial nor hospital waste

project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

14 In case of waste incineration if auxiliary fossil fuel is added into the incinerator the fraction of energy generated by auxiliary fossil fuel is no more than 50 of the total energy generated in the incinerator

There is no waste incineration in the proposed project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

15 This methodology is not applicable to project activities that involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill This should be treated as a separate project activity due to the difference in waste characteristics of existing and fresh waste which may have an implication on the baseline scenario determination

Project activity does not involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

Thus as per the methodology AM0025 the project activity involves the treatment of fresh waste (ie municipal solid waste) originally intended for dumping through a combination of the processes a) composting b) RDF processing without incineration The project activity avoids methane emissions by diverting organic waste from being dumped where methane emissions are caused by anaerobic decomposition By treating the fresh waste through alternative treatment options these methane emissions are avoided Therefore the project meets the applicability conditions of AM0025 B3 Project boundary As per AM0025 the spatial extent of the project boundary is the site of the project activity where the waste is treated This includes the facilities for processing the waste on-site electricity consumption onsite fuel use and the sanitary landfill site The project boundary does not include facilities for waste collection sorting and transport to the project site The summary of gases and sources included in the project boundary and justification explanation where gases and sources are not included is listed below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 12

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation B

asel

ine

scen

ario

Emissions from decomposition of waste at the landfill site

CO2 Excluded CO2 emissions from the decomposition of organic waste are not accounted

CH4 Included The major source of emissions in the baseline since the fresh waste is being disposed off in the landfill Hence included

N2O Excluded N2O emissions are small compared to CH4 emissions from landfills Exclusion of this gas is conservative

Emissions from electricity consumption

CO2 Excluded Electricity is not being consumed in the baseline Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

Proj

ect s

cena

rio

On-site fossil fuel consumption due to the project activity other than for electricity generation

CO2 Included The project activity involves on-site fossil fuel consumption Hence included

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

Emissions from on-site electricity use

CO2 Included The project activity involves consumption of electricity from the grid Hence included

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded

The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 13

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation Pr

ojec

t sce

nari

o

Direct emissions from the waste treatment processes

N2O Included May be an important emission source N2O can be emitted from composting activities Hence included

CO2 Included CO2 emissions from decomposition of organic waste are not accounted8

CH4 Included Composting process may not be complete and result in anaerobic decay resulting in CH4 emissions

Emissions from waste water treatment

CO2 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

CH4 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

A graphical representation of the project boundary is shown below

Bio degradable waste processing Segregated Inert Recyclables

Compost RDF Sanitary landfill

Open market

MSW Collection in Lucknow

MSW Processing Site

PROJECT BOUNDARY

Electricity fromDiesel

Electricity from Grid

Consumption of Electricity

8 CO2 emissions from the combustion or decomposition of biomass (see definition by the EB in Annex 8 of the EBs 20th meeting report) are not accounted as GHG emissions Where the combustion or decomposition of biomass under a CDM project activity results in a decrease of carbon pools such stock changes should be considered in the calculation of emission reductions This is not the case for waste treatment projects

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 14 The various monitoring points in the project activity as included within the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram as given below

B4 Establishment and description of baseline scenario gtgt The approved methodology AM0025 version 12 recommends the use of the latest version of the tool for demonstration and assessment of additionality (version 0600) to determine the most plausible baseline scenarios for the project The various steps to establish the additionality of the project as per the methodological tool is demonstrated pictorially as given below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 15

According to the approved methodology AM0025 the baseline scenario of the activity is defined as disposal of the waste in open dump yards without taking any measures to capture the landfill gas or avoid methane emission due to the anaerobic decomposition of waste The procedure to define the baseline scenario as per AM0025 is as follows Step 1 Identification of alternative scenarios The most realistic and credible alternatives available to the project activity have been identified using the following sub steps

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 16 Sub-step 1a Defining alternatives to project activity The approved methodology has provided the following alternatives for the disposaltreatment of the fresh waste in the absence of the project activity ie the scenario relevant for estimating baseline methane emissions to be analysed should include inter alia M1 The project activity (ie composting gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas Assessment of the alternatives for waste treatment

Alternative Description Justification M1 The project activity (ie composting

gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project

This alternative seems to be a realistic and plausible alternative The project activity not implemented as a CDM project is however not a feasible alternative as the project involves high investment cost in order to set up the processing plant whereas the return from the project activity is exceptionally low (As discussed in detail in Section B5) However M1 is still a plausible option and is subjected to further consideration as a baseline scenario

M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared

The cost of construction operation and maintenance of an engineered landfill is high as compared to the zerominimal expenditure in the dumping of waste Hence the scope of landfill gas recovery is minimized in India Hence this scenario M2 is not feasible and is thus eliminated from further consideration as baseline scenario

M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas

Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas is the most common practice in India as demonstrated in Section B5 The same has been found to be prevalent in Lucknow in the absence of the project activity9 Hence this is a common practice that faces no barriers because of low expenditure low O amp M cost non-requirement of skilled labor etc Thus this is the most widely practiced method for MSW disposal throughout the country

9 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf page 26 paragraph 34

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 17

This alternative M3 is considered as the most likely baseline scenario for the project activity

The methodology further states that ldquoIf energy is exported to a grid andor to a nearby industry or used on-site realistic and credible alternatives should also be separately determined for bull Power generation in the absence of the project activity bull Heat generation in the absence of the project activityrdquo Under the scope of the project activity neither heat nor power generation takes place Hence the clause as mentioned above is not applicable to the project activity Thus alternatives M1 and M3 are further subjected for baseline consideration Alternative M2 is not considered as a plausible and realistic baseline scenario for the project activity Sub-step 1b Consistency with mandatory laws and regulations The MSW (Management and Handling) Rules 2000 notified by Ministry of Environment and Forests Government of India makes it mandatory for proper and scientific management of solid waste Under this rule land filling of the waste is not allowed but based on the studies10 and surveys carried out it was observed that the most common practice in India to dispose the solid waste is open dumping and land filling without any treatment and processing It is observed that these rules are not implementedenforced systematically thus leading to the most widespread practice of dumping waste in the country Conclusion Thus the alternatives M1 and M3 has been considered further Outcome of Sub-step 1b The two identified realistic and credible alternative scenario(s) to the project activity that are in compliance with mandatory legislation and regulations taking into account the enforcement in the country and EB decisions on national andor sectoral policies and regulations are as follows Alternative M1 The project activity carried out without the CDM and Alternative M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas (Continuation of the current practice of disposal in landfill) Step 2 Identify the fuel for the baseline choice of energy source taking into account the national andor sectoral policies as applicable Since there is no power generation or heat utilization in the project activity thus baseline does not involve use of fuel for energy Outcome of Sub-step 2 Alternatives M1 and M3 have been subjected for further consideration Step 3 Step 2 andor Step 3 of the latest approved version of the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo shall be used to assess which of these alternatives should be excluded from further consideration (eg alternatives facing prohibitive barriers or those clearly economically unattractive) The above analysis in Step 1 and Step 2 leaves with two alternatives M1 and M3

10 Present Scenario of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Dumping Grounds in India by Amiya Kumar Sahu National Solid Waste Association of India Mumbai

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 18 The further analysis has been discussed in detail in Section B5 below Step 4 Where more than one credible and plausible alternative remains project participants shall as a conservative assumption use the alternative baseline scenario that results in the lowest baseline emissions as the most likely baseline scenario The least emission alternative will be identified for each component of the baseline scenario In assessing these scenarios any regulatory or contractual requirements should be taken into consideration As demonstrated in Section B5 only one alternative remains after applying the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo to assess exclusion of the alternatives from further consideration Hence this step is not applicable as there is only one alternative available to the project activity As demonstrated in section B5 it is evident that after investment analysis only one alternative ie M3 remains as the most plausible option and hence this has been considered as the baseline to the project activity B5 Demonstration of additionality gtgt As per the approved methodology Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has identified the above mentioned realistic and credible alternative(s) (M1 and M3) that were available to them and that would provide output and services comparable to the project activity (refer section B4) These alternatives are in compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements The Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality stipulates that either Step 2 (Investment Analysis) or Step 3 (Barrier Analysis) or both can be selected to demonstrate additionality As the Project faces financial barriers for its implementation in the absence of CDM it is appropriate to choose Step 2 to demonstrate its additionality Step 2 Investment analysis The alternative considered for further analysis is alternative ldquoM3rdquo being the most commonly followed practice Sub-step 2a Determine appropriate analysis method Since the project generates incomes other than CDM related income for the purpose of investment analysis Option III (Benchmark Analysis) is chosen as it is deemed as the most appropriate analysis method where the returns on the investment in the project activity is compared to benchmark returns Sub-step 2b Option III Apply benchmark analysis The indicator used for carrying out the investment analysis is IRR that will determine the feasibility of the project activity This is compared with the Prime Lending Rate available at the time of investment decision For this purpose the PLR of Reserve Bank of India has been considered which is found to be 1200 as per Benchmark PLR of RBI during Aug-200911 Sub-step 2c Calculation and comparison of financial indicators The IRR for the proposed project activity without CDM revenue is computed for a period of 20 years lifetime A detailed investment analysis has been carried out and presented in the supported excel sheets The data and analysis is presented here The techno-economical parameters used for IRR calculation of the project activity is provided in the table below

11 httpwwwrbiorginscriptsWSSViewaspxId=14988

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 19

Parameters Unit Value Source

Capacity (MSW per day) MTs day 1300 As per DPR

Project Lifetime Years 25 yrs 0 months

As per specification provided by tech supplier

Cost of the project Buildings amp Civil works Rs in Lacs 3541056 As per DPR Plant and Machinery Rs in Lacs 1781286 As per DPR Interest payable during construction Rs in Lacs 15781 As per DPR Contingencies Rs in Lacs 10444 As per DPR Margin Money for working capital Rs in Lacs 12011 As per DPR Total cost Rs in Lacs 5704709 As per DPR

Financing pattern

Promoterrsquos Contribution through equity Rs in Lacs 8934 As per DPR Promoterrsquos contribution through loan Rs in Lacs 2700 As per DPR Subsidy under JNNURM Rs in Lacs 2111 As per RFP

Applicable Interest Rate on term loan Percent 1250 As per bank terms

Benchmark Prime Lending Rate (PLR) Percent 1200 httpwwwibaorginviewplraspmemcatid=1

Compost and RDF related costs

Recovery of compost from total MSW processed Percent 18

As per DPR

Recovery of RDF from total MSW processed Percent 12

Recovery of recyclable materials from total MSW processed Percent 2

Percentage of compost produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year

Percent 70

Percentage of RDF produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year Percent 70

Sale price of compost RsTon 2000 As per quote received from distributor Sale price of RDF RsTon 2000

Yearly increment in percentage of compost and RDF for sale in the market Percent 5 CPI(Consumer Price

Index) data Yearly escalation in sale price of compost and RDF Percent 5

Packaging cost of Compost Rs TON 150

As per quote received from distributor

Marketing cost of Compost Rs TON 100 Transportation cost of Compost Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of compost Rs TON 100 Packaging cost of RDF Rs TON 150

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 20 Marketing cost of RDF Rs TON 100 Transportation of RDF Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of RDF Rs TON 100

MSW Processing cost

Power consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 16539

As per DPR

Diesel consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 18720 Plant maintenance cost including that of vehicles

of capital cost for plant machineries 2

Use of senitiler ml MT of MSW processing 50

Use of bio-culture kg MT of MSW processing 10

Cost of senitiler use Rslitre 150

As per quote received Cost of bio-culture use Rskg 180 Cost of daily consumables (oil lubricants and cotton waste) Rs Lacsannum 26

Salary and wages of employees and staff Rs Lacsannum 373 As per DPR

Escalation rates

Escalation in maintenance cost Percent 400 CPI(Consumer Price Index) data Escalation in employee wages Percent 714

Escalation in fuel cost Percent 874 WPI(WholeSale Price Index) data Escalation in electricity cost Percent 874

Other commodities escalation Percent 583

Depreciation

St line Depn - Buildings Percent 334 As per companyrsquos law 1956 wwwfastfactscoinresourcesDepCoActrtf

- Plant amp Machinery Percent 113 IT Depreciation - Buildings Percent 10 - Plant amp Machinery Percent 15 Income Tax ndash MAT Percent 1133 Income Tax Act-

httpwwwindiainbusinessnicininvestmenttaxationhtm

Income Tax Percent 3399

Based on the above assumptions the results of the financial analysis have been provided below

Location Benchmark IRR (Without CDM) Lucknow MSW project 1200 686

As evident the IRR of the project activity is below the benchmark This clearly indicates that investment barrier exists in project activity implementation which is mitigated by the revenue derived from the carbon credits that the project activity would obtain due to Clean Development Mechanism The additionality of the project is thus evident Sub-step 2d Sensitivity analysis

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 21 The purpose of sensitivity analysis is to examine whether the conclusion regarding the financial viability of the proposed project is sound and tenable with those reasonable variations in the assumptions The investment analysis provides a valid argument in favor of additionality only if it consistently supports (for realistic range of assumptions) the conclusion that the project activity is unlikely to be the most financially attractive or is likely to be financially attractive Thus a sensitivity analysis was also applied to the IRR calculations to measure the impact positive or negative of changes in the indicated parameters The project proponent has chosen various factors as critical to the operation of the project in accordance with Guidance on the Assessment of Investment Analysis (Version- 031 paragraph- 17) which states that only variables including the initial investment cost that constitute more than 20 of either total project costs or total project revenues should be subjected to reasonable variation Hence the sensitivity is carried out by varying the parameters to 10 on either side to ascertain the impact on the profitability and hence the IRR of the project The results of the sensitivity analysis are as presented below

Sensitivity Parameter Variation and resultant IRR +10 0 -10

Quantity of waste processed 1325

686

-ve value OampM cost -ve value

(12 increase leads to an IRR

of -104 ) Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1688 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the OampM cost is not

expected to decrease in future

Organic Manure sales 1369 However 10 increase in sale price of organic

manures is a highly

unrealistic under the higly

stringent market scenario for

compost sale (explained in subsequent

paragraphs on barrier analysis)

-ve value -5 leads to a

decrease of IRR to -302

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

Cost of bioculture used -ve value 16 leads to a decrease of IRR

to 091 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1513 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the bioculture cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from

the WPI for all commodities as

published by

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 22

RBI Fuel and electricity cost -ve value

24 leads to a decrease of IRR

to -057 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1279 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the fuel and

electricity cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from the WPI for fuel

power and electricity as published by

RBI Project capital cost 570

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

818 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Packaging marketing and transportation expense

077 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1040 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Thus the sensitivity analysis for the project reveals that even with significant changes in various parameters the project IRR does not cross benchmark rates Therefore the project activity is clearly additional and is not a businessndashasndashusual scenario Step 3 Barrier Analysis The major barrier applicable to the alternative M1 is A) Technology Barrier B) Other Barrier and C) Investment Barrier Sub-step 3a Identify barriers that would prevent the implementation of the proposed CDM project Activity

A) Technological Barrier The plant would use state of the art technology in the process of waste handling and compost manufacturing EOT (Electric Overhead Transport) cranes would transfer the wastes from one processing station to the other Automation will be ensured wherever possible Hydraulic type press system would be installed for the RDF manufacturing Thus the plant would employ the latest technologies in the field of waste handling and management that involves a lot of technology transfer from international suppliers and exorbitant costs Also smooth operation of the plant would require proper training of the operating personnel on the equipments and hence regular capacity building training programs would have to be organized by the project proponent Another threat posed by the variation in feedstock quality is the content of highly abrasive and corrosive materials in it These cause rapid wear and corrosion of the process equipments Hence all MSW plants entail high cost of operation and maintenance due to frequent repairs breakdowns and shutdowns

B) Market barrier

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 23

Organic waste recycling is still neglected by private initiatives because of its low value and the lack of a market for compost Limited markets for compost sales and low prices for compost are a major challenge that all systems face12 The persisting skepticism among the farmers about the quality of composts poses a constant threat on the marketability of the composts Misconceptions like soil contamination due to use of composts are still borne in the minds of many Thus the emphasis on quality control of final products is of utmost importance Also increased awareness among the farmers on the benefits derived out of compost usage as value added substitutes to chemical fertilizers have to be encouraged through campaigns and other promotional activities

Also high cost of transportation sometimes makes it difficult to justify the use of composts when compared to the benefits derived out of it

C) Investment barrier The project proponent has demonstrated through investment analysis that without CDM revenue the project activity is not a financially attractive proposition At the inception the project had received refusal for loans from financial institutions for unimpressive returns envisaged from the project and the project proponent was suggested to estimate the returns along with additional revenue as may be associated with the project activity (for eg revenue from carbon credits) The project proponent had re-submitted their application for loan with the consideration of the CDM revenue and thereafter received the sanction

All these factors substantiate to prove that additional efforts are required for overcoming the market barrier for the compost produced in the plant In this context the additional incentive available to the plant through Clean Development Mechanism would be utilized for market development of the compost produced in the plant and also to partially compensate for the losses for not being able to sell compost in the market Thus the barriers as illustrated above pose a serious obstacle to the project activity and thus would lead to high operational uncertainties if not implemented as a CDM project activity Sub-step 3 b Shows that the identified barriers would not prevent a wide spread implementation of at least one of the alternatives (except the proposed project activity) As discussed above dumping of the solid waste in a landfill without gas capture (M3) is a common practice in India and none of the barriers discussed above would prevent it from occurring The barriers identified ie technological barrier and the market barrier does not in any way prevent the continuation of the baseline scenario Hence project activity satisfies the additionality criteria as per clause 3b) of the tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality Version 0600 Step 4 Common practice analysis According to the methodology AM0025 project proponents should ldquoprovide evidence of the early stage of development of the project activity and that it is not common practice in the country To this end they should provide an analysis of waste management practicesrdquo In order to justify the early development of the project activity the chronology for the same has been presented below as we proceed further As per the ldquoTool to for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo (Version 0600) similar type of project is defined as follows

12 httpwwwtngovincmaswm_in_indiapdf page 145

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 24 Sub-step 4b Discuss any similar Options that are occurring The above analysis demonstrates the similar activities occurring as the project activity But it can be seen that all the treatment facilities are composting facilities and none of the plants have RDF production facility Most of these composting facilities have applied for CDM benefits and those that have not are facing difficulties The project activity conforms to the measures of ldquoMethane formation avoidancerdquo as mentioned in paragraph 6 of the Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Hence analysis of the project activity as per paragraph 47 is illustrated as follows Step 1 Calculate applicable output range as +-50 of the design output or capacity of the proposed project activity The capacity of the project activity is 1300 TPD Hence considering an output range of +-50 the analysis would entail all projects of capacities between 1950 TPD and 650 TPD Therefore as per the table of cities as listed above the cities considered for present analysis would include the following

City Waste

Quantity (TPD)

Processing of Waste Disposal of waste CDM status Composting Pelletisation Uncontrolled

dumping Sanitary landfill

Earth cover

Bangalore 1669 300 Ahmedabad 1302 500 Pune 1175 500 Surat 1000

Kanpur 1100

Jaipur 904

Ludhiana 735 Agra 654 Step 2 In the applicable geographical area identify all plants that deliver the same output or capacity within the applicable output range calculated in Step 1 as the proposed project activity and have started commercial operation before the start date of the project Note their number Nall Registered CDM project activities and projects activities undergoing validation shall not be included in this step The applicable geographical area for the project activity would entail the entire host country ie India Of the selected cities as listed above the same output ie organic composts and RDF is produced by Bangalore and Pune However all the projects are under validation Hence as per the given definitions Nall for the present analysis of the project activity is equal to 0 since all the plants with similar output and within the applicable capacity range have considered CDM benefits associated to the projects Nall = 0 Step 3 Within plants identified in Step 2 identify those that apply technologies different than the technology applied in the proposed project activity Note their number Ndiff All the plants as included in Nall use the same technology for compost production and RDF manufacturing Hence under the scope of the present analysis Ndiff = 0

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 25 Step 4 Calculate factor F=1-NdiffNall representing the share of plants using technology similar to the technology used in the proposed project activity in all plants that deliver the same output or capacity as the proposed project activity Under the scope of the project activity the factor is calculated as follows F = 1-NdiffNall = 1 ndash 0= 1 Therefore under the scope of the project activity the factor F cannot be determined The proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled (a) the factor F is greater than 02 and (b) Nall-Ndiff is greater than 3 Since as per the above analysis F = 1 which is greater than 02 Nall - Ndiff = 0 which is less than 3 As per the methodology the proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled Thus since one of the criterions as imposed by the tool is not satisfied by the project activity hence it is prudent to conclude that the project activity is not a common practice and hence additional the analysis shows that the project activity is additional

Also as per the India Infrastructure Report 2006 the few aerobic compost plants that have been set up are typically functioning much below installed capacity and most are ldquofacing a problem of marketing the compost due to an ineffective marketing mechanismrdquo Thus it can be concluded that extremely few similar activities can be observed in India and when they are observed they face considerable barriers and have not had much success from an economic perspective The experience provided by these composting attempts only serves to reinforce the fact that implementing composting activities is financially unviable Therefore as demonstrated by the investment and barrier analyses in Steps 2 and 3 it is clear that the project is not financially viable without the revenue from CDM and there are significant barriers to its implementation In addition as detailed in Step 4 the proposed project is not common practice either and in the limited cases where aerobic composting is taking place it is proving to be a failure from an economic perspective It can therefore be concluded that the proposed project is additional and would not occur without CDM due to the financial and technological barriers in place Moreover the CDM registration of the Project will also serve as a model for other projects and promote the dissemination of sustainable waste management practices Serious consideration of CDM As per paragraph 2 of EB 62 Annex 13 ldquoGuidelines to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDM for project activities with a start date after 2nd August 2008 ldquothe project proponent must inform a Host Party designated national authority (DNA) and the UNFCCC secretariat in writing of the commencement of the project activity and of their intension to seek CDM status Such notification must be made within six months of the project activity start date and shall contain the precise geographical location and brief description of the proposed project activity using the standardized form F-CDM ndash Prior considerationrdquo As mentioned in the section C11 the start date for the project activity is 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 26 The project proponent had intimated the Host Party designated national authority (DNA) ie Ministry of environment and Forests (Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat about the project activity on 09102011 This intimation was made in the F-CDM-Prior consideration format as prescribed by UNFCCC Thus the intimation to Host party DNA and UNFCCC secretariat was made within six months from the project start date as this is in accordance to the ldquoGuideline to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo As per the ldquoGuidelines on the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo version 04 EB 62 Annex 13 serious consideration of CDM has been demonstrated below

Date Project Related Activity CDM Related Activity Evidence 14092009 Financial proposal from

Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd Copy of proposal

28102009 Revised financial proposal from Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of proposal

11112009 Letter of award for development of Integrated Solid waste management facilities for Lucknow Municipal Corporation UP

Copy of the letter of award

07092010 Receipt of certificate of incorporation for Ms JYOTI ENVIROTECH PRIVATE LIMITED

Copy of certificate

23102010 Concession agreement signed between Lucknow Municipal Corporation Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam and Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of the Agreement

07062011 Environmental Clearance received for development of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill and processing facility at Village-Shiveri

Copy of letter of Approval

21092011 Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd appointed CDM consultants for the project

Copy of work order placed on the CDM consultants

03102011 No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

Copy of no objection certificate

09102011 Project proponent submitted the Prior consideration of the CDM form to host party DNA (Ministry of Environment and Forests Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat

Copy of Prior consideration of the CDM form as submitted to MoEF GoI and UNFCCC

10102011 Purchase order raised for Plant Machinery

Copy of Purchase order

23032012 Stakeholder Consultation Meeting

Copy of the Minutes of Meeting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 27 B6 Emission reductions B61 Explanation of methodological choices gtgt Approved baseline and monitoring methodology AM0025- Avoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processes Version 13 has been used to calculate emission reductions from the project The estimation of project emission baseline emission and leakage emission are described below Project emissions The proposed project uses MSW processing (RDF and compost production processes) to treat the organic waste Therefore the project emissions in year y are calculated as follows PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy + PEay + PEgy+ PEry + PEiy + PEwy + PEco-firingy (1) Where PEy = Is the project emissions during the year y (tCO2e) PEelecy = Is the emissions from electricity consumption on-site due to the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) PEfuel on-sitey =Is the emissions on-site due to fuel consumption on-site in year y (tCO2e) PEcy =Is the emissions during the composting process in year y (tCO2e) PEay =Is the emissions from the anaerobic digestion process in year y (tCO2e) PEgy =Is the emissions from the gasification process in year y (tCO2e) PEry =Is the emissions from the combustion of RDFstabilized biomass in year y (tCO2e) PEiy =Is the emissions from waste incineration in year y (tCO2e) PEwy =Is the emissions from wastewater treatment in year y (tCO2e) PEco-firingy =Is the emissions from thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on site

fossil fuel consumption during co-firing in year y (tCO2e) The project activity involves composting and mechanical treatment to produce compost and RDF It involves the electricity consumption onsite and on-site fuel consumption Hence the equation applicable to the project activity is as follows Hence for the project activity PEay =0 as the project does not entail anaerobic digestion PEgy =0 as the project does not entail gasification PEry =0 as the project does not entail combustion of RDFstabilized PEiy =0 as the project does not entail waste incineration PEwy =0 as the project does not entail wastewater treatment PEco-firingy =0 as the project does not entail thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on

site fossil fuel consumption Therefore PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy (2) Emissions from electricity use on site (PEelecy) The project uses electricity from the NEWNE grid at processing plant at Lucknow The emissions from electricity use are therefore calculated as PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec (3)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 28 Where EGPJFFy = Is the amount of electricity generated in an on-site fossil fuel fired power plant or

consumed from the grid as a result of the project activity measured using an electricity meter (MWh)

CEFelec = Is the carbon emissions factor for electricity consumed in the project activity (tCO2eMWh)

Under the scope of the project activity electricity use on site would include the electricity consumption due to the plant equipments and machineries on site that are used to produce the composts the RDF Emissions from fuel use on-site (PEfuelon-sitey) Project participants shall account for CO2 emissions from any on-site fuel combustion (other than electricity generation eg vehicles used on-site heat generation for starting the gasifier auxiliary fossil fuels need to be added into incinerator heat generation for mechanicalthermal treatment process etc) Emissions are calculated from the quantity of fuel used and the specific CO2-emission factor of the fuel as follows PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel (4) Where PEfuel on-sitey = Is the CO2 emissions due to on-site fuel combustion in year y (tCO2) Fconsy = Is the fuel consumption on site in year y (l or kg) NCVfuel = Is the net caloric value of the fuel (MJl or MJkg) EFfuel = Is the CO2 emissions factor of the fuel (tCO2MJ) As per methodology project participants may use IPCC default values for the net calorific values and CO2 emission factors Under the scope of the project activity fuel use on-site would include consumption of diesel fuel by the vehicles (eg excavators earth movers etc) as may be engaged for the project activity on-site Further the project may also include Diesel Generator(s) placed on site to provide necessary power back-up in incidents of exigency Thus the diesel fuel consumed by the DG set would also be monitored and be counted in fuel use quantity on-site Hence for the project activity NCVfuel = NCVydiesel And EFfuel = EFdiesel Emissions from composting (PEcy) As per the methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 Annex 09 emission from composting PEcy = PEECy + PEFCy + PECH4y + PEN2Oy + PEROy (5) Where PEECy = Project emissions from electricity consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEelecy as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 29 PEFCy = Project emissions from fossil fuel consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEfuelon-sitey as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

PECH4y = Project emissions of methane from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEN2Oy = Project emissions of nitrous oxide from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEROy =Project emissions of methane from run-off wastewater associated with co-composting

in year y (tCO2eyr) The leachate generated in the project activity will be gainfully utilized in maintaining the moist environment of the bio degradable waste Hence the project activity would not entail any project emission from run-off wastewater PEROy= 0

Therefore PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy (6) Determination of project emissions of methane (PECH4y ) Project emissions of methane from composting (PECH4y) are determined as follows PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 (7) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFCH4y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tCH4 t) For the value of EFCH4y a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFCH4y = EFCH4default GWPCH4 = Global Warming Potential of CH4 (tCO2e tCH4 ) Determination of project emissions of nitrous oxide (PEN2Oy ) The N2O emissions from composting are calculated as follows PEN2Oy = Qy EFN2Oy GWPN2O (8) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFN20y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tN2O t) For the value of EFN2Oy a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFN20y = EFN20default GWPN20 = Global Warming Potential of N20 (tCO2e tN2O ) Baseline emissions To calculate the baseline emissions project participants shall use the following equation BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy (9)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 30 Where BEy = Is the baseline emissions in year y (tCO2e) MBy = Is the methane produced in the landfill in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) MDregy = Is methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) BEENy = Baseline emissions from generation of energy displaced by the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) Since the project activity does not entail generation of energy hence BEENy= 0

Methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity (MDregy) The methodology states that In cases where regulatory or contractual requirements do not specify MDregy an Adjustment Factor (AF) shall be used and justified taking into account the project context In doing so the project participant should take into account that some of the methane generated by the landfill may be captured and destroyed to comply with other relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odour concerns MDregy = MBy AF Where AF = Is Adjustment Factor for MBy () The parameter AF shall be estimated as follows In cases where a specific system for collection and destruction of methane is mandated by regulatory or contractual requirements the ratio between the destruction efficiency of that system and the destruction efficiency of the system used in the project activity shall be used In the host country India there is no regulation for capture and destruction of methane generated by the landfill Hence the adjustment factor the project activity is 0 as per the present scenario ie AF = 0 Therefore MDregy = 0 However in due course of time the value of AF may undergo changes as per the governmental regulations imposed in the host country (India) with respect to MSW management Rate of compliance In cases where there are regulations that mandate the use of one of the project activity treatment options and which is not being enforced the baseline scenario is identified as a gradual improvement of waste management practices to the acceptable technical options expected over a period of time to comply with the MSW Management Rules The adjusted baseline emissions (BEya) are calculated as follows BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) (10) Where BEy = Is the CO2-equivalent emissions as determined from equation 14 RATECompliance

y = Is the state-level compliance rate of the MSW Management Rules in that year y The compliance rate shall be lower than 50 if it exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 31 The compliance ratio RATECompliance

y shall be monitored ex post based on the official reports for instance annual reports provided by municipal bodies For details on the consideration the value of RATECompliance

y for the purpose of ex ante calculation refer to annexure 1 Methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity (MBy) The amount of methane that is generated each year (MBy) is calculated as per the latest version of the approved methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo (Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46) Considering the following additional equation MBy = BECH4SWDSy Where BECH4SWDSy = Is the methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity at

year y that is methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the solid waste disposal site during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e) as calculated using Application B in the methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo The tool estimates methane generation adjusted for using adjustment factor (fy) any landfill gas in the baseline that would have been captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odor concerns As this is already accounted for in this methodology ldquofyrdquo in the tool shall be assigned a value 0

The amount of methane that is generated each year (BECH4SWDSy tCO2e) is calculated for each year with the recommended multi-phase model the First Order Decay (FOD) model The amount of methane produced in the year y is calculated as follows

(11) Where BECH4SWDSy = Methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the

solid waste disposal site (SWDS) during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e)

φ = Model correction factor to account for model uncertainties f = Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used in another

manner Since no such practice exists in the host country India hence for the project activity the value for ldquofrdquo has been considered 0

GWPCH4 =Global Warming Potential (GWP) of methane valid for the relevant commitment period OX =Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste) F =Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCf =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that can decompose For the

project activity the default value has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore DOCf = DOCf Default

MCF =Methane correction factor For the project activity the value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore MCFy = 08

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 32 Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) DOCj =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j kj =Decay rate for the waste type j j =Waste type category (index) x =Year during the crediting period x runs from the first year of the project activity

(x = 1) to the year y for which avoided emissions are calculated (x = y) y =Year for which methane emissions are calculated Where different waste types j are prevented from disposal the amount of different waste types (Wjx) is determined through sampling and the mean is calculated from the samples as follows Since the project activity corresponds to Application B as stated in the tool hence the values of few parameters have been adopted as explained in table 1 of the tool Determining the amounts of waste types j disposed in the SWDS (Wjx) Wjx = Wx pjx (12) Where Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) Wx =Total amount of waste prevented from from disposal in the SWDS in year x (t) pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from the

first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) The fraction of the waste type j in the waste for the year x or month i are calculated according to equations (7) and (8) as follows

(13)

Where pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) pnjx = Fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the year x (weight

fraction) zx = Number of samples collected during the year x n = Samples collected in year x j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from

the first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) Determining the fraction of DOC that decomposes in the SWDS (DOCfy) In the case that the tool is applied to MSW then project participants may choose to either apply a default value (DOCfy = DOCfdefault) or to determine DOCfy or DOCfm based on measurements of the biochemical methane potential of the MSW (BMPMSW) as follows

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 33

(14) Where DOCfy = Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that decomposes under the

specific conditions occurring in the SWDS for year y (weight fraction) BMPj = Biochemical methane potential for the MSW disposed or prevented from disposal

(t CH4 t waste) F = Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCj = Fraction of degradable organic carbon in the waste type j (weight fraction) pjy = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year y (weight fraction) pjm = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in month m (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste in the MSW y = Year of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated (y is a

consecutive period of 12 months) m = Month of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated Leakage The sources of leakage considered in the methodology are CO2 emissions from off-site transportation of waste materials in addition to CH4 and N2O emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digestion gasification processes and processingcombustion of RDF Leakage emissions should be estimated from the following equation Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy (15) Where Lty =Is the leakage emissions from increased transport in year y (tCO2e) Lry =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digester the

gasifier the processingcombustion of RDFstabilized biomass or compost in case it is disposed of in landfills in year y (tCO2e)

Liy =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from MSW incinerator in year y (tCO2e)

Lsy =Is the leakage emissions from end use of stabilized biomass (tCO2e) LCOMPy =Leakage emissions associated with composting in year y (t CO2e yr) Since the project activity does not include the use of MSW incinerator Lsy = 0 The project activity does not involve the disposal of residual waste from processing of RDF or compost in landfill Also for ex-ante estimations the residual waste is taken as 100 inerts Hence Lry =0 The produced compost and RDF will be sold in the market Also for ex-ante estimations for this project activity the weight of stabilized biomass sold offsite for which no sale invoices can be provided is considered as zero Hence Lsy =0 Emissions from Transportation (Lt y)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 34 This would occur when the waste is transported from waste collecting points in the collection area to the treatment facility instead of the existing landfills In this case project participants shall document the following data in the CDM-PDD an overview of collection points from where the waste will be collected their approximate distance (in km) to the treatment facility existing landfills and their approximate distance (in km) to the nearest end-user The emissions are calculated (As per AM0025) from the quantity of fuel (diesel) used and the specific CO2 emission factor of the fuel (diesel) for vehicles

(16) Where NOvehiclesiy =Is the number of vehicles for transport with similar loading capacity DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) NCVfuel =Is the Calorific value of the fuel (MJKg or TJGg) Dfuel =Is the fuel density (kgl) if necessary EFfuel =Is the Emission factor of the fuel (tCO2eMJ) For estimation of NOvehiclesiy the following equation has been used for ex-ante calculation NOvehiclesiy = QyCTy (17) Where Qy = Is the quantity of waste composted in the year ldquoyrdquo (tonnes) CTy = Is the average truck capacity for waste transportation (tonnestruck) Ltywaste is the emissions due to increased transportation from the waste collecting point to the waste treatment facility In this the incremental distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline is equalt to 0 Therefore Ltywaste = 0 For calculation of emissions from transport of compost to the users (Ltycompost) the same formula applies Qy is replaced by Mcompost where Mcompost is the total quantity of compost produced in year y Similarly for calculation of emissions from transport of RDF (LtyRDF) Qy is replaced by MRDF where MRDF is the total quantity of RDF produced in year y Thus Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF (18) Calculation of emission reductions To calculate the emission reductions the following equation has been applied ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly (19) Where ERy = Is the emissions reductions in year y (t CO2e) BEy = Is the emissions in the baseline scenario in year y (tCO2e) PEy = Is the emissions in the project scenario in year y (tCO2e) Ly = Is the leakage in year y (tCO2e)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 35 B62 Data and parameters fixed ex ante (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

Data Parameter AF

Unit

Description Methane destroyed due to regulatory or other requirements

Source of data Local andor national authorities

Value(s) applied 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per the approved methodology AM0025 Version 13 AF shall be assigned a value taking into account the amount of methane generated by the landfills that may be captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations and contractual requirements of the host country Since there exists no regulations or contractual requirement to capture and destroy the methane generated from the landfills in India hence AF has been fixed ex-ante and assigned a value of 0

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

Data Parameter φ Unit Unitless

Description Default value model corrections factor to account for model uncertainties

Source of data Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Value(s) applied 085

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per Table 3 the project activity conforms to HumidWet conditions in Application B Accordingly the default value for φ has been taken from table 3 This is in the absence of monitored data for φ as per Option 2 in the tool for determination of model correction factor

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 36

Data Parameter F

Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction)

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Upon biodegradation organic material is converted to a mixture of

methane and carbon dioxide

Data Parameter OX Unit Unitless

Description Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste)

Source of data Based on an extensive review of published literature on this subject including the IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 01

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment When methane passes through the top-layer part of it is oxidized by

methanotrophic bacteria to produce CO2 The oxidation factor represents the proportion of methane that is oxidized to CO2 This should be distinguished from the methane correction factor (MCF) which is to account for the situation that ambient air might intrude into the SWDS and prevent methane from being formed in the upper layer of SWDS

Data Parameter DOCfDefault

Unit Unitless

Description Default value for the fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) in MSW that decomposes in the SWDS

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 37

Data Parameter MCFy Unit Unitless

Description Methane correction factor

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 08

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46 This comprises all SWDS not meeting the criteria of managed SWDS and which have depths of greater than or equal to 5 meters

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment MCF accounts for the fact that unmanaged SWDS produce less methane

from a given amount of waste than managed SWDS because a larger fraction of waste decomposes aerobically in the top layers of unmanaged SWDS The baseline dumping sites have been found to be greater than 5 meters

Data Parameter DOCj Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Tables 24 and 25)

Value(s) applied

Waste type j DOCj ( wet waste)

Wood and wood products 43 Pulp paper and cardboard

(other than sludge) 40

Food food waste beverages and tobacco (other than sludge) 15

Textiles 24 Garden yard and park waste 20

Glass plastic metal other inert waste 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default values adopted from table 4 as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 38

Data Parameter kj

Unit Unitless

Description Decay rate for the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Table 33)

Value(s) applied Default values adopted from table 5 for Wet Type waste in tropical (Matgt20ordmC) conditions as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Waste type j kj

Slowly degrading

Pulp paper cardboard (other than sludge) textiles

0045

Wood wood products and straw 0025

Rapidly degrading Food food waste sewage sludge beverages and tobacco 0085

Moderately degrading Other (non-food) organic putrescible garden and park waste 0065

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

The annual temperature limits of Lucknow has been adopted from httpwwwnihernetinrbisindia_informationannual20temperaturehtm The average annual temp of Lucknow is thus estimated to be 2582ordmC Thus Lucknow is considered to be in the tropical zone with MAT gt 20ordmC And hence the default value has been obtained as per Table 5

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CEFelec Unit t CO2MWh Description Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid Source of data CEA CO2 Baseline Database Version 70 Jan 2012 (wwwceanicin) Value(s) applied 09216 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

This data is taken from publicly available CEA CO2 baseline database version 7 dated March 2012 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment This value is fixed for the entire crediting period

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 39

Data Parameter EFCH4Default Unit t CH4 t Description Default emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted (wet

basis) Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of

emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 0002 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFN2ODefault Unit t N20 t

Description Default emission factor of nitrous oxide per tonne of waste composted (wet basis)

Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 00002

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 40

Data Parameter NCVydiesel

Unit TJ Gg

Description Net calorific value of diesel consumed for power generation at the MSW processing unit

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Volume 2 Table 12 p118

Value(s) applied 43

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFdiesel Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 741

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter GWPCH4

Unit tCO2 tCH4

Description Global warming potential of CH4

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 21 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 41

Data Parameter GWPN20

Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 310 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter Ddiesel

Unit KgL

Description Density of fuel

Source of data Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) India

Value(s) applied 087

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data BEE value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission Additional comment

B63 Ex ante calculation of emission reductions gtgt For the purpose of ex-ante calculation of emission reduction the following assumptions have been taken into consideration Total quantity of MSW available (tonnesday) 1300 Annual Number of operating days 330 Percentage of organic content in the MSW 47 Rate of compliance 10 Total quantity of biodegradable wastes to be processed 201630 TPD (Calculated) Amount of electricity consumed per day due to the project 1550 kWh Specific gravity of diesel 087 kglitre Calculation of Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid (CEFelec) As the project activity utilises electricity from the NEWNE Grid the project uses the approach (a)

combined margin emission factor for the NEWNE grid following seven steps of ldquoTool to calculate the

emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) and using publicly available data of

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 42 ldquoCentral Electrical Authorityrdquo (the most recent version ldquoCO2 Baseline Database Version 70rdquo13 available

at the time of submission of the CDM PDD to the DOE for Global Stakeholders Consultation) As per the

stepwise approach to calculate the emission factor of an electricity system the EFy is being calculated as

follows

Step 1 Identify the relevant electricity system

As per the CEA CO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 combined emission factor is given

for northern eastern western and north-eastern girds taken together Therefore this combined emission

factor will be used for the NEWNE grid to evaluate the emission reductions

Step 2 Choose whether to include off-grid power plants in the project electricity system (optional)

As per the tool Option I is selected for the project activity as only grid connected power plants are

included in the calculation

Step 3 STEP3 Select a method to determine Operating Margin (OM)

The project proponent has chosen to adopt option a) of step 3 ie consideration of Simple Operating

Margin for the project As per the tool The simple OM method (Option a) can only be used if low-

costmust-run resources2 constitute less than 50 of total grid generation in 1) average of the five most

recent years or 2) based on long-term averages for hydroelectricity production

Referring the relevant data from the CEACO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 the below

table is drawn for the share of net generation by the must-run hydronuclear plants for the past 5 years

Region 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Average NEWNE 1850 1900 1740 1590 1760 177

Since the average is 177 and is below the threshold of 50 as prescribed in the tool hence Simple OM

method is applicable for the project activity

Step 4 Calculate the operating margin emission factor according to the selected method

Simple OM The Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2

Operating Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid The following information has been used for the

calculation of baseline emissions

Simple Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridOMy) (incl Imports) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference

13 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 43 Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2008-09 tCO2MWh 101 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10 tCO2MWh 098

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2010-11 tCO2MWh 097

3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor

tCO2MWh 09843 Calculated based on the most recent data available at the time of submission of the CDM-PDD to the DOE for validation

Note 3 year generation weighted average of Operating margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) STEP 5 Calculate the build margin (BM) emission factor Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2 Build Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid for the year 2010-2011 Build Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridBMy) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference Build Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10

tCO2MWh 0859 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Step 6 Calculate the combined margin emissions factor The Project proponent has opted for Option A ie estimation of Combined Margin by weighted average nethod EFy = wOM EFgridOMy + wBM EFgridBMy Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy) 3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (NEWNE grid) EFgridOMy

tCO2MWh 09843 Refer the above table

Build Margin (NEWNE grid) EFgridBMy

tCO2MWh 0859 Refer the above table

Weighting of operating margin emissions factor wOM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Weighting of build margin emissions factor wBM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy)

tCO2MWh 09216 Calculated

Note Combined margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) Hence CEFelec is calcualted to be 09216 for the Project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 44 Calculation of Project Emission As per equation 3) PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec = (1550 3301000) 09216 = 471 tCO2e Considering diesel consumption per day due to the project activity100 Litre Fconsy = 100 3300871000 = 29 tonnes As per equation 4) PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel = 29 43 741 = 91 tCO2e Considering composition of organic waste as follows Cloth 5 Garden Yard waste 30 Food Waste 55 Paper 10 Thus waste type category (j) = 4 Therefore Quantity of cloth waste = 1300 330 47 5 = 10082 tonnesannum Quantity of garden waste = 1300 330 47 30 = 60489 tonnesannum Quantity of food waste = 1300 330 47 55 = 110897 tonnesannum Quantity of paper waste = 1300 330 47 10 = 20163 tonnesannum Therefore total waste quantity = (10082 + 60489 + 110897 + 20163) = 201630 tonnesannum Therefore amount of waste composted is Qy = (50 of 201630) = 100815 tonnesannum (This is with the consideration of equal distribution of the total biodegradable waste for RDF production and for composting The parameter Qy will be monitored ex-post) As per equation 7) project emission of methane has been calculated as PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 = 100815 0002 21 = 4234 tCO2e As per equation 8) project emission of methane has been calculated as PEN20y = Qy EFN20y GWPN20 = 100815 00002 310 = 6251 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 6) emission from composting has been calculated as PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy = 3243 + 4788 = 10485 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 2) project emission has been calculated as PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy = (471 + 91 + 10485) tCO2e = 11048 tCO2e Calculation of Baseline Emission As per equation 11) methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity is calculated as

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 45 = 085(1-0)21(1-01)1612050508[10082024e-07(1)(1- e-07)] + [6048902e-017(1)(1- e-

017)]+ [110897015e-04(1)(1- e-04)] + [201630 4e-007(1)(1- e-007)] = 34633 tCO2e Considering a compliance rate of 4514 ie RATECompliance

y = 0045 Therefore as per equation 10) Adjusted baseline emission has been calculated as BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) = 38481 (1 ndash 0045) = 17316 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 9) Baseline emission has been calculated as BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy = (34633 ndash 0) + 0 = 33058 tCO2e Calculation of Leakage Emission As per equation 16)

Where DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) For ex-ante estimation this has been considered to be 200 Kms for both compost and RDF

VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) For ex-ante estimation the same has been assumed to be 02 lkm

Now as per equation 17) NOvehiclesiy is given by QyCTy For ex-ante estimation CTy has been considered to be 10 Tons Ltycompost = (18 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 856 tCO2e LtyRDF = (12 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 571 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 18) emission from transportation has been calculated as Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF = (856 + 571) = 1427 tCO2e As per equation 15) leakage emission has been calculated as Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy = 1427 + 0 + 0 + 0 +0 = 1427 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 19) emission reduction has been calculated as ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly = (33058 ndash 11048 ndash 1427) = 20584 tCO2e Emission reduction for all other years in the crediting period has been calculated in a similar manner 14 For details on the value considered refer to Annexure 1 below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 46 B64 Summary of ex ante estimates of emission reductions

Year Baseline

emissions (t CO2e)

Project emissions (t CO2e)

Leakage (t CO2e)

Emission reductions (t CO2e)

2012-2013 33058 11048 1427 20584 2013-2014 57319 11048 1427 44844 2014-2015 75420 11048 1427 62945 2015-2016 89168 11048 1427 76694 2016-2017 99805 11048 1427 87330 2017-2018 108188 11048 1427 95714 2018-2019 114916 11048 1427 102441 2019-2020 120408 11048 1427 107934 2020-2021 124963 11048 1427 112489 2021-2022 128795 11048 1427 116320

Total 952041 110476 14270 827294 Total number of crediting years 10

Annual average over the crediting period

95204 11408 1427 82729

B7 Monitoring plan B71 Data and parameters to be monitored (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 47

Data Parameter Mcompost Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 77220 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of compost produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of compost produced will be cross checked with the sale of

compost Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter M RDF Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 51480 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of RDF produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of RDF produced will be cross checked with the sale of RDF Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 48

Data Parameter Pnjx

Unit - Description Weight fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the

year x Source of data Sample analysis of the MSW by project participant Value(s) applied

SL No Waste type Composition

1 Cloth 5 2 Garden yard waste 30 3 Food Waste 55 4 Paper 10

Source These values are as mentioned in the DPR

Measurement methods and procedures

Sampling method will be selected in order to determine a constant weight fraction of the waste type treated As per the tool the size and frequency of sampling should be statistically with a maximum uncertainty range of 20 at 95 confidence level Since the number of operating days is 330 it is ensured that the waste will be delivered for all the 330 days and hence will be monitored daily Sampling will be done on a monthly basis

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures The sampling of the raw wastes will be done by a laboratory in the project

site The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months

Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter RATECompliancey

Unit Description Rate of compliance Source of data Reports published by Municipal bodies (Central Pollution Control Board

(CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority) Analysis for computation of value for RATECompliance

y has been presented in Annexure 1 provided in the last section of the document

Value(s) applied 45 Measurement methods and procedures

The ex-ante value has been taken as 45 For ex-post calculation of emission reductions compliance rates would be taken from the reports published by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per AM0025 Version 12 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 49

Data Parameter z Unit - Description Number of samples collected during the year x Source of data Lab Records Value(s) applied 12 per year Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter f Unit - Description Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used

in another manner Source of data Plant Log Book- Written information from the operator of the solid waste

disposal site Value(s) applied 0 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- - Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per the methodological tool to determine ldquoEmissions

avoided from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment At present there is no provision for capturing flaring or combusting the

methane emissions at the SWDS This justifies the choice of the data value Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years in both electronic and paper formats

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 50

Data Parameter EG PJFFy Unit MWhyr Description Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the project

activity Source of data Electricity meter reading from electricity meter bill Value(s) applied 512 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the energy meter is 05 Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Monthly QAQC procedures Electricity meter will be subject to regular (in accordance with stipulation

of the meter supplier) maintenance and testing to ensure accuracy Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Fconsy Unit litre Description Fuel (diesel) consumption on-site during year lsquoyrsquo of the crediting period Source of data Purchase invoices Value(s) applied 100 litresday Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 51

Data Parameter DT i compost y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for compost transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap Assumption to be approved by DOE

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Qy Unit Tonnesyr Description Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 100815 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of waste composted will be measured with belt scales installed in the conveyer belt coming out of the pre-sorting area Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Once in three yearsfrom NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the belt scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures The belt scales will be calibrated as per standards provided by the

manufacturer Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 52

Data Parameter DT i RDF y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for RDF transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CTt y Unit Tonnestruck Description Carrying capacity of each truck delivering waste to the composting

installation in year y Source of data The maximum carrying capacity as stated on the truckrsquos nameplate is

registered by personnel at the entrance gate of the composting installation Value(s) applied 10 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be monitored by the challan received from the transport contractors post the loading of the vehicle Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- - Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 5 kgs Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Every vehicle QAQC procedures Weighbridge or any other applicable weighing device is subject to periodic

calibration (in accordance with stipulation of the weighing device supplier)

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 53

Data Parameter VFcons Unit litre km Description Average fuel consumption per kilometre of vehicles for compost

transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 5 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- Transporterrsquos challan Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency-

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures Transporterrsquos challan is a third-party document Hence QAQC procedures

are not required Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

B72 Sampling plan gtgt The project proponent has proposed a sampling plan in accordance with ldquoStandard for sampling and surveys for CDM project activities and programme of activitiesrdquo Version 020 ( EB 65 Annex 2) Sampling will be done to determine weight fraction of the waste type treated Sampling procedures will be followed in-line with the sectoral best practices and as per the guidelines laid out Section 33 Chapter 3 of the Manual on Solid Waste Management as published by the Ministry of Urban Development for public information15 Therefore on each sample collection day about 100 Kg of incoming MSW will be withdrawn randomly from four incoming trucks entering the project site About 10 Kg of MSW each will be collected from ten randomly selected points from outside and inside of the solid waste heap so piled The total quantity of waste so collected (approx 100 Kg) will then be thoroughly mixed and then reduced by quartering till a sample of such a size was obtained which could be handled by the laboratory Thus each master sample of approximately 25 Kg will be sent to the accredited laboratory for composition analysis Sampling will be done once in a month in in-house laboratory The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months B73 Other elements of monitoring plan gtgt Monitoring refers to the collection and archiving of all relevant data necessary for determining the baseline measuring anthropogenic emissions by sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) within the project boundary of a CDM project activity and leakage as applicable The project activity is a GHG avoidance project where the waste materials (ie municipal solid wastes) collected will be treated aerobically to produce compost and mechanically to produce RDF and will be sold in an open market The financial performance of the project activity depends significantly on the CDM revenue to be availed through sale of Certified Emission Reduction (CER) units accrued from the project activity This will require monitoring of all the relevant GHG performance parameters Therefore

15 httpurbanindianicinpublicinfoswmchap3pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 54 the project proponent has developed a monitoring protocol which will be followed throughout the proposed crediting period in order to ensure proper operation of the project activity resulting in generation of carbon credits The same is explained below Monitoring Plan Monitoring the projectrsquos performance in terms of ERs achievement requires the fulfillment of operational data collection and processing obligations from the operator The operator of compost plant has the primary obligation to collect data that would facilitate the calculation of the project ERs The data shall be collected by the operator based on the most recent available information as per the Procedures presented in this PDD In addition roles and responsibilities of monitoring personnel would be well defined

10 Objective of monitoring plan sect To ensure smooth uninterrupted operation of the project activity and hence generation of carbon

credits sect To ensure proper monitoring reporting and verification of all the parameters required to evaluate

the GHG performance of the project activity sect To identify flaws in the monitoring system and open up opportunities for further improvement

20 Roles and Responsibilities

The project proponent has developed a team who will be involved in monitoring reporting and verification of all the GHG performance related parameters The following schematic diagram will explain the individual roles and responsibilities of all the members of the team

Team Responsibility

Shift Operator Monitoring and reporting the GHG performance related parameters following the guidance provided in the Project Design Document

Shift In-charge

- Reviewing the GHG performance related parameters as recorded by the Shift Operator in every shift - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the reported parameters - Preparation of daily and monthly reports

Plant Manager

- Reviewing the daily and monthly reports in consultation with the Shift In-charge - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the daily and monthly reports - Ensuring calibration of the monitoring equipments as and when required

Management Representative(s)-

Production Department

- Reviewing the monthly and annual production statistics - Evaluating the GHG performance of the project activity - Identify opportunities for further improvement

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 55 SECTION C Duration and crediting period C1 Duration of project activity C11 Start date of project activity gtgt 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity C12 Expected operational lifetime of project activity gtgt 25 years 0 months C2 Crediting period of project activity C21 Type of crediting period gtgt The project proponent has opted for a fixed crediting period C22 Start date of crediting period gtgt 01092012 or date of registration of the project activity with UNFCCC whichever is later C23 Length of crediting period 10 years 0 months

SECTION D Environmental impacts D1 Analysis of environmental impacts gtgt In the applicable EIA notification ie SO 3067(E)16 dated 01122009 Ministry of Environment amp Forests (MoEF) Govt of India the Municipal Solid Waste projects are not included in the list of projects that has to get Prior Environmental Clearance (EC) either from State or Central Govt authorities and hence no EIA study was conducted The project does not fall under the purview of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) notification of the Ministry of Environment and Forest Government of India However due weightage has been given to environmental aspects D2 Environmental impact assessment gtgt The environmental impacts of the project activity are not considered to be significant by the project participant or the host party The project activity would help in avoidance of emissions caused due to the combustion of fossil fuels such as SOx NOx and particulate matter

SECTION E Local stakeholder consultation E1 Solicitation of comments from local stakeholders gtgt Stakeholder meeting was convened by Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd at the plant site at Shiveri Lucknow on 23032012 to explain the salient details of the Project its benefits to the society and villagers Prior to the meeting individual invitation letters were sent to each of the identified stakeholder on 15032012 to obtain their consensus for attending the meeting The objective of the meeting was to conduct open discussion where stakeholders are encouraged to raise questions express their concern and

16 httpmoefnicindownloadsrules-and-regulations3067pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 56 comments about the proposed project through a participatory process and to list down any probable concern of stakeholders The various stakeholders present in the meeting were the local inhabitants employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd representatives from equipment supplier Eco Trademart Pvt Ltd representatives of Lucknow Development Agency and local NGO representatives The MD of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd then briefed them about the project activity as per the following schedule

bull Project Background and information about the company bull Technology Involved in the project activity bull Benefits and impacts of the project activity bull Process of Clean Development Mechanism

Later half of the meeting a dedicated session was allotted for question and answer session and comments from the stakeholders were invited E2 Summary of comments received gtgt Meeting was very interactive and got very encouraging response from stakeholders The local villagers and the office bearers expressed their happiness with the setting up of an environment friendly project in their village as it had resulted in generation of employment opportunities both for literate and illiterate people Development of infrastructure in the locality was highly appreciated Few of prominent attendees are as follows S No Name Age Sex

(MF) Occupation Village

1 MrDunna 65 M Gram Pradhan Shiveri

2 SdBalbir Singh Maan 26 M Secretary

NGO - Umeed Chowk

3 Abhishek Singh 36 M

Equipments Supplier ndash Eco Trademart Pvt

Ltd

Dubagga

4 MrPCMehrotra 72 M

Retired Chief EngineerLDALu

cknow Aliganj

The meeting also included employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd The project received unanimous acknowledgement and appreciation from all the attendees at the meeting The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech in their attempt to combat global warming and simultaneously improve the local hygiene and modernize municipal solid waste management of Lucknow has been applauded by all

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 57 E3 Report on consideration of comments received gtgt The project has received positive amp encouraging feedback from the stakeholders concerned All the stakeholders have appreciated and encouraged the project proponent for taking up this project activity In view of various direct and indirect benefits (social economical and environmental) all the stakeholders have supported the project activity The documents supporting the stakeholder consultation will be submitted to the DOE Examples of few questions as raised by the stakeholders and their respective clarifications as provided by the project proponent have been detailed below 1What is CER CERs or Certified Emission Reductions are a ldquocertificaterdquo just like a stock A CER is given by the CDM Executive Board to projects in developing countries to certify they have reduced greeen house gas emissions by one tonne of carbon dioxide per year 2-What is Global Warming Potential Ans Green house gases affect global warming with varying intensities This intensity is measured by the ldquoglobal warming potentialrdquo of the gas 3- Is there any negative impact on surrounding area Ans There is no negative impact on surrounding area 4-What are carbon credits How these will obtained Who will by them Ans Carbon credits are generated in the developing countries by reducing the greenhouse gases emission in the atmosphere One tonne of carbon dioxide saved is equal to one carbon credit All steps of CDM cycle was explained and the process of Credits monetization 5-How does CDM benefit society Ans CDM is clean development mechanism a tool to provide incentives to mitigate the emission of greenhouse gases which are enhancing the climate change The purpose of this programme is to reduce emission of GHGs as well as promote sustainable development in host country Therefore developing country like India will gain financial and environmental benefits by reducing the emission of ever increasing GHGs to save the earth 6Would the project provide employment opportunities and or improve economic development of area There would be generation of employment through this project activity At the same point of time there would be regular trainings that would be imparted to the local population 7 How this project will help to address the issues raised by the local villagers The project will help the stake holders in the following ways A Create jobs for the local masses B Create business opportunities for the contractors C Increase awareness of the people regarding the local and global environment D Help to conserve depleting resources of fossil fuel such as coal It was also mentioned in the meeting that 2 of the CER revenue earned from the project would be utilized in developmental works of the local community There would be a robust monitoring plan for the same and the plant manager Mr Sachin Mehta was appointed as the local contact person for the same

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 58 The project received unanimous appreciation from the stakeholders present The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd towards mitigation of global warming was applauded by all

SECTION F Approval and authorization gtgt The project has received the following approvalsclearances

1) No objection certificate from Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board Lucknow 2) Environmental clearance certificate from the State Level Environment Impact Assessment

Authority Uttar Pradesh 3) No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

The project has applied for Host Country Approval and will be provided to the DOE during the course of project validation

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 59 Appendix A 1 The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has committed to share 2 (mention

approximate amount in INR per year) of its Certified Emission Reduction (CERs) in connection with hisher CDM project based on the issuance and transaction of the CERs

2 The committed amount of money will be utilized for addressing the identified issues in the following villages Identified Villages Total Population Key issues for development Shiveri 1200 approx The project is located in a rural area and the economy

of the area where the project activity is located is heavily dependent on agriculture and other farm based livelihoods The process of stakeholder engagement undertaken as a part of social impact assessment came across community needs and expectations from the project The process of need assessment conducted recently and prioritization undertaken as part of an exercise to seek participation in the preparation of the community development plan and livelihood restoration plan came across the following community needs

bull Skill trainingup-gradation institute for youth and creation of employment opportunities

bull Education support to children for secondary and higher secondary education

bull Drinking water bull Strengthening health infrastructure bull Developing land resources

Enhancing agriculture productivity and market linkages

Pankhera 800 approx

3 Accordingly the project proponent has identified the activities support for the following villages

S No Village Name ActivitiesSupport proposed over the project life time

Approximate amount in INR

1 Shiveri Skill training and Capacity Building Initiative

a Objective To build skill sets of the youth in the community in order to realize the potential employment opportunities arising due to the project and also enhance employment options elsewhere

b Target Beneficiaries Youth especially belonging to the families of the nearby villagers and those belonging to the economically and socially vulnerable

It will be difficult to confirm the exact allocation of funds for individual activities and for individual villages now as the expenditure would depend upon the social needs of the identified stakeholders much nearer to the Commercial Operation Date

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 60

communities

c Proposed Activities

i) Self help group for the women will be formed and will be imparted skill development training for initiating some income generation activities One group will be formed in each target village

ii) Imparting of training to youths on various skills having potential for starting self employment program or to enable them to get wage employment

2 Health Intervention a Objective Improved health care access and

delivery systems and reduction in incidence of diseases and improved health behavior of the community

b c Target Beneficiaries General community

with focus on elderly women children and economically weaker section

d e Proposed Activities i)To organize health awareness among

community members especially women on various facets of reproductive and child health hygiene sanitation etc

ii) To organize general health camps in the target villages

iii) To establish network with Government health functionaries in strengthening the intervention in the target villages

To conduct the school health camps and also health education programs

3 Agriculture Natural Resource Management and Allied Activities

a Objective To work toward improving the agriculture and allied activities in the target area

b c Target beneficiaries Land owners

economically backward and marginal farmers

d Description of proposed activities i) To organize training programme for

(COD) of the Project The Project Proponent will allocate funds for each identified activity and for each village during each crediting period accordingly

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 61

farmers on latest agriculture methods and technologies

ii) To organize exposure visits for the farmers to Agriculture universities kisan melas and other modern agriculture farms

iii) To organize training programme on animal husbandry

iv) To organize cattle health camp v)To get the existing water bodies repaired

to increase the availability of water and also to increase the ground water recharge

4 Education a Objective To strengthen the education

infrastructure at village level to improve access and quality of existing education service

b Target Beneficiaries Children in school going age group especially girls and children belonging to economically and socially vulnerable community

c Proposed activities

i) Strengthening early childhood education and development by provisioning of quality pre school kits and skill development

ii)Provisioning of scholarship for students from socially and economically weaker sections of the society especially for girls for both academic and professional courses iii)Organizing sports and other competitions in schools and for village youth clubs

4 The implementation details along with local contact and money transfer mechanism are as follows

The plan as mentioned above was discussed in details with the stakeholders present at the local stakeholder meeting held at the project site During the meeting the project proponent received unanimous appreciation and encouragement from the meeting attendees The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd would be implementing the plan themselves The project manager of Jyoti Enviro Tech was nominated as the local contact for the developmental plan shared Local contact of project proponent Money transfer mechanism

Mr Sachin Mehta Manager Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd Adress Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Lucknow ndash 226003 Phone 0522 ndash4049397

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 62 5 Details of monitoring arrangement

Monitoring Committee

The expenditure details can be verified by the Designated Operational Entity (DOE) during the verification If required the same can also be certified by a chartered accountant The expenditure details would be made public in the annual report of the company

Monitoring Parameters

Expenditure of 2 earning (net realizable value) from sale of CER available from the project activity would be monitored The sustainability initiatives undertaken by the company would be analyzed in detail during the verification

Monitoring Frequency Yearly

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 63

Appendix 1 Contact information of project participants

Organization name Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd StreetPO Box Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Building City Lucknow StateRegion Uttar Pradesh Postcode 226003 Country India Telephone 0522 ndash4049397 Fax E-mail jyotienvirogmailcom Website Contact person Title Manager Salutation Mr Last name Mehta Middle name First name Sachin Department Projects Mobile Direct fax Direct tel 0522 ndash4049397 Personal e-mail jyotienvirogmailcom

Appendix 2 Affirmation regarding public funding

There is no public funding available for the project The same has been mentioned in section A4

Appendix 3 Applicability of selected methodology

The applicability of the project activity to the selected methodology has been demonstrated in section B2

Appendix 4 Further background information on ex ante calculation of emission reductions

All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 5 Further background information on monitoring plan

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 64 All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 6 Summary of post registration changes

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 65

Annexure 1 Analysis for value of RATECompliancey for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction

State level analysis of Municipal Solid Waste handling practice in the state of Uttar Pradesh reveals that at few locations scientific handling practices have been adopted with simultaneous consideration of CDM benefits associated with the project

While some municipal bodies still have plans for installation of plants for scientific handling of Municipal Solid Waste and subsequent compost manufacturing with consideration of carbon credits

Sl no Location Present practice CDM

consideration Source

1 Kanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex at Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh India

2 Ghaziabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source17

3 Agra

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) processing plant in Agra by Ultra Urban Infratech Limited

4 Varanasi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Varanasi India

5 Meerut

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Meerut India

6 Allahabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Allahabad Uttar Pradesh

7 Bareilly

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source18

8 Aligarh

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Aligarh India

17

httpncrpbnicinTechnical_assistance_report_comp_BVolume20IV20Solid20Waste20Management20GhaziabadWSA_ADB20NCRPB_FR_Vol_IV-A_(GZB20Main20Report)pdf

18 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPBarielly_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 66

9 Moradabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management Project at Moradabad India

10 Saharanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources19

11 Gorakhpur Unscientific practice of open dumping still persists

NA Publicly available sources20

12 Mathura

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Mathura Uttar Pradesh

13 Jhansi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources21

14 Muzaffarnagar

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex

15 Mirzapur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Mirzapur India

16 Amravati

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Amravati India

17 Sambhal Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Have been considered as a single bundled project

18 Badaun 19 Fatehpur 20 Jaunpur 21 Ballia Hence from the above list it is evident only one (as highlighted) out of 21 locations comply to the MSW rules Hence for ex ante estimation RATECompliance

y is computed as presented below RATECompliance

y = (1 21) = 47 = 0047

------------

19

httpwwwindiawaterportalorgsitesindiawaterportalorgfilesCII_Excellence20in20Water20Management_ITC20Saharanpur_2009pdf

20 httpwwwgeagindiaorgPDFSOLID20WASTEpdf 21 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPJhansi_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 67

History of the document

Version Date Nature of revision 041 11 April 2012 Editorial revision to change version 02 line in history box from Annex 06 to

Annex 06b 040 EB 66

13 March 2012 Revision required to ensure consistency with the ldquoGuidelines for completing the project design document form for CDM project activitiesrdquo (EB 66 Annex 8)

03 EB 25 Annex 15 26 July 2006

02 EB 14 Annex 06b 14 June 2004

01 EB 05 Paragraph 12 03 August 2002

Initial adoption

Decision Class Regulatory Document Type Form Business Function Registration

Page 2: Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 2

SECTION A Description of project activity A1 Purpose and general description of project activity gtgt Description of the project activity Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd is in the process of installation of a solid waste treatment facility to produce compost and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) by aerobic treatment of municipal solid wastes (MSW) in Lucknow The objective of the project activity is to avoid methane emissions from anaerobic decomposition of MSW through aerobic treatment of the wastes in the solid waste treatment facility The installed facility would have a capacity to treat 1300 TPD of municipal solid wastes Pre-Project Scenario At present the management of municipal solid waste in Lucknow is not sound structured and the reason behind it is lack of awareness among the citizens as well as inactions of the civic bodies responsible for handling and management of the MSW The waste processing and disposal mechanisms in Lucknow are majorly unscientific and involve mainly open dumping at identified sites without any preprocessing There are no measures for landfill gas capture and or destruction The open disposal leads to uncontrolled anaerobic decomposition of wastes causing a number of environmental and health hazards in addition to unabated release of methane into the atmosphere which is one of the prominent greenhouse gases Also the leachate generated in the landfill seeps into the soil and pollutes the ground and surface water This scenario identified above in the pre-project scenario is the baseline scenario for the project activity Project Scenario The project activity involves installation of a waste handling and processing plant for treatment of waste under aerobic conditions to produce composts and refuse derived fuel (RDF) Both these products are saleable in the market The project activity through scientific processing of wastes under aerobic conditions will result in avoidance of methane generation which would have taken place due to anaerobic decomposition of the wastes in landfill the existing scenario of waste disposal in the city of Lucknow Thus the project activity results in the emission reductions to the tune of 82729 tCO2annum on an average over 10 years of its crediting period Contribution of the project activity towards sustainable development Government of India has stipulated following indicators1 for sustainable development in the interim approval guidelines for CDM projects The sustainability aspect of the project activity has been dealt under the following four pillars of sustainable development Social Well-being The project activity will improve the local sanitary conditions of the inhabitants of the city by facilitating an eco-friendly disposal of MSW The project activity by avoiding the decay of MSW in unscientific and ordinary landfills helps in improving the health moral and sanitary conditions of the local people Jyoti

1 httpwwwcdmindiainapproval_processphp

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 3 Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has also committed to dedicate 2 of the revenue derived from CER towards development of local community The monitorable plan for the same has been detailed in Appendix A in the later section of this PDD Economic Well-Being The project provides employment to the community directly at the MSW processing facility and indirectly through waste collection transportation of compost and RDF to the end user Thus the project provides fresh job opportunities to the local people and helps in upliftment of the economic stature of the society Environmental Well-being Composting of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is an attractive option for resource recovery and environmental improvement In contrast to the anaerobic decay of biodegradable waste that occurs in the landfill sites which results in methane generation among other landfill gases the MSW processing project will contribute in mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through aerobic decomposition and mechanical treatment of the municipal solid waste Due to the proposed project activity dumping of given waste is prevented resulting in reduction in land requirement for waste disposal leading to improved environmental conditions and a replicable model Technological Well-being Successful implementation of this project would lead to further diffusion of MSW processing technology for treatment of waste generated in India A2 Location of project activity A21 Host Party(ies) gtgt India A22 RegionStateProvince etc gtgt Uttar Pradesh A23 CityTownCommunity etc gtgt Lucknow

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 4 A24 PhysicalGeographical location gtgt The proposed project activity will be implemented in Shiveri village in the district of Lucknow in the state of Uttar Pradesh Lucknow is the capital of one of the largest states of India Uttar Pradesh It is located at latitudes 26deg 51 402rdquoN and longitudes 80deg 4952rdquoE Lucknow is accessible from every part of India through air rail and road It is directly connected with New Delhi Patna Kolkata Mumbai Varanasi and other major cities by Amausi airport

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 5 A3 Technologies andor measures gtgt Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd follows a scientific waste management approach which includes aerobic treatment of bio-degradable solid waste to produce compost and refuse derived fuel The waste reaching the processing plant will be received in two separate parts biodegradable and non-biodegradable The biodegradable part of the wastes would be processed to produce compost and RDF while the inert materials in non-biodegradable wastes will be delivered to the sanitary landfill The collection of waste is estimated to be 1300 TPD The scope of project activity includes

bull Aerobic processing and mechanical treatment of the waste The collection vehicles that bring in the

waste from the transfer station to the MSW processing site will be weighed in a weighbridge at the entrance of the facility every time the vehicles come in and go out and the respective weights will be recorded This will be done to have a record of the incoming MSW quantities by weight Thereafter the vehicles carrying wastes will be directed to the specified points for unloading The inert waste will be unloaded at the identified site for sanitary landfill and the recyclable materials will be segregated for sale to scrap dealers The rest of the waste ie the biodegradable wastes will be unloaded at pits which mark the start point of the waste processing line A seepage line is present at the bottom of each pit which connects with the similar lines from other pits This is meant for collecting the leachate that is generated from the waste deposition at the pits

Each pit has a hopper adjacent to it The wastes collected from the pit by the EOT crane is fed into the hopper through a conveyer belt The hopper leads the waste into a pre-sorting section and thereafter through a conveyer belt into a rotary screen trommel where the waste is screened The wastes below 100mm as screened in the trommel are led to the composting area whereas those screened above 100 mm are led by another conveyer belt to the area for production of RDF a) Production of compost The trommel is a rotary screen that separates the waste on the basis of size The biodegradable wastes fed into the trommel is further screened to segregate wastes below and above 100 mm size The wastes below 100mm are undergone composting The waste is collected by the EOT cranes and led to the curing and drying area where the waste is heaped and biological inoculum are sprayed at regular intervals In this area the moisture of the waste is dried up and maintained at 5-10 The heaps are turned at scheduled intervals to ensure a proper aerobic processing of the waste The heap of waste thus accumulated is further led to the composting pads The waste is processed for duration of 20-25 days In the course of this time through monitored processing the waste is transformed into a brown colored mass resembling humus Further the waste is passed through 3 more stages of trommel for screening the mass of waste successively into 35mm 16mm and finally to 4 mm At this stage the waste is fed into the finishing area Finishing area comprises of sheds where the final product of waste processing compost is packed and made ready to be sold in the market b) Production of Reduce derived fuel (RDF) Wastes screened at the trommel above 100mm are directed to a conveyer line carrying them to an adjacent area where the waste will be processed to produce reduce derived fuel (RDF) The waste is passed through a vibrating conveyer where a blower segregates any plastic material from the waste The rest waste is then passed through the conveyer into the RDF producing machine The production of RDF involves processing of the waste by magnetic shredders and subsequent homogenizing of the

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 6

waste in homogenizers Thereafter the uniform mass of waste thus prepared is compressed by hydraulic systems to produce RDF units resembling the shape of soap blocks The lifetime of the project equipments is specified as 25 yrs 00 months Also it is to be noted that the project does not involve any technology transfer from Annex 1 countries The training required for the persons for operation and maintenance of the equipments would be provided through capacity building sessions by the technology provider and would be frequently organized by the project proponent

Brief description of type of monitoring equipments For monitoring the various parameters of the project the following equipments would be used Sl No Parameter Description of equipment type 1 Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 2 Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 3 Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the

project activity Energy meter

4 Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Belt scales 5 Raw waste quantity Weigh bridge Further details on the same have been furnished in Section B71 under section ldquoData and parameters to be monitoredrdquo The various monitoring points in the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 7 A4 Parties and project participants

Party involved (host) indicates a host Party

Private andor public entity(ies) project participants

(as applicable)

Indicate if the Party involved wishes to be considered as

project participant (YesNo)

India(host)

Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd (Private entity)

No

A5 Public funding of project activity gtgt The project has not received any Official Development Assistance (ODA) from Annex I countries

SECTION B Application of selected approved baseline and monitoring methodology B1 Reference of methodology gtgt Title of the approved baseline and monitoring methodology ldquoAvoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processesrdquo Version 13 EB 65 Sectoral Scope 01 and 13 Reference ldquoTool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Version 0600 EB 65 Methodological tool for ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 ldquoTool to calculate the emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo Version 0221 EB 63 Methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 B2 Applicability of methodology gtgt The project meets all the applicability criteria as set out in the methodology The applicability conditions of the methodology AM0025 Version 13 for the project activity have been justified as below Sr No

Applicability Conditions as per AM0025 Version 13

Justification

1 The project activity involves one or a combination of the following waste treatment options for the fresh waste that in a given year would have otherwise been disposed of in a landfill (a) A composting process in aerobic conditions (b) Gasification to produce syngas and its use (c) Anaerobic digestion with biogas collection and flaring andor its use The anaerobic digester processes only the waste for which emission reductions are claimed in this methodology If the biogas is processed and upgraded to the quality of natural gas and it is distributed as energy via natural gas

The project activity involves a combination of the waste treatment options a) A composting process in aerobic conditions d) Mechanical treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) The project activity does not involve the use of RDF Also the project activity does not involve any thermal operation In the absence of the project the fresh waste would have been disposed off in a landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 8

distribution grid project activities may use approved methodology AM0053 in conjunction with this methodology In such cases the baseline scenario identification procedure and additionality assessment shall be undertaken for the combination of the two components of the project activity ie biomethane emission avoidance and displacement of natural gas (d) Mechanicalthermal treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) and its use The thermal treatment process (dehydration) occurs under controlled conditions (up to 300 degrees Celsius) In case of thermal treatment process the process shall generate a stabilized biomass that would be used as fuel or raw material in other industrial process The physical and chemical properties of the produced RDFSB shall be homogenous and constant over time (e) Incineration of fresh waste for energy generation electricity andor heat The thermal energy generated is either consumed on-site andor exported to a nearby facility Electricity generated is either consumed on-site exported to the grid or exported to a nearby facility The incinerator is rotating fluidized bed or circulating fluidized bed or hearth or grate type

2 In case of anaerobic digestion gasification or RDF processing of waste the residual waste from these processes is aerobically composted andor delivered to a landfill

In RDF processing of waste the residual biodegradable waste is aerobically composted and the remainder ie the inert portion is delivered to the pre-identified sanitary landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

3 In case of composting the produced compost is either used as soil conditioner or disposed of in landfills

The compost produced in the project activity will be sold in the market that will be used as a soil conditioner This justifies the applicability criteria

4 In case of RDFstabilized biomass processing the produced RDFstabilized biomass should not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 9

This justifies the applicability criteria

5 If RDFSB is disposed of in a landfill project proponent shall provide degradability analysis on an annual basis to demonstrate that the methane generation in the life-cycle of the SB is below 1 of related emissions It has to be demonstrated regularly that the characteristics of the produced RDFSB should not allow for re-absorption of moisture of more than 3 Otherwise monitoring the fate of the produced RDFSB is necessary to ensure that it is not subject to anaerobic conditions in its lifecycle

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be disposed in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

6 In the case of incineration of the waste the waste should not be stored longer than 10 days The waste should not be stored in conditions that would lead to anaerobic decomposition and hence generation of CH4

The project activity does not involve the incineration of waste Hence this condition is not applicable

7 The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity can be determined in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity

The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity will be determined as per the process described in section B72 of PDD in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity This justifies the applicability criteria

8 The project activity may include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation from the biogas syngas captured RDFstabilized biomass produced combustion heat generated in the incineration process respectively from the anaerobic digester the gasifier RDFstabilized biomass combustor and waste incinerator The electricity can be exported to the grid andor used internally at the project site In the case of RDFSB produced the emission reductions can be claimed only for the cases where the RDFSB used for electricity andor thermal energy generation can be monitored

The project activity does not include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation Hence this condition is not applicable

9 Waste handling in the baseline scenario The MSW 2000 rules stipulated by GoI mandated

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 10

shows a continuation of current practice of disposing the waste in a landfill despite environmental regulation that mandates the treatment of the waste if any using any of the project activity treatment options mentioned above

the municipal bodies to treat the municipal waste in a scientific manner 2 However despite the rules the common practice of handling the waste in the country is continuation of current practice of dumping the wastes in a disposal site 3 In addition no single municipality or local body has complied with the guidelines stipulated by MSW Rules 2000 in the country4 Further the present scenario of solid waste management in Lucknow is highly unsynchronized and inadequate and entails dumping of waste in open areas5 This justifies the applicability criteria

10 The compliance rate of the environmental regulations during (part of) the crediting period is below 50 if monitored compliance with the MSW rules exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit since the assumption that the policy is not enforced is no longer tenable

The compliance rate of Indian MSW Rules 2000 is below 50 No single municipality or local body in India has complied with the guidelines stipulated in the MSW Rules 20006 However a conservative value of 45 is taken for ex-ante estimations of emission reductions7 This justifies the applicability criteria

11 Local regulations do not constrain the establishment of RDF production plantsthermal treatment plants nor the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material

There is no such regulations that constrain the establishment of RDF production nor any regulation for the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material This justifies the applicability criteria

12 In case of RDFstabilized biomass production project proponent shall provide evidences that no GHG emissions occur other than biogenic CO2 due to chemical reactions during the thermal treatment process (such as Chimney Gas Analysis report)

The project activity does not involve any thermal treatment in case of RDF production The process involved is purely mechanical treatment Hence this condition is not applicable

13 The project activity does not involve thermal There is no waste incineration in the proposed

2 httpenvfornicinlegishsmmswmhrhtml 3 httpwwwnswaicomimagesnewslettersjun2010pdf 4 Sunil Kumar Bhattacharyya JK Vaidya AN Tapan Chakrabarti Sukumar Devotta Akolkar AB Assessment of the status of municipal solid waste management in metro cities state capitals class I cities and class II towns in India An insight pg 3 Waste Management journal homepage wwwelseviercomlocatewasman 5 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf Page 26 Paragraph 34 describes the present scenario of solid waste management in

Lucknow 6 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 8

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf 7 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 9

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 11

treatment process of neither industrial nor hospital waste

project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

14 In case of waste incineration if auxiliary fossil fuel is added into the incinerator the fraction of energy generated by auxiliary fossil fuel is no more than 50 of the total energy generated in the incinerator

There is no waste incineration in the proposed project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

15 This methodology is not applicable to project activities that involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill This should be treated as a separate project activity due to the difference in waste characteristics of existing and fresh waste which may have an implication on the baseline scenario determination

Project activity does not involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

Thus as per the methodology AM0025 the project activity involves the treatment of fresh waste (ie municipal solid waste) originally intended for dumping through a combination of the processes a) composting b) RDF processing without incineration The project activity avoids methane emissions by diverting organic waste from being dumped where methane emissions are caused by anaerobic decomposition By treating the fresh waste through alternative treatment options these methane emissions are avoided Therefore the project meets the applicability conditions of AM0025 B3 Project boundary As per AM0025 the spatial extent of the project boundary is the site of the project activity where the waste is treated This includes the facilities for processing the waste on-site electricity consumption onsite fuel use and the sanitary landfill site The project boundary does not include facilities for waste collection sorting and transport to the project site The summary of gases and sources included in the project boundary and justification explanation where gases and sources are not included is listed below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 12

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation B

asel

ine

scen

ario

Emissions from decomposition of waste at the landfill site

CO2 Excluded CO2 emissions from the decomposition of organic waste are not accounted

CH4 Included The major source of emissions in the baseline since the fresh waste is being disposed off in the landfill Hence included

N2O Excluded N2O emissions are small compared to CH4 emissions from landfills Exclusion of this gas is conservative

Emissions from electricity consumption

CO2 Excluded Electricity is not being consumed in the baseline Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

Proj

ect s

cena

rio

On-site fossil fuel consumption due to the project activity other than for electricity generation

CO2 Included The project activity involves on-site fossil fuel consumption Hence included

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

Emissions from on-site electricity use

CO2 Included The project activity involves consumption of electricity from the grid Hence included

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded

The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 13

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation Pr

ojec

t sce

nari

o

Direct emissions from the waste treatment processes

N2O Included May be an important emission source N2O can be emitted from composting activities Hence included

CO2 Included CO2 emissions from decomposition of organic waste are not accounted8

CH4 Included Composting process may not be complete and result in anaerobic decay resulting in CH4 emissions

Emissions from waste water treatment

CO2 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

CH4 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

A graphical representation of the project boundary is shown below

Bio degradable waste processing Segregated Inert Recyclables

Compost RDF Sanitary landfill

Open market

MSW Collection in Lucknow

MSW Processing Site

PROJECT BOUNDARY

Electricity fromDiesel

Electricity from Grid

Consumption of Electricity

8 CO2 emissions from the combustion or decomposition of biomass (see definition by the EB in Annex 8 of the EBs 20th meeting report) are not accounted as GHG emissions Where the combustion or decomposition of biomass under a CDM project activity results in a decrease of carbon pools such stock changes should be considered in the calculation of emission reductions This is not the case for waste treatment projects

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 14 The various monitoring points in the project activity as included within the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram as given below

B4 Establishment and description of baseline scenario gtgt The approved methodology AM0025 version 12 recommends the use of the latest version of the tool for demonstration and assessment of additionality (version 0600) to determine the most plausible baseline scenarios for the project The various steps to establish the additionality of the project as per the methodological tool is demonstrated pictorially as given below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 15

According to the approved methodology AM0025 the baseline scenario of the activity is defined as disposal of the waste in open dump yards without taking any measures to capture the landfill gas or avoid methane emission due to the anaerobic decomposition of waste The procedure to define the baseline scenario as per AM0025 is as follows Step 1 Identification of alternative scenarios The most realistic and credible alternatives available to the project activity have been identified using the following sub steps

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 16 Sub-step 1a Defining alternatives to project activity The approved methodology has provided the following alternatives for the disposaltreatment of the fresh waste in the absence of the project activity ie the scenario relevant for estimating baseline methane emissions to be analysed should include inter alia M1 The project activity (ie composting gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas Assessment of the alternatives for waste treatment

Alternative Description Justification M1 The project activity (ie composting

gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project

This alternative seems to be a realistic and plausible alternative The project activity not implemented as a CDM project is however not a feasible alternative as the project involves high investment cost in order to set up the processing plant whereas the return from the project activity is exceptionally low (As discussed in detail in Section B5) However M1 is still a plausible option and is subjected to further consideration as a baseline scenario

M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared

The cost of construction operation and maintenance of an engineered landfill is high as compared to the zerominimal expenditure in the dumping of waste Hence the scope of landfill gas recovery is minimized in India Hence this scenario M2 is not feasible and is thus eliminated from further consideration as baseline scenario

M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas

Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas is the most common practice in India as demonstrated in Section B5 The same has been found to be prevalent in Lucknow in the absence of the project activity9 Hence this is a common practice that faces no barriers because of low expenditure low O amp M cost non-requirement of skilled labor etc Thus this is the most widely practiced method for MSW disposal throughout the country

9 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf page 26 paragraph 34

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 17

This alternative M3 is considered as the most likely baseline scenario for the project activity

The methodology further states that ldquoIf energy is exported to a grid andor to a nearby industry or used on-site realistic and credible alternatives should also be separately determined for bull Power generation in the absence of the project activity bull Heat generation in the absence of the project activityrdquo Under the scope of the project activity neither heat nor power generation takes place Hence the clause as mentioned above is not applicable to the project activity Thus alternatives M1 and M3 are further subjected for baseline consideration Alternative M2 is not considered as a plausible and realistic baseline scenario for the project activity Sub-step 1b Consistency with mandatory laws and regulations The MSW (Management and Handling) Rules 2000 notified by Ministry of Environment and Forests Government of India makes it mandatory for proper and scientific management of solid waste Under this rule land filling of the waste is not allowed but based on the studies10 and surveys carried out it was observed that the most common practice in India to dispose the solid waste is open dumping and land filling without any treatment and processing It is observed that these rules are not implementedenforced systematically thus leading to the most widespread practice of dumping waste in the country Conclusion Thus the alternatives M1 and M3 has been considered further Outcome of Sub-step 1b The two identified realistic and credible alternative scenario(s) to the project activity that are in compliance with mandatory legislation and regulations taking into account the enforcement in the country and EB decisions on national andor sectoral policies and regulations are as follows Alternative M1 The project activity carried out without the CDM and Alternative M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas (Continuation of the current practice of disposal in landfill) Step 2 Identify the fuel for the baseline choice of energy source taking into account the national andor sectoral policies as applicable Since there is no power generation or heat utilization in the project activity thus baseline does not involve use of fuel for energy Outcome of Sub-step 2 Alternatives M1 and M3 have been subjected for further consideration Step 3 Step 2 andor Step 3 of the latest approved version of the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo shall be used to assess which of these alternatives should be excluded from further consideration (eg alternatives facing prohibitive barriers or those clearly economically unattractive) The above analysis in Step 1 and Step 2 leaves with two alternatives M1 and M3

10 Present Scenario of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Dumping Grounds in India by Amiya Kumar Sahu National Solid Waste Association of India Mumbai

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 18 The further analysis has been discussed in detail in Section B5 below Step 4 Where more than one credible and plausible alternative remains project participants shall as a conservative assumption use the alternative baseline scenario that results in the lowest baseline emissions as the most likely baseline scenario The least emission alternative will be identified for each component of the baseline scenario In assessing these scenarios any regulatory or contractual requirements should be taken into consideration As demonstrated in Section B5 only one alternative remains after applying the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo to assess exclusion of the alternatives from further consideration Hence this step is not applicable as there is only one alternative available to the project activity As demonstrated in section B5 it is evident that after investment analysis only one alternative ie M3 remains as the most plausible option and hence this has been considered as the baseline to the project activity B5 Demonstration of additionality gtgt As per the approved methodology Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has identified the above mentioned realistic and credible alternative(s) (M1 and M3) that were available to them and that would provide output and services comparable to the project activity (refer section B4) These alternatives are in compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements The Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality stipulates that either Step 2 (Investment Analysis) or Step 3 (Barrier Analysis) or both can be selected to demonstrate additionality As the Project faces financial barriers for its implementation in the absence of CDM it is appropriate to choose Step 2 to demonstrate its additionality Step 2 Investment analysis The alternative considered for further analysis is alternative ldquoM3rdquo being the most commonly followed practice Sub-step 2a Determine appropriate analysis method Since the project generates incomes other than CDM related income for the purpose of investment analysis Option III (Benchmark Analysis) is chosen as it is deemed as the most appropriate analysis method where the returns on the investment in the project activity is compared to benchmark returns Sub-step 2b Option III Apply benchmark analysis The indicator used for carrying out the investment analysis is IRR that will determine the feasibility of the project activity This is compared with the Prime Lending Rate available at the time of investment decision For this purpose the PLR of Reserve Bank of India has been considered which is found to be 1200 as per Benchmark PLR of RBI during Aug-200911 Sub-step 2c Calculation and comparison of financial indicators The IRR for the proposed project activity without CDM revenue is computed for a period of 20 years lifetime A detailed investment analysis has been carried out and presented in the supported excel sheets The data and analysis is presented here The techno-economical parameters used for IRR calculation of the project activity is provided in the table below

11 httpwwwrbiorginscriptsWSSViewaspxId=14988

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 19

Parameters Unit Value Source

Capacity (MSW per day) MTs day 1300 As per DPR

Project Lifetime Years 25 yrs 0 months

As per specification provided by tech supplier

Cost of the project Buildings amp Civil works Rs in Lacs 3541056 As per DPR Plant and Machinery Rs in Lacs 1781286 As per DPR Interest payable during construction Rs in Lacs 15781 As per DPR Contingencies Rs in Lacs 10444 As per DPR Margin Money for working capital Rs in Lacs 12011 As per DPR Total cost Rs in Lacs 5704709 As per DPR

Financing pattern

Promoterrsquos Contribution through equity Rs in Lacs 8934 As per DPR Promoterrsquos contribution through loan Rs in Lacs 2700 As per DPR Subsidy under JNNURM Rs in Lacs 2111 As per RFP

Applicable Interest Rate on term loan Percent 1250 As per bank terms

Benchmark Prime Lending Rate (PLR) Percent 1200 httpwwwibaorginviewplraspmemcatid=1

Compost and RDF related costs

Recovery of compost from total MSW processed Percent 18

As per DPR

Recovery of RDF from total MSW processed Percent 12

Recovery of recyclable materials from total MSW processed Percent 2

Percentage of compost produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year

Percent 70

Percentage of RDF produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year Percent 70

Sale price of compost RsTon 2000 As per quote received from distributor Sale price of RDF RsTon 2000

Yearly increment in percentage of compost and RDF for sale in the market Percent 5 CPI(Consumer Price

Index) data Yearly escalation in sale price of compost and RDF Percent 5

Packaging cost of Compost Rs TON 150

As per quote received from distributor

Marketing cost of Compost Rs TON 100 Transportation cost of Compost Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of compost Rs TON 100 Packaging cost of RDF Rs TON 150

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 20 Marketing cost of RDF Rs TON 100 Transportation of RDF Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of RDF Rs TON 100

MSW Processing cost

Power consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 16539

As per DPR

Diesel consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 18720 Plant maintenance cost including that of vehicles

of capital cost for plant machineries 2

Use of senitiler ml MT of MSW processing 50

Use of bio-culture kg MT of MSW processing 10

Cost of senitiler use Rslitre 150

As per quote received Cost of bio-culture use Rskg 180 Cost of daily consumables (oil lubricants and cotton waste) Rs Lacsannum 26

Salary and wages of employees and staff Rs Lacsannum 373 As per DPR

Escalation rates

Escalation in maintenance cost Percent 400 CPI(Consumer Price Index) data Escalation in employee wages Percent 714

Escalation in fuel cost Percent 874 WPI(WholeSale Price Index) data Escalation in electricity cost Percent 874

Other commodities escalation Percent 583

Depreciation

St line Depn - Buildings Percent 334 As per companyrsquos law 1956 wwwfastfactscoinresourcesDepCoActrtf

- Plant amp Machinery Percent 113 IT Depreciation - Buildings Percent 10 - Plant amp Machinery Percent 15 Income Tax ndash MAT Percent 1133 Income Tax Act-

httpwwwindiainbusinessnicininvestmenttaxationhtm

Income Tax Percent 3399

Based on the above assumptions the results of the financial analysis have been provided below

Location Benchmark IRR (Without CDM) Lucknow MSW project 1200 686

As evident the IRR of the project activity is below the benchmark This clearly indicates that investment barrier exists in project activity implementation which is mitigated by the revenue derived from the carbon credits that the project activity would obtain due to Clean Development Mechanism The additionality of the project is thus evident Sub-step 2d Sensitivity analysis

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 21 The purpose of sensitivity analysis is to examine whether the conclusion regarding the financial viability of the proposed project is sound and tenable with those reasonable variations in the assumptions The investment analysis provides a valid argument in favor of additionality only if it consistently supports (for realistic range of assumptions) the conclusion that the project activity is unlikely to be the most financially attractive or is likely to be financially attractive Thus a sensitivity analysis was also applied to the IRR calculations to measure the impact positive or negative of changes in the indicated parameters The project proponent has chosen various factors as critical to the operation of the project in accordance with Guidance on the Assessment of Investment Analysis (Version- 031 paragraph- 17) which states that only variables including the initial investment cost that constitute more than 20 of either total project costs or total project revenues should be subjected to reasonable variation Hence the sensitivity is carried out by varying the parameters to 10 on either side to ascertain the impact on the profitability and hence the IRR of the project The results of the sensitivity analysis are as presented below

Sensitivity Parameter Variation and resultant IRR +10 0 -10

Quantity of waste processed 1325

686

-ve value OampM cost -ve value

(12 increase leads to an IRR

of -104 ) Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1688 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the OampM cost is not

expected to decrease in future

Organic Manure sales 1369 However 10 increase in sale price of organic

manures is a highly

unrealistic under the higly

stringent market scenario for

compost sale (explained in subsequent

paragraphs on barrier analysis)

-ve value -5 leads to a

decrease of IRR to -302

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

Cost of bioculture used -ve value 16 leads to a decrease of IRR

to 091 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1513 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the bioculture cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from

the WPI for all commodities as

published by

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 22

RBI Fuel and electricity cost -ve value

24 leads to a decrease of IRR

to -057 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1279 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the fuel and

electricity cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from the WPI for fuel

power and electricity as published by

RBI Project capital cost 570

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

818 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Packaging marketing and transportation expense

077 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1040 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Thus the sensitivity analysis for the project reveals that even with significant changes in various parameters the project IRR does not cross benchmark rates Therefore the project activity is clearly additional and is not a businessndashasndashusual scenario Step 3 Barrier Analysis The major barrier applicable to the alternative M1 is A) Technology Barrier B) Other Barrier and C) Investment Barrier Sub-step 3a Identify barriers that would prevent the implementation of the proposed CDM project Activity

A) Technological Barrier The plant would use state of the art technology in the process of waste handling and compost manufacturing EOT (Electric Overhead Transport) cranes would transfer the wastes from one processing station to the other Automation will be ensured wherever possible Hydraulic type press system would be installed for the RDF manufacturing Thus the plant would employ the latest technologies in the field of waste handling and management that involves a lot of technology transfer from international suppliers and exorbitant costs Also smooth operation of the plant would require proper training of the operating personnel on the equipments and hence regular capacity building training programs would have to be organized by the project proponent Another threat posed by the variation in feedstock quality is the content of highly abrasive and corrosive materials in it These cause rapid wear and corrosion of the process equipments Hence all MSW plants entail high cost of operation and maintenance due to frequent repairs breakdowns and shutdowns

B) Market barrier

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 23

Organic waste recycling is still neglected by private initiatives because of its low value and the lack of a market for compost Limited markets for compost sales and low prices for compost are a major challenge that all systems face12 The persisting skepticism among the farmers about the quality of composts poses a constant threat on the marketability of the composts Misconceptions like soil contamination due to use of composts are still borne in the minds of many Thus the emphasis on quality control of final products is of utmost importance Also increased awareness among the farmers on the benefits derived out of compost usage as value added substitutes to chemical fertilizers have to be encouraged through campaigns and other promotional activities

Also high cost of transportation sometimes makes it difficult to justify the use of composts when compared to the benefits derived out of it

C) Investment barrier The project proponent has demonstrated through investment analysis that without CDM revenue the project activity is not a financially attractive proposition At the inception the project had received refusal for loans from financial institutions for unimpressive returns envisaged from the project and the project proponent was suggested to estimate the returns along with additional revenue as may be associated with the project activity (for eg revenue from carbon credits) The project proponent had re-submitted their application for loan with the consideration of the CDM revenue and thereafter received the sanction

All these factors substantiate to prove that additional efforts are required for overcoming the market barrier for the compost produced in the plant In this context the additional incentive available to the plant through Clean Development Mechanism would be utilized for market development of the compost produced in the plant and also to partially compensate for the losses for not being able to sell compost in the market Thus the barriers as illustrated above pose a serious obstacle to the project activity and thus would lead to high operational uncertainties if not implemented as a CDM project activity Sub-step 3 b Shows that the identified barriers would not prevent a wide spread implementation of at least one of the alternatives (except the proposed project activity) As discussed above dumping of the solid waste in a landfill without gas capture (M3) is a common practice in India and none of the barriers discussed above would prevent it from occurring The barriers identified ie technological barrier and the market barrier does not in any way prevent the continuation of the baseline scenario Hence project activity satisfies the additionality criteria as per clause 3b) of the tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality Version 0600 Step 4 Common practice analysis According to the methodology AM0025 project proponents should ldquoprovide evidence of the early stage of development of the project activity and that it is not common practice in the country To this end they should provide an analysis of waste management practicesrdquo In order to justify the early development of the project activity the chronology for the same has been presented below as we proceed further As per the ldquoTool to for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo (Version 0600) similar type of project is defined as follows

12 httpwwwtngovincmaswm_in_indiapdf page 145

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 24 Sub-step 4b Discuss any similar Options that are occurring The above analysis demonstrates the similar activities occurring as the project activity But it can be seen that all the treatment facilities are composting facilities and none of the plants have RDF production facility Most of these composting facilities have applied for CDM benefits and those that have not are facing difficulties The project activity conforms to the measures of ldquoMethane formation avoidancerdquo as mentioned in paragraph 6 of the Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Hence analysis of the project activity as per paragraph 47 is illustrated as follows Step 1 Calculate applicable output range as +-50 of the design output or capacity of the proposed project activity The capacity of the project activity is 1300 TPD Hence considering an output range of +-50 the analysis would entail all projects of capacities between 1950 TPD and 650 TPD Therefore as per the table of cities as listed above the cities considered for present analysis would include the following

City Waste

Quantity (TPD)

Processing of Waste Disposal of waste CDM status Composting Pelletisation Uncontrolled

dumping Sanitary landfill

Earth cover

Bangalore 1669 300 Ahmedabad 1302 500 Pune 1175 500 Surat 1000

Kanpur 1100

Jaipur 904

Ludhiana 735 Agra 654 Step 2 In the applicable geographical area identify all plants that deliver the same output or capacity within the applicable output range calculated in Step 1 as the proposed project activity and have started commercial operation before the start date of the project Note their number Nall Registered CDM project activities and projects activities undergoing validation shall not be included in this step The applicable geographical area for the project activity would entail the entire host country ie India Of the selected cities as listed above the same output ie organic composts and RDF is produced by Bangalore and Pune However all the projects are under validation Hence as per the given definitions Nall for the present analysis of the project activity is equal to 0 since all the plants with similar output and within the applicable capacity range have considered CDM benefits associated to the projects Nall = 0 Step 3 Within plants identified in Step 2 identify those that apply technologies different than the technology applied in the proposed project activity Note their number Ndiff All the plants as included in Nall use the same technology for compost production and RDF manufacturing Hence under the scope of the present analysis Ndiff = 0

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 25 Step 4 Calculate factor F=1-NdiffNall representing the share of plants using technology similar to the technology used in the proposed project activity in all plants that deliver the same output or capacity as the proposed project activity Under the scope of the project activity the factor is calculated as follows F = 1-NdiffNall = 1 ndash 0= 1 Therefore under the scope of the project activity the factor F cannot be determined The proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled (a) the factor F is greater than 02 and (b) Nall-Ndiff is greater than 3 Since as per the above analysis F = 1 which is greater than 02 Nall - Ndiff = 0 which is less than 3 As per the methodology the proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled Thus since one of the criterions as imposed by the tool is not satisfied by the project activity hence it is prudent to conclude that the project activity is not a common practice and hence additional the analysis shows that the project activity is additional

Also as per the India Infrastructure Report 2006 the few aerobic compost plants that have been set up are typically functioning much below installed capacity and most are ldquofacing a problem of marketing the compost due to an ineffective marketing mechanismrdquo Thus it can be concluded that extremely few similar activities can be observed in India and when they are observed they face considerable barriers and have not had much success from an economic perspective The experience provided by these composting attempts only serves to reinforce the fact that implementing composting activities is financially unviable Therefore as demonstrated by the investment and barrier analyses in Steps 2 and 3 it is clear that the project is not financially viable without the revenue from CDM and there are significant barriers to its implementation In addition as detailed in Step 4 the proposed project is not common practice either and in the limited cases where aerobic composting is taking place it is proving to be a failure from an economic perspective It can therefore be concluded that the proposed project is additional and would not occur without CDM due to the financial and technological barriers in place Moreover the CDM registration of the Project will also serve as a model for other projects and promote the dissemination of sustainable waste management practices Serious consideration of CDM As per paragraph 2 of EB 62 Annex 13 ldquoGuidelines to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDM for project activities with a start date after 2nd August 2008 ldquothe project proponent must inform a Host Party designated national authority (DNA) and the UNFCCC secretariat in writing of the commencement of the project activity and of their intension to seek CDM status Such notification must be made within six months of the project activity start date and shall contain the precise geographical location and brief description of the proposed project activity using the standardized form F-CDM ndash Prior considerationrdquo As mentioned in the section C11 the start date for the project activity is 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 26 The project proponent had intimated the Host Party designated national authority (DNA) ie Ministry of environment and Forests (Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat about the project activity on 09102011 This intimation was made in the F-CDM-Prior consideration format as prescribed by UNFCCC Thus the intimation to Host party DNA and UNFCCC secretariat was made within six months from the project start date as this is in accordance to the ldquoGuideline to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo As per the ldquoGuidelines on the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo version 04 EB 62 Annex 13 serious consideration of CDM has been demonstrated below

Date Project Related Activity CDM Related Activity Evidence 14092009 Financial proposal from

Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd Copy of proposal

28102009 Revised financial proposal from Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of proposal

11112009 Letter of award for development of Integrated Solid waste management facilities for Lucknow Municipal Corporation UP

Copy of the letter of award

07092010 Receipt of certificate of incorporation for Ms JYOTI ENVIROTECH PRIVATE LIMITED

Copy of certificate

23102010 Concession agreement signed between Lucknow Municipal Corporation Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam and Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of the Agreement

07062011 Environmental Clearance received for development of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill and processing facility at Village-Shiveri

Copy of letter of Approval

21092011 Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd appointed CDM consultants for the project

Copy of work order placed on the CDM consultants

03102011 No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

Copy of no objection certificate

09102011 Project proponent submitted the Prior consideration of the CDM form to host party DNA (Ministry of Environment and Forests Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat

Copy of Prior consideration of the CDM form as submitted to MoEF GoI and UNFCCC

10102011 Purchase order raised for Plant Machinery

Copy of Purchase order

23032012 Stakeholder Consultation Meeting

Copy of the Minutes of Meeting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 27 B6 Emission reductions B61 Explanation of methodological choices gtgt Approved baseline and monitoring methodology AM0025- Avoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processes Version 13 has been used to calculate emission reductions from the project The estimation of project emission baseline emission and leakage emission are described below Project emissions The proposed project uses MSW processing (RDF and compost production processes) to treat the organic waste Therefore the project emissions in year y are calculated as follows PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy + PEay + PEgy+ PEry + PEiy + PEwy + PEco-firingy (1) Where PEy = Is the project emissions during the year y (tCO2e) PEelecy = Is the emissions from electricity consumption on-site due to the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) PEfuel on-sitey =Is the emissions on-site due to fuel consumption on-site in year y (tCO2e) PEcy =Is the emissions during the composting process in year y (tCO2e) PEay =Is the emissions from the anaerobic digestion process in year y (tCO2e) PEgy =Is the emissions from the gasification process in year y (tCO2e) PEry =Is the emissions from the combustion of RDFstabilized biomass in year y (tCO2e) PEiy =Is the emissions from waste incineration in year y (tCO2e) PEwy =Is the emissions from wastewater treatment in year y (tCO2e) PEco-firingy =Is the emissions from thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on site

fossil fuel consumption during co-firing in year y (tCO2e) The project activity involves composting and mechanical treatment to produce compost and RDF It involves the electricity consumption onsite and on-site fuel consumption Hence the equation applicable to the project activity is as follows Hence for the project activity PEay =0 as the project does not entail anaerobic digestion PEgy =0 as the project does not entail gasification PEry =0 as the project does not entail combustion of RDFstabilized PEiy =0 as the project does not entail waste incineration PEwy =0 as the project does not entail wastewater treatment PEco-firingy =0 as the project does not entail thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on

site fossil fuel consumption Therefore PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy (2) Emissions from electricity use on site (PEelecy) The project uses electricity from the NEWNE grid at processing plant at Lucknow The emissions from electricity use are therefore calculated as PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec (3)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 28 Where EGPJFFy = Is the amount of electricity generated in an on-site fossil fuel fired power plant or

consumed from the grid as a result of the project activity measured using an electricity meter (MWh)

CEFelec = Is the carbon emissions factor for electricity consumed in the project activity (tCO2eMWh)

Under the scope of the project activity electricity use on site would include the electricity consumption due to the plant equipments and machineries on site that are used to produce the composts the RDF Emissions from fuel use on-site (PEfuelon-sitey) Project participants shall account for CO2 emissions from any on-site fuel combustion (other than electricity generation eg vehicles used on-site heat generation for starting the gasifier auxiliary fossil fuels need to be added into incinerator heat generation for mechanicalthermal treatment process etc) Emissions are calculated from the quantity of fuel used and the specific CO2-emission factor of the fuel as follows PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel (4) Where PEfuel on-sitey = Is the CO2 emissions due to on-site fuel combustion in year y (tCO2) Fconsy = Is the fuel consumption on site in year y (l or kg) NCVfuel = Is the net caloric value of the fuel (MJl or MJkg) EFfuel = Is the CO2 emissions factor of the fuel (tCO2MJ) As per methodology project participants may use IPCC default values for the net calorific values and CO2 emission factors Under the scope of the project activity fuel use on-site would include consumption of diesel fuel by the vehicles (eg excavators earth movers etc) as may be engaged for the project activity on-site Further the project may also include Diesel Generator(s) placed on site to provide necessary power back-up in incidents of exigency Thus the diesel fuel consumed by the DG set would also be monitored and be counted in fuel use quantity on-site Hence for the project activity NCVfuel = NCVydiesel And EFfuel = EFdiesel Emissions from composting (PEcy) As per the methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 Annex 09 emission from composting PEcy = PEECy + PEFCy + PECH4y + PEN2Oy + PEROy (5) Where PEECy = Project emissions from electricity consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEelecy as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 29 PEFCy = Project emissions from fossil fuel consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEfuelon-sitey as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

PECH4y = Project emissions of methane from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEN2Oy = Project emissions of nitrous oxide from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEROy =Project emissions of methane from run-off wastewater associated with co-composting

in year y (tCO2eyr) The leachate generated in the project activity will be gainfully utilized in maintaining the moist environment of the bio degradable waste Hence the project activity would not entail any project emission from run-off wastewater PEROy= 0

Therefore PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy (6) Determination of project emissions of methane (PECH4y ) Project emissions of methane from composting (PECH4y) are determined as follows PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 (7) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFCH4y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tCH4 t) For the value of EFCH4y a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFCH4y = EFCH4default GWPCH4 = Global Warming Potential of CH4 (tCO2e tCH4 ) Determination of project emissions of nitrous oxide (PEN2Oy ) The N2O emissions from composting are calculated as follows PEN2Oy = Qy EFN2Oy GWPN2O (8) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFN20y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tN2O t) For the value of EFN2Oy a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFN20y = EFN20default GWPN20 = Global Warming Potential of N20 (tCO2e tN2O ) Baseline emissions To calculate the baseline emissions project participants shall use the following equation BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy (9)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 30 Where BEy = Is the baseline emissions in year y (tCO2e) MBy = Is the methane produced in the landfill in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) MDregy = Is methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) BEENy = Baseline emissions from generation of energy displaced by the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) Since the project activity does not entail generation of energy hence BEENy= 0

Methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity (MDregy) The methodology states that In cases where regulatory or contractual requirements do not specify MDregy an Adjustment Factor (AF) shall be used and justified taking into account the project context In doing so the project participant should take into account that some of the methane generated by the landfill may be captured and destroyed to comply with other relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odour concerns MDregy = MBy AF Where AF = Is Adjustment Factor for MBy () The parameter AF shall be estimated as follows In cases where a specific system for collection and destruction of methane is mandated by regulatory or contractual requirements the ratio between the destruction efficiency of that system and the destruction efficiency of the system used in the project activity shall be used In the host country India there is no regulation for capture and destruction of methane generated by the landfill Hence the adjustment factor the project activity is 0 as per the present scenario ie AF = 0 Therefore MDregy = 0 However in due course of time the value of AF may undergo changes as per the governmental regulations imposed in the host country (India) with respect to MSW management Rate of compliance In cases where there are regulations that mandate the use of one of the project activity treatment options and which is not being enforced the baseline scenario is identified as a gradual improvement of waste management practices to the acceptable technical options expected over a period of time to comply with the MSW Management Rules The adjusted baseline emissions (BEya) are calculated as follows BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) (10) Where BEy = Is the CO2-equivalent emissions as determined from equation 14 RATECompliance

y = Is the state-level compliance rate of the MSW Management Rules in that year y The compliance rate shall be lower than 50 if it exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 31 The compliance ratio RATECompliance

y shall be monitored ex post based on the official reports for instance annual reports provided by municipal bodies For details on the consideration the value of RATECompliance

y for the purpose of ex ante calculation refer to annexure 1 Methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity (MBy) The amount of methane that is generated each year (MBy) is calculated as per the latest version of the approved methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo (Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46) Considering the following additional equation MBy = BECH4SWDSy Where BECH4SWDSy = Is the methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity at

year y that is methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the solid waste disposal site during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e) as calculated using Application B in the methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo The tool estimates methane generation adjusted for using adjustment factor (fy) any landfill gas in the baseline that would have been captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odor concerns As this is already accounted for in this methodology ldquofyrdquo in the tool shall be assigned a value 0

The amount of methane that is generated each year (BECH4SWDSy tCO2e) is calculated for each year with the recommended multi-phase model the First Order Decay (FOD) model The amount of methane produced in the year y is calculated as follows

(11) Where BECH4SWDSy = Methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the

solid waste disposal site (SWDS) during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e)

φ = Model correction factor to account for model uncertainties f = Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used in another

manner Since no such practice exists in the host country India hence for the project activity the value for ldquofrdquo has been considered 0

GWPCH4 =Global Warming Potential (GWP) of methane valid for the relevant commitment period OX =Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste) F =Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCf =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that can decompose For the

project activity the default value has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore DOCf = DOCf Default

MCF =Methane correction factor For the project activity the value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore MCFy = 08

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 32 Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) DOCj =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j kj =Decay rate for the waste type j j =Waste type category (index) x =Year during the crediting period x runs from the first year of the project activity

(x = 1) to the year y for which avoided emissions are calculated (x = y) y =Year for which methane emissions are calculated Where different waste types j are prevented from disposal the amount of different waste types (Wjx) is determined through sampling and the mean is calculated from the samples as follows Since the project activity corresponds to Application B as stated in the tool hence the values of few parameters have been adopted as explained in table 1 of the tool Determining the amounts of waste types j disposed in the SWDS (Wjx) Wjx = Wx pjx (12) Where Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) Wx =Total amount of waste prevented from from disposal in the SWDS in year x (t) pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from the

first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) The fraction of the waste type j in the waste for the year x or month i are calculated according to equations (7) and (8) as follows

(13)

Where pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) pnjx = Fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the year x (weight

fraction) zx = Number of samples collected during the year x n = Samples collected in year x j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from

the first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) Determining the fraction of DOC that decomposes in the SWDS (DOCfy) In the case that the tool is applied to MSW then project participants may choose to either apply a default value (DOCfy = DOCfdefault) or to determine DOCfy or DOCfm based on measurements of the biochemical methane potential of the MSW (BMPMSW) as follows

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 33

(14) Where DOCfy = Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that decomposes under the

specific conditions occurring in the SWDS for year y (weight fraction) BMPj = Biochemical methane potential for the MSW disposed or prevented from disposal

(t CH4 t waste) F = Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCj = Fraction of degradable organic carbon in the waste type j (weight fraction) pjy = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year y (weight fraction) pjm = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in month m (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste in the MSW y = Year of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated (y is a

consecutive period of 12 months) m = Month of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated Leakage The sources of leakage considered in the methodology are CO2 emissions from off-site transportation of waste materials in addition to CH4 and N2O emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digestion gasification processes and processingcombustion of RDF Leakage emissions should be estimated from the following equation Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy (15) Where Lty =Is the leakage emissions from increased transport in year y (tCO2e) Lry =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digester the

gasifier the processingcombustion of RDFstabilized biomass or compost in case it is disposed of in landfills in year y (tCO2e)

Liy =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from MSW incinerator in year y (tCO2e)

Lsy =Is the leakage emissions from end use of stabilized biomass (tCO2e) LCOMPy =Leakage emissions associated with composting in year y (t CO2e yr) Since the project activity does not include the use of MSW incinerator Lsy = 0 The project activity does not involve the disposal of residual waste from processing of RDF or compost in landfill Also for ex-ante estimations the residual waste is taken as 100 inerts Hence Lry =0 The produced compost and RDF will be sold in the market Also for ex-ante estimations for this project activity the weight of stabilized biomass sold offsite for which no sale invoices can be provided is considered as zero Hence Lsy =0 Emissions from Transportation (Lt y)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 34 This would occur when the waste is transported from waste collecting points in the collection area to the treatment facility instead of the existing landfills In this case project participants shall document the following data in the CDM-PDD an overview of collection points from where the waste will be collected their approximate distance (in km) to the treatment facility existing landfills and their approximate distance (in km) to the nearest end-user The emissions are calculated (As per AM0025) from the quantity of fuel (diesel) used and the specific CO2 emission factor of the fuel (diesel) for vehicles

(16) Where NOvehiclesiy =Is the number of vehicles for transport with similar loading capacity DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) NCVfuel =Is the Calorific value of the fuel (MJKg or TJGg) Dfuel =Is the fuel density (kgl) if necessary EFfuel =Is the Emission factor of the fuel (tCO2eMJ) For estimation of NOvehiclesiy the following equation has been used for ex-ante calculation NOvehiclesiy = QyCTy (17) Where Qy = Is the quantity of waste composted in the year ldquoyrdquo (tonnes) CTy = Is the average truck capacity for waste transportation (tonnestruck) Ltywaste is the emissions due to increased transportation from the waste collecting point to the waste treatment facility In this the incremental distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline is equalt to 0 Therefore Ltywaste = 0 For calculation of emissions from transport of compost to the users (Ltycompost) the same formula applies Qy is replaced by Mcompost where Mcompost is the total quantity of compost produced in year y Similarly for calculation of emissions from transport of RDF (LtyRDF) Qy is replaced by MRDF where MRDF is the total quantity of RDF produced in year y Thus Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF (18) Calculation of emission reductions To calculate the emission reductions the following equation has been applied ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly (19) Where ERy = Is the emissions reductions in year y (t CO2e) BEy = Is the emissions in the baseline scenario in year y (tCO2e) PEy = Is the emissions in the project scenario in year y (tCO2e) Ly = Is the leakage in year y (tCO2e)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 35 B62 Data and parameters fixed ex ante (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

Data Parameter AF

Unit

Description Methane destroyed due to regulatory or other requirements

Source of data Local andor national authorities

Value(s) applied 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per the approved methodology AM0025 Version 13 AF shall be assigned a value taking into account the amount of methane generated by the landfills that may be captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations and contractual requirements of the host country Since there exists no regulations or contractual requirement to capture and destroy the methane generated from the landfills in India hence AF has been fixed ex-ante and assigned a value of 0

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

Data Parameter φ Unit Unitless

Description Default value model corrections factor to account for model uncertainties

Source of data Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Value(s) applied 085

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per Table 3 the project activity conforms to HumidWet conditions in Application B Accordingly the default value for φ has been taken from table 3 This is in the absence of monitored data for φ as per Option 2 in the tool for determination of model correction factor

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 36

Data Parameter F

Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction)

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Upon biodegradation organic material is converted to a mixture of

methane and carbon dioxide

Data Parameter OX Unit Unitless

Description Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste)

Source of data Based on an extensive review of published literature on this subject including the IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 01

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment When methane passes through the top-layer part of it is oxidized by

methanotrophic bacteria to produce CO2 The oxidation factor represents the proportion of methane that is oxidized to CO2 This should be distinguished from the methane correction factor (MCF) which is to account for the situation that ambient air might intrude into the SWDS and prevent methane from being formed in the upper layer of SWDS

Data Parameter DOCfDefault

Unit Unitless

Description Default value for the fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) in MSW that decomposes in the SWDS

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 37

Data Parameter MCFy Unit Unitless

Description Methane correction factor

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 08

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46 This comprises all SWDS not meeting the criteria of managed SWDS and which have depths of greater than or equal to 5 meters

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment MCF accounts for the fact that unmanaged SWDS produce less methane

from a given amount of waste than managed SWDS because a larger fraction of waste decomposes aerobically in the top layers of unmanaged SWDS The baseline dumping sites have been found to be greater than 5 meters

Data Parameter DOCj Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Tables 24 and 25)

Value(s) applied

Waste type j DOCj ( wet waste)

Wood and wood products 43 Pulp paper and cardboard

(other than sludge) 40

Food food waste beverages and tobacco (other than sludge) 15

Textiles 24 Garden yard and park waste 20

Glass plastic metal other inert waste 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default values adopted from table 4 as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 38

Data Parameter kj

Unit Unitless

Description Decay rate for the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Table 33)

Value(s) applied Default values adopted from table 5 for Wet Type waste in tropical (Matgt20ordmC) conditions as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Waste type j kj

Slowly degrading

Pulp paper cardboard (other than sludge) textiles

0045

Wood wood products and straw 0025

Rapidly degrading Food food waste sewage sludge beverages and tobacco 0085

Moderately degrading Other (non-food) organic putrescible garden and park waste 0065

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

The annual temperature limits of Lucknow has been adopted from httpwwwnihernetinrbisindia_informationannual20temperaturehtm The average annual temp of Lucknow is thus estimated to be 2582ordmC Thus Lucknow is considered to be in the tropical zone with MAT gt 20ordmC And hence the default value has been obtained as per Table 5

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CEFelec Unit t CO2MWh Description Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid Source of data CEA CO2 Baseline Database Version 70 Jan 2012 (wwwceanicin) Value(s) applied 09216 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

This data is taken from publicly available CEA CO2 baseline database version 7 dated March 2012 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment This value is fixed for the entire crediting period

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 39

Data Parameter EFCH4Default Unit t CH4 t Description Default emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted (wet

basis) Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of

emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 0002 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFN2ODefault Unit t N20 t

Description Default emission factor of nitrous oxide per tonne of waste composted (wet basis)

Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 00002

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 40

Data Parameter NCVydiesel

Unit TJ Gg

Description Net calorific value of diesel consumed for power generation at the MSW processing unit

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Volume 2 Table 12 p118

Value(s) applied 43

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFdiesel Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 741

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter GWPCH4

Unit tCO2 tCH4

Description Global warming potential of CH4

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 21 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 41

Data Parameter GWPN20

Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 310 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter Ddiesel

Unit KgL

Description Density of fuel

Source of data Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) India

Value(s) applied 087

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data BEE value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission Additional comment

B63 Ex ante calculation of emission reductions gtgt For the purpose of ex-ante calculation of emission reduction the following assumptions have been taken into consideration Total quantity of MSW available (tonnesday) 1300 Annual Number of operating days 330 Percentage of organic content in the MSW 47 Rate of compliance 10 Total quantity of biodegradable wastes to be processed 201630 TPD (Calculated) Amount of electricity consumed per day due to the project 1550 kWh Specific gravity of diesel 087 kglitre Calculation of Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid (CEFelec) As the project activity utilises electricity from the NEWNE Grid the project uses the approach (a)

combined margin emission factor for the NEWNE grid following seven steps of ldquoTool to calculate the

emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) and using publicly available data of

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 42 ldquoCentral Electrical Authorityrdquo (the most recent version ldquoCO2 Baseline Database Version 70rdquo13 available

at the time of submission of the CDM PDD to the DOE for Global Stakeholders Consultation) As per the

stepwise approach to calculate the emission factor of an electricity system the EFy is being calculated as

follows

Step 1 Identify the relevant electricity system

As per the CEA CO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 combined emission factor is given

for northern eastern western and north-eastern girds taken together Therefore this combined emission

factor will be used for the NEWNE grid to evaluate the emission reductions

Step 2 Choose whether to include off-grid power plants in the project electricity system (optional)

As per the tool Option I is selected for the project activity as only grid connected power plants are

included in the calculation

Step 3 STEP3 Select a method to determine Operating Margin (OM)

The project proponent has chosen to adopt option a) of step 3 ie consideration of Simple Operating

Margin for the project As per the tool The simple OM method (Option a) can only be used if low-

costmust-run resources2 constitute less than 50 of total grid generation in 1) average of the five most

recent years or 2) based on long-term averages for hydroelectricity production

Referring the relevant data from the CEACO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 the below

table is drawn for the share of net generation by the must-run hydronuclear plants for the past 5 years

Region 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Average NEWNE 1850 1900 1740 1590 1760 177

Since the average is 177 and is below the threshold of 50 as prescribed in the tool hence Simple OM

method is applicable for the project activity

Step 4 Calculate the operating margin emission factor according to the selected method

Simple OM The Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2

Operating Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid The following information has been used for the

calculation of baseline emissions

Simple Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridOMy) (incl Imports) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference

13 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 43 Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2008-09 tCO2MWh 101 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10 tCO2MWh 098

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2010-11 tCO2MWh 097

3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor

tCO2MWh 09843 Calculated based on the most recent data available at the time of submission of the CDM-PDD to the DOE for validation

Note 3 year generation weighted average of Operating margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) STEP 5 Calculate the build margin (BM) emission factor Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2 Build Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid for the year 2010-2011 Build Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridBMy) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference Build Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10

tCO2MWh 0859 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Step 6 Calculate the combined margin emissions factor The Project proponent has opted for Option A ie estimation of Combined Margin by weighted average nethod EFy = wOM EFgridOMy + wBM EFgridBMy Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy) 3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (NEWNE grid) EFgridOMy

tCO2MWh 09843 Refer the above table

Build Margin (NEWNE grid) EFgridBMy

tCO2MWh 0859 Refer the above table

Weighting of operating margin emissions factor wOM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Weighting of build margin emissions factor wBM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy)

tCO2MWh 09216 Calculated

Note Combined margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) Hence CEFelec is calcualted to be 09216 for the Project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 44 Calculation of Project Emission As per equation 3) PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec = (1550 3301000) 09216 = 471 tCO2e Considering diesel consumption per day due to the project activity100 Litre Fconsy = 100 3300871000 = 29 tonnes As per equation 4) PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel = 29 43 741 = 91 tCO2e Considering composition of organic waste as follows Cloth 5 Garden Yard waste 30 Food Waste 55 Paper 10 Thus waste type category (j) = 4 Therefore Quantity of cloth waste = 1300 330 47 5 = 10082 tonnesannum Quantity of garden waste = 1300 330 47 30 = 60489 tonnesannum Quantity of food waste = 1300 330 47 55 = 110897 tonnesannum Quantity of paper waste = 1300 330 47 10 = 20163 tonnesannum Therefore total waste quantity = (10082 + 60489 + 110897 + 20163) = 201630 tonnesannum Therefore amount of waste composted is Qy = (50 of 201630) = 100815 tonnesannum (This is with the consideration of equal distribution of the total biodegradable waste for RDF production and for composting The parameter Qy will be monitored ex-post) As per equation 7) project emission of methane has been calculated as PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 = 100815 0002 21 = 4234 tCO2e As per equation 8) project emission of methane has been calculated as PEN20y = Qy EFN20y GWPN20 = 100815 00002 310 = 6251 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 6) emission from composting has been calculated as PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy = 3243 + 4788 = 10485 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 2) project emission has been calculated as PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy = (471 + 91 + 10485) tCO2e = 11048 tCO2e Calculation of Baseline Emission As per equation 11) methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity is calculated as

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 45 = 085(1-0)21(1-01)1612050508[10082024e-07(1)(1- e-07)] + [6048902e-017(1)(1- e-

017)]+ [110897015e-04(1)(1- e-04)] + [201630 4e-007(1)(1- e-007)] = 34633 tCO2e Considering a compliance rate of 4514 ie RATECompliance

y = 0045 Therefore as per equation 10) Adjusted baseline emission has been calculated as BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) = 38481 (1 ndash 0045) = 17316 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 9) Baseline emission has been calculated as BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy = (34633 ndash 0) + 0 = 33058 tCO2e Calculation of Leakage Emission As per equation 16)

Where DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) For ex-ante estimation this has been considered to be 200 Kms for both compost and RDF

VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) For ex-ante estimation the same has been assumed to be 02 lkm

Now as per equation 17) NOvehiclesiy is given by QyCTy For ex-ante estimation CTy has been considered to be 10 Tons Ltycompost = (18 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 856 tCO2e LtyRDF = (12 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 571 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 18) emission from transportation has been calculated as Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF = (856 + 571) = 1427 tCO2e As per equation 15) leakage emission has been calculated as Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy = 1427 + 0 + 0 + 0 +0 = 1427 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 19) emission reduction has been calculated as ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly = (33058 ndash 11048 ndash 1427) = 20584 tCO2e Emission reduction for all other years in the crediting period has been calculated in a similar manner 14 For details on the value considered refer to Annexure 1 below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 46 B64 Summary of ex ante estimates of emission reductions

Year Baseline

emissions (t CO2e)

Project emissions (t CO2e)

Leakage (t CO2e)

Emission reductions (t CO2e)

2012-2013 33058 11048 1427 20584 2013-2014 57319 11048 1427 44844 2014-2015 75420 11048 1427 62945 2015-2016 89168 11048 1427 76694 2016-2017 99805 11048 1427 87330 2017-2018 108188 11048 1427 95714 2018-2019 114916 11048 1427 102441 2019-2020 120408 11048 1427 107934 2020-2021 124963 11048 1427 112489 2021-2022 128795 11048 1427 116320

Total 952041 110476 14270 827294 Total number of crediting years 10

Annual average over the crediting period

95204 11408 1427 82729

B7 Monitoring plan B71 Data and parameters to be monitored (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 47

Data Parameter Mcompost Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 77220 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of compost produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of compost produced will be cross checked with the sale of

compost Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter M RDF Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 51480 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of RDF produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of RDF produced will be cross checked with the sale of RDF Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 48

Data Parameter Pnjx

Unit - Description Weight fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the

year x Source of data Sample analysis of the MSW by project participant Value(s) applied

SL No Waste type Composition

1 Cloth 5 2 Garden yard waste 30 3 Food Waste 55 4 Paper 10

Source These values are as mentioned in the DPR

Measurement methods and procedures

Sampling method will be selected in order to determine a constant weight fraction of the waste type treated As per the tool the size and frequency of sampling should be statistically with a maximum uncertainty range of 20 at 95 confidence level Since the number of operating days is 330 it is ensured that the waste will be delivered for all the 330 days and hence will be monitored daily Sampling will be done on a monthly basis

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures The sampling of the raw wastes will be done by a laboratory in the project

site The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months

Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter RATECompliancey

Unit Description Rate of compliance Source of data Reports published by Municipal bodies (Central Pollution Control Board

(CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority) Analysis for computation of value for RATECompliance

y has been presented in Annexure 1 provided in the last section of the document

Value(s) applied 45 Measurement methods and procedures

The ex-ante value has been taken as 45 For ex-post calculation of emission reductions compliance rates would be taken from the reports published by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per AM0025 Version 12 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 49

Data Parameter z Unit - Description Number of samples collected during the year x Source of data Lab Records Value(s) applied 12 per year Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter f Unit - Description Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used

in another manner Source of data Plant Log Book- Written information from the operator of the solid waste

disposal site Value(s) applied 0 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- - Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per the methodological tool to determine ldquoEmissions

avoided from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment At present there is no provision for capturing flaring or combusting the

methane emissions at the SWDS This justifies the choice of the data value Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years in both electronic and paper formats

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 50

Data Parameter EG PJFFy Unit MWhyr Description Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the project

activity Source of data Electricity meter reading from electricity meter bill Value(s) applied 512 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the energy meter is 05 Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Monthly QAQC procedures Electricity meter will be subject to regular (in accordance with stipulation

of the meter supplier) maintenance and testing to ensure accuracy Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Fconsy Unit litre Description Fuel (diesel) consumption on-site during year lsquoyrsquo of the crediting period Source of data Purchase invoices Value(s) applied 100 litresday Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 51

Data Parameter DT i compost y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for compost transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap Assumption to be approved by DOE

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Qy Unit Tonnesyr Description Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 100815 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of waste composted will be measured with belt scales installed in the conveyer belt coming out of the pre-sorting area Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Once in three yearsfrom NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the belt scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures The belt scales will be calibrated as per standards provided by the

manufacturer Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 52

Data Parameter DT i RDF y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for RDF transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CTt y Unit Tonnestruck Description Carrying capacity of each truck delivering waste to the composting

installation in year y Source of data The maximum carrying capacity as stated on the truckrsquos nameplate is

registered by personnel at the entrance gate of the composting installation Value(s) applied 10 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be monitored by the challan received from the transport contractors post the loading of the vehicle Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- - Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 5 kgs Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Every vehicle QAQC procedures Weighbridge or any other applicable weighing device is subject to periodic

calibration (in accordance with stipulation of the weighing device supplier)

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 53

Data Parameter VFcons Unit litre km Description Average fuel consumption per kilometre of vehicles for compost

transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 5 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- Transporterrsquos challan Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency-

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures Transporterrsquos challan is a third-party document Hence QAQC procedures

are not required Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

B72 Sampling plan gtgt The project proponent has proposed a sampling plan in accordance with ldquoStandard for sampling and surveys for CDM project activities and programme of activitiesrdquo Version 020 ( EB 65 Annex 2) Sampling will be done to determine weight fraction of the waste type treated Sampling procedures will be followed in-line with the sectoral best practices and as per the guidelines laid out Section 33 Chapter 3 of the Manual on Solid Waste Management as published by the Ministry of Urban Development for public information15 Therefore on each sample collection day about 100 Kg of incoming MSW will be withdrawn randomly from four incoming trucks entering the project site About 10 Kg of MSW each will be collected from ten randomly selected points from outside and inside of the solid waste heap so piled The total quantity of waste so collected (approx 100 Kg) will then be thoroughly mixed and then reduced by quartering till a sample of such a size was obtained which could be handled by the laboratory Thus each master sample of approximately 25 Kg will be sent to the accredited laboratory for composition analysis Sampling will be done once in a month in in-house laboratory The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months B73 Other elements of monitoring plan gtgt Monitoring refers to the collection and archiving of all relevant data necessary for determining the baseline measuring anthropogenic emissions by sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) within the project boundary of a CDM project activity and leakage as applicable The project activity is a GHG avoidance project where the waste materials (ie municipal solid wastes) collected will be treated aerobically to produce compost and mechanically to produce RDF and will be sold in an open market The financial performance of the project activity depends significantly on the CDM revenue to be availed through sale of Certified Emission Reduction (CER) units accrued from the project activity This will require monitoring of all the relevant GHG performance parameters Therefore

15 httpurbanindianicinpublicinfoswmchap3pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 54 the project proponent has developed a monitoring protocol which will be followed throughout the proposed crediting period in order to ensure proper operation of the project activity resulting in generation of carbon credits The same is explained below Monitoring Plan Monitoring the projectrsquos performance in terms of ERs achievement requires the fulfillment of operational data collection and processing obligations from the operator The operator of compost plant has the primary obligation to collect data that would facilitate the calculation of the project ERs The data shall be collected by the operator based on the most recent available information as per the Procedures presented in this PDD In addition roles and responsibilities of monitoring personnel would be well defined

10 Objective of monitoring plan sect To ensure smooth uninterrupted operation of the project activity and hence generation of carbon

credits sect To ensure proper monitoring reporting and verification of all the parameters required to evaluate

the GHG performance of the project activity sect To identify flaws in the monitoring system and open up opportunities for further improvement

20 Roles and Responsibilities

The project proponent has developed a team who will be involved in monitoring reporting and verification of all the GHG performance related parameters The following schematic diagram will explain the individual roles and responsibilities of all the members of the team

Team Responsibility

Shift Operator Monitoring and reporting the GHG performance related parameters following the guidance provided in the Project Design Document

Shift In-charge

- Reviewing the GHG performance related parameters as recorded by the Shift Operator in every shift - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the reported parameters - Preparation of daily and monthly reports

Plant Manager

- Reviewing the daily and monthly reports in consultation with the Shift In-charge - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the daily and monthly reports - Ensuring calibration of the monitoring equipments as and when required

Management Representative(s)-

Production Department

- Reviewing the monthly and annual production statistics - Evaluating the GHG performance of the project activity - Identify opportunities for further improvement

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 55 SECTION C Duration and crediting period C1 Duration of project activity C11 Start date of project activity gtgt 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity C12 Expected operational lifetime of project activity gtgt 25 years 0 months C2 Crediting period of project activity C21 Type of crediting period gtgt The project proponent has opted for a fixed crediting period C22 Start date of crediting period gtgt 01092012 or date of registration of the project activity with UNFCCC whichever is later C23 Length of crediting period 10 years 0 months

SECTION D Environmental impacts D1 Analysis of environmental impacts gtgt In the applicable EIA notification ie SO 3067(E)16 dated 01122009 Ministry of Environment amp Forests (MoEF) Govt of India the Municipal Solid Waste projects are not included in the list of projects that has to get Prior Environmental Clearance (EC) either from State or Central Govt authorities and hence no EIA study was conducted The project does not fall under the purview of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) notification of the Ministry of Environment and Forest Government of India However due weightage has been given to environmental aspects D2 Environmental impact assessment gtgt The environmental impacts of the project activity are not considered to be significant by the project participant or the host party The project activity would help in avoidance of emissions caused due to the combustion of fossil fuels such as SOx NOx and particulate matter

SECTION E Local stakeholder consultation E1 Solicitation of comments from local stakeholders gtgt Stakeholder meeting was convened by Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd at the plant site at Shiveri Lucknow on 23032012 to explain the salient details of the Project its benefits to the society and villagers Prior to the meeting individual invitation letters were sent to each of the identified stakeholder on 15032012 to obtain their consensus for attending the meeting The objective of the meeting was to conduct open discussion where stakeholders are encouraged to raise questions express their concern and

16 httpmoefnicindownloadsrules-and-regulations3067pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 56 comments about the proposed project through a participatory process and to list down any probable concern of stakeholders The various stakeholders present in the meeting were the local inhabitants employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd representatives from equipment supplier Eco Trademart Pvt Ltd representatives of Lucknow Development Agency and local NGO representatives The MD of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd then briefed them about the project activity as per the following schedule

bull Project Background and information about the company bull Technology Involved in the project activity bull Benefits and impacts of the project activity bull Process of Clean Development Mechanism

Later half of the meeting a dedicated session was allotted for question and answer session and comments from the stakeholders were invited E2 Summary of comments received gtgt Meeting was very interactive and got very encouraging response from stakeholders The local villagers and the office bearers expressed their happiness with the setting up of an environment friendly project in their village as it had resulted in generation of employment opportunities both for literate and illiterate people Development of infrastructure in the locality was highly appreciated Few of prominent attendees are as follows S No Name Age Sex

(MF) Occupation Village

1 MrDunna 65 M Gram Pradhan Shiveri

2 SdBalbir Singh Maan 26 M Secretary

NGO - Umeed Chowk

3 Abhishek Singh 36 M

Equipments Supplier ndash Eco Trademart Pvt

Ltd

Dubagga

4 MrPCMehrotra 72 M

Retired Chief EngineerLDALu

cknow Aliganj

The meeting also included employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd The project received unanimous acknowledgement and appreciation from all the attendees at the meeting The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech in their attempt to combat global warming and simultaneously improve the local hygiene and modernize municipal solid waste management of Lucknow has been applauded by all

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 57 E3 Report on consideration of comments received gtgt The project has received positive amp encouraging feedback from the stakeholders concerned All the stakeholders have appreciated and encouraged the project proponent for taking up this project activity In view of various direct and indirect benefits (social economical and environmental) all the stakeholders have supported the project activity The documents supporting the stakeholder consultation will be submitted to the DOE Examples of few questions as raised by the stakeholders and their respective clarifications as provided by the project proponent have been detailed below 1What is CER CERs or Certified Emission Reductions are a ldquocertificaterdquo just like a stock A CER is given by the CDM Executive Board to projects in developing countries to certify they have reduced greeen house gas emissions by one tonne of carbon dioxide per year 2-What is Global Warming Potential Ans Green house gases affect global warming with varying intensities This intensity is measured by the ldquoglobal warming potentialrdquo of the gas 3- Is there any negative impact on surrounding area Ans There is no negative impact on surrounding area 4-What are carbon credits How these will obtained Who will by them Ans Carbon credits are generated in the developing countries by reducing the greenhouse gases emission in the atmosphere One tonne of carbon dioxide saved is equal to one carbon credit All steps of CDM cycle was explained and the process of Credits monetization 5-How does CDM benefit society Ans CDM is clean development mechanism a tool to provide incentives to mitigate the emission of greenhouse gases which are enhancing the climate change The purpose of this programme is to reduce emission of GHGs as well as promote sustainable development in host country Therefore developing country like India will gain financial and environmental benefits by reducing the emission of ever increasing GHGs to save the earth 6Would the project provide employment opportunities and or improve economic development of area There would be generation of employment through this project activity At the same point of time there would be regular trainings that would be imparted to the local population 7 How this project will help to address the issues raised by the local villagers The project will help the stake holders in the following ways A Create jobs for the local masses B Create business opportunities for the contractors C Increase awareness of the people regarding the local and global environment D Help to conserve depleting resources of fossil fuel such as coal It was also mentioned in the meeting that 2 of the CER revenue earned from the project would be utilized in developmental works of the local community There would be a robust monitoring plan for the same and the plant manager Mr Sachin Mehta was appointed as the local contact person for the same

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 58 The project received unanimous appreciation from the stakeholders present The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd towards mitigation of global warming was applauded by all

SECTION F Approval and authorization gtgt The project has received the following approvalsclearances

1) No objection certificate from Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board Lucknow 2) Environmental clearance certificate from the State Level Environment Impact Assessment

Authority Uttar Pradesh 3) No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

The project has applied for Host Country Approval and will be provided to the DOE during the course of project validation

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 59 Appendix A 1 The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has committed to share 2 (mention

approximate amount in INR per year) of its Certified Emission Reduction (CERs) in connection with hisher CDM project based on the issuance and transaction of the CERs

2 The committed amount of money will be utilized for addressing the identified issues in the following villages Identified Villages Total Population Key issues for development Shiveri 1200 approx The project is located in a rural area and the economy

of the area where the project activity is located is heavily dependent on agriculture and other farm based livelihoods The process of stakeholder engagement undertaken as a part of social impact assessment came across community needs and expectations from the project The process of need assessment conducted recently and prioritization undertaken as part of an exercise to seek participation in the preparation of the community development plan and livelihood restoration plan came across the following community needs

bull Skill trainingup-gradation institute for youth and creation of employment opportunities

bull Education support to children for secondary and higher secondary education

bull Drinking water bull Strengthening health infrastructure bull Developing land resources

Enhancing agriculture productivity and market linkages

Pankhera 800 approx

3 Accordingly the project proponent has identified the activities support for the following villages

S No Village Name ActivitiesSupport proposed over the project life time

Approximate amount in INR

1 Shiveri Skill training and Capacity Building Initiative

a Objective To build skill sets of the youth in the community in order to realize the potential employment opportunities arising due to the project and also enhance employment options elsewhere

b Target Beneficiaries Youth especially belonging to the families of the nearby villagers and those belonging to the economically and socially vulnerable

It will be difficult to confirm the exact allocation of funds for individual activities and for individual villages now as the expenditure would depend upon the social needs of the identified stakeholders much nearer to the Commercial Operation Date

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 60

communities

c Proposed Activities

i) Self help group for the women will be formed and will be imparted skill development training for initiating some income generation activities One group will be formed in each target village

ii) Imparting of training to youths on various skills having potential for starting self employment program or to enable them to get wage employment

2 Health Intervention a Objective Improved health care access and

delivery systems and reduction in incidence of diseases and improved health behavior of the community

b c Target Beneficiaries General community

with focus on elderly women children and economically weaker section

d e Proposed Activities i)To organize health awareness among

community members especially women on various facets of reproductive and child health hygiene sanitation etc

ii) To organize general health camps in the target villages

iii) To establish network with Government health functionaries in strengthening the intervention in the target villages

To conduct the school health camps and also health education programs

3 Agriculture Natural Resource Management and Allied Activities

a Objective To work toward improving the agriculture and allied activities in the target area

b c Target beneficiaries Land owners

economically backward and marginal farmers

d Description of proposed activities i) To organize training programme for

(COD) of the Project The Project Proponent will allocate funds for each identified activity and for each village during each crediting period accordingly

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 61

farmers on latest agriculture methods and technologies

ii) To organize exposure visits for the farmers to Agriculture universities kisan melas and other modern agriculture farms

iii) To organize training programme on animal husbandry

iv) To organize cattle health camp v)To get the existing water bodies repaired

to increase the availability of water and also to increase the ground water recharge

4 Education a Objective To strengthen the education

infrastructure at village level to improve access and quality of existing education service

b Target Beneficiaries Children in school going age group especially girls and children belonging to economically and socially vulnerable community

c Proposed activities

i) Strengthening early childhood education and development by provisioning of quality pre school kits and skill development

ii)Provisioning of scholarship for students from socially and economically weaker sections of the society especially for girls for both academic and professional courses iii)Organizing sports and other competitions in schools and for village youth clubs

4 The implementation details along with local contact and money transfer mechanism are as follows

The plan as mentioned above was discussed in details with the stakeholders present at the local stakeholder meeting held at the project site During the meeting the project proponent received unanimous appreciation and encouragement from the meeting attendees The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd would be implementing the plan themselves The project manager of Jyoti Enviro Tech was nominated as the local contact for the developmental plan shared Local contact of project proponent Money transfer mechanism

Mr Sachin Mehta Manager Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd Adress Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Lucknow ndash 226003 Phone 0522 ndash4049397

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 62 5 Details of monitoring arrangement

Monitoring Committee

The expenditure details can be verified by the Designated Operational Entity (DOE) during the verification If required the same can also be certified by a chartered accountant The expenditure details would be made public in the annual report of the company

Monitoring Parameters

Expenditure of 2 earning (net realizable value) from sale of CER available from the project activity would be monitored The sustainability initiatives undertaken by the company would be analyzed in detail during the verification

Monitoring Frequency Yearly

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 63

Appendix 1 Contact information of project participants

Organization name Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd StreetPO Box Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Building City Lucknow StateRegion Uttar Pradesh Postcode 226003 Country India Telephone 0522 ndash4049397 Fax E-mail jyotienvirogmailcom Website Contact person Title Manager Salutation Mr Last name Mehta Middle name First name Sachin Department Projects Mobile Direct fax Direct tel 0522 ndash4049397 Personal e-mail jyotienvirogmailcom

Appendix 2 Affirmation regarding public funding

There is no public funding available for the project The same has been mentioned in section A4

Appendix 3 Applicability of selected methodology

The applicability of the project activity to the selected methodology has been demonstrated in section B2

Appendix 4 Further background information on ex ante calculation of emission reductions

All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 5 Further background information on monitoring plan

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 64 All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 6 Summary of post registration changes

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 65

Annexure 1 Analysis for value of RATECompliancey for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction

State level analysis of Municipal Solid Waste handling practice in the state of Uttar Pradesh reveals that at few locations scientific handling practices have been adopted with simultaneous consideration of CDM benefits associated with the project

While some municipal bodies still have plans for installation of plants for scientific handling of Municipal Solid Waste and subsequent compost manufacturing with consideration of carbon credits

Sl no Location Present practice CDM

consideration Source

1 Kanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex at Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh India

2 Ghaziabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source17

3 Agra

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) processing plant in Agra by Ultra Urban Infratech Limited

4 Varanasi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Varanasi India

5 Meerut

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Meerut India

6 Allahabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Allahabad Uttar Pradesh

7 Bareilly

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source18

8 Aligarh

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Aligarh India

17

httpncrpbnicinTechnical_assistance_report_comp_BVolume20IV20Solid20Waste20Management20GhaziabadWSA_ADB20NCRPB_FR_Vol_IV-A_(GZB20Main20Report)pdf

18 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPBarielly_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 66

9 Moradabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management Project at Moradabad India

10 Saharanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources19

11 Gorakhpur Unscientific practice of open dumping still persists

NA Publicly available sources20

12 Mathura

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Mathura Uttar Pradesh

13 Jhansi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources21

14 Muzaffarnagar

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex

15 Mirzapur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Mirzapur India

16 Amravati

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Amravati India

17 Sambhal Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Have been considered as a single bundled project

18 Badaun 19 Fatehpur 20 Jaunpur 21 Ballia Hence from the above list it is evident only one (as highlighted) out of 21 locations comply to the MSW rules Hence for ex ante estimation RATECompliance

y is computed as presented below RATECompliance

y = (1 21) = 47 = 0047

------------

19

httpwwwindiawaterportalorgsitesindiawaterportalorgfilesCII_Excellence20in20Water20Management_ITC20Saharanpur_2009pdf

20 httpwwwgeagindiaorgPDFSOLID20WASTEpdf 21 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPJhansi_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 67

History of the document

Version Date Nature of revision 041 11 April 2012 Editorial revision to change version 02 line in history box from Annex 06 to

Annex 06b 040 EB 66

13 March 2012 Revision required to ensure consistency with the ldquoGuidelines for completing the project design document form for CDM project activitiesrdquo (EB 66 Annex 8)

03 EB 25 Annex 15 26 July 2006

02 EB 14 Annex 06b 14 June 2004

01 EB 05 Paragraph 12 03 August 2002

Initial adoption

Decision Class Regulatory Document Type Form Business Function Registration

Page 3: Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 3 Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has also committed to dedicate 2 of the revenue derived from CER towards development of local community The monitorable plan for the same has been detailed in Appendix A in the later section of this PDD Economic Well-Being The project provides employment to the community directly at the MSW processing facility and indirectly through waste collection transportation of compost and RDF to the end user Thus the project provides fresh job opportunities to the local people and helps in upliftment of the economic stature of the society Environmental Well-being Composting of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is an attractive option for resource recovery and environmental improvement In contrast to the anaerobic decay of biodegradable waste that occurs in the landfill sites which results in methane generation among other landfill gases the MSW processing project will contribute in mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through aerobic decomposition and mechanical treatment of the municipal solid waste Due to the proposed project activity dumping of given waste is prevented resulting in reduction in land requirement for waste disposal leading to improved environmental conditions and a replicable model Technological Well-being Successful implementation of this project would lead to further diffusion of MSW processing technology for treatment of waste generated in India A2 Location of project activity A21 Host Party(ies) gtgt India A22 RegionStateProvince etc gtgt Uttar Pradesh A23 CityTownCommunity etc gtgt Lucknow

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 4 A24 PhysicalGeographical location gtgt The proposed project activity will be implemented in Shiveri village in the district of Lucknow in the state of Uttar Pradesh Lucknow is the capital of one of the largest states of India Uttar Pradesh It is located at latitudes 26deg 51 402rdquoN and longitudes 80deg 4952rdquoE Lucknow is accessible from every part of India through air rail and road It is directly connected with New Delhi Patna Kolkata Mumbai Varanasi and other major cities by Amausi airport

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 5 A3 Technologies andor measures gtgt Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd follows a scientific waste management approach which includes aerobic treatment of bio-degradable solid waste to produce compost and refuse derived fuel The waste reaching the processing plant will be received in two separate parts biodegradable and non-biodegradable The biodegradable part of the wastes would be processed to produce compost and RDF while the inert materials in non-biodegradable wastes will be delivered to the sanitary landfill The collection of waste is estimated to be 1300 TPD The scope of project activity includes

bull Aerobic processing and mechanical treatment of the waste The collection vehicles that bring in the

waste from the transfer station to the MSW processing site will be weighed in a weighbridge at the entrance of the facility every time the vehicles come in and go out and the respective weights will be recorded This will be done to have a record of the incoming MSW quantities by weight Thereafter the vehicles carrying wastes will be directed to the specified points for unloading The inert waste will be unloaded at the identified site for sanitary landfill and the recyclable materials will be segregated for sale to scrap dealers The rest of the waste ie the biodegradable wastes will be unloaded at pits which mark the start point of the waste processing line A seepage line is present at the bottom of each pit which connects with the similar lines from other pits This is meant for collecting the leachate that is generated from the waste deposition at the pits

Each pit has a hopper adjacent to it The wastes collected from the pit by the EOT crane is fed into the hopper through a conveyer belt The hopper leads the waste into a pre-sorting section and thereafter through a conveyer belt into a rotary screen trommel where the waste is screened The wastes below 100mm as screened in the trommel are led to the composting area whereas those screened above 100 mm are led by another conveyer belt to the area for production of RDF a) Production of compost The trommel is a rotary screen that separates the waste on the basis of size The biodegradable wastes fed into the trommel is further screened to segregate wastes below and above 100 mm size The wastes below 100mm are undergone composting The waste is collected by the EOT cranes and led to the curing and drying area where the waste is heaped and biological inoculum are sprayed at regular intervals In this area the moisture of the waste is dried up and maintained at 5-10 The heaps are turned at scheduled intervals to ensure a proper aerobic processing of the waste The heap of waste thus accumulated is further led to the composting pads The waste is processed for duration of 20-25 days In the course of this time through monitored processing the waste is transformed into a brown colored mass resembling humus Further the waste is passed through 3 more stages of trommel for screening the mass of waste successively into 35mm 16mm and finally to 4 mm At this stage the waste is fed into the finishing area Finishing area comprises of sheds where the final product of waste processing compost is packed and made ready to be sold in the market b) Production of Reduce derived fuel (RDF) Wastes screened at the trommel above 100mm are directed to a conveyer line carrying them to an adjacent area where the waste will be processed to produce reduce derived fuel (RDF) The waste is passed through a vibrating conveyer where a blower segregates any plastic material from the waste The rest waste is then passed through the conveyer into the RDF producing machine The production of RDF involves processing of the waste by magnetic shredders and subsequent homogenizing of the

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 6

waste in homogenizers Thereafter the uniform mass of waste thus prepared is compressed by hydraulic systems to produce RDF units resembling the shape of soap blocks The lifetime of the project equipments is specified as 25 yrs 00 months Also it is to be noted that the project does not involve any technology transfer from Annex 1 countries The training required for the persons for operation and maintenance of the equipments would be provided through capacity building sessions by the technology provider and would be frequently organized by the project proponent

Brief description of type of monitoring equipments For monitoring the various parameters of the project the following equipments would be used Sl No Parameter Description of equipment type 1 Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 2 Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 3 Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the

project activity Energy meter

4 Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Belt scales 5 Raw waste quantity Weigh bridge Further details on the same have been furnished in Section B71 under section ldquoData and parameters to be monitoredrdquo The various monitoring points in the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 7 A4 Parties and project participants

Party involved (host) indicates a host Party

Private andor public entity(ies) project participants

(as applicable)

Indicate if the Party involved wishes to be considered as

project participant (YesNo)

India(host)

Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd (Private entity)

No

A5 Public funding of project activity gtgt The project has not received any Official Development Assistance (ODA) from Annex I countries

SECTION B Application of selected approved baseline and monitoring methodology B1 Reference of methodology gtgt Title of the approved baseline and monitoring methodology ldquoAvoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processesrdquo Version 13 EB 65 Sectoral Scope 01 and 13 Reference ldquoTool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Version 0600 EB 65 Methodological tool for ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 ldquoTool to calculate the emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo Version 0221 EB 63 Methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 B2 Applicability of methodology gtgt The project meets all the applicability criteria as set out in the methodology The applicability conditions of the methodology AM0025 Version 13 for the project activity have been justified as below Sr No

Applicability Conditions as per AM0025 Version 13

Justification

1 The project activity involves one or a combination of the following waste treatment options for the fresh waste that in a given year would have otherwise been disposed of in a landfill (a) A composting process in aerobic conditions (b) Gasification to produce syngas and its use (c) Anaerobic digestion with biogas collection and flaring andor its use The anaerobic digester processes only the waste for which emission reductions are claimed in this methodology If the biogas is processed and upgraded to the quality of natural gas and it is distributed as energy via natural gas

The project activity involves a combination of the waste treatment options a) A composting process in aerobic conditions d) Mechanical treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) The project activity does not involve the use of RDF Also the project activity does not involve any thermal operation In the absence of the project the fresh waste would have been disposed off in a landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 8

distribution grid project activities may use approved methodology AM0053 in conjunction with this methodology In such cases the baseline scenario identification procedure and additionality assessment shall be undertaken for the combination of the two components of the project activity ie biomethane emission avoidance and displacement of natural gas (d) Mechanicalthermal treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) and its use The thermal treatment process (dehydration) occurs under controlled conditions (up to 300 degrees Celsius) In case of thermal treatment process the process shall generate a stabilized biomass that would be used as fuel or raw material in other industrial process The physical and chemical properties of the produced RDFSB shall be homogenous and constant over time (e) Incineration of fresh waste for energy generation electricity andor heat The thermal energy generated is either consumed on-site andor exported to a nearby facility Electricity generated is either consumed on-site exported to the grid or exported to a nearby facility The incinerator is rotating fluidized bed or circulating fluidized bed or hearth or grate type

2 In case of anaerobic digestion gasification or RDF processing of waste the residual waste from these processes is aerobically composted andor delivered to a landfill

In RDF processing of waste the residual biodegradable waste is aerobically composted and the remainder ie the inert portion is delivered to the pre-identified sanitary landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

3 In case of composting the produced compost is either used as soil conditioner or disposed of in landfills

The compost produced in the project activity will be sold in the market that will be used as a soil conditioner This justifies the applicability criteria

4 In case of RDFstabilized biomass processing the produced RDFstabilized biomass should not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 9

This justifies the applicability criteria

5 If RDFSB is disposed of in a landfill project proponent shall provide degradability analysis on an annual basis to demonstrate that the methane generation in the life-cycle of the SB is below 1 of related emissions It has to be demonstrated regularly that the characteristics of the produced RDFSB should not allow for re-absorption of moisture of more than 3 Otherwise monitoring the fate of the produced RDFSB is necessary to ensure that it is not subject to anaerobic conditions in its lifecycle

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be disposed in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

6 In the case of incineration of the waste the waste should not be stored longer than 10 days The waste should not be stored in conditions that would lead to anaerobic decomposition and hence generation of CH4

The project activity does not involve the incineration of waste Hence this condition is not applicable

7 The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity can be determined in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity

The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity will be determined as per the process described in section B72 of PDD in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity This justifies the applicability criteria

8 The project activity may include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation from the biogas syngas captured RDFstabilized biomass produced combustion heat generated in the incineration process respectively from the anaerobic digester the gasifier RDFstabilized biomass combustor and waste incinerator The electricity can be exported to the grid andor used internally at the project site In the case of RDFSB produced the emission reductions can be claimed only for the cases where the RDFSB used for electricity andor thermal energy generation can be monitored

The project activity does not include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation Hence this condition is not applicable

9 Waste handling in the baseline scenario The MSW 2000 rules stipulated by GoI mandated

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 10

shows a continuation of current practice of disposing the waste in a landfill despite environmental regulation that mandates the treatment of the waste if any using any of the project activity treatment options mentioned above

the municipal bodies to treat the municipal waste in a scientific manner 2 However despite the rules the common practice of handling the waste in the country is continuation of current practice of dumping the wastes in a disposal site 3 In addition no single municipality or local body has complied with the guidelines stipulated by MSW Rules 2000 in the country4 Further the present scenario of solid waste management in Lucknow is highly unsynchronized and inadequate and entails dumping of waste in open areas5 This justifies the applicability criteria

10 The compliance rate of the environmental regulations during (part of) the crediting period is below 50 if monitored compliance with the MSW rules exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit since the assumption that the policy is not enforced is no longer tenable

The compliance rate of Indian MSW Rules 2000 is below 50 No single municipality or local body in India has complied with the guidelines stipulated in the MSW Rules 20006 However a conservative value of 45 is taken for ex-ante estimations of emission reductions7 This justifies the applicability criteria

11 Local regulations do not constrain the establishment of RDF production plantsthermal treatment plants nor the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material

There is no such regulations that constrain the establishment of RDF production nor any regulation for the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material This justifies the applicability criteria

12 In case of RDFstabilized biomass production project proponent shall provide evidences that no GHG emissions occur other than biogenic CO2 due to chemical reactions during the thermal treatment process (such as Chimney Gas Analysis report)

The project activity does not involve any thermal treatment in case of RDF production The process involved is purely mechanical treatment Hence this condition is not applicable

13 The project activity does not involve thermal There is no waste incineration in the proposed

2 httpenvfornicinlegishsmmswmhrhtml 3 httpwwwnswaicomimagesnewslettersjun2010pdf 4 Sunil Kumar Bhattacharyya JK Vaidya AN Tapan Chakrabarti Sukumar Devotta Akolkar AB Assessment of the status of municipal solid waste management in metro cities state capitals class I cities and class II towns in India An insight pg 3 Waste Management journal homepage wwwelseviercomlocatewasman 5 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf Page 26 Paragraph 34 describes the present scenario of solid waste management in

Lucknow 6 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 8

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf 7 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 9

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 11

treatment process of neither industrial nor hospital waste

project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

14 In case of waste incineration if auxiliary fossil fuel is added into the incinerator the fraction of energy generated by auxiliary fossil fuel is no more than 50 of the total energy generated in the incinerator

There is no waste incineration in the proposed project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

15 This methodology is not applicable to project activities that involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill This should be treated as a separate project activity due to the difference in waste characteristics of existing and fresh waste which may have an implication on the baseline scenario determination

Project activity does not involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

Thus as per the methodology AM0025 the project activity involves the treatment of fresh waste (ie municipal solid waste) originally intended for dumping through a combination of the processes a) composting b) RDF processing without incineration The project activity avoids methane emissions by diverting organic waste from being dumped where methane emissions are caused by anaerobic decomposition By treating the fresh waste through alternative treatment options these methane emissions are avoided Therefore the project meets the applicability conditions of AM0025 B3 Project boundary As per AM0025 the spatial extent of the project boundary is the site of the project activity where the waste is treated This includes the facilities for processing the waste on-site electricity consumption onsite fuel use and the sanitary landfill site The project boundary does not include facilities for waste collection sorting and transport to the project site The summary of gases and sources included in the project boundary and justification explanation where gases and sources are not included is listed below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 12

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation B

asel

ine

scen

ario

Emissions from decomposition of waste at the landfill site

CO2 Excluded CO2 emissions from the decomposition of organic waste are not accounted

CH4 Included The major source of emissions in the baseline since the fresh waste is being disposed off in the landfill Hence included

N2O Excluded N2O emissions are small compared to CH4 emissions from landfills Exclusion of this gas is conservative

Emissions from electricity consumption

CO2 Excluded Electricity is not being consumed in the baseline Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

Proj

ect s

cena

rio

On-site fossil fuel consumption due to the project activity other than for electricity generation

CO2 Included The project activity involves on-site fossil fuel consumption Hence included

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

Emissions from on-site electricity use

CO2 Included The project activity involves consumption of electricity from the grid Hence included

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded

The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 13

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation Pr

ojec

t sce

nari

o

Direct emissions from the waste treatment processes

N2O Included May be an important emission source N2O can be emitted from composting activities Hence included

CO2 Included CO2 emissions from decomposition of organic waste are not accounted8

CH4 Included Composting process may not be complete and result in anaerobic decay resulting in CH4 emissions

Emissions from waste water treatment

CO2 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

CH4 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

A graphical representation of the project boundary is shown below

Bio degradable waste processing Segregated Inert Recyclables

Compost RDF Sanitary landfill

Open market

MSW Collection in Lucknow

MSW Processing Site

PROJECT BOUNDARY

Electricity fromDiesel

Electricity from Grid

Consumption of Electricity

8 CO2 emissions from the combustion or decomposition of biomass (see definition by the EB in Annex 8 of the EBs 20th meeting report) are not accounted as GHG emissions Where the combustion or decomposition of biomass under a CDM project activity results in a decrease of carbon pools such stock changes should be considered in the calculation of emission reductions This is not the case for waste treatment projects

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 14 The various monitoring points in the project activity as included within the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram as given below

B4 Establishment and description of baseline scenario gtgt The approved methodology AM0025 version 12 recommends the use of the latest version of the tool for demonstration and assessment of additionality (version 0600) to determine the most plausible baseline scenarios for the project The various steps to establish the additionality of the project as per the methodological tool is demonstrated pictorially as given below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 15

According to the approved methodology AM0025 the baseline scenario of the activity is defined as disposal of the waste in open dump yards without taking any measures to capture the landfill gas or avoid methane emission due to the anaerobic decomposition of waste The procedure to define the baseline scenario as per AM0025 is as follows Step 1 Identification of alternative scenarios The most realistic and credible alternatives available to the project activity have been identified using the following sub steps

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 16 Sub-step 1a Defining alternatives to project activity The approved methodology has provided the following alternatives for the disposaltreatment of the fresh waste in the absence of the project activity ie the scenario relevant for estimating baseline methane emissions to be analysed should include inter alia M1 The project activity (ie composting gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas Assessment of the alternatives for waste treatment

Alternative Description Justification M1 The project activity (ie composting

gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project

This alternative seems to be a realistic and plausible alternative The project activity not implemented as a CDM project is however not a feasible alternative as the project involves high investment cost in order to set up the processing plant whereas the return from the project activity is exceptionally low (As discussed in detail in Section B5) However M1 is still a plausible option and is subjected to further consideration as a baseline scenario

M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared

The cost of construction operation and maintenance of an engineered landfill is high as compared to the zerominimal expenditure in the dumping of waste Hence the scope of landfill gas recovery is minimized in India Hence this scenario M2 is not feasible and is thus eliminated from further consideration as baseline scenario

M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas

Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas is the most common practice in India as demonstrated in Section B5 The same has been found to be prevalent in Lucknow in the absence of the project activity9 Hence this is a common practice that faces no barriers because of low expenditure low O amp M cost non-requirement of skilled labor etc Thus this is the most widely practiced method for MSW disposal throughout the country

9 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf page 26 paragraph 34

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 17

This alternative M3 is considered as the most likely baseline scenario for the project activity

The methodology further states that ldquoIf energy is exported to a grid andor to a nearby industry or used on-site realistic and credible alternatives should also be separately determined for bull Power generation in the absence of the project activity bull Heat generation in the absence of the project activityrdquo Under the scope of the project activity neither heat nor power generation takes place Hence the clause as mentioned above is not applicable to the project activity Thus alternatives M1 and M3 are further subjected for baseline consideration Alternative M2 is not considered as a plausible and realistic baseline scenario for the project activity Sub-step 1b Consistency with mandatory laws and regulations The MSW (Management and Handling) Rules 2000 notified by Ministry of Environment and Forests Government of India makes it mandatory for proper and scientific management of solid waste Under this rule land filling of the waste is not allowed but based on the studies10 and surveys carried out it was observed that the most common practice in India to dispose the solid waste is open dumping and land filling without any treatment and processing It is observed that these rules are not implementedenforced systematically thus leading to the most widespread practice of dumping waste in the country Conclusion Thus the alternatives M1 and M3 has been considered further Outcome of Sub-step 1b The two identified realistic and credible alternative scenario(s) to the project activity that are in compliance with mandatory legislation and regulations taking into account the enforcement in the country and EB decisions on national andor sectoral policies and regulations are as follows Alternative M1 The project activity carried out without the CDM and Alternative M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas (Continuation of the current practice of disposal in landfill) Step 2 Identify the fuel for the baseline choice of energy source taking into account the national andor sectoral policies as applicable Since there is no power generation or heat utilization in the project activity thus baseline does not involve use of fuel for energy Outcome of Sub-step 2 Alternatives M1 and M3 have been subjected for further consideration Step 3 Step 2 andor Step 3 of the latest approved version of the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo shall be used to assess which of these alternatives should be excluded from further consideration (eg alternatives facing prohibitive barriers or those clearly economically unattractive) The above analysis in Step 1 and Step 2 leaves with two alternatives M1 and M3

10 Present Scenario of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Dumping Grounds in India by Amiya Kumar Sahu National Solid Waste Association of India Mumbai

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 18 The further analysis has been discussed in detail in Section B5 below Step 4 Where more than one credible and plausible alternative remains project participants shall as a conservative assumption use the alternative baseline scenario that results in the lowest baseline emissions as the most likely baseline scenario The least emission alternative will be identified for each component of the baseline scenario In assessing these scenarios any regulatory or contractual requirements should be taken into consideration As demonstrated in Section B5 only one alternative remains after applying the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo to assess exclusion of the alternatives from further consideration Hence this step is not applicable as there is only one alternative available to the project activity As demonstrated in section B5 it is evident that after investment analysis only one alternative ie M3 remains as the most plausible option and hence this has been considered as the baseline to the project activity B5 Demonstration of additionality gtgt As per the approved methodology Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has identified the above mentioned realistic and credible alternative(s) (M1 and M3) that were available to them and that would provide output and services comparable to the project activity (refer section B4) These alternatives are in compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements The Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality stipulates that either Step 2 (Investment Analysis) or Step 3 (Barrier Analysis) or both can be selected to demonstrate additionality As the Project faces financial barriers for its implementation in the absence of CDM it is appropriate to choose Step 2 to demonstrate its additionality Step 2 Investment analysis The alternative considered for further analysis is alternative ldquoM3rdquo being the most commonly followed practice Sub-step 2a Determine appropriate analysis method Since the project generates incomes other than CDM related income for the purpose of investment analysis Option III (Benchmark Analysis) is chosen as it is deemed as the most appropriate analysis method where the returns on the investment in the project activity is compared to benchmark returns Sub-step 2b Option III Apply benchmark analysis The indicator used for carrying out the investment analysis is IRR that will determine the feasibility of the project activity This is compared with the Prime Lending Rate available at the time of investment decision For this purpose the PLR of Reserve Bank of India has been considered which is found to be 1200 as per Benchmark PLR of RBI during Aug-200911 Sub-step 2c Calculation and comparison of financial indicators The IRR for the proposed project activity without CDM revenue is computed for a period of 20 years lifetime A detailed investment analysis has been carried out and presented in the supported excel sheets The data and analysis is presented here The techno-economical parameters used for IRR calculation of the project activity is provided in the table below

11 httpwwwrbiorginscriptsWSSViewaspxId=14988

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 19

Parameters Unit Value Source

Capacity (MSW per day) MTs day 1300 As per DPR

Project Lifetime Years 25 yrs 0 months

As per specification provided by tech supplier

Cost of the project Buildings amp Civil works Rs in Lacs 3541056 As per DPR Plant and Machinery Rs in Lacs 1781286 As per DPR Interest payable during construction Rs in Lacs 15781 As per DPR Contingencies Rs in Lacs 10444 As per DPR Margin Money for working capital Rs in Lacs 12011 As per DPR Total cost Rs in Lacs 5704709 As per DPR

Financing pattern

Promoterrsquos Contribution through equity Rs in Lacs 8934 As per DPR Promoterrsquos contribution through loan Rs in Lacs 2700 As per DPR Subsidy under JNNURM Rs in Lacs 2111 As per RFP

Applicable Interest Rate on term loan Percent 1250 As per bank terms

Benchmark Prime Lending Rate (PLR) Percent 1200 httpwwwibaorginviewplraspmemcatid=1

Compost and RDF related costs

Recovery of compost from total MSW processed Percent 18

As per DPR

Recovery of RDF from total MSW processed Percent 12

Recovery of recyclable materials from total MSW processed Percent 2

Percentage of compost produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year

Percent 70

Percentage of RDF produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year Percent 70

Sale price of compost RsTon 2000 As per quote received from distributor Sale price of RDF RsTon 2000

Yearly increment in percentage of compost and RDF for sale in the market Percent 5 CPI(Consumer Price

Index) data Yearly escalation in sale price of compost and RDF Percent 5

Packaging cost of Compost Rs TON 150

As per quote received from distributor

Marketing cost of Compost Rs TON 100 Transportation cost of Compost Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of compost Rs TON 100 Packaging cost of RDF Rs TON 150

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 20 Marketing cost of RDF Rs TON 100 Transportation of RDF Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of RDF Rs TON 100

MSW Processing cost

Power consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 16539

As per DPR

Diesel consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 18720 Plant maintenance cost including that of vehicles

of capital cost for plant machineries 2

Use of senitiler ml MT of MSW processing 50

Use of bio-culture kg MT of MSW processing 10

Cost of senitiler use Rslitre 150

As per quote received Cost of bio-culture use Rskg 180 Cost of daily consumables (oil lubricants and cotton waste) Rs Lacsannum 26

Salary and wages of employees and staff Rs Lacsannum 373 As per DPR

Escalation rates

Escalation in maintenance cost Percent 400 CPI(Consumer Price Index) data Escalation in employee wages Percent 714

Escalation in fuel cost Percent 874 WPI(WholeSale Price Index) data Escalation in electricity cost Percent 874

Other commodities escalation Percent 583

Depreciation

St line Depn - Buildings Percent 334 As per companyrsquos law 1956 wwwfastfactscoinresourcesDepCoActrtf

- Plant amp Machinery Percent 113 IT Depreciation - Buildings Percent 10 - Plant amp Machinery Percent 15 Income Tax ndash MAT Percent 1133 Income Tax Act-

httpwwwindiainbusinessnicininvestmenttaxationhtm

Income Tax Percent 3399

Based on the above assumptions the results of the financial analysis have been provided below

Location Benchmark IRR (Without CDM) Lucknow MSW project 1200 686

As evident the IRR of the project activity is below the benchmark This clearly indicates that investment barrier exists in project activity implementation which is mitigated by the revenue derived from the carbon credits that the project activity would obtain due to Clean Development Mechanism The additionality of the project is thus evident Sub-step 2d Sensitivity analysis

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 21 The purpose of sensitivity analysis is to examine whether the conclusion regarding the financial viability of the proposed project is sound and tenable with those reasonable variations in the assumptions The investment analysis provides a valid argument in favor of additionality only if it consistently supports (for realistic range of assumptions) the conclusion that the project activity is unlikely to be the most financially attractive or is likely to be financially attractive Thus a sensitivity analysis was also applied to the IRR calculations to measure the impact positive or negative of changes in the indicated parameters The project proponent has chosen various factors as critical to the operation of the project in accordance with Guidance on the Assessment of Investment Analysis (Version- 031 paragraph- 17) which states that only variables including the initial investment cost that constitute more than 20 of either total project costs or total project revenues should be subjected to reasonable variation Hence the sensitivity is carried out by varying the parameters to 10 on either side to ascertain the impact on the profitability and hence the IRR of the project The results of the sensitivity analysis are as presented below

Sensitivity Parameter Variation and resultant IRR +10 0 -10

Quantity of waste processed 1325

686

-ve value OampM cost -ve value

(12 increase leads to an IRR

of -104 ) Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1688 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the OampM cost is not

expected to decrease in future

Organic Manure sales 1369 However 10 increase in sale price of organic

manures is a highly

unrealistic under the higly

stringent market scenario for

compost sale (explained in subsequent

paragraphs on barrier analysis)

-ve value -5 leads to a

decrease of IRR to -302

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

Cost of bioculture used -ve value 16 leads to a decrease of IRR

to 091 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1513 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the bioculture cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from

the WPI for all commodities as

published by

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 22

RBI Fuel and electricity cost -ve value

24 leads to a decrease of IRR

to -057 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1279 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the fuel and

electricity cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from the WPI for fuel

power and electricity as published by

RBI Project capital cost 570

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

818 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Packaging marketing and transportation expense

077 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1040 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Thus the sensitivity analysis for the project reveals that even with significant changes in various parameters the project IRR does not cross benchmark rates Therefore the project activity is clearly additional and is not a businessndashasndashusual scenario Step 3 Barrier Analysis The major barrier applicable to the alternative M1 is A) Technology Barrier B) Other Barrier and C) Investment Barrier Sub-step 3a Identify barriers that would prevent the implementation of the proposed CDM project Activity

A) Technological Barrier The plant would use state of the art technology in the process of waste handling and compost manufacturing EOT (Electric Overhead Transport) cranes would transfer the wastes from one processing station to the other Automation will be ensured wherever possible Hydraulic type press system would be installed for the RDF manufacturing Thus the plant would employ the latest technologies in the field of waste handling and management that involves a lot of technology transfer from international suppliers and exorbitant costs Also smooth operation of the plant would require proper training of the operating personnel on the equipments and hence regular capacity building training programs would have to be organized by the project proponent Another threat posed by the variation in feedstock quality is the content of highly abrasive and corrosive materials in it These cause rapid wear and corrosion of the process equipments Hence all MSW plants entail high cost of operation and maintenance due to frequent repairs breakdowns and shutdowns

B) Market barrier

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 23

Organic waste recycling is still neglected by private initiatives because of its low value and the lack of a market for compost Limited markets for compost sales and low prices for compost are a major challenge that all systems face12 The persisting skepticism among the farmers about the quality of composts poses a constant threat on the marketability of the composts Misconceptions like soil contamination due to use of composts are still borne in the minds of many Thus the emphasis on quality control of final products is of utmost importance Also increased awareness among the farmers on the benefits derived out of compost usage as value added substitutes to chemical fertilizers have to be encouraged through campaigns and other promotional activities

Also high cost of transportation sometimes makes it difficult to justify the use of composts when compared to the benefits derived out of it

C) Investment barrier The project proponent has demonstrated through investment analysis that without CDM revenue the project activity is not a financially attractive proposition At the inception the project had received refusal for loans from financial institutions for unimpressive returns envisaged from the project and the project proponent was suggested to estimate the returns along with additional revenue as may be associated with the project activity (for eg revenue from carbon credits) The project proponent had re-submitted their application for loan with the consideration of the CDM revenue and thereafter received the sanction

All these factors substantiate to prove that additional efforts are required for overcoming the market barrier for the compost produced in the plant In this context the additional incentive available to the plant through Clean Development Mechanism would be utilized for market development of the compost produced in the plant and also to partially compensate for the losses for not being able to sell compost in the market Thus the barriers as illustrated above pose a serious obstacle to the project activity and thus would lead to high operational uncertainties if not implemented as a CDM project activity Sub-step 3 b Shows that the identified barriers would not prevent a wide spread implementation of at least one of the alternatives (except the proposed project activity) As discussed above dumping of the solid waste in a landfill without gas capture (M3) is a common practice in India and none of the barriers discussed above would prevent it from occurring The barriers identified ie technological barrier and the market barrier does not in any way prevent the continuation of the baseline scenario Hence project activity satisfies the additionality criteria as per clause 3b) of the tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality Version 0600 Step 4 Common practice analysis According to the methodology AM0025 project proponents should ldquoprovide evidence of the early stage of development of the project activity and that it is not common practice in the country To this end they should provide an analysis of waste management practicesrdquo In order to justify the early development of the project activity the chronology for the same has been presented below as we proceed further As per the ldquoTool to for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo (Version 0600) similar type of project is defined as follows

12 httpwwwtngovincmaswm_in_indiapdf page 145

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 24 Sub-step 4b Discuss any similar Options that are occurring The above analysis demonstrates the similar activities occurring as the project activity But it can be seen that all the treatment facilities are composting facilities and none of the plants have RDF production facility Most of these composting facilities have applied for CDM benefits and those that have not are facing difficulties The project activity conforms to the measures of ldquoMethane formation avoidancerdquo as mentioned in paragraph 6 of the Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Hence analysis of the project activity as per paragraph 47 is illustrated as follows Step 1 Calculate applicable output range as +-50 of the design output or capacity of the proposed project activity The capacity of the project activity is 1300 TPD Hence considering an output range of +-50 the analysis would entail all projects of capacities between 1950 TPD and 650 TPD Therefore as per the table of cities as listed above the cities considered for present analysis would include the following

City Waste

Quantity (TPD)

Processing of Waste Disposal of waste CDM status Composting Pelletisation Uncontrolled

dumping Sanitary landfill

Earth cover

Bangalore 1669 300 Ahmedabad 1302 500 Pune 1175 500 Surat 1000

Kanpur 1100

Jaipur 904

Ludhiana 735 Agra 654 Step 2 In the applicable geographical area identify all plants that deliver the same output or capacity within the applicable output range calculated in Step 1 as the proposed project activity and have started commercial operation before the start date of the project Note their number Nall Registered CDM project activities and projects activities undergoing validation shall not be included in this step The applicable geographical area for the project activity would entail the entire host country ie India Of the selected cities as listed above the same output ie organic composts and RDF is produced by Bangalore and Pune However all the projects are under validation Hence as per the given definitions Nall for the present analysis of the project activity is equal to 0 since all the plants with similar output and within the applicable capacity range have considered CDM benefits associated to the projects Nall = 0 Step 3 Within plants identified in Step 2 identify those that apply technologies different than the technology applied in the proposed project activity Note their number Ndiff All the plants as included in Nall use the same technology for compost production and RDF manufacturing Hence under the scope of the present analysis Ndiff = 0

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 25 Step 4 Calculate factor F=1-NdiffNall representing the share of plants using technology similar to the technology used in the proposed project activity in all plants that deliver the same output or capacity as the proposed project activity Under the scope of the project activity the factor is calculated as follows F = 1-NdiffNall = 1 ndash 0= 1 Therefore under the scope of the project activity the factor F cannot be determined The proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled (a) the factor F is greater than 02 and (b) Nall-Ndiff is greater than 3 Since as per the above analysis F = 1 which is greater than 02 Nall - Ndiff = 0 which is less than 3 As per the methodology the proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled Thus since one of the criterions as imposed by the tool is not satisfied by the project activity hence it is prudent to conclude that the project activity is not a common practice and hence additional the analysis shows that the project activity is additional

Also as per the India Infrastructure Report 2006 the few aerobic compost plants that have been set up are typically functioning much below installed capacity and most are ldquofacing a problem of marketing the compost due to an ineffective marketing mechanismrdquo Thus it can be concluded that extremely few similar activities can be observed in India and when they are observed they face considerable barriers and have not had much success from an economic perspective The experience provided by these composting attempts only serves to reinforce the fact that implementing composting activities is financially unviable Therefore as demonstrated by the investment and barrier analyses in Steps 2 and 3 it is clear that the project is not financially viable without the revenue from CDM and there are significant barriers to its implementation In addition as detailed in Step 4 the proposed project is not common practice either and in the limited cases where aerobic composting is taking place it is proving to be a failure from an economic perspective It can therefore be concluded that the proposed project is additional and would not occur without CDM due to the financial and technological barriers in place Moreover the CDM registration of the Project will also serve as a model for other projects and promote the dissemination of sustainable waste management practices Serious consideration of CDM As per paragraph 2 of EB 62 Annex 13 ldquoGuidelines to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDM for project activities with a start date after 2nd August 2008 ldquothe project proponent must inform a Host Party designated national authority (DNA) and the UNFCCC secretariat in writing of the commencement of the project activity and of their intension to seek CDM status Such notification must be made within six months of the project activity start date and shall contain the precise geographical location and brief description of the proposed project activity using the standardized form F-CDM ndash Prior considerationrdquo As mentioned in the section C11 the start date for the project activity is 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 26 The project proponent had intimated the Host Party designated national authority (DNA) ie Ministry of environment and Forests (Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat about the project activity on 09102011 This intimation was made in the F-CDM-Prior consideration format as prescribed by UNFCCC Thus the intimation to Host party DNA and UNFCCC secretariat was made within six months from the project start date as this is in accordance to the ldquoGuideline to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo As per the ldquoGuidelines on the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo version 04 EB 62 Annex 13 serious consideration of CDM has been demonstrated below

Date Project Related Activity CDM Related Activity Evidence 14092009 Financial proposal from

Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd Copy of proposal

28102009 Revised financial proposal from Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of proposal

11112009 Letter of award for development of Integrated Solid waste management facilities for Lucknow Municipal Corporation UP

Copy of the letter of award

07092010 Receipt of certificate of incorporation for Ms JYOTI ENVIROTECH PRIVATE LIMITED

Copy of certificate

23102010 Concession agreement signed between Lucknow Municipal Corporation Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam and Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of the Agreement

07062011 Environmental Clearance received for development of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill and processing facility at Village-Shiveri

Copy of letter of Approval

21092011 Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd appointed CDM consultants for the project

Copy of work order placed on the CDM consultants

03102011 No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

Copy of no objection certificate

09102011 Project proponent submitted the Prior consideration of the CDM form to host party DNA (Ministry of Environment and Forests Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat

Copy of Prior consideration of the CDM form as submitted to MoEF GoI and UNFCCC

10102011 Purchase order raised for Plant Machinery

Copy of Purchase order

23032012 Stakeholder Consultation Meeting

Copy of the Minutes of Meeting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 27 B6 Emission reductions B61 Explanation of methodological choices gtgt Approved baseline and monitoring methodology AM0025- Avoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processes Version 13 has been used to calculate emission reductions from the project The estimation of project emission baseline emission and leakage emission are described below Project emissions The proposed project uses MSW processing (RDF and compost production processes) to treat the organic waste Therefore the project emissions in year y are calculated as follows PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy + PEay + PEgy+ PEry + PEiy + PEwy + PEco-firingy (1) Where PEy = Is the project emissions during the year y (tCO2e) PEelecy = Is the emissions from electricity consumption on-site due to the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) PEfuel on-sitey =Is the emissions on-site due to fuel consumption on-site in year y (tCO2e) PEcy =Is the emissions during the composting process in year y (tCO2e) PEay =Is the emissions from the anaerobic digestion process in year y (tCO2e) PEgy =Is the emissions from the gasification process in year y (tCO2e) PEry =Is the emissions from the combustion of RDFstabilized biomass in year y (tCO2e) PEiy =Is the emissions from waste incineration in year y (tCO2e) PEwy =Is the emissions from wastewater treatment in year y (tCO2e) PEco-firingy =Is the emissions from thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on site

fossil fuel consumption during co-firing in year y (tCO2e) The project activity involves composting and mechanical treatment to produce compost and RDF It involves the electricity consumption onsite and on-site fuel consumption Hence the equation applicable to the project activity is as follows Hence for the project activity PEay =0 as the project does not entail anaerobic digestion PEgy =0 as the project does not entail gasification PEry =0 as the project does not entail combustion of RDFstabilized PEiy =0 as the project does not entail waste incineration PEwy =0 as the project does not entail wastewater treatment PEco-firingy =0 as the project does not entail thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on

site fossil fuel consumption Therefore PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy (2) Emissions from electricity use on site (PEelecy) The project uses electricity from the NEWNE grid at processing plant at Lucknow The emissions from electricity use are therefore calculated as PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec (3)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 28 Where EGPJFFy = Is the amount of electricity generated in an on-site fossil fuel fired power plant or

consumed from the grid as a result of the project activity measured using an electricity meter (MWh)

CEFelec = Is the carbon emissions factor for electricity consumed in the project activity (tCO2eMWh)

Under the scope of the project activity electricity use on site would include the electricity consumption due to the plant equipments and machineries on site that are used to produce the composts the RDF Emissions from fuel use on-site (PEfuelon-sitey) Project participants shall account for CO2 emissions from any on-site fuel combustion (other than electricity generation eg vehicles used on-site heat generation for starting the gasifier auxiliary fossil fuels need to be added into incinerator heat generation for mechanicalthermal treatment process etc) Emissions are calculated from the quantity of fuel used and the specific CO2-emission factor of the fuel as follows PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel (4) Where PEfuel on-sitey = Is the CO2 emissions due to on-site fuel combustion in year y (tCO2) Fconsy = Is the fuel consumption on site in year y (l or kg) NCVfuel = Is the net caloric value of the fuel (MJl or MJkg) EFfuel = Is the CO2 emissions factor of the fuel (tCO2MJ) As per methodology project participants may use IPCC default values for the net calorific values and CO2 emission factors Under the scope of the project activity fuel use on-site would include consumption of diesel fuel by the vehicles (eg excavators earth movers etc) as may be engaged for the project activity on-site Further the project may also include Diesel Generator(s) placed on site to provide necessary power back-up in incidents of exigency Thus the diesel fuel consumed by the DG set would also be monitored and be counted in fuel use quantity on-site Hence for the project activity NCVfuel = NCVydiesel And EFfuel = EFdiesel Emissions from composting (PEcy) As per the methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 Annex 09 emission from composting PEcy = PEECy + PEFCy + PECH4y + PEN2Oy + PEROy (5) Where PEECy = Project emissions from electricity consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEelecy as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 29 PEFCy = Project emissions from fossil fuel consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEfuelon-sitey as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

PECH4y = Project emissions of methane from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEN2Oy = Project emissions of nitrous oxide from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEROy =Project emissions of methane from run-off wastewater associated with co-composting

in year y (tCO2eyr) The leachate generated in the project activity will be gainfully utilized in maintaining the moist environment of the bio degradable waste Hence the project activity would not entail any project emission from run-off wastewater PEROy= 0

Therefore PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy (6) Determination of project emissions of methane (PECH4y ) Project emissions of methane from composting (PECH4y) are determined as follows PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 (7) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFCH4y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tCH4 t) For the value of EFCH4y a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFCH4y = EFCH4default GWPCH4 = Global Warming Potential of CH4 (tCO2e tCH4 ) Determination of project emissions of nitrous oxide (PEN2Oy ) The N2O emissions from composting are calculated as follows PEN2Oy = Qy EFN2Oy GWPN2O (8) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFN20y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tN2O t) For the value of EFN2Oy a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFN20y = EFN20default GWPN20 = Global Warming Potential of N20 (tCO2e tN2O ) Baseline emissions To calculate the baseline emissions project participants shall use the following equation BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy (9)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 30 Where BEy = Is the baseline emissions in year y (tCO2e) MBy = Is the methane produced in the landfill in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) MDregy = Is methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) BEENy = Baseline emissions from generation of energy displaced by the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) Since the project activity does not entail generation of energy hence BEENy= 0

Methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity (MDregy) The methodology states that In cases where regulatory or contractual requirements do not specify MDregy an Adjustment Factor (AF) shall be used and justified taking into account the project context In doing so the project participant should take into account that some of the methane generated by the landfill may be captured and destroyed to comply with other relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odour concerns MDregy = MBy AF Where AF = Is Adjustment Factor for MBy () The parameter AF shall be estimated as follows In cases where a specific system for collection and destruction of methane is mandated by regulatory or contractual requirements the ratio between the destruction efficiency of that system and the destruction efficiency of the system used in the project activity shall be used In the host country India there is no regulation for capture and destruction of methane generated by the landfill Hence the adjustment factor the project activity is 0 as per the present scenario ie AF = 0 Therefore MDregy = 0 However in due course of time the value of AF may undergo changes as per the governmental regulations imposed in the host country (India) with respect to MSW management Rate of compliance In cases where there are regulations that mandate the use of one of the project activity treatment options and which is not being enforced the baseline scenario is identified as a gradual improvement of waste management practices to the acceptable technical options expected over a period of time to comply with the MSW Management Rules The adjusted baseline emissions (BEya) are calculated as follows BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) (10) Where BEy = Is the CO2-equivalent emissions as determined from equation 14 RATECompliance

y = Is the state-level compliance rate of the MSW Management Rules in that year y The compliance rate shall be lower than 50 if it exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 31 The compliance ratio RATECompliance

y shall be monitored ex post based on the official reports for instance annual reports provided by municipal bodies For details on the consideration the value of RATECompliance

y for the purpose of ex ante calculation refer to annexure 1 Methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity (MBy) The amount of methane that is generated each year (MBy) is calculated as per the latest version of the approved methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo (Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46) Considering the following additional equation MBy = BECH4SWDSy Where BECH4SWDSy = Is the methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity at

year y that is methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the solid waste disposal site during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e) as calculated using Application B in the methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo The tool estimates methane generation adjusted for using adjustment factor (fy) any landfill gas in the baseline that would have been captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odor concerns As this is already accounted for in this methodology ldquofyrdquo in the tool shall be assigned a value 0

The amount of methane that is generated each year (BECH4SWDSy tCO2e) is calculated for each year with the recommended multi-phase model the First Order Decay (FOD) model The amount of methane produced in the year y is calculated as follows

(11) Where BECH4SWDSy = Methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the

solid waste disposal site (SWDS) during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e)

φ = Model correction factor to account for model uncertainties f = Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used in another

manner Since no such practice exists in the host country India hence for the project activity the value for ldquofrdquo has been considered 0

GWPCH4 =Global Warming Potential (GWP) of methane valid for the relevant commitment period OX =Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste) F =Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCf =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that can decompose For the

project activity the default value has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore DOCf = DOCf Default

MCF =Methane correction factor For the project activity the value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore MCFy = 08

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 32 Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) DOCj =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j kj =Decay rate for the waste type j j =Waste type category (index) x =Year during the crediting period x runs from the first year of the project activity

(x = 1) to the year y for which avoided emissions are calculated (x = y) y =Year for which methane emissions are calculated Where different waste types j are prevented from disposal the amount of different waste types (Wjx) is determined through sampling and the mean is calculated from the samples as follows Since the project activity corresponds to Application B as stated in the tool hence the values of few parameters have been adopted as explained in table 1 of the tool Determining the amounts of waste types j disposed in the SWDS (Wjx) Wjx = Wx pjx (12) Where Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) Wx =Total amount of waste prevented from from disposal in the SWDS in year x (t) pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from the

first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) The fraction of the waste type j in the waste for the year x or month i are calculated according to equations (7) and (8) as follows

(13)

Where pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) pnjx = Fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the year x (weight

fraction) zx = Number of samples collected during the year x n = Samples collected in year x j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from

the first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) Determining the fraction of DOC that decomposes in the SWDS (DOCfy) In the case that the tool is applied to MSW then project participants may choose to either apply a default value (DOCfy = DOCfdefault) or to determine DOCfy or DOCfm based on measurements of the biochemical methane potential of the MSW (BMPMSW) as follows

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 33

(14) Where DOCfy = Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that decomposes under the

specific conditions occurring in the SWDS for year y (weight fraction) BMPj = Biochemical methane potential for the MSW disposed or prevented from disposal

(t CH4 t waste) F = Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCj = Fraction of degradable organic carbon in the waste type j (weight fraction) pjy = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year y (weight fraction) pjm = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in month m (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste in the MSW y = Year of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated (y is a

consecutive period of 12 months) m = Month of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated Leakage The sources of leakage considered in the methodology are CO2 emissions from off-site transportation of waste materials in addition to CH4 and N2O emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digestion gasification processes and processingcombustion of RDF Leakage emissions should be estimated from the following equation Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy (15) Where Lty =Is the leakage emissions from increased transport in year y (tCO2e) Lry =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digester the

gasifier the processingcombustion of RDFstabilized biomass or compost in case it is disposed of in landfills in year y (tCO2e)

Liy =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from MSW incinerator in year y (tCO2e)

Lsy =Is the leakage emissions from end use of stabilized biomass (tCO2e) LCOMPy =Leakage emissions associated with composting in year y (t CO2e yr) Since the project activity does not include the use of MSW incinerator Lsy = 0 The project activity does not involve the disposal of residual waste from processing of RDF or compost in landfill Also for ex-ante estimations the residual waste is taken as 100 inerts Hence Lry =0 The produced compost and RDF will be sold in the market Also for ex-ante estimations for this project activity the weight of stabilized biomass sold offsite for which no sale invoices can be provided is considered as zero Hence Lsy =0 Emissions from Transportation (Lt y)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 34 This would occur when the waste is transported from waste collecting points in the collection area to the treatment facility instead of the existing landfills In this case project participants shall document the following data in the CDM-PDD an overview of collection points from where the waste will be collected their approximate distance (in km) to the treatment facility existing landfills and their approximate distance (in km) to the nearest end-user The emissions are calculated (As per AM0025) from the quantity of fuel (diesel) used and the specific CO2 emission factor of the fuel (diesel) for vehicles

(16) Where NOvehiclesiy =Is the number of vehicles for transport with similar loading capacity DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) NCVfuel =Is the Calorific value of the fuel (MJKg or TJGg) Dfuel =Is the fuel density (kgl) if necessary EFfuel =Is the Emission factor of the fuel (tCO2eMJ) For estimation of NOvehiclesiy the following equation has been used for ex-ante calculation NOvehiclesiy = QyCTy (17) Where Qy = Is the quantity of waste composted in the year ldquoyrdquo (tonnes) CTy = Is the average truck capacity for waste transportation (tonnestruck) Ltywaste is the emissions due to increased transportation from the waste collecting point to the waste treatment facility In this the incremental distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline is equalt to 0 Therefore Ltywaste = 0 For calculation of emissions from transport of compost to the users (Ltycompost) the same formula applies Qy is replaced by Mcompost where Mcompost is the total quantity of compost produced in year y Similarly for calculation of emissions from transport of RDF (LtyRDF) Qy is replaced by MRDF where MRDF is the total quantity of RDF produced in year y Thus Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF (18) Calculation of emission reductions To calculate the emission reductions the following equation has been applied ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly (19) Where ERy = Is the emissions reductions in year y (t CO2e) BEy = Is the emissions in the baseline scenario in year y (tCO2e) PEy = Is the emissions in the project scenario in year y (tCO2e) Ly = Is the leakage in year y (tCO2e)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 35 B62 Data and parameters fixed ex ante (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

Data Parameter AF

Unit

Description Methane destroyed due to regulatory or other requirements

Source of data Local andor national authorities

Value(s) applied 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per the approved methodology AM0025 Version 13 AF shall be assigned a value taking into account the amount of methane generated by the landfills that may be captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations and contractual requirements of the host country Since there exists no regulations or contractual requirement to capture and destroy the methane generated from the landfills in India hence AF has been fixed ex-ante and assigned a value of 0

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

Data Parameter φ Unit Unitless

Description Default value model corrections factor to account for model uncertainties

Source of data Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Value(s) applied 085

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per Table 3 the project activity conforms to HumidWet conditions in Application B Accordingly the default value for φ has been taken from table 3 This is in the absence of monitored data for φ as per Option 2 in the tool for determination of model correction factor

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 36

Data Parameter F

Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction)

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Upon biodegradation organic material is converted to a mixture of

methane and carbon dioxide

Data Parameter OX Unit Unitless

Description Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste)

Source of data Based on an extensive review of published literature on this subject including the IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 01

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment When methane passes through the top-layer part of it is oxidized by

methanotrophic bacteria to produce CO2 The oxidation factor represents the proportion of methane that is oxidized to CO2 This should be distinguished from the methane correction factor (MCF) which is to account for the situation that ambient air might intrude into the SWDS and prevent methane from being formed in the upper layer of SWDS

Data Parameter DOCfDefault

Unit Unitless

Description Default value for the fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) in MSW that decomposes in the SWDS

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 37

Data Parameter MCFy Unit Unitless

Description Methane correction factor

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 08

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46 This comprises all SWDS not meeting the criteria of managed SWDS and which have depths of greater than or equal to 5 meters

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment MCF accounts for the fact that unmanaged SWDS produce less methane

from a given amount of waste than managed SWDS because a larger fraction of waste decomposes aerobically in the top layers of unmanaged SWDS The baseline dumping sites have been found to be greater than 5 meters

Data Parameter DOCj Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Tables 24 and 25)

Value(s) applied

Waste type j DOCj ( wet waste)

Wood and wood products 43 Pulp paper and cardboard

(other than sludge) 40

Food food waste beverages and tobacco (other than sludge) 15

Textiles 24 Garden yard and park waste 20

Glass plastic metal other inert waste 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default values adopted from table 4 as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 38

Data Parameter kj

Unit Unitless

Description Decay rate for the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Table 33)

Value(s) applied Default values adopted from table 5 for Wet Type waste in tropical (Matgt20ordmC) conditions as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Waste type j kj

Slowly degrading

Pulp paper cardboard (other than sludge) textiles

0045

Wood wood products and straw 0025

Rapidly degrading Food food waste sewage sludge beverages and tobacco 0085

Moderately degrading Other (non-food) organic putrescible garden and park waste 0065

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

The annual temperature limits of Lucknow has been adopted from httpwwwnihernetinrbisindia_informationannual20temperaturehtm The average annual temp of Lucknow is thus estimated to be 2582ordmC Thus Lucknow is considered to be in the tropical zone with MAT gt 20ordmC And hence the default value has been obtained as per Table 5

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CEFelec Unit t CO2MWh Description Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid Source of data CEA CO2 Baseline Database Version 70 Jan 2012 (wwwceanicin) Value(s) applied 09216 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

This data is taken from publicly available CEA CO2 baseline database version 7 dated March 2012 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment This value is fixed for the entire crediting period

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 39

Data Parameter EFCH4Default Unit t CH4 t Description Default emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted (wet

basis) Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of

emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 0002 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFN2ODefault Unit t N20 t

Description Default emission factor of nitrous oxide per tonne of waste composted (wet basis)

Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 00002

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 40

Data Parameter NCVydiesel

Unit TJ Gg

Description Net calorific value of diesel consumed for power generation at the MSW processing unit

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Volume 2 Table 12 p118

Value(s) applied 43

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFdiesel Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 741

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter GWPCH4

Unit tCO2 tCH4

Description Global warming potential of CH4

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 21 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 41

Data Parameter GWPN20

Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 310 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter Ddiesel

Unit KgL

Description Density of fuel

Source of data Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) India

Value(s) applied 087

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data BEE value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission Additional comment

B63 Ex ante calculation of emission reductions gtgt For the purpose of ex-ante calculation of emission reduction the following assumptions have been taken into consideration Total quantity of MSW available (tonnesday) 1300 Annual Number of operating days 330 Percentage of organic content in the MSW 47 Rate of compliance 10 Total quantity of biodegradable wastes to be processed 201630 TPD (Calculated) Amount of electricity consumed per day due to the project 1550 kWh Specific gravity of diesel 087 kglitre Calculation of Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid (CEFelec) As the project activity utilises electricity from the NEWNE Grid the project uses the approach (a)

combined margin emission factor for the NEWNE grid following seven steps of ldquoTool to calculate the

emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) and using publicly available data of

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 42 ldquoCentral Electrical Authorityrdquo (the most recent version ldquoCO2 Baseline Database Version 70rdquo13 available

at the time of submission of the CDM PDD to the DOE for Global Stakeholders Consultation) As per the

stepwise approach to calculate the emission factor of an electricity system the EFy is being calculated as

follows

Step 1 Identify the relevant electricity system

As per the CEA CO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 combined emission factor is given

for northern eastern western and north-eastern girds taken together Therefore this combined emission

factor will be used for the NEWNE grid to evaluate the emission reductions

Step 2 Choose whether to include off-grid power plants in the project electricity system (optional)

As per the tool Option I is selected for the project activity as only grid connected power plants are

included in the calculation

Step 3 STEP3 Select a method to determine Operating Margin (OM)

The project proponent has chosen to adopt option a) of step 3 ie consideration of Simple Operating

Margin for the project As per the tool The simple OM method (Option a) can only be used if low-

costmust-run resources2 constitute less than 50 of total grid generation in 1) average of the five most

recent years or 2) based on long-term averages for hydroelectricity production

Referring the relevant data from the CEACO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 the below

table is drawn for the share of net generation by the must-run hydronuclear plants for the past 5 years

Region 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Average NEWNE 1850 1900 1740 1590 1760 177

Since the average is 177 and is below the threshold of 50 as prescribed in the tool hence Simple OM

method is applicable for the project activity

Step 4 Calculate the operating margin emission factor according to the selected method

Simple OM The Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2

Operating Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid The following information has been used for the

calculation of baseline emissions

Simple Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridOMy) (incl Imports) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference

13 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 43 Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2008-09 tCO2MWh 101 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10 tCO2MWh 098

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2010-11 tCO2MWh 097

3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor

tCO2MWh 09843 Calculated based on the most recent data available at the time of submission of the CDM-PDD to the DOE for validation

Note 3 year generation weighted average of Operating margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) STEP 5 Calculate the build margin (BM) emission factor Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2 Build Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid for the year 2010-2011 Build Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridBMy) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference Build Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10

tCO2MWh 0859 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Step 6 Calculate the combined margin emissions factor The Project proponent has opted for Option A ie estimation of Combined Margin by weighted average nethod EFy = wOM EFgridOMy + wBM EFgridBMy Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy) 3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (NEWNE grid) EFgridOMy

tCO2MWh 09843 Refer the above table

Build Margin (NEWNE grid) EFgridBMy

tCO2MWh 0859 Refer the above table

Weighting of operating margin emissions factor wOM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Weighting of build margin emissions factor wBM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy)

tCO2MWh 09216 Calculated

Note Combined margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) Hence CEFelec is calcualted to be 09216 for the Project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 44 Calculation of Project Emission As per equation 3) PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec = (1550 3301000) 09216 = 471 tCO2e Considering diesel consumption per day due to the project activity100 Litre Fconsy = 100 3300871000 = 29 tonnes As per equation 4) PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel = 29 43 741 = 91 tCO2e Considering composition of organic waste as follows Cloth 5 Garden Yard waste 30 Food Waste 55 Paper 10 Thus waste type category (j) = 4 Therefore Quantity of cloth waste = 1300 330 47 5 = 10082 tonnesannum Quantity of garden waste = 1300 330 47 30 = 60489 tonnesannum Quantity of food waste = 1300 330 47 55 = 110897 tonnesannum Quantity of paper waste = 1300 330 47 10 = 20163 tonnesannum Therefore total waste quantity = (10082 + 60489 + 110897 + 20163) = 201630 tonnesannum Therefore amount of waste composted is Qy = (50 of 201630) = 100815 tonnesannum (This is with the consideration of equal distribution of the total biodegradable waste for RDF production and for composting The parameter Qy will be monitored ex-post) As per equation 7) project emission of methane has been calculated as PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 = 100815 0002 21 = 4234 tCO2e As per equation 8) project emission of methane has been calculated as PEN20y = Qy EFN20y GWPN20 = 100815 00002 310 = 6251 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 6) emission from composting has been calculated as PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy = 3243 + 4788 = 10485 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 2) project emission has been calculated as PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy = (471 + 91 + 10485) tCO2e = 11048 tCO2e Calculation of Baseline Emission As per equation 11) methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity is calculated as

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 45 = 085(1-0)21(1-01)1612050508[10082024e-07(1)(1- e-07)] + [6048902e-017(1)(1- e-

017)]+ [110897015e-04(1)(1- e-04)] + [201630 4e-007(1)(1- e-007)] = 34633 tCO2e Considering a compliance rate of 4514 ie RATECompliance

y = 0045 Therefore as per equation 10) Adjusted baseline emission has been calculated as BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) = 38481 (1 ndash 0045) = 17316 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 9) Baseline emission has been calculated as BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy = (34633 ndash 0) + 0 = 33058 tCO2e Calculation of Leakage Emission As per equation 16)

Where DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) For ex-ante estimation this has been considered to be 200 Kms for both compost and RDF

VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) For ex-ante estimation the same has been assumed to be 02 lkm

Now as per equation 17) NOvehiclesiy is given by QyCTy For ex-ante estimation CTy has been considered to be 10 Tons Ltycompost = (18 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 856 tCO2e LtyRDF = (12 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 571 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 18) emission from transportation has been calculated as Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF = (856 + 571) = 1427 tCO2e As per equation 15) leakage emission has been calculated as Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy = 1427 + 0 + 0 + 0 +0 = 1427 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 19) emission reduction has been calculated as ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly = (33058 ndash 11048 ndash 1427) = 20584 tCO2e Emission reduction for all other years in the crediting period has been calculated in a similar manner 14 For details on the value considered refer to Annexure 1 below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 46 B64 Summary of ex ante estimates of emission reductions

Year Baseline

emissions (t CO2e)

Project emissions (t CO2e)

Leakage (t CO2e)

Emission reductions (t CO2e)

2012-2013 33058 11048 1427 20584 2013-2014 57319 11048 1427 44844 2014-2015 75420 11048 1427 62945 2015-2016 89168 11048 1427 76694 2016-2017 99805 11048 1427 87330 2017-2018 108188 11048 1427 95714 2018-2019 114916 11048 1427 102441 2019-2020 120408 11048 1427 107934 2020-2021 124963 11048 1427 112489 2021-2022 128795 11048 1427 116320

Total 952041 110476 14270 827294 Total number of crediting years 10

Annual average over the crediting period

95204 11408 1427 82729

B7 Monitoring plan B71 Data and parameters to be monitored (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 47

Data Parameter Mcompost Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 77220 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of compost produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of compost produced will be cross checked with the sale of

compost Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter M RDF Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 51480 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of RDF produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of RDF produced will be cross checked with the sale of RDF Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 48

Data Parameter Pnjx

Unit - Description Weight fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the

year x Source of data Sample analysis of the MSW by project participant Value(s) applied

SL No Waste type Composition

1 Cloth 5 2 Garden yard waste 30 3 Food Waste 55 4 Paper 10

Source These values are as mentioned in the DPR

Measurement methods and procedures

Sampling method will be selected in order to determine a constant weight fraction of the waste type treated As per the tool the size and frequency of sampling should be statistically with a maximum uncertainty range of 20 at 95 confidence level Since the number of operating days is 330 it is ensured that the waste will be delivered for all the 330 days and hence will be monitored daily Sampling will be done on a monthly basis

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures The sampling of the raw wastes will be done by a laboratory in the project

site The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months

Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter RATECompliancey

Unit Description Rate of compliance Source of data Reports published by Municipal bodies (Central Pollution Control Board

(CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority) Analysis for computation of value for RATECompliance

y has been presented in Annexure 1 provided in the last section of the document

Value(s) applied 45 Measurement methods and procedures

The ex-ante value has been taken as 45 For ex-post calculation of emission reductions compliance rates would be taken from the reports published by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per AM0025 Version 12 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 49

Data Parameter z Unit - Description Number of samples collected during the year x Source of data Lab Records Value(s) applied 12 per year Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter f Unit - Description Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used

in another manner Source of data Plant Log Book- Written information from the operator of the solid waste

disposal site Value(s) applied 0 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- - Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per the methodological tool to determine ldquoEmissions

avoided from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment At present there is no provision for capturing flaring or combusting the

methane emissions at the SWDS This justifies the choice of the data value Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years in both electronic and paper formats

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 50

Data Parameter EG PJFFy Unit MWhyr Description Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the project

activity Source of data Electricity meter reading from electricity meter bill Value(s) applied 512 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the energy meter is 05 Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Monthly QAQC procedures Electricity meter will be subject to regular (in accordance with stipulation

of the meter supplier) maintenance and testing to ensure accuracy Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Fconsy Unit litre Description Fuel (diesel) consumption on-site during year lsquoyrsquo of the crediting period Source of data Purchase invoices Value(s) applied 100 litresday Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 51

Data Parameter DT i compost y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for compost transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap Assumption to be approved by DOE

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Qy Unit Tonnesyr Description Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 100815 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of waste composted will be measured with belt scales installed in the conveyer belt coming out of the pre-sorting area Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Once in three yearsfrom NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the belt scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures The belt scales will be calibrated as per standards provided by the

manufacturer Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 52

Data Parameter DT i RDF y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for RDF transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CTt y Unit Tonnestruck Description Carrying capacity of each truck delivering waste to the composting

installation in year y Source of data The maximum carrying capacity as stated on the truckrsquos nameplate is

registered by personnel at the entrance gate of the composting installation Value(s) applied 10 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be monitored by the challan received from the transport contractors post the loading of the vehicle Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- - Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 5 kgs Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Every vehicle QAQC procedures Weighbridge or any other applicable weighing device is subject to periodic

calibration (in accordance with stipulation of the weighing device supplier)

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 53

Data Parameter VFcons Unit litre km Description Average fuel consumption per kilometre of vehicles for compost

transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 5 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- Transporterrsquos challan Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency-

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures Transporterrsquos challan is a third-party document Hence QAQC procedures

are not required Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

B72 Sampling plan gtgt The project proponent has proposed a sampling plan in accordance with ldquoStandard for sampling and surveys for CDM project activities and programme of activitiesrdquo Version 020 ( EB 65 Annex 2) Sampling will be done to determine weight fraction of the waste type treated Sampling procedures will be followed in-line with the sectoral best practices and as per the guidelines laid out Section 33 Chapter 3 of the Manual on Solid Waste Management as published by the Ministry of Urban Development for public information15 Therefore on each sample collection day about 100 Kg of incoming MSW will be withdrawn randomly from four incoming trucks entering the project site About 10 Kg of MSW each will be collected from ten randomly selected points from outside and inside of the solid waste heap so piled The total quantity of waste so collected (approx 100 Kg) will then be thoroughly mixed and then reduced by quartering till a sample of such a size was obtained which could be handled by the laboratory Thus each master sample of approximately 25 Kg will be sent to the accredited laboratory for composition analysis Sampling will be done once in a month in in-house laboratory The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months B73 Other elements of monitoring plan gtgt Monitoring refers to the collection and archiving of all relevant data necessary for determining the baseline measuring anthropogenic emissions by sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) within the project boundary of a CDM project activity and leakage as applicable The project activity is a GHG avoidance project where the waste materials (ie municipal solid wastes) collected will be treated aerobically to produce compost and mechanically to produce RDF and will be sold in an open market The financial performance of the project activity depends significantly on the CDM revenue to be availed through sale of Certified Emission Reduction (CER) units accrued from the project activity This will require monitoring of all the relevant GHG performance parameters Therefore

15 httpurbanindianicinpublicinfoswmchap3pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 54 the project proponent has developed a monitoring protocol which will be followed throughout the proposed crediting period in order to ensure proper operation of the project activity resulting in generation of carbon credits The same is explained below Monitoring Plan Monitoring the projectrsquos performance in terms of ERs achievement requires the fulfillment of operational data collection and processing obligations from the operator The operator of compost plant has the primary obligation to collect data that would facilitate the calculation of the project ERs The data shall be collected by the operator based on the most recent available information as per the Procedures presented in this PDD In addition roles and responsibilities of monitoring personnel would be well defined

10 Objective of monitoring plan sect To ensure smooth uninterrupted operation of the project activity and hence generation of carbon

credits sect To ensure proper monitoring reporting and verification of all the parameters required to evaluate

the GHG performance of the project activity sect To identify flaws in the monitoring system and open up opportunities for further improvement

20 Roles and Responsibilities

The project proponent has developed a team who will be involved in monitoring reporting and verification of all the GHG performance related parameters The following schematic diagram will explain the individual roles and responsibilities of all the members of the team

Team Responsibility

Shift Operator Monitoring and reporting the GHG performance related parameters following the guidance provided in the Project Design Document

Shift In-charge

- Reviewing the GHG performance related parameters as recorded by the Shift Operator in every shift - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the reported parameters - Preparation of daily and monthly reports

Plant Manager

- Reviewing the daily and monthly reports in consultation with the Shift In-charge - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the daily and monthly reports - Ensuring calibration of the monitoring equipments as and when required

Management Representative(s)-

Production Department

- Reviewing the monthly and annual production statistics - Evaluating the GHG performance of the project activity - Identify opportunities for further improvement

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 55 SECTION C Duration and crediting period C1 Duration of project activity C11 Start date of project activity gtgt 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity C12 Expected operational lifetime of project activity gtgt 25 years 0 months C2 Crediting period of project activity C21 Type of crediting period gtgt The project proponent has opted for a fixed crediting period C22 Start date of crediting period gtgt 01092012 or date of registration of the project activity with UNFCCC whichever is later C23 Length of crediting period 10 years 0 months

SECTION D Environmental impacts D1 Analysis of environmental impacts gtgt In the applicable EIA notification ie SO 3067(E)16 dated 01122009 Ministry of Environment amp Forests (MoEF) Govt of India the Municipal Solid Waste projects are not included in the list of projects that has to get Prior Environmental Clearance (EC) either from State or Central Govt authorities and hence no EIA study was conducted The project does not fall under the purview of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) notification of the Ministry of Environment and Forest Government of India However due weightage has been given to environmental aspects D2 Environmental impact assessment gtgt The environmental impacts of the project activity are not considered to be significant by the project participant or the host party The project activity would help in avoidance of emissions caused due to the combustion of fossil fuels such as SOx NOx and particulate matter

SECTION E Local stakeholder consultation E1 Solicitation of comments from local stakeholders gtgt Stakeholder meeting was convened by Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd at the plant site at Shiveri Lucknow on 23032012 to explain the salient details of the Project its benefits to the society and villagers Prior to the meeting individual invitation letters were sent to each of the identified stakeholder on 15032012 to obtain their consensus for attending the meeting The objective of the meeting was to conduct open discussion where stakeholders are encouraged to raise questions express their concern and

16 httpmoefnicindownloadsrules-and-regulations3067pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 56 comments about the proposed project through a participatory process and to list down any probable concern of stakeholders The various stakeholders present in the meeting were the local inhabitants employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd representatives from equipment supplier Eco Trademart Pvt Ltd representatives of Lucknow Development Agency and local NGO representatives The MD of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd then briefed them about the project activity as per the following schedule

bull Project Background and information about the company bull Technology Involved in the project activity bull Benefits and impacts of the project activity bull Process of Clean Development Mechanism

Later half of the meeting a dedicated session was allotted for question and answer session and comments from the stakeholders were invited E2 Summary of comments received gtgt Meeting was very interactive and got very encouraging response from stakeholders The local villagers and the office bearers expressed their happiness with the setting up of an environment friendly project in their village as it had resulted in generation of employment opportunities both for literate and illiterate people Development of infrastructure in the locality was highly appreciated Few of prominent attendees are as follows S No Name Age Sex

(MF) Occupation Village

1 MrDunna 65 M Gram Pradhan Shiveri

2 SdBalbir Singh Maan 26 M Secretary

NGO - Umeed Chowk

3 Abhishek Singh 36 M

Equipments Supplier ndash Eco Trademart Pvt

Ltd

Dubagga

4 MrPCMehrotra 72 M

Retired Chief EngineerLDALu

cknow Aliganj

The meeting also included employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd The project received unanimous acknowledgement and appreciation from all the attendees at the meeting The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech in their attempt to combat global warming and simultaneously improve the local hygiene and modernize municipal solid waste management of Lucknow has been applauded by all

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 57 E3 Report on consideration of comments received gtgt The project has received positive amp encouraging feedback from the stakeholders concerned All the stakeholders have appreciated and encouraged the project proponent for taking up this project activity In view of various direct and indirect benefits (social economical and environmental) all the stakeholders have supported the project activity The documents supporting the stakeholder consultation will be submitted to the DOE Examples of few questions as raised by the stakeholders and their respective clarifications as provided by the project proponent have been detailed below 1What is CER CERs or Certified Emission Reductions are a ldquocertificaterdquo just like a stock A CER is given by the CDM Executive Board to projects in developing countries to certify they have reduced greeen house gas emissions by one tonne of carbon dioxide per year 2-What is Global Warming Potential Ans Green house gases affect global warming with varying intensities This intensity is measured by the ldquoglobal warming potentialrdquo of the gas 3- Is there any negative impact on surrounding area Ans There is no negative impact on surrounding area 4-What are carbon credits How these will obtained Who will by them Ans Carbon credits are generated in the developing countries by reducing the greenhouse gases emission in the atmosphere One tonne of carbon dioxide saved is equal to one carbon credit All steps of CDM cycle was explained and the process of Credits monetization 5-How does CDM benefit society Ans CDM is clean development mechanism a tool to provide incentives to mitigate the emission of greenhouse gases which are enhancing the climate change The purpose of this programme is to reduce emission of GHGs as well as promote sustainable development in host country Therefore developing country like India will gain financial and environmental benefits by reducing the emission of ever increasing GHGs to save the earth 6Would the project provide employment opportunities and or improve economic development of area There would be generation of employment through this project activity At the same point of time there would be regular trainings that would be imparted to the local population 7 How this project will help to address the issues raised by the local villagers The project will help the stake holders in the following ways A Create jobs for the local masses B Create business opportunities for the contractors C Increase awareness of the people regarding the local and global environment D Help to conserve depleting resources of fossil fuel such as coal It was also mentioned in the meeting that 2 of the CER revenue earned from the project would be utilized in developmental works of the local community There would be a robust monitoring plan for the same and the plant manager Mr Sachin Mehta was appointed as the local contact person for the same

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 58 The project received unanimous appreciation from the stakeholders present The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd towards mitigation of global warming was applauded by all

SECTION F Approval and authorization gtgt The project has received the following approvalsclearances

1) No objection certificate from Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board Lucknow 2) Environmental clearance certificate from the State Level Environment Impact Assessment

Authority Uttar Pradesh 3) No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

The project has applied for Host Country Approval and will be provided to the DOE during the course of project validation

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 59 Appendix A 1 The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has committed to share 2 (mention

approximate amount in INR per year) of its Certified Emission Reduction (CERs) in connection with hisher CDM project based on the issuance and transaction of the CERs

2 The committed amount of money will be utilized for addressing the identified issues in the following villages Identified Villages Total Population Key issues for development Shiveri 1200 approx The project is located in a rural area and the economy

of the area where the project activity is located is heavily dependent on agriculture and other farm based livelihoods The process of stakeholder engagement undertaken as a part of social impact assessment came across community needs and expectations from the project The process of need assessment conducted recently and prioritization undertaken as part of an exercise to seek participation in the preparation of the community development plan and livelihood restoration plan came across the following community needs

bull Skill trainingup-gradation institute for youth and creation of employment opportunities

bull Education support to children for secondary and higher secondary education

bull Drinking water bull Strengthening health infrastructure bull Developing land resources

Enhancing agriculture productivity and market linkages

Pankhera 800 approx

3 Accordingly the project proponent has identified the activities support for the following villages

S No Village Name ActivitiesSupport proposed over the project life time

Approximate amount in INR

1 Shiveri Skill training and Capacity Building Initiative

a Objective To build skill sets of the youth in the community in order to realize the potential employment opportunities arising due to the project and also enhance employment options elsewhere

b Target Beneficiaries Youth especially belonging to the families of the nearby villagers and those belonging to the economically and socially vulnerable

It will be difficult to confirm the exact allocation of funds for individual activities and for individual villages now as the expenditure would depend upon the social needs of the identified stakeholders much nearer to the Commercial Operation Date

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 60

communities

c Proposed Activities

i) Self help group for the women will be formed and will be imparted skill development training for initiating some income generation activities One group will be formed in each target village

ii) Imparting of training to youths on various skills having potential for starting self employment program or to enable them to get wage employment

2 Health Intervention a Objective Improved health care access and

delivery systems and reduction in incidence of diseases and improved health behavior of the community

b c Target Beneficiaries General community

with focus on elderly women children and economically weaker section

d e Proposed Activities i)To organize health awareness among

community members especially women on various facets of reproductive and child health hygiene sanitation etc

ii) To organize general health camps in the target villages

iii) To establish network with Government health functionaries in strengthening the intervention in the target villages

To conduct the school health camps and also health education programs

3 Agriculture Natural Resource Management and Allied Activities

a Objective To work toward improving the agriculture and allied activities in the target area

b c Target beneficiaries Land owners

economically backward and marginal farmers

d Description of proposed activities i) To organize training programme for

(COD) of the Project The Project Proponent will allocate funds for each identified activity and for each village during each crediting period accordingly

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 61

farmers on latest agriculture methods and technologies

ii) To organize exposure visits for the farmers to Agriculture universities kisan melas and other modern agriculture farms

iii) To organize training programme on animal husbandry

iv) To organize cattle health camp v)To get the existing water bodies repaired

to increase the availability of water and also to increase the ground water recharge

4 Education a Objective To strengthen the education

infrastructure at village level to improve access and quality of existing education service

b Target Beneficiaries Children in school going age group especially girls and children belonging to economically and socially vulnerable community

c Proposed activities

i) Strengthening early childhood education and development by provisioning of quality pre school kits and skill development

ii)Provisioning of scholarship for students from socially and economically weaker sections of the society especially for girls for both academic and professional courses iii)Organizing sports and other competitions in schools and for village youth clubs

4 The implementation details along with local contact and money transfer mechanism are as follows

The plan as mentioned above was discussed in details with the stakeholders present at the local stakeholder meeting held at the project site During the meeting the project proponent received unanimous appreciation and encouragement from the meeting attendees The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd would be implementing the plan themselves The project manager of Jyoti Enviro Tech was nominated as the local contact for the developmental plan shared Local contact of project proponent Money transfer mechanism

Mr Sachin Mehta Manager Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd Adress Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Lucknow ndash 226003 Phone 0522 ndash4049397

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 62 5 Details of monitoring arrangement

Monitoring Committee

The expenditure details can be verified by the Designated Operational Entity (DOE) during the verification If required the same can also be certified by a chartered accountant The expenditure details would be made public in the annual report of the company

Monitoring Parameters

Expenditure of 2 earning (net realizable value) from sale of CER available from the project activity would be monitored The sustainability initiatives undertaken by the company would be analyzed in detail during the verification

Monitoring Frequency Yearly

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 63

Appendix 1 Contact information of project participants

Organization name Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd StreetPO Box Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Building City Lucknow StateRegion Uttar Pradesh Postcode 226003 Country India Telephone 0522 ndash4049397 Fax E-mail jyotienvirogmailcom Website Contact person Title Manager Salutation Mr Last name Mehta Middle name First name Sachin Department Projects Mobile Direct fax Direct tel 0522 ndash4049397 Personal e-mail jyotienvirogmailcom

Appendix 2 Affirmation regarding public funding

There is no public funding available for the project The same has been mentioned in section A4

Appendix 3 Applicability of selected methodology

The applicability of the project activity to the selected methodology has been demonstrated in section B2

Appendix 4 Further background information on ex ante calculation of emission reductions

All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 5 Further background information on monitoring plan

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 64 All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 6 Summary of post registration changes

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 65

Annexure 1 Analysis for value of RATECompliancey for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction

State level analysis of Municipal Solid Waste handling practice in the state of Uttar Pradesh reveals that at few locations scientific handling practices have been adopted with simultaneous consideration of CDM benefits associated with the project

While some municipal bodies still have plans for installation of plants for scientific handling of Municipal Solid Waste and subsequent compost manufacturing with consideration of carbon credits

Sl no Location Present practice CDM

consideration Source

1 Kanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex at Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh India

2 Ghaziabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source17

3 Agra

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) processing plant in Agra by Ultra Urban Infratech Limited

4 Varanasi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Varanasi India

5 Meerut

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Meerut India

6 Allahabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Allahabad Uttar Pradesh

7 Bareilly

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source18

8 Aligarh

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Aligarh India

17

httpncrpbnicinTechnical_assistance_report_comp_BVolume20IV20Solid20Waste20Management20GhaziabadWSA_ADB20NCRPB_FR_Vol_IV-A_(GZB20Main20Report)pdf

18 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPBarielly_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 66

9 Moradabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management Project at Moradabad India

10 Saharanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources19

11 Gorakhpur Unscientific practice of open dumping still persists

NA Publicly available sources20

12 Mathura

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Mathura Uttar Pradesh

13 Jhansi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources21

14 Muzaffarnagar

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex

15 Mirzapur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Mirzapur India

16 Amravati

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Amravati India

17 Sambhal Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Have been considered as a single bundled project

18 Badaun 19 Fatehpur 20 Jaunpur 21 Ballia Hence from the above list it is evident only one (as highlighted) out of 21 locations comply to the MSW rules Hence for ex ante estimation RATECompliance

y is computed as presented below RATECompliance

y = (1 21) = 47 = 0047

------------

19

httpwwwindiawaterportalorgsitesindiawaterportalorgfilesCII_Excellence20in20Water20Management_ITC20Saharanpur_2009pdf

20 httpwwwgeagindiaorgPDFSOLID20WASTEpdf 21 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPJhansi_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 67

History of the document

Version Date Nature of revision 041 11 April 2012 Editorial revision to change version 02 line in history box from Annex 06 to

Annex 06b 040 EB 66

13 March 2012 Revision required to ensure consistency with the ldquoGuidelines for completing the project design document form for CDM project activitiesrdquo (EB 66 Annex 8)

03 EB 25 Annex 15 26 July 2006

02 EB 14 Annex 06b 14 June 2004

01 EB 05 Paragraph 12 03 August 2002

Initial adoption

Decision Class Regulatory Document Type Form Business Function Registration

Page 4: Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 4 A24 PhysicalGeographical location gtgt The proposed project activity will be implemented in Shiveri village in the district of Lucknow in the state of Uttar Pradesh Lucknow is the capital of one of the largest states of India Uttar Pradesh It is located at latitudes 26deg 51 402rdquoN and longitudes 80deg 4952rdquoE Lucknow is accessible from every part of India through air rail and road It is directly connected with New Delhi Patna Kolkata Mumbai Varanasi and other major cities by Amausi airport

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 5 A3 Technologies andor measures gtgt Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd follows a scientific waste management approach which includes aerobic treatment of bio-degradable solid waste to produce compost and refuse derived fuel The waste reaching the processing plant will be received in two separate parts biodegradable and non-biodegradable The biodegradable part of the wastes would be processed to produce compost and RDF while the inert materials in non-biodegradable wastes will be delivered to the sanitary landfill The collection of waste is estimated to be 1300 TPD The scope of project activity includes

bull Aerobic processing and mechanical treatment of the waste The collection vehicles that bring in the

waste from the transfer station to the MSW processing site will be weighed in a weighbridge at the entrance of the facility every time the vehicles come in and go out and the respective weights will be recorded This will be done to have a record of the incoming MSW quantities by weight Thereafter the vehicles carrying wastes will be directed to the specified points for unloading The inert waste will be unloaded at the identified site for sanitary landfill and the recyclable materials will be segregated for sale to scrap dealers The rest of the waste ie the biodegradable wastes will be unloaded at pits which mark the start point of the waste processing line A seepage line is present at the bottom of each pit which connects with the similar lines from other pits This is meant for collecting the leachate that is generated from the waste deposition at the pits

Each pit has a hopper adjacent to it The wastes collected from the pit by the EOT crane is fed into the hopper through a conveyer belt The hopper leads the waste into a pre-sorting section and thereafter through a conveyer belt into a rotary screen trommel where the waste is screened The wastes below 100mm as screened in the trommel are led to the composting area whereas those screened above 100 mm are led by another conveyer belt to the area for production of RDF a) Production of compost The trommel is a rotary screen that separates the waste on the basis of size The biodegradable wastes fed into the trommel is further screened to segregate wastes below and above 100 mm size The wastes below 100mm are undergone composting The waste is collected by the EOT cranes and led to the curing and drying area where the waste is heaped and biological inoculum are sprayed at regular intervals In this area the moisture of the waste is dried up and maintained at 5-10 The heaps are turned at scheduled intervals to ensure a proper aerobic processing of the waste The heap of waste thus accumulated is further led to the composting pads The waste is processed for duration of 20-25 days In the course of this time through monitored processing the waste is transformed into a brown colored mass resembling humus Further the waste is passed through 3 more stages of trommel for screening the mass of waste successively into 35mm 16mm and finally to 4 mm At this stage the waste is fed into the finishing area Finishing area comprises of sheds where the final product of waste processing compost is packed and made ready to be sold in the market b) Production of Reduce derived fuel (RDF) Wastes screened at the trommel above 100mm are directed to a conveyer line carrying them to an adjacent area where the waste will be processed to produce reduce derived fuel (RDF) The waste is passed through a vibrating conveyer where a blower segregates any plastic material from the waste The rest waste is then passed through the conveyer into the RDF producing machine The production of RDF involves processing of the waste by magnetic shredders and subsequent homogenizing of the

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 6

waste in homogenizers Thereafter the uniform mass of waste thus prepared is compressed by hydraulic systems to produce RDF units resembling the shape of soap blocks The lifetime of the project equipments is specified as 25 yrs 00 months Also it is to be noted that the project does not involve any technology transfer from Annex 1 countries The training required for the persons for operation and maintenance of the equipments would be provided through capacity building sessions by the technology provider and would be frequently organized by the project proponent

Brief description of type of monitoring equipments For monitoring the various parameters of the project the following equipments would be used Sl No Parameter Description of equipment type 1 Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 2 Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 3 Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the

project activity Energy meter

4 Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Belt scales 5 Raw waste quantity Weigh bridge Further details on the same have been furnished in Section B71 under section ldquoData and parameters to be monitoredrdquo The various monitoring points in the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 7 A4 Parties and project participants

Party involved (host) indicates a host Party

Private andor public entity(ies) project participants

(as applicable)

Indicate if the Party involved wishes to be considered as

project participant (YesNo)

India(host)

Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd (Private entity)

No

A5 Public funding of project activity gtgt The project has not received any Official Development Assistance (ODA) from Annex I countries

SECTION B Application of selected approved baseline and monitoring methodology B1 Reference of methodology gtgt Title of the approved baseline and monitoring methodology ldquoAvoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processesrdquo Version 13 EB 65 Sectoral Scope 01 and 13 Reference ldquoTool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Version 0600 EB 65 Methodological tool for ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 ldquoTool to calculate the emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo Version 0221 EB 63 Methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 B2 Applicability of methodology gtgt The project meets all the applicability criteria as set out in the methodology The applicability conditions of the methodology AM0025 Version 13 for the project activity have been justified as below Sr No

Applicability Conditions as per AM0025 Version 13

Justification

1 The project activity involves one or a combination of the following waste treatment options for the fresh waste that in a given year would have otherwise been disposed of in a landfill (a) A composting process in aerobic conditions (b) Gasification to produce syngas and its use (c) Anaerobic digestion with biogas collection and flaring andor its use The anaerobic digester processes only the waste for which emission reductions are claimed in this methodology If the biogas is processed and upgraded to the quality of natural gas and it is distributed as energy via natural gas

The project activity involves a combination of the waste treatment options a) A composting process in aerobic conditions d) Mechanical treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) The project activity does not involve the use of RDF Also the project activity does not involve any thermal operation In the absence of the project the fresh waste would have been disposed off in a landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 8

distribution grid project activities may use approved methodology AM0053 in conjunction with this methodology In such cases the baseline scenario identification procedure and additionality assessment shall be undertaken for the combination of the two components of the project activity ie biomethane emission avoidance and displacement of natural gas (d) Mechanicalthermal treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) and its use The thermal treatment process (dehydration) occurs under controlled conditions (up to 300 degrees Celsius) In case of thermal treatment process the process shall generate a stabilized biomass that would be used as fuel or raw material in other industrial process The physical and chemical properties of the produced RDFSB shall be homogenous and constant over time (e) Incineration of fresh waste for energy generation electricity andor heat The thermal energy generated is either consumed on-site andor exported to a nearby facility Electricity generated is either consumed on-site exported to the grid or exported to a nearby facility The incinerator is rotating fluidized bed or circulating fluidized bed or hearth or grate type

2 In case of anaerobic digestion gasification or RDF processing of waste the residual waste from these processes is aerobically composted andor delivered to a landfill

In RDF processing of waste the residual biodegradable waste is aerobically composted and the remainder ie the inert portion is delivered to the pre-identified sanitary landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

3 In case of composting the produced compost is either used as soil conditioner or disposed of in landfills

The compost produced in the project activity will be sold in the market that will be used as a soil conditioner This justifies the applicability criteria

4 In case of RDFstabilized biomass processing the produced RDFstabilized biomass should not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 9

This justifies the applicability criteria

5 If RDFSB is disposed of in a landfill project proponent shall provide degradability analysis on an annual basis to demonstrate that the methane generation in the life-cycle of the SB is below 1 of related emissions It has to be demonstrated regularly that the characteristics of the produced RDFSB should not allow for re-absorption of moisture of more than 3 Otherwise monitoring the fate of the produced RDFSB is necessary to ensure that it is not subject to anaerobic conditions in its lifecycle

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be disposed in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

6 In the case of incineration of the waste the waste should not be stored longer than 10 days The waste should not be stored in conditions that would lead to anaerobic decomposition and hence generation of CH4

The project activity does not involve the incineration of waste Hence this condition is not applicable

7 The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity can be determined in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity

The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity will be determined as per the process described in section B72 of PDD in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity This justifies the applicability criteria

8 The project activity may include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation from the biogas syngas captured RDFstabilized biomass produced combustion heat generated in the incineration process respectively from the anaerobic digester the gasifier RDFstabilized biomass combustor and waste incinerator The electricity can be exported to the grid andor used internally at the project site In the case of RDFSB produced the emission reductions can be claimed only for the cases where the RDFSB used for electricity andor thermal energy generation can be monitored

The project activity does not include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation Hence this condition is not applicable

9 Waste handling in the baseline scenario The MSW 2000 rules stipulated by GoI mandated

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 10

shows a continuation of current practice of disposing the waste in a landfill despite environmental regulation that mandates the treatment of the waste if any using any of the project activity treatment options mentioned above

the municipal bodies to treat the municipal waste in a scientific manner 2 However despite the rules the common practice of handling the waste in the country is continuation of current practice of dumping the wastes in a disposal site 3 In addition no single municipality or local body has complied with the guidelines stipulated by MSW Rules 2000 in the country4 Further the present scenario of solid waste management in Lucknow is highly unsynchronized and inadequate and entails dumping of waste in open areas5 This justifies the applicability criteria

10 The compliance rate of the environmental regulations during (part of) the crediting period is below 50 if monitored compliance with the MSW rules exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit since the assumption that the policy is not enforced is no longer tenable

The compliance rate of Indian MSW Rules 2000 is below 50 No single municipality or local body in India has complied with the guidelines stipulated in the MSW Rules 20006 However a conservative value of 45 is taken for ex-ante estimations of emission reductions7 This justifies the applicability criteria

11 Local regulations do not constrain the establishment of RDF production plantsthermal treatment plants nor the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material

There is no such regulations that constrain the establishment of RDF production nor any regulation for the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material This justifies the applicability criteria

12 In case of RDFstabilized biomass production project proponent shall provide evidences that no GHG emissions occur other than biogenic CO2 due to chemical reactions during the thermal treatment process (such as Chimney Gas Analysis report)

The project activity does not involve any thermal treatment in case of RDF production The process involved is purely mechanical treatment Hence this condition is not applicable

13 The project activity does not involve thermal There is no waste incineration in the proposed

2 httpenvfornicinlegishsmmswmhrhtml 3 httpwwwnswaicomimagesnewslettersjun2010pdf 4 Sunil Kumar Bhattacharyya JK Vaidya AN Tapan Chakrabarti Sukumar Devotta Akolkar AB Assessment of the status of municipal solid waste management in metro cities state capitals class I cities and class II towns in India An insight pg 3 Waste Management journal homepage wwwelseviercomlocatewasman 5 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf Page 26 Paragraph 34 describes the present scenario of solid waste management in

Lucknow 6 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 8

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf 7 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 9

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 11

treatment process of neither industrial nor hospital waste

project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

14 In case of waste incineration if auxiliary fossil fuel is added into the incinerator the fraction of energy generated by auxiliary fossil fuel is no more than 50 of the total energy generated in the incinerator

There is no waste incineration in the proposed project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

15 This methodology is not applicable to project activities that involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill This should be treated as a separate project activity due to the difference in waste characteristics of existing and fresh waste which may have an implication on the baseline scenario determination

Project activity does not involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

Thus as per the methodology AM0025 the project activity involves the treatment of fresh waste (ie municipal solid waste) originally intended for dumping through a combination of the processes a) composting b) RDF processing without incineration The project activity avoids methane emissions by diverting organic waste from being dumped where methane emissions are caused by anaerobic decomposition By treating the fresh waste through alternative treatment options these methane emissions are avoided Therefore the project meets the applicability conditions of AM0025 B3 Project boundary As per AM0025 the spatial extent of the project boundary is the site of the project activity where the waste is treated This includes the facilities for processing the waste on-site electricity consumption onsite fuel use and the sanitary landfill site The project boundary does not include facilities for waste collection sorting and transport to the project site The summary of gases and sources included in the project boundary and justification explanation where gases and sources are not included is listed below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 12

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation B

asel

ine

scen

ario

Emissions from decomposition of waste at the landfill site

CO2 Excluded CO2 emissions from the decomposition of organic waste are not accounted

CH4 Included The major source of emissions in the baseline since the fresh waste is being disposed off in the landfill Hence included

N2O Excluded N2O emissions are small compared to CH4 emissions from landfills Exclusion of this gas is conservative

Emissions from electricity consumption

CO2 Excluded Electricity is not being consumed in the baseline Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

Proj

ect s

cena

rio

On-site fossil fuel consumption due to the project activity other than for electricity generation

CO2 Included The project activity involves on-site fossil fuel consumption Hence included

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

Emissions from on-site electricity use

CO2 Included The project activity involves consumption of electricity from the grid Hence included

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded

The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 13

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation Pr

ojec

t sce

nari

o

Direct emissions from the waste treatment processes

N2O Included May be an important emission source N2O can be emitted from composting activities Hence included

CO2 Included CO2 emissions from decomposition of organic waste are not accounted8

CH4 Included Composting process may not be complete and result in anaerobic decay resulting in CH4 emissions

Emissions from waste water treatment

CO2 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

CH4 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

A graphical representation of the project boundary is shown below

Bio degradable waste processing Segregated Inert Recyclables

Compost RDF Sanitary landfill

Open market

MSW Collection in Lucknow

MSW Processing Site

PROJECT BOUNDARY

Electricity fromDiesel

Electricity from Grid

Consumption of Electricity

8 CO2 emissions from the combustion or decomposition of biomass (see definition by the EB in Annex 8 of the EBs 20th meeting report) are not accounted as GHG emissions Where the combustion or decomposition of biomass under a CDM project activity results in a decrease of carbon pools such stock changes should be considered in the calculation of emission reductions This is not the case for waste treatment projects

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 14 The various monitoring points in the project activity as included within the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram as given below

B4 Establishment and description of baseline scenario gtgt The approved methodology AM0025 version 12 recommends the use of the latest version of the tool for demonstration and assessment of additionality (version 0600) to determine the most plausible baseline scenarios for the project The various steps to establish the additionality of the project as per the methodological tool is demonstrated pictorially as given below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 15

According to the approved methodology AM0025 the baseline scenario of the activity is defined as disposal of the waste in open dump yards without taking any measures to capture the landfill gas or avoid methane emission due to the anaerobic decomposition of waste The procedure to define the baseline scenario as per AM0025 is as follows Step 1 Identification of alternative scenarios The most realistic and credible alternatives available to the project activity have been identified using the following sub steps

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 16 Sub-step 1a Defining alternatives to project activity The approved methodology has provided the following alternatives for the disposaltreatment of the fresh waste in the absence of the project activity ie the scenario relevant for estimating baseline methane emissions to be analysed should include inter alia M1 The project activity (ie composting gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas Assessment of the alternatives for waste treatment

Alternative Description Justification M1 The project activity (ie composting

gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project

This alternative seems to be a realistic and plausible alternative The project activity not implemented as a CDM project is however not a feasible alternative as the project involves high investment cost in order to set up the processing plant whereas the return from the project activity is exceptionally low (As discussed in detail in Section B5) However M1 is still a plausible option and is subjected to further consideration as a baseline scenario

M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared

The cost of construction operation and maintenance of an engineered landfill is high as compared to the zerominimal expenditure in the dumping of waste Hence the scope of landfill gas recovery is minimized in India Hence this scenario M2 is not feasible and is thus eliminated from further consideration as baseline scenario

M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas

Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas is the most common practice in India as demonstrated in Section B5 The same has been found to be prevalent in Lucknow in the absence of the project activity9 Hence this is a common practice that faces no barriers because of low expenditure low O amp M cost non-requirement of skilled labor etc Thus this is the most widely practiced method for MSW disposal throughout the country

9 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf page 26 paragraph 34

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 17

This alternative M3 is considered as the most likely baseline scenario for the project activity

The methodology further states that ldquoIf energy is exported to a grid andor to a nearby industry or used on-site realistic and credible alternatives should also be separately determined for bull Power generation in the absence of the project activity bull Heat generation in the absence of the project activityrdquo Under the scope of the project activity neither heat nor power generation takes place Hence the clause as mentioned above is not applicable to the project activity Thus alternatives M1 and M3 are further subjected for baseline consideration Alternative M2 is not considered as a plausible and realistic baseline scenario for the project activity Sub-step 1b Consistency with mandatory laws and regulations The MSW (Management and Handling) Rules 2000 notified by Ministry of Environment and Forests Government of India makes it mandatory for proper and scientific management of solid waste Under this rule land filling of the waste is not allowed but based on the studies10 and surveys carried out it was observed that the most common practice in India to dispose the solid waste is open dumping and land filling without any treatment and processing It is observed that these rules are not implementedenforced systematically thus leading to the most widespread practice of dumping waste in the country Conclusion Thus the alternatives M1 and M3 has been considered further Outcome of Sub-step 1b The two identified realistic and credible alternative scenario(s) to the project activity that are in compliance with mandatory legislation and regulations taking into account the enforcement in the country and EB decisions on national andor sectoral policies and regulations are as follows Alternative M1 The project activity carried out without the CDM and Alternative M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas (Continuation of the current practice of disposal in landfill) Step 2 Identify the fuel for the baseline choice of energy source taking into account the national andor sectoral policies as applicable Since there is no power generation or heat utilization in the project activity thus baseline does not involve use of fuel for energy Outcome of Sub-step 2 Alternatives M1 and M3 have been subjected for further consideration Step 3 Step 2 andor Step 3 of the latest approved version of the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo shall be used to assess which of these alternatives should be excluded from further consideration (eg alternatives facing prohibitive barriers or those clearly economically unattractive) The above analysis in Step 1 and Step 2 leaves with two alternatives M1 and M3

10 Present Scenario of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Dumping Grounds in India by Amiya Kumar Sahu National Solid Waste Association of India Mumbai

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 18 The further analysis has been discussed in detail in Section B5 below Step 4 Where more than one credible and plausible alternative remains project participants shall as a conservative assumption use the alternative baseline scenario that results in the lowest baseline emissions as the most likely baseline scenario The least emission alternative will be identified for each component of the baseline scenario In assessing these scenarios any regulatory or contractual requirements should be taken into consideration As demonstrated in Section B5 only one alternative remains after applying the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo to assess exclusion of the alternatives from further consideration Hence this step is not applicable as there is only one alternative available to the project activity As demonstrated in section B5 it is evident that after investment analysis only one alternative ie M3 remains as the most plausible option and hence this has been considered as the baseline to the project activity B5 Demonstration of additionality gtgt As per the approved methodology Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has identified the above mentioned realistic and credible alternative(s) (M1 and M3) that were available to them and that would provide output and services comparable to the project activity (refer section B4) These alternatives are in compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements The Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality stipulates that either Step 2 (Investment Analysis) or Step 3 (Barrier Analysis) or both can be selected to demonstrate additionality As the Project faces financial barriers for its implementation in the absence of CDM it is appropriate to choose Step 2 to demonstrate its additionality Step 2 Investment analysis The alternative considered for further analysis is alternative ldquoM3rdquo being the most commonly followed practice Sub-step 2a Determine appropriate analysis method Since the project generates incomes other than CDM related income for the purpose of investment analysis Option III (Benchmark Analysis) is chosen as it is deemed as the most appropriate analysis method where the returns on the investment in the project activity is compared to benchmark returns Sub-step 2b Option III Apply benchmark analysis The indicator used for carrying out the investment analysis is IRR that will determine the feasibility of the project activity This is compared with the Prime Lending Rate available at the time of investment decision For this purpose the PLR of Reserve Bank of India has been considered which is found to be 1200 as per Benchmark PLR of RBI during Aug-200911 Sub-step 2c Calculation and comparison of financial indicators The IRR for the proposed project activity without CDM revenue is computed for a period of 20 years lifetime A detailed investment analysis has been carried out and presented in the supported excel sheets The data and analysis is presented here The techno-economical parameters used for IRR calculation of the project activity is provided in the table below

11 httpwwwrbiorginscriptsWSSViewaspxId=14988

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 19

Parameters Unit Value Source

Capacity (MSW per day) MTs day 1300 As per DPR

Project Lifetime Years 25 yrs 0 months

As per specification provided by tech supplier

Cost of the project Buildings amp Civil works Rs in Lacs 3541056 As per DPR Plant and Machinery Rs in Lacs 1781286 As per DPR Interest payable during construction Rs in Lacs 15781 As per DPR Contingencies Rs in Lacs 10444 As per DPR Margin Money for working capital Rs in Lacs 12011 As per DPR Total cost Rs in Lacs 5704709 As per DPR

Financing pattern

Promoterrsquos Contribution through equity Rs in Lacs 8934 As per DPR Promoterrsquos contribution through loan Rs in Lacs 2700 As per DPR Subsidy under JNNURM Rs in Lacs 2111 As per RFP

Applicable Interest Rate on term loan Percent 1250 As per bank terms

Benchmark Prime Lending Rate (PLR) Percent 1200 httpwwwibaorginviewplraspmemcatid=1

Compost and RDF related costs

Recovery of compost from total MSW processed Percent 18

As per DPR

Recovery of RDF from total MSW processed Percent 12

Recovery of recyclable materials from total MSW processed Percent 2

Percentage of compost produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year

Percent 70

Percentage of RDF produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year Percent 70

Sale price of compost RsTon 2000 As per quote received from distributor Sale price of RDF RsTon 2000

Yearly increment in percentage of compost and RDF for sale in the market Percent 5 CPI(Consumer Price

Index) data Yearly escalation in sale price of compost and RDF Percent 5

Packaging cost of Compost Rs TON 150

As per quote received from distributor

Marketing cost of Compost Rs TON 100 Transportation cost of Compost Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of compost Rs TON 100 Packaging cost of RDF Rs TON 150

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 20 Marketing cost of RDF Rs TON 100 Transportation of RDF Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of RDF Rs TON 100

MSW Processing cost

Power consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 16539

As per DPR

Diesel consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 18720 Plant maintenance cost including that of vehicles

of capital cost for plant machineries 2

Use of senitiler ml MT of MSW processing 50

Use of bio-culture kg MT of MSW processing 10

Cost of senitiler use Rslitre 150

As per quote received Cost of bio-culture use Rskg 180 Cost of daily consumables (oil lubricants and cotton waste) Rs Lacsannum 26

Salary and wages of employees and staff Rs Lacsannum 373 As per DPR

Escalation rates

Escalation in maintenance cost Percent 400 CPI(Consumer Price Index) data Escalation in employee wages Percent 714

Escalation in fuel cost Percent 874 WPI(WholeSale Price Index) data Escalation in electricity cost Percent 874

Other commodities escalation Percent 583

Depreciation

St line Depn - Buildings Percent 334 As per companyrsquos law 1956 wwwfastfactscoinresourcesDepCoActrtf

- Plant amp Machinery Percent 113 IT Depreciation - Buildings Percent 10 - Plant amp Machinery Percent 15 Income Tax ndash MAT Percent 1133 Income Tax Act-

httpwwwindiainbusinessnicininvestmenttaxationhtm

Income Tax Percent 3399

Based on the above assumptions the results of the financial analysis have been provided below

Location Benchmark IRR (Without CDM) Lucknow MSW project 1200 686

As evident the IRR of the project activity is below the benchmark This clearly indicates that investment barrier exists in project activity implementation which is mitigated by the revenue derived from the carbon credits that the project activity would obtain due to Clean Development Mechanism The additionality of the project is thus evident Sub-step 2d Sensitivity analysis

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 21 The purpose of sensitivity analysis is to examine whether the conclusion regarding the financial viability of the proposed project is sound and tenable with those reasonable variations in the assumptions The investment analysis provides a valid argument in favor of additionality only if it consistently supports (for realistic range of assumptions) the conclusion that the project activity is unlikely to be the most financially attractive or is likely to be financially attractive Thus a sensitivity analysis was also applied to the IRR calculations to measure the impact positive or negative of changes in the indicated parameters The project proponent has chosen various factors as critical to the operation of the project in accordance with Guidance on the Assessment of Investment Analysis (Version- 031 paragraph- 17) which states that only variables including the initial investment cost that constitute more than 20 of either total project costs or total project revenues should be subjected to reasonable variation Hence the sensitivity is carried out by varying the parameters to 10 on either side to ascertain the impact on the profitability and hence the IRR of the project The results of the sensitivity analysis are as presented below

Sensitivity Parameter Variation and resultant IRR +10 0 -10

Quantity of waste processed 1325

686

-ve value OampM cost -ve value

(12 increase leads to an IRR

of -104 ) Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1688 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the OampM cost is not

expected to decrease in future

Organic Manure sales 1369 However 10 increase in sale price of organic

manures is a highly

unrealistic under the higly

stringent market scenario for

compost sale (explained in subsequent

paragraphs on barrier analysis)

-ve value -5 leads to a

decrease of IRR to -302

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

Cost of bioculture used -ve value 16 leads to a decrease of IRR

to 091 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1513 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the bioculture cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from

the WPI for all commodities as

published by

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 22

RBI Fuel and electricity cost -ve value

24 leads to a decrease of IRR

to -057 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1279 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the fuel and

electricity cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from the WPI for fuel

power and electricity as published by

RBI Project capital cost 570

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

818 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Packaging marketing and transportation expense

077 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1040 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Thus the sensitivity analysis for the project reveals that even with significant changes in various parameters the project IRR does not cross benchmark rates Therefore the project activity is clearly additional and is not a businessndashasndashusual scenario Step 3 Barrier Analysis The major barrier applicable to the alternative M1 is A) Technology Barrier B) Other Barrier and C) Investment Barrier Sub-step 3a Identify barriers that would prevent the implementation of the proposed CDM project Activity

A) Technological Barrier The plant would use state of the art technology in the process of waste handling and compost manufacturing EOT (Electric Overhead Transport) cranes would transfer the wastes from one processing station to the other Automation will be ensured wherever possible Hydraulic type press system would be installed for the RDF manufacturing Thus the plant would employ the latest technologies in the field of waste handling and management that involves a lot of technology transfer from international suppliers and exorbitant costs Also smooth operation of the plant would require proper training of the operating personnel on the equipments and hence regular capacity building training programs would have to be organized by the project proponent Another threat posed by the variation in feedstock quality is the content of highly abrasive and corrosive materials in it These cause rapid wear and corrosion of the process equipments Hence all MSW plants entail high cost of operation and maintenance due to frequent repairs breakdowns and shutdowns

B) Market barrier

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 23

Organic waste recycling is still neglected by private initiatives because of its low value and the lack of a market for compost Limited markets for compost sales and low prices for compost are a major challenge that all systems face12 The persisting skepticism among the farmers about the quality of composts poses a constant threat on the marketability of the composts Misconceptions like soil contamination due to use of composts are still borne in the minds of many Thus the emphasis on quality control of final products is of utmost importance Also increased awareness among the farmers on the benefits derived out of compost usage as value added substitutes to chemical fertilizers have to be encouraged through campaigns and other promotional activities

Also high cost of transportation sometimes makes it difficult to justify the use of composts when compared to the benefits derived out of it

C) Investment barrier The project proponent has demonstrated through investment analysis that without CDM revenue the project activity is not a financially attractive proposition At the inception the project had received refusal for loans from financial institutions for unimpressive returns envisaged from the project and the project proponent was suggested to estimate the returns along with additional revenue as may be associated with the project activity (for eg revenue from carbon credits) The project proponent had re-submitted their application for loan with the consideration of the CDM revenue and thereafter received the sanction

All these factors substantiate to prove that additional efforts are required for overcoming the market barrier for the compost produced in the plant In this context the additional incentive available to the plant through Clean Development Mechanism would be utilized for market development of the compost produced in the plant and also to partially compensate for the losses for not being able to sell compost in the market Thus the barriers as illustrated above pose a serious obstacle to the project activity and thus would lead to high operational uncertainties if not implemented as a CDM project activity Sub-step 3 b Shows that the identified barriers would not prevent a wide spread implementation of at least one of the alternatives (except the proposed project activity) As discussed above dumping of the solid waste in a landfill without gas capture (M3) is a common practice in India and none of the barriers discussed above would prevent it from occurring The barriers identified ie technological barrier and the market barrier does not in any way prevent the continuation of the baseline scenario Hence project activity satisfies the additionality criteria as per clause 3b) of the tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality Version 0600 Step 4 Common practice analysis According to the methodology AM0025 project proponents should ldquoprovide evidence of the early stage of development of the project activity and that it is not common practice in the country To this end they should provide an analysis of waste management practicesrdquo In order to justify the early development of the project activity the chronology for the same has been presented below as we proceed further As per the ldquoTool to for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo (Version 0600) similar type of project is defined as follows

12 httpwwwtngovincmaswm_in_indiapdf page 145

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 24 Sub-step 4b Discuss any similar Options that are occurring The above analysis demonstrates the similar activities occurring as the project activity But it can be seen that all the treatment facilities are composting facilities and none of the plants have RDF production facility Most of these composting facilities have applied for CDM benefits and those that have not are facing difficulties The project activity conforms to the measures of ldquoMethane formation avoidancerdquo as mentioned in paragraph 6 of the Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Hence analysis of the project activity as per paragraph 47 is illustrated as follows Step 1 Calculate applicable output range as +-50 of the design output or capacity of the proposed project activity The capacity of the project activity is 1300 TPD Hence considering an output range of +-50 the analysis would entail all projects of capacities between 1950 TPD and 650 TPD Therefore as per the table of cities as listed above the cities considered for present analysis would include the following

City Waste

Quantity (TPD)

Processing of Waste Disposal of waste CDM status Composting Pelletisation Uncontrolled

dumping Sanitary landfill

Earth cover

Bangalore 1669 300 Ahmedabad 1302 500 Pune 1175 500 Surat 1000

Kanpur 1100

Jaipur 904

Ludhiana 735 Agra 654 Step 2 In the applicable geographical area identify all plants that deliver the same output or capacity within the applicable output range calculated in Step 1 as the proposed project activity and have started commercial operation before the start date of the project Note their number Nall Registered CDM project activities and projects activities undergoing validation shall not be included in this step The applicable geographical area for the project activity would entail the entire host country ie India Of the selected cities as listed above the same output ie organic composts and RDF is produced by Bangalore and Pune However all the projects are under validation Hence as per the given definitions Nall for the present analysis of the project activity is equal to 0 since all the plants with similar output and within the applicable capacity range have considered CDM benefits associated to the projects Nall = 0 Step 3 Within plants identified in Step 2 identify those that apply technologies different than the technology applied in the proposed project activity Note their number Ndiff All the plants as included in Nall use the same technology for compost production and RDF manufacturing Hence under the scope of the present analysis Ndiff = 0

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 25 Step 4 Calculate factor F=1-NdiffNall representing the share of plants using technology similar to the technology used in the proposed project activity in all plants that deliver the same output or capacity as the proposed project activity Under the scope of the project activity the factor is calculated as follows F = 1-NdiffNall = 1 ndash 0= 1 Therefore under the scope of the project activity the factor F cannot be determined The proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled (a) the factor F is greater than 02 and (b) Nall-Ndiff is greater than 3 Since as per the above analysis F = 1 which is greater than 02 Nall - Ndiff = 0 which is less than 3 As per the methodology the proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled Thus since one of the criterions as imposed by the tool is not satisfied by the project activity hence it is prudent to conclude that the project activity is not a common practice and hence additional the analysis shows that the project activity is additional

Also as per the India Infrastructure Report 2006 the few aerobic compost plants that have been set up are typically functioning much below installed capacity and most are ldquofacing a problem of marketing the compost due to an ineffective marketing mechanismrdquo Thus it can be concluded that extremely few similar activities can be observed in India and when they are observed they face considerable barriers and have not had much success from an economic perspective The experience provided by these composting attempts only serves to reinforce the fact that implementing composting activities is financially unviable Therefore as demonstrated by the investment and barrier analyses in Steps 2 and 3 it is clear that the project is not financially viable without the revenue from CDM and there are significant barriers to its implementation In addition as detailed in Step 4 the proposed project is not common practice either and in the limited cases where aerobic composting is taking place it is proving to be a failure from an economic perspective It can therefore be concluded that the proposed project is additional and would not occur without CDM due to the financial and technological barriers in place Moreover the CDM registration of the Project will also serve as a model for other projects and promote the dissemination of sustainable waste management practices Serious consideration of CDM As per paragraph 2 of EB 62 Annex 13 ldquoGuidelines to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDM for project activities with a start date after 2nd August 2008 ldquothe project proponent must inform a Host Party designated national authority (DNA) and the UNFCCC secretariat in writing of the commencement of the project activity and of their intension to seek CDM status Such notification must be made within six months of the project activity start date and shall contain the precise geographical location and brief description of the proposed project activity using the standardized form F-CDM ndash Prior considerationrdquo As mentioned in the section C11 the start date for the project activity is 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 26 The project proponent had intimated the Host Party designated national authority (DNA) ie Ministry of environment and Forests (Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat about the project activity on 09102011 This intimation was made in the F-CDM-Prior consideration format as prescribed by UNFCCC Thus the intimation to Host party DNA and UNFCCC secretariat was made within six months from the project start date as this is in accordance to the ldquoGuideline to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo As per the ldquoGuidelines on the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo version 04 EB 62 Annex 13 serious consideration of CDM has been demonstrated below

Date Project Related Activity CDM Related Activity Evidence 14092009 Financial proposal from

Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd Copy of proposal

28102009 Revised financial proposal from Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of proposal

11112009 Letter of award for development of Integrated Solid waste management facilities for Lucknow Municipal Corporation UP

Copy of the letter of award

07092010 Receipt of certificate of incorporation for Ms JYOTI ENVIROTECH PRIVATE LIMITED

Copy of certificate

23102010 Concession agreement signed between Lucknow Municipal Corporation Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam and Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of the Agreement

07062011 Environmental Clearance received for development of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill and processing facility at Village-Shiveri

Copy of letter of Approval

21092011 Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd appointed CDM consultants for the project

Copy of work order placed on the CDM consultants

03102011 No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

Copy of no objection certificate

09102011 Project proponent submitted the Prior consideration of the CDM form to host party DNA (Ministry of Environment and Forests Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat

Copy of Prior consideration of the CDM form as submitted to MoEF GoI and UNFCCC

10102011 Purchase order raised for Plant Machinery

Copy of Purchase order

23032012 Stakeholder Consultation Meeting

Copy of the Minutes of Meeting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 27 B6 Emission reductions B61 Explanation of methodological choices gtgt Approved baseline and monitoring methodology AM0025- Avoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processes Version 13 has been used to calculate emission reductions from the project The estimation of project emission baseline emission and leakage emission are described below Project emissions The proposed project uses MSW processing (RDF and compost production processes) to treat the organic waste Therefore the project emissions in year y are calculated as follows PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy + PEay + PEgy+ PEry + PEiy + PEwy + PEco-firingy (1) Where PEy = Is the project emissions during the year y (tCO2e) PEelecy = Is the emissions from electricity consumption on-site due to the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) PEfuel on-sitey =Is the emissions on-site due to fuel consumption on-site in year y (tCO2e) PEcy =Is the emissions during the composting process in year y (tCO2e) PEay =Is the emissions from the anaerobic digestion process in year y (tCO2e) PEgy =Is the emissions from the gasification process in year y (tCO2e) PEry =Is the emissions from the combustion of RDFstabilized biomass in year y (tCO2e) PEiy =Is the emissions from waste incineration in year y (tCO2e) PEwy =Is the emissions from wastewater treatment in year y (tCO2e) PEco-firingy =Is the emissions from thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on site

fossil fuel consumption during co-firing in year y (tCO2e) The project activity involves composting and mechanical treatment to produce compost and RDF It involves the electricity consumption onsite and on-site fuel consumption Hence the equation applicable to the project activity is as follows Hence for the project activity PEay =0 as the project does not entail anaerobic digestion PEgy =0 as the project does not entail gasification PEry =0 as the project does not entail combustion of RDFstabilized PEiy =0 as the project does not entail waste incineration PEwy =0 as the project does not entail wastewater treatment PEco-firingy =0 as the project does not entail thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on

site fossil fuel consumption Therefore PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy (2) Emissions from electricity use on site (PEelecy) The project uses electricity from the NEWNE grid at processing plant at Lucknow The emissions from electricity use are therefore calculated as PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec (3)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 28 Where EGPJFFy = Is the amount of electricity generated in an on-site fossil fuel fired power plant or

consumed from the grid as a result of the project activity measured using an electricity meter (MWh)

CEFelec = Is the carbon emissions factor for electricity consumed in the project activity (tCO2eMWh)

Under the scope of the project activity electricity use on site would include the electricity consumption due to the plant equipments and machineries on site that are used to produce the composts the RDF Emissions from fuel use on-site (PEfuelon-sitey) Project participants shall account for CO2 emissions from any on-site fuel combustion (other than electricity generation eg vehicles used on-site heat generation for starting the gasifier auxiliary fossil fuels need to be added into incinerator heat generation for mechanicalthermal treatment process etc) Emissions are calculated from the quantity of fuel used and the specific CO2-emission factor of the fuel as follows PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel (4) Where PEfuel on-sitey = Is the CO2 emissions due to on-site fuel combustion in year y (tCO2) Fconsy = Is the fuel consumption on site in year y (l or kg) NCVfuel = Is the net caloric value of the fuel (MJl or MJkg) EFfuel = Is the CO2 emissions factor of the fuel (tCO2MJ) As per methodology project participants may use IPCC default values for the net calorific values and CO2 emission factors Under the scope of the project activity fuel use on-site would include consumption of diesel fuel by the vehicles (eg excavators earth movers etc) as may be engaged for the project activity on-site Further the project may also include Diesel Generator(s) placed on site to provide necessary power back-up in incidents of exigency Thus the diesel fuel consumed by the DG set would also be monitored and be counted in fuel use quantity on-site Hence for the project activity NCVfuel = NCVydiesel And EFfuel = EFdiesel Emissions from composting (PEcy) As per the methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 Annex 09 emission from composting PEcy = PEECy + PEFCy + PECH4y + PEN2Oy + PEROy (5) Where PEECy = Project emissions from electricity consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEelecy as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 29 PEFCy = Project emissions from fossil fuel consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEfuelon-sitey as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

PECH4y = Project emissions of methane from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEN2Oy = Project emissions of nitrous oxide from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEROy =Project emissions of methane from run-off wastewater associated with co-composting

in year y (tCO2eyr) The leachate generated in the project activity will be gainfully utilized in maintaining the moist environment of the bio degradable waste Hence the project activity would not entail any project emission from run-off wastewater PEROy= 0

Therefore PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy (6) Determination of project emissions of methane (PECH4y ) Project emissions of methane from composting (PECH4y) are determined as follows PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 (7) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFCH4y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tCH4 t) For the value of EFCH4y a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFCH4y = EFCH4default GWPCH4 = Global Warming Potential of CH4 (tCO2e tCH4 ) Determination of project emissions of nitrous oxide (PEN2Oy ) The N2O emissions from composting are calculated as follows PEN2Oy = Qy EFN2Oy GWPN2O (8) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFN20y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tN2O t) For the value of EFN2Oy a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFN20y = EFN20default GWPN20 = Global Warming Potential of N20 (tCO2e tN2O ) Baseline emissions To calculate the baseline emissions project participants shall use the following equation BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy (9)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 30 Where BEy = Is the baseline emissions in year y (tCO2e) MBy = Is the methane produced in the landfill in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) MDregy = Is methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) BEENy = Baseline emissions from generation of energy displaced by the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) Since the project activity does not entail generation of energy hence BEENy= 0

Methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity (MDregy) The methodology states that In cases where regulatory or contractual requirements do not specify MDregy an Adjustment Factor (AF) shall be used and justified taking into account the project context In doing so the project participant should take into account that some of the methane generated by the landfill may be captured and destroyed to comply with other relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odour concerns MDregy = MBy AF Where AF = Is Adjustment Factor for MBy () The parameter AF shall be estimated as follows In cases where a specific system for collection and destruction of methane is mandated by regulatory or contractual requirements the ratio between the destruction efficiency of that system and the destruction efficiency of the system used in the project activity shall be used In the host country India there is no regulation for capture and destruction of methane generated by the landfill Hence the adjustment factor the project activity is 0 as per the present scenario ie AF = 0 Therefore MDregy = 0 However in due course of time the value of AF may undergo changes as per the governmental regulations imposed in the host country (India) with respect to MSW management Rate of compliance In cases where there are regulations that mandate the use of one of the project activity treatment options and which is not being enforced the baseline scenario is identified as a gradual improvement of waste management practices to the acceptable technical options expected over a period of time to comply with the MSW Management Rules The adjusted baseline emissions (BEya) are calculated as follows BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) (10) Where BEy = Is the CO2-equivalent emissions as determined from equation 14 RATECompliance

y = Is the state-level compliance rate of the MSW Management Rules in that year y The compliance rate shall be lower than 50 if it exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 31 The compliance ratio RATECompliance

y shall be monitored ex post based on the official reports for instance annual reports provided by municipal bodies For details on the consideration the value of RATECompliance

y for the purpose of ex ante calculation refer to annexure 1 Methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity (MBy) The amount of methane that is generated each year (MBy) is calculated as per the latest version of the approved methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo (Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46) Considering the following additional equation MBy = BECH4SWDSy Where BECH4SWDSy = Is the methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity at

year y that is methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the solid waste disposal site during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e) as calculated using Application B in the methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo The tool estimates methane generation adjusted for using adjustment factor (fy) any landfill gas in the baseline that would have been captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odor concerns As this is already accounted for in this methodology ldquofyrdquo in the tool shall be assigned a value 0

The amount of methane that is generated each year (BECH4SWDSy tCO2e) is calculated for each year with the recommended multi-phase model the First Order Decay (FOD) model The amount of methane produced in the year y is calculated as follows

(11) Where BECH4SWDSy = Methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the

solid waste disposal site (SWDS) during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e)

φ = Model correction factor to account for model uncertainties f = Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used in another

manner Since no such practice exists in the host country India hence for the project activity the value for ldquofrdquo has been considered 0

GWPCH4 =Global Warming Potential (GWP) of methane valid for the relevant commitment period OX =Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste) F =Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCf =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that can decompose For the

project activity the default value has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore DOCf = DOCf Default

MCF =Methane correction factor For the project activity the value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore MCFy = 08

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 32 Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) DOCj =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j kj =Decay rate for the waste type j j =Waste type category (index) x =Year during the crediting period x runs from the first year of the project activity

(x = 1) to the year y for which avoided emissions are calculated (x = y) y =Year for which methane emissions are calculated Where different waste types j are prevented from disposal the amount of different waste types (Wjx) is determined through sampling and the mean is calculated from the samples as follows Since the project activity corresponds to Application B as stated in the tool hence the values of few parameters have been adopted as explained in table 1 of the tool Determining the amounts of waste types j disposed in the SWDS (Wjx) Wjx = Wx pjx (12) Where Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) Wx =Total amount of waste prevented from from disposal in the SWDS in year x (t) pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from the

first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) The fraction of the waste type j in the waste for the year x or month i are calculated according to equations (7) and (8) as follows

(13)

Where pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) pnjx = Fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the year x (weight

fraction) zx = Number of samples collected during the year x n = Samples collected in year x j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from

the first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) Determining the fraction of DOC that decomposes in the SWDS (DOCfy) In the case that the tool is applied to MSW then project participants may choose to either apply a default value (DOCfy = DOCfdefault) or to determine DOCfy or DOCfm based on measurements of the biochemical methane potential of the MSW (BMPMSW) as follows

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 33

(14) Where DOCfy = Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that decomposes under the

specific conditions occurring in the SWDS for year y (weight fraction) BMPj = Biochemical methane potential for the MSW disposed or prevented from disposal

(t CH4 t waste) F = Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCj = Fraction of degradable organic carbon in the waste type j (weight fraction) pjy = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year y (weight fraction) pjm = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in month m (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste in the MSW y = Year of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated (y is a

consecutive period of 12 months) m = Month of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated Leakage The sources of leakage considered in the methodology are CO2 emissions from off-site transportation of waste materials in addition to CH4 and N2O emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digestion gasification processes and processingcombustion of RDF Leakage emissions should be estimated from the following equation Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy (15) Where Lty =Is the leakage emissions from increased transport in year y (tCO2e) Lry =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digester the

gasifier the processingcombustion of RDFstabilized biomass or compost in case it is disposed of in landfills in year y (tCO2e)

Liy =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from MSW incinerator in year y (tCO2e)

Lsy =Is the leakage emissions from end use of stabilized biomass (tCO2e) LCOMPy =Leakage emissions associated with composting in year y (t CO2e yr) Since the project activity does not include the use of MSW incinerator Lsy = 0 The project activity does not involve the disposal of residual waste from processing of RDF or compost in landfill Also for ex-ante estimations the residual waste is taken as 100 inerts Hence Lry =0 The produced compost and RDF will be sold in the market Also for ex-ante estimations for this project activity the weight of stabilized biomass sold offsite for which no sale invoices can be provided is considered as zero Hence Lsy =0 Emissions from Transportation (Lt y)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 34 This would occur when the waste is transported from waste collecting points in the collection area to the treatment facility instead of the existing landfills In this case project participants shall document the following data in the CDM-PDD an overview of collection points from where the waste will be collected their approximate distance (in km) to the treatment facility existing landfills and their approximate distance (in km) to the nearest end-user The emissions are calculated (As per AM0025) from the quantity of fuel (diesel) used and the specific CO2 emission factor of the fuel (diesel) for vehicles

(16) Where NOvehiclesiy =Is the number of vehicles for transport with similar loading capacity DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) NCVfuel =Is the Calorific value of the fuel (MJKg or TJGg) Dfuel =Is the fuel density (kgl) if necessary EFfuel =Is the Emission factor of the fuel (tCO2eMJ) For estimation of NOvehiclesiy the following equation has been used for ex-ante calculation NOvehiclesiy = QyCTy (17) Where Qy = Is the quantity of waste composted in the year ldquoyrdquo (tonnes) CTy = Is the average truck capacity for waste transportation (tonnestruck) Ltywaste is the emissions due to increased transportation from the waste collecting point to the waste treatment facility In this the incremental distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline is equalt to 0 Therefore Ltywaste = 0 For calculation of emissions from transport of compost to the users (Ltycompost) the same formula applies Qy is replaced by Mcompost where Mcompost is the total quantity of compost produced in year y Similarly for calculation of emissions from transport of RDF (LtyRDF) Qy is replaced by MRDF where MRDF is the total quantity of RDF produced in year y Thus Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF (18) Calculation of emission reductions To calculate the emission reductions the following equation has been applied ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly (19) Where ERy = Is the emissions reductions in year y (t CO2e) BEy = Is the emissions in the baseline scenario in year y (tCO2e) PEy = Is the emissions in the project scenario in year y (tCO2e) Ly = Is the leakage in year y (tCO2e)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 35 B62 Data and parameters fixed ex ante (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

Data Parameter AF

Unit

Description Methane destroyed due to regulatory or other requirements

Source of data Local andor national authorities

Value(s) applied 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per the approved methodology AM0025 Version 13 AF shall be assigned a value taking into account the amount of methane generated by the landfills that may be captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations and contractual requirements of the host country Since there exists no regulations or contractual requirement to capture and destroy the methane generated from the landfills in India hence AF has been fixed ex-ante and assigned a value of 0

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

Data Parameter φ Unit Unitless

Description Default value model corrections factor to account for model uncertainties

Source of data Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Value(s) applied 085

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per Table 3 the project activity conforms to HumidWet conditions in Application B Accordingly the default value for φ has been taken from table 3 This is in the absence of monitored data for φ as per Option 2 in the tool for determination of model correction factor

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 36

Data Parameter F

Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction)

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Upon biodegradation organic material is converted to a mixture of

methane and carbon dioxide

Data Parameter OX Unit Unitless

Description Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste)

Source of data Based on an extensive review of published literature on this subject including the IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 01

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment When methane passes through the top-layer part of it is oxidized by

methanotrophic bacteria to produce CO2 The oxidation factor represents the proportion of methane that is oxidized to CO2 This should be distinguished from the methane correction factor (MCF) which is to account for the situation that ambient air might intrude into the SWDS and prevent methane from being formed in the upper layer of SWDS

Data Parameter DOCfDefault

Unit Unitless

Description Default value for the fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) in MSW that decomposes in the SWDS

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 37

Data Parameter MCFy Unit Unitless

Description Methane correction factor

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 08

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46 This comprises all SWDS not meeting the criteria of managed SWDS and which have depths of greater than or equal to 5 meters

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment MCF accounts for the fact that unmanaged SWDS produce less methane

from a given amount of waste than managed SWDS because a larger fraction of waste decomposes aerobically in the top layers of unmanaged SWDS The baseline dumping sites have been found to be greater than 5 meters

Data Parameter DOCj Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Tables 24 and 25)

Value(s) applied

Waste type j DOCj ( wet waste)

Wood and wood products 43 Pulp paper and cardboard

(other than sludge) 40

Food food waste beverages and tobacco (other than sludge) 15

Textiles 24 Garden yard and park waste 20

Glass plastic metal other inert waste 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default values adopted from table 4 as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 38

Data Parameter kj

Unit Unitless

Description Decay rate for the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Table 33)

Value(s) applied Default values adopted from table 5 for Wet Type waste in tropical (Matgt20ordmC) conditions as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Waste type j kj

Slowly degrading

Pulp paper cardboard (other than sludge) textiles

0045

Wood wood products and straw 0025

Rapidly degrading Food food waste sewage sludge beverages and tobacco 0085

Moderately degrading Other (non-food) organic putrescible garden and park waste 0065

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

The annual temperature limits of Lucknow has been adopted from httpwwwnihernetinrbisindia_informationannual20temperaturehtm The average annual temp of Lucknow is thus estimated to be 2582ordmC Thus Lucknow is considered to be in the tropical zone with MAT gt 20ordmC And hence the default value has been obtained as per Table 5

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CEFelec Unit t CO2MWh Description Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid Source of data CEA CO2 Baseline Database Version 70 Jan 2012 (wwwceanicin) Value(s) applied 09216 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

This data is taken from publicly available CEA CO2 baseline database version 7 dated March 2012 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment This value is fixed for the entire crediting period

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 39

Data Parameter EFCH4Default Unit t CH4 t Description Default emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted (wet

basis) Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of

emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 0002 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFN2ODefault Unit t N20 t

Description Default emission factor of nitrous oxide per tonne of waste composted (wet basis)

Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 00002

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 40

Data Parameter NCVydiesel

Unit TJ Gg

Description Net calorific value of diesel consumed for power generation at the MSW processing unit

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Volume 2 Table 12 p118

Value(s) applied 43

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFdiesel Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 741

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter GWPCH4

Unit tCO2 tCH4

Description Global warming potential of CH4

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 21 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 41

Data Parameter GWPN20

Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 310 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter Ddiesel

Unit KgL

Description Density of fuel

Source of data Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) India

Value(s) applied 087

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data BEE value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission Additional comment

B63 Ex ante calculation of emission reductions gtgt For the purpose of ex-ante calculation of emission reduction the following assumptions have been taken into consideration Total quantity of MSW available (tonnesday) 1300 Annual Number of operating days 330 Percentage of organic content in the MSW 47 Rate of compliance 10 Total quantity of biodegradable wastes to be processed 201630 TPD (Calculated) Amount of electricity consumed per day due to the project 1550 kWh Specific gravity of diesel 087 kglitre Calculation of Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid (CEFelec) As the project activity utilises electricity from the NEWNE Grid the project uses the approach (a)

combined margin emission factor for the NEWNE grid following seven steps of ldquoTool to calculate the

emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) and using publicly available data of

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 42 ldquoCentral Electrical Authorityrdquo (the most recent version ldquoCO2 Baseline Database Version 70rdquo13 available

at the time of submission of the CDM PDD to the DOE for Global Stakeholders Consultation) As per the

stepwise approach to calculate the emission factor of an electricity system the EFy is being calculated as

follows

Step 1 Identify the relevant electricity system

As per the CEA CO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 combined emission factor is given

for northern eastern western and north-eastern girds taken together Therefore this combined emission

factor will be used for the NEWNE grid to evaluate the emission reductions

Step 2 Choose whether to include off-grid power plants in the project electricity system (optional)

As per the tool Option I is selected for the project activity as only grid connected power plants are

included in the calculation

Step 3 STEP3 Select a method to determine Operating Margin (OM)

The project proponent has chosen to adopt option a) of step 3 ie consideration of Simple Operating

Margin for the project As per the tool The simple OM method (Option a) can only be used if low-

costmust-run resources2 constitute less than 50 of total grid generation in 1) average of the five most

recent years or 2) based on long-term averages for hydroelectricity production

Referring the relevant data from the CEACO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 the below

table is drawn for the share of net generation by the must-run hydronuclear plants for the past 5 years

Region 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Average NEWNE 1850 1900 1740 1590 1760 177

Since the average is 177 and is below the threshold of 50 as prescribed in the tool hence Simple OM

method is applicable for the project activity

Step 4 Calculate the operating margin emission factor according to the selected method

Simple OM The Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2

Operating Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid The following information has been used for the

calculation of baseline emissions

Simple Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridOMy) (incl Imports) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference

13 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 43 Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2008-09 tCO2MWh 101 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10 tCO2MWh 098

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2010-11 tCO2MWh 097

3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor

tCO2MWh 09843 Calculated based on the most recent data available at the time of submission of the CDM-PDD to the DOE for validation

Note 3 year generation weighted average of Operating margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) STEP 5 Calculate the build margin (BM) emission factor Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2 Build Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid for the year 2010-2011 Build Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridBMy) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference Build Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10

tCO2MWh 0859 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Step 6 Calculate the combined margin emissions factor The Project proponent has opted for Option A ie estimation of Combined Margin by weighted average nethod EFy = wOM EFgridOMy + wBM EFgridBMy Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy) 3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (NEWNE grid) EFgridOMy

tCO2MWh 09843 Refer the above table

Build Margin (NEWNE grid) EFgridBMy

tCO2MWh 0859 Refer the above table

Weighting of operating margin emissions factor wOM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Weighting of build margin emissions factor wBM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy)

tCO2MWh 09216 Calculated

Note Combined margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) Hence CEFelec is calcualted to be 09216 for the Project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 44 Calculation of Project Emission As per equation 3) PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec = (1550 3301000) 09216 = 471 tCO2e Considering diesel consumption per day due to the project activity100 Litre Fconsy = 100 3300871000 = 29 tonnes As per equation 4) PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel = 29 43 741 = 91 tCO2e Considering composition of organic waste as follows Cloth 5 Garden Yard waste 30 Food Waste 55 Paper 10 Thus waste type category (j) = 4 Therefore Quantity of cloth waste = 1300 330 47 5 = 10082 tonnesannum Quantity of garden waste = 1300 330 47 30 = 60489 tonnesannum Quantity of food waste = 1300 330 47 55 = 110897 tonnesannum Quantity of paper waste = 1300 330 47 10 = 20163 tonnesannum Therefore total waste quantity = (10082 + 60489 + 110897 + 20163) = 201630 tonnesannum Therefore amount of waste composted is Qy = (50 of 201630) = 100815 tonnesannum (This is with the consideration of equal distribution of the total biodegradable waste for RDF production and for composting The parameter Qy will be monitored ex-post) As per equation 7) project emission of methane has been calculated as PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 = 100815 0002 21 = 4234 tCO2e As per equation 8) project emission of methane has been calculated as PEN20y = Qy EFN20y GWPN20 = 100815 00002 310 = 6251 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 6) emission from composting has been calculated as PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy = 3243 + 4788 = 10485 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 2) project emission has been calculated as PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy = (471 + 91 + 10485) tCO2e = 11048 tCO2e Calculation of Baseline Emission As per equation 11) methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity is calculated as

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 45 = 085(1-0)21(1-01)1612050508[10082024e-07(1)(1- e-07)] + [6048902e-017(1)(1- e-

017)]+ [110897015e-04(1)(1- e-04)] + [201630 4e-007(1)(1- e-007)] = 34633 tCO2e Considering a compliance rate of 4514 ie RATECompliance

y = 0045 Therefore as per equation 10) Adjusted baseline emission has been calculated as BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) = 38481 (1 ndash 0045) = 17316 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 9) Baseline emission has been calculated as BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy = (34633 ndash 0) + 0 = 33058 tCO2e Calculation of Leakage Emission As per equation 16)

Where DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) For ex-ante estimation this has been considered to be 200 Kms for both compost and RDF

VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) For ex-ante estimation the same has been assumed to be 02 lkm

Now as per equation 17) NOvehiclesiy is given by QyCTy For ex-ante estimation CTy has been considered to be 10 Tons Ltycompost = (18 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 856 tCO2e LtyRDF = (12 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 571 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 18) emission from transportation has been calculated as Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF = (856 + 571) = 1427 tCO2e As per equation 15) leakage emission has been calculated as Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy = 1427 + 0 + 0 + 0 +0 = 1427 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 19) emission reduction has been calculated as ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly = (33058 ndash 11048 ndash 1427) = 20584 tCO2e Emission reduction for all other years in the crediting period has been calculated in a similar manner 14 For details on the value considered refer to Annexure 1 below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 46 B64 Summary of ex ante estimates of emission reductions

Year Baseline

emissions (t CO2e)

Project emissions (t CO2e)

Leakage (t CO2e)

Emission reductions (t CO2e)

2012-2013 33058 11048 1427 20584 2013-2014 57319 11048 1427 44844 2014-2015 75420 11048 1427 62945 2015-2016 89168 11048 1427 76694 2016-2017 99805 11048 1427 87330 2017-2018 108188 11048 1427 95714 2018-2019 114916 11048 1427 102441 2019-2020 120408 11048 1427 107934 2020-2021 124963 11048 1427 112489 2021-2022 128795 11048 1427 116320

Total 952041 110476 14270 827294 Total number of crediting years 10

Annual average over the crediting period

95204 11408 1427 82729

B7 Monitoring plan B71 Data and parameters to be monitored (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 47

Data Parameter Mcompost Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 77220 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of compost produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of compost produced will be cross checked with the sale of

compost Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter M RDF Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 51480 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of RDF produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of RDF produced will be cross checked with the sale of RDF Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 48

Data Parameter Pnjx

Unit - Description Weight fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the

year x Source of data Sample analysis of the MSW by project participant Value(s) applied

SL No Waste type Composition

1 Cloth 5 2 Garden yard waste 30 3 Food Waste 55 4 Paper 10

Source These values are as mentioned in the DPR

Measurement methods and procedures

Sampling method will be selected in order to determine a constant weight fraction of the waste type treated As per the tool the size and frequency of sampling should be statistically with a maximum uncertainty range of 20 at 95 confidence level Since the number of operating days is 330 it is ensured that the waste will be delivered for all the 330 days and hence will be monitored daily Sampling will be done on a monthly basis

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures The sampling of the raw wastes will be done by a laboratory in the project

site The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months

Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter RATECompliancey

Unit Description Rate of compliance Source of data Reports published by Municipal bodies (Central Pollution Control Board

(CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority) Analysis for computation of value for RATECompliance

y has been presented in Annexure 1 provided in the last section of the document

Value(s) applied 45 Measurement methods and procedures

The ex-ante value has been taken as 45 For ex-post calculation of emission reductions compliance rates would be taken from the reports published by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per AM0025 Version 12 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 49

Data Parameter z Unit - Description Number of samples collected during the year x Source of data Lab Records Value(s) applied 12 per year Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter f Unit - Description Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used

in another manner Source of data Plant Log Book- Written information from the operator of the solid waste

disposal site Value(s) applied 0 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- - Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per the methodological tool to determine ldquoEmissions

avoided from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment At present there is no provision for capturing flaring or combusting the

methane emissions at the SWDS This justifies the choice of the data value Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years in both electronic and paper formats

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 50

Data Parameter EG PJFFy Unit MWhyr Description Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the project

activity Source of data Electricity meter reading from electricity meter bill Value(s) applied 512 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the energy meter is 05 Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Monthly QAQC procedures Electricity meter will be subject to regular (in accordance with stipulation

of the meter supplier) maintenance and testing to ensure accuracy Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Fconsy Unit litre Description Fuel (diesel) consumption on-site during year lsquoyrsquo of the crediting period Source of data Purchase invoices Value(s) applied 100 litresday Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 51

Data Parameter DT i compost y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for compost transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap Assumption to be approved by DOE

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Qy Unit Tonnesyr Description Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 100815 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of waste composted will be measured with belt scales installed in the conveyer belt coming out of the pre-sorting area Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Once in three yearsfrom NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the belt scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures The belt scales will be calibrated as per standards provided by the

manufacturer Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 52

Data Parameter DT i RDF y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for RDF transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CTt y Unit Tonnestruck Description Carrying capacity of each truck delivering waste to the composting

installation in year y Source of data The maximum carrying capacity as stated on the truckrsquos nameplate is

registered by personnel at the entrance gate of the composting installation Value(s) applied 10 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be monitored by the challan received from the transport contractors post the loading of the vehicle Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- - Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 5 kgs Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Every vehicle QAQC procedures Weighbridge or any other applicable weighing device is subject to periodic

calibration (in accordance with stipulation of the weighing device supplier)

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 53

Data Parameter VFcons Unit litre km Description Average fuel consumption per kilometre of vehicles for compost

transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 5 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- Transporterrsquos challan Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency-

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures Transporterrsquos challan is a third-party document Hence QAQC procedures

are not required Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

B72 Sampling plan gtgt The project proponent has proposed a sampling plan in accordance with ldquoStandard for sampling and surveys for CDM project activities and programme of activitiesrdquo Version 020 ( EB 65 Annex 2) Sampling will be done to determine weight fraction of the waste type treated Sampling procedures will be followed in-line with the sectoral best practices and as per the guidelines laid out Section 33 Chapter 3 of the Manual on Solid Waste Management as published by the Ministry of Urban Development for public information15 Therefore on each sample collection day about 100 Kg of incoming MSW will be withdrawn randomly from four incoming trucks entering the project site About 10 Kg of MSW each will be collected from ten randomly selected points from outside and inside of the solid waste heap so piled The total quantity of waste so collected (approx 100 Kg) will then be thoroughly mixed and then reduced by quartering till a sample of such a size was obtained which could be handled by the laboratory Thus each master sample of approximately 25 Kg will be sent to the accredited laboratory for composition analysis Sampling will be done once in a month in in-house laboratory The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months B73 Other elements of monitoring plan gtgt Monitoring refers to the collection and archiving of all relevant data necessary for determining the baseline measuring anthropogenic emissions by sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) within the project boundary of a CDM project activity and leakage as applicable The project activity is a GHG avoidance project where the waste materials (ie municipal solid wastes) collected will be treated aerobically to produce compost and mechanically to produce RDF and will be sold in an open market The financial performance of the project activity depends significantly on the CDM revenue to be availed through sale of Certified Emission Reduction (CER) units accrued from the project activity This will require monitoring of all the relevant GHG performance parameters Therefore

15 httpurbanindianicinpublicinfoswmchap3pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 54 the project proponent has developed a monitoring protocol which will be followed throughout the proposed crediting period in order to ensure proper operation of the project activity resulting in generation of carbon credits The same is explained below Monitoring Plan Monitoring the projectrsquos performance in terms of ERs achievement requires the fulfillment of operational data collection and processing obligations from the operator The operator of compost plant has the primary obligation to collect data that would facilitate the calculation of the project ERs The data shall be collected by the operator based on the most recent available information as per the Procedures presented in this PDD In addition roles and responsibilities of monitoring personnel would be well defined

10 Objective of monitoring plan sect To ensure smooth uninterrupted operation of the project activity and hence generation of carbon

credits sect To ensure proper monitoring reporting and verification of all the parameters required to evaluate

the GHG performance of the project activity sect To identify flaws in the monitoring system and open up opportunities for further improvement

20 Roles and Responsibilities

The project proponent has developed a team who will be involved in monitoring reporting and verification of all the GHG performance related parameters The following schematic diagram will explain the individual roles and responsibilities of all the members of the team

Team Responsibility

Shift Operator Monitoring and reporting the GHG performance related parameters following the guidance provided in the Project Design Document

Shift In-charge

- Reviewing the GHG performance related parameters as recorded by the Shift Operator in every shift - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the reported parameters - Preparation of daily and monthly reports

Plant Manager

- Reviewing the daily and monthly reports in consultation with the Shift In-charge - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the daily and monthly reports - Ensuring calibration of the monitoring equipments as and when required

Management Representative(s)-

Production Department

- Reviewing the monthly and annual production statistics - Evaluating the GHG performance of the project activity - Identify opportunities for further improvement

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 55 SECTION C Duration and crediting period C1 Duration of project activity C11 Start date of project activity gtgt 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity C12 Expected operational lifetime of project activity gtgt 25 years 0 months C2 Crediting period of project activity C21 Type of crediting period gtgt The project proponent has opted for a fixed crediting period C22 Start date of crediting period gtgt 01092012 or date of registration of the project activity with UNFCCC whichever is later C23 Length of crediting period 10 years 0 months

SECTION D Environmental impacts D1 Analysis of environmental impacts gtgt In the applicable EIA notification ie SO 3067(E)16 dated 01122009 Ministry of Environment amp Forests (MoEF) Govt of India the Municipal Solid Waste projects are not included in the list of projects that has to get Prior Environmental Clearance (EC) either from State or Central Govt authorities and hence no EIA study was conducted The project does not fall under the purview of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) notification of the Ministry of Environment and Forest Government of India However due weightage has been given to environmental aspects D2 Environmental impact assessment gtgt The environmental impacts of the project activity are not considered to be significant by the project participant or the host party The project activity would help in avoidance of emissions caused due to the combustion of fossil fuels such as SOx NOx and particulate matter

SECTION E Local stakeholder consultation E1 Solicitation of comments from local stakeholders gtgt Stakeholder meeting was convened by Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd at the plant site at Shiveri Lucknow on 23032012 to explain the salient details of the Project its benefits to the society and villagers Prior to the meeting individual invitation letters were sent to each of the identified stakeholder on 15032012 to obtain their consensus for attending the meeting The objective of the meeting was to conduct open discussion where stakeholders are encouraged to raise questions express their concern and

16 httpmoefnicindownloadsrules-and-regulations3067pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 56 comments about the proposed project through a participatory process and to list down any probable concern of stakeholders The various stakeholders present in the meeting were the local inhabitants employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd representatives from equipment supplier Eco Trademart Pvt Ltd representatives of Lucknow Development Agency and local NGO representatives The MD of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd then briefed them about the project activity as per the following schedule

bull Project Background and information about the company bull Technology Involved in the project activity bull Benefits and impacts of the project activity bull Process of Clean Development Mechanism

Later half of the meeting a dedicated session was allotted for question and answer session and comments from the stakeholders were invited E2 Summary of comments received gtgt Meeting was very interactive and got very encouraging response from stakeholders The local villagers and the office bearers expressed their happiness with the setting up of an environment friendly project in their village as it had resulted in generation of employment opportunities both for literate and illiterate people Development of infrastructure in the locality was highly appreciated Few of prominent attendees are as follows S No Name Age Sex

(MF) Occupation Village

1 MrDunna 65 M Gram Pradhan Shiveri

2 SdBalbir Singh Maan 26 M Secretary

NGO - Umeed Chowk

3 Abhishek Singh 36 M

Equipments Supplier ndash Eco Trademart Pvt

Ltd

Dubagga

4 MrPCMehrotra 72 M

Retired Chief EngineerLDALu

cknow Aliganj

The meeting also included employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd The project received unanimous acknowledgement and appreciation from all the attendees at the meeting The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech in their attempt to combat global warming and simultaneously improve the local hygiene and modernize municipal solid waste management of Lucknow has been applauded by all

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 57 E3 Report on consideration of comments received gtgt The project has received positive amp encouraging feedback from the stakeholders concerned All the stakeholders have appreciated and encouraged the project proponent for taking up this project activity In view of various direct and indirect benefits (social economical and environmental) all the stakeholders have supported the project activity The documents supporting the stakeholder consultation will be submitted to the DOE Examples of few questions as raised by the stakeholders and their respective clarifications as provided by the project proponent have been detailed below 1What is CER CERs or Certified Emission Reductions are a ldquocertificaterdquo just like a stock A CER is given by the CDM Executive Board to projects in developing countries to certify they have reduced greeen house gas emissions by one tonne of carbon dioxide per year 2-What is Global Warming Potential Ans Green house gases affect global warming with varying intensities This intensity is measured by the ldquoglobal warming potentialrdquo of the gas 3- Is there any negative impact on surrounding area Ans There is no negative impact on surrounding area 4-What are carbon credits How these will obtained Who will by them Ans Carbon credits are generated in the developing countries by reducing the greenhouse gases emission in the atmosphere One tonne of carbon dioxide saved is equal to one carbon credit All steps of CDM cycle was explained and the process of Credits monetization 5-How does CDM benefit society Ans CDM is clean development mechanism a tool to provide incentives to mitigate the emission of greenhouse gases which are enhancing the climate change The purpose of this programme is to reduce emission of GHGs as well as promote sustainable development in host country Therefore developing country like India will gain financial and environmental benefits by reducing the emission of ever increasing GHGs to save the earth 6Would the project provide employment opportunities and or improve economic development of area There would be generation of employment through this project activity At the same point of time there would be regular trainings that would be imparted to the local population 7 How this project will help to address the issues raised by the local villagers The project will help the stake holders in the following ways A Create jobs for the local masses B Create business opportunities for the contractors C Increase awareness of the people regarding the local and global environment D Help to conserve depleting resources of fossil fuel such as coal It was also mentioned in the meeting that 2 of the CER revenue earned from the project would be utilized in developmental works of the local community There would be a robust monitoring plan for the same and the plant manager Mr Sachin Mehta was appointed as the local contact person for the same

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 58 The project received unanimous appreciation from the stakeholders present The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd towards mitigation of global warming was applauded by all

SECTION F Approval and authorization gtgt The project has received the following approvalsclearances

1) No objection certificate from Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board Lucknow 2) Environmental clearance certificate from the State Level Environment Impact Assessment

Authority Uttar Pradesh 3) No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

The project has applied for Host Country Approval and will be provided to the DOE during the course of project validation

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 59 Appendix A 1 The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has committed to share 2 (mention

approximate amount in INR per year) of its Certified Emission Reduction (CERs) in connection with hisher CDM project based on the issuance and transaction of the CERs

2 The committed amount of money will be utilized for addressing the identified issues in the following villages Identified Villages Total Population Key issues for development Shiveri 1200 approx The project is located in a rural area and the economy

of the area where the project activity is located is heavily dependent on agriculture and other farm based livelihoods The process of stakeholder engagement undertaken as a part of social impact assessment came across community needs and expectations from the project The process of need assessment conducted recently and prioritization undertaken as part of an exercise to seek participation in the preparation of the community development plan and livelihood restoration plan came across the following community needs

bull Skill trainingup-gradation institute for youth and creation of employment opportunities

bull Education support to children for secondary and higher secondary education

bull Drinking water bull Strengthening health infrastructure bull Developing land resources

Enhancing agriculture productivity and market linkages

Pankhera 800 approx

3 Accordingly the project proponent has identified the activities support for the following villages

S No Village Name ActivitiesSupport proposed over the project life time

Approximate amount in INR

1 Shiveri Skill training and Capacity Building Initiative

a Objective To build skill sets of the youth in the community in order to realize the potential employment opportunities arising due to the project and also enhance employment options elsewhere

b Target Beneficiaries Youth especially belonging to the families of the nearby villagers and those belonging to the economically and socially vulnerable

It will be difficult to confirm the exact allocation of funds for individual activities and for individual villages now as the expenditure would depend upon the social needs of the identified stakeholders much nearer to the Commercial Operation Date

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 60

communities

c Proposed Activities

i) Self help group for the women will be formed and will be imparted skill development training for initiating some income generation activities One group will be formed in each target village

ii) Imparting of training to youths on various skills having potential for starting self employment program or to enable them to get wage employment

2 Health Intervention a Objective Improved health care access and

delivery systems and reduction in incidence of diseases and improved health behavior of the community

b c Target Beneficiaries General community

with focus on elderly women children and economically weaker section

d e Proposed Activities i)To organize health awareness among

community members especially women on various facets of reproductive and child health hygiene sanitation etc

ii) To organize general health camps in the target villages

iii) To establish network with Government health functionaries in strengthening the intervention in the target villages

To conduct the school health camps and also health education programs

3 Agriculture Natural Resource Management and Allied Activities

a Objective To work toward improving the agriculture and allied activities in the target area

b c Target beneficiaries Land owners

economically backward and marginal farmers

d Description of proposed activities i) To organize training programme for

(COD) of the Project The Project Proponent will allocate funds for each identified activity and for each village during each crediting period accordingly

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 61

farmers on latest agriculture methods and technologies

ii) To organize exposure visits for the farmers to Agriculture universities kisan melas and other modern agriculture farms

iii) To organize training programme on animal husbandry

iv) To organize cattle health camp v)To get the existing water bodies repaired

to increase the availability of water and also to increase the ground water recharge

4 Education a Objective To strengthen the education

infrastructure at village level to improve access and quality of existing education service

b Target Beneficiaries Children in school going age group especially girls and children belonging to economically and socially vulnerable community

c Proposed activities

i) Strengthening early childhood education and development by provisioning of quality pre school kits and skill development

ii)Provisioning of scholarship for students from socially and economically weaker sections of the society especially for girls for both academic and professional courses iii)Organizing sports and other competitions in schools and for village youth clubs

4 The implementation details along with local contact and money transfer mechanism are as follows

The plan as mentioned above was discussed in details with the stakeholders present at the local stakeholder meeting held at the project site During the meeting the project proponent received unanimous appreciation and encouragement from the meeting attendees The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd would be implementing the plan themselves The project manager of Jyoti Enviro Tech was nominated as the local contact for the developmental plan shared Local contact of project proponent Money transfer mechanism

Mr Sachin Mehta Manager Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd Adress Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Lucknow ndash 226003 Phone 0522 ndash4049397

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 62 5 Details of monitoring arrangement

Monitoring Committee

The expenditure details can be verified by the Designated Operational Entity (DOE) during the verification If required the same can also be certified by a chartered accountant The expenditure details would be made public in the annual report of the company

Monitoring Parameters

Expenditure of 2 earning (net realizable value) from sale of CER available from the project activity would be monitored The sustainability initiatives undertaken by the company would be analyzed in detail during the verification

Monitoring Frequency Yearly

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 63

Appendix 1 Contact information of project participants

Organization name Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd StreetPO Box Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Building City Lucknow StateRegion Uttar Pradesh Postcode 226003 Country India Telephone 0522 ndash4049397 Fax E-mail jyotienvirogmailcom Website Contact person Title Manager Salutation Mr Last name Mehta Middle name First name Sachin Department Projects Mobile Direct fax Direct tel 0522 ndash4049397 Personal e-mail jyotienvirogmailcom

Appendix 2 Affirmation regarding public funding

There is no public funding available for the project The same has been mentioned in section A4

Appendix 3 Applicability of selected methodology

The applicability of the project activity to the selected methodology has been demonstrated in section B2

Appendix 4 Further background information on ex ante calculation of emission reductions

All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 5 Further background information on monitoring plan

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 64 All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 6 Summary of post registration changes

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 65

Annexure 1 Analysis for value of RATECompliancey for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction

State level analysis of Municipal Solid Waste handling practice in the state of Uttar Pradesh reveals that at few locations scientific handling practices have been adopted with simultaneous consideration of CDM benefits associated with the project

While some municipal bodies still have plans for installation of plants for scientific handling of Municipal Solid Waste and subsequent compost manufacturing with consideration of carbon credits

Sl no Location Present practice CDM

consideration Source

1 Kanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex at Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh India

2 Ghaziabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source17

3 Agra

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) processing plant in Agra by Ultra Urban Infratech Limited

4 Varanasi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Varanasi India

5 Meerut

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Meerut India

6 Allahabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Allahabad Uttar Pradesh

7 Bareilly

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source18

8 Aligarh

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Aligarh India

17

httpncrpbnicinTechnical_assistance_report_comp_BVolume20IV20Solid20Waste20Management20GhaziabadWSA_ADB20NCRPB_FR_Vol_IV-A_(GZB20Main20Report)pdf

18 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPBarielly_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 66

9 Moradabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management Project at Moradabad India

10 Saharanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources19

11 Gorakhpur Unscientific practice of open dumping still persists

NA Publicly available sources20

12 Mathura

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Mathura Uttar Pradesh

13 Jhansi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources21

14 Muzaffarnagar

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex

15 Mirzapur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Mirzapur India

16 Amravati

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Amravati India

17 Sambhal Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Have been considered as a single bundled project

18 Badaun 19 Fatehpur 20 Jaunpur 21 Ballia Hence from the above list it is evident only one (as highlighted) out of 21 locations comply to the MSW rules Hence for ex ante estimation RATECompliance

y is computed as presented below RATECompliance

y = (1 21) = 47 = 0047

------------

19

httpwwwindiawaterportalorgsitesindiawaterportalorgfilesCII_Excellence20in20Water20Management_ITC20Saharanpur_2009pdf

20 httpwwwgeagindiaorgPDFSOLID20WASTEpdf 21 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPJhansi_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 67

History of the document

Version Date Nature of revision 041 11 April 2012 Editorial revision to change version 02 line in history box from Annex 06 to

Annex 06b 040 EB 66

13 March 2012 Revision required to ensure consistency with the ldquoGuidelines for completing the project design document form for CDM project activitiesrdquo (EB 66 Annex 8)

03 EB 25 Annex 15 26 July 2006

02 EB 14 Annex 06b 14 June 2004

01 EB 05 Paragraph 12 03 August 2002

Initial adoption

Decision Class Regulatory Document Type Form Business Function Registration

Page 5: Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 5 A3 Technologies andor measures gtgt Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd follows a scientific waste management approach which includes aerobic treatment of bio-degradable solid waste to produce compost and refuse derived fuel The waste reaching the processing plant will be received in two separate parts biodegradable and non-biodegradable The biodegradable part of the wastes would be processed to produce compost and RDF while the inert materials in non-biodegradable wastes will be delivered to the sanitary landfill The collection of waste is estimated to be 1300 TPD The scope of project activity includes

bull Aerobic processing and mechanical treatment of the waste The collection vehicles that bring in the

waste from the transfer station to the MSW processing site will be weighed in a weighbridge at the entrance of the facility every time the vehicles come in and go out and the respective weights will be recorded This will be done to have a record of the incoming MSW quantities by weight Thereafter the vehicles carrying wastes will be directed to the specified points for unloading The inert waste will be unloaded at the identified site for sanitary landfill and the recyclable materials will be segregated for sale to scrap dealers The rest of the waste ie the biodegradable wastes will be unloaded at pits which mark the start point of the waste processing line A seepage line is present at the bottom of each pit which connects with the similar lines from other pits This is meant for collecting the leachate that is generated from the waste deposition at the pits

Each pit has a hopper adjacent to it The wastes collected from the pit by the EOT crane is fed into the hopper through a conveyer belt The hopper leads the waste into a pre-sorting section and thereafter through a conveyer belt into a rotary screen trommel where the waste is screened The wastes below 100mm as screened in the trommel are led to the composting area whereas those screened above 100 mm are led by another conveyer belt to the area for production of RDF a) Production of compost The trommel is a rotary screen that separates the waste on the basis of size The biodegradable wastes fed into the trommel is further screened to segregate wastes below and above 100 mm size The wastes below 100mm are undergone composting The waste is collected by the EOT cranes and led to the curing and drying area where the waste is heaped and biological inoculum are sprayed at regular intervals In this area the moisture of the waste is dried up and maintained at 5-10 The heaps are turned at scheduled intervals to ensure a proper aerobic processing of the waste The heap of waste thus accumulated is further led to the composting pads The waste is processed for duration of 20-25 days In the course of this time through monitored processing the waste is transformed into a brown colored mass resembling humus Further the waste is passed through 3 more stages of trommel for screening the mass of waste successively into 35mm 16mm and finally to 4 mm At this stage the waste is fed into the finishing area Finishing area comprises of sheds where the final product of waste processing compost is packed and made ready to be sold in the market b) Production of Reduce derived fuel (RDF) Wastes screened at the trommel above 100mm are directed to a conveyer line carrying them to an adjacent area where the waste will be processed to produce reduce derived fuel (RDF) The waste is passed through a vibrating conveyer where a blower segregates any plastic material from the waste The rest waste is then passed through the conveyer into the RDF producing machine The production of RDF involves processing of the waste by magnetic shredders and subsequent homogenizing of the

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 6

waste in homogenizers Thereafter the uniform mass of waste thus prepared is compressed by hydraulic systems to produce RDF units resembling the shape of soap blocks The lifetime of the project equipments is specified as 25 yrs 00 months Also it is to be noted that the project does not involve any technology transfer from Annex 1 countries The training required for the persons for operation and maintenance of the equipments would be provided through capacity building sessions by the technology provider and would be frequently organized by the project proponent

Brief description of type of monitoring equipments For monitoring the various parameters of the project the following equipments would be used Sl No Parameter Description of equipment type 1 Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 2 Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 3 Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the

project activity Energy meter

4 Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Belt scales 5 Raw waste quantity Weigh bridge Further details on the same have been furnished in Section B71 under section ldquoData and parameters to be monitoredrdquo The various monitoring points in the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 7 A4 Parties and project participants

Party involved (host) indicates a host Party

Private andor public entity(ies) project participants

(as applicable)

Indicate if the Party involved wishes to be considered as

project participant (YesNo)

India(host)

Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd (Private entity)

No

A5 Public funding of project activity gtgt The project has not received any Official Development Assistance (ODA) from Annex I countries

SECTION B Application of selected approved baseline and monitoring methodology B1 Reference of methodology gtgt Title of the approved baseline and monitoring methodology ldquoAvoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processesrdquo Version 13 EB 65 Sectoral Scope 01 and 13 Reference ldquoTool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Version 0600 EB 65 Methodological tool for ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 ldquoTool to calculate the emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo Version 0221 EB 63 Methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 B2 Applicability of methodology gtgt The project meets all the applicability criteria as set out in the methodology The applicability conditions of the methodology AM0025 Version 13 for the project activity have been justified as below Sr No

Applicability Conditions as per AM0025 Version 13

Justification

1 The project activity involves one or a combination of the following waste treatment options for the fresh waste that in a given year would have otherwise been disposed of in a landfill (a) A composting process in aerobic conditions (b) Gasification to produce syngas and its use (c) Anaerobic digestion with biogas collection and flaring andor its use The anaerobic digester processes only the waste for which emission reductions are claimed in this methodology If the biogas is processed and upgraded to the quality of natural gas and it is distributed as energy via natural gas

The project activity involves a combination of the waste treatment options a) A composting process in aerobic conditions d) Mechanical treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) The project activity does not involve the use of RDF Also the project activity does not involve any thermal operation In the absence of the project the fresh waste would have been disposed off in a landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 8

distribution grid project activities may use approved methodology AM0053 in conjunction with this methodology In such cases the baseline scenario identification procedure and additionality assessment shall be undertaken for the combination of the two components of the project activity ie biomethane emission avoidance and displacement of natural gas (d) Mechanicalthermal treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) and its use The thermal treatment process (dehydration) occurs under controlled conditions (up to 300 degrees Celsius) In case of thermal treatment process the process shall generate a stabilized biomass that would be used as fuel or raw material in other industrial process The physical and chemical properties of the produced RDFSB shall be homogenous and constant over time (e) Incineration of fresh waste for energy generation electricity andor heat The thermal energy generated is either consumed on-site andor exported to a nearby facility Electricity generated is either consumed on-site exported to the grid or exported to a nearby facility The incinerator is rotating fluidized bed or circulating fluidized bed or hearth or grate type

2 In case of anaerobic digestion gasification or RDF processing of waste the residual waste from these processes is aerobically composted andor delivered to a landfill

In RDF processing of waste the residual biodegradable waste is aerobically composted and the remainder ie the inert portion is delivered to the pre-identified sanitary landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

3 In case of composting the produced compost is either used as soil conditioner or disposed of in landfills

The compost produced in the project activity will be sold in the market that will be used as a soil conditioner This justifies the applicability criteria

4 In case of RDFstabilized biomass processing the produced RDFstabilized biomass should not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 9

This justifies the applicability criteria

5 If RDFSB is disposed of in a landfill project proponent shall provide degradability analysis on an annual basis to demonstrate that the methane generation in the life-cycle of the SB is below 1 of related emissions It has to be demonstrated regularly that the characteristics of the produced RDFSB should not allow for re-absorption of moisture of more than 3 Otherwise monitoring the fate of the produced RDFSB is necessary to ensure that it is not subject to anaerobic conditions in its lifecycle

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be disposed in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

6 In the case of incineration of the waste the waste should not be stored longer than 10 days The waste should not be stored in conditions that would lead to anaerobic decomposition and hence generation of CH4

The project activity does not involve the incineration of waste Hence this condition is not applicable

7 The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity can be determined in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity

The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity will be determined as per the process described in section B72 of PDD in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity This justifies the applicability criteria

8 The project activity may include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation from the biogas syngas captured RDFstabilized biomass produced combustion heat generated in the incineration process respectively from the anaerobic digester the gasifier RDFstabilized biomass combustor and waste incinerator The electricity can be exported to the grid andor used internally at the project site In the case of RDFSB produced the emission reductions can be claimed only for the cases where the RDFSB used for electricity andor thermal energy generation can be monitored

The project activity does not include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation Hence this condition is not applicable

9 Waste handling in the baseline scenario The MSW 2000 rules stipulated by GoI mandated

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 10

shows a continuation of current practice of disposing the waste in a landfill despite environmental regulation that mandates the treatment of the waste if any using any of the project activity treatment options mentioned above

the municipal bodies to treat the municipal waste in a scientific manner 2 However despite the rules the common practice of handling the waste in the country is continuation of current practice of dumping the wastes in a disposal site 3 In addition no single municipality or local body has complied with the guidelines stipulated by MSW Rules 2000 in the country4 Further the present scenario of solid waste management in Lucknow is highly unsynchronized and inadequate and entails dumping of waste in open areas5 This justifies the applicability criteria

10 The compliance rate of the environmental regulations during (part of) the crediting period is below 50 if monitored compliance with the MSW rules exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit since the assumption that the policy is not enforced is no longer tenable

The compliance rate of Indian MSW Rules 2000 is below 50 No single municipality or local body in India has complied with the guidelines stipulated in the MSW Rules 20006 However a conservative value of 45 is taken for ex-ante estimations of emission reductions7 This justifies the applicability criteria

11 Local regulations do not constrain the establishment of RDF production plantsthermal treatment plants nor the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material

There is no such regulations that constrain the establishment of RDF production nor any regulation for the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material This justifies the applicability criteria

12 In case of RDFstabilized biomass production project proponent shall provide evidences that no GHG emissions occur other than biogenic CO2 due to chemical reactions during the thermal treatment process (such as Chimney Gas Analysis report)

The project activity does not involve any thermal treatment in case of RDF production The process involved is purely mechanical treatment Hence this condition is not applicable

13 The project activity does not involve thermal There is no waste incineration in the proposed

2 httpenvfornicinlegishsmmswmhrhtml 3 httpwwwnswaicomimagesnewslettersjun2010pdf 4 Sunil Kumar Bhattacharyya JK Vaidya AN Tapan Chakrabarti Sukumar Devotta Akolkar AB Assessment of the status of municipal solid waste management in metro cities state capitals class I cities and class II towns in India An insight pg 3 Waste Management journal homepage wwwelseviercomlocatewasman 5 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf Page 26 Paragraph 34 describes the present scenario of solid waste management in

Lucknow 6 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 8

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf 7 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 9

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 11

treatment process of neither industrial nor hospital waste

project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

14 In case of waste incineration if auxiliary fossil fuel is added into the incinerator the fraction of energy generated by auxiliary fossil fuel is no more than 50 of the total energy generated in the incinerator

There is no waste incineration in the proposed project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

15 This methodology is not applicable to project activities that involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill This should be treated as a separate project activity due to the difference in waste characteristics of existing and fresh waste which may have an implication on the baseline scenario determination

Project activity does not involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

Thus as per the methodology AM0025 the project activity involves the treatment of fresh waste (ie municipal solid waste) originally intended for dumping through a combination of the processes a) composting b) RDF processing without incineration The project activity avoids methane emissions by diverting organic waste from being dumped where methane emissions are caused by anaerobic decomposition By treating the fresh waste through alternative treatment options these methane emissions are avoided Therefore the project meets the applicability conditions of AM0025 B3 Project boundary As per AM0025 the spatial extent of the project boundary is the site of the project activity where the waste is treated This includes the facilities for processing the waste on-site electricity consumption onsite fuel use and the sanitary landfill site The project boundary does not include facilities for waste collection sorting and transport to the project site The summary of gases and sources included in the project boundary and justification explanation where gases and sources are not included is listed below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 12

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation B

asel

ine

scen

ario

Emissions from decomposition of waste at the landfill site

CO2 Excluded CO2 emissions from the decomposition of organic waste are not accounted

CH4 Included The major source of emissions in the baseline since the fresh waste is being disposed off in the landfill Hence included

N2O Excluded N2O emissions are small compared to CH4 emissions from landfills Exclusion of this gas is conservative

Emissions from electricity consumption

CO2 Excluded Electricity is not being consumed in the baseline Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

Proj

ect s

cena

rio

On-site fossil fuel consumption due to the project activity other than for electricity generation

CO2 Included The project activity involves on-site fossil fuel consumption Hence included

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

Emissions from on-site electricity use

CO2 Included The project activity involves consumption of electricity from the grid Hence included

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded

The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 13

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation Pr

ojec

t sce

nari

o

Direct emissions from the waste treatment processes

N2O Included May be an important emission source N2O can be emitted from composting activities Hence included

CO2 Included CO2 emissions from decomposition of organic waste are not accounted8

CH4 Included Composting process may not be complete and result in anaerobic decay resulting in CH4 emissions

Emissions from waste water treatment

CO2 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

CH4 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

A graphical representation of the project boundary is shown below

Bio degradable waste processing Segregated Inert Recyclables

Compost RDF Sanitary landfill

Open market

MSW Collection in Lucknow

MSW Processing Site

PROJECT BOUNDARY

Electricity fromDiesel

Electricity from Grid

Consumption of Electricity

8 CO2 emissions from the combustion or decomposition of biomass (see definition by the EB in Annex 8 of the EBs 20th meeting report) are not accounted as GHG emissions Where the combustion or decomposition of biomass under a CDM project activity results in a decrease of carbon pools such stock changes should be considered in the calculation of emission reductions This is not the case for waste treatment projects

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 14 The various monitoring points in the project activity as included within the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram as given below

B4 Establishment and description of baseline scenario gtgt The approved methodology AM0025 version 12 recommends the use of the latest version of the tool for demonstration and assessment of additionality (version 0600) to determine the most plausible baseline scenarios for the project The various steps to establish the additionality of the project as per the methodological tool is demonstrated pictorially as given below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 15

According to the approved methodology AM0025 the baseline scenario of the activity is defined as disposal of the waste in open dump yards without taking any measures to capture the landfill gas or avoid methane emission due to the anaerobic decomposition of waste The procedure to define the baseline scenario as per AM0025 is as follows Step 1 Identification of alternative scenarios The most realistic and credible alternatives available to the project activity have been identified using the following sub steps

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 16 Sub-step 1a Defining alternatives to project activity The approved methodology has provided the following alternatives for the disposaltreatment of the fresh waste in the absence of the project activity ie the scenario relevant for estimating baseline methane emissions to be analysed should include inter alia M1 The project activity (ie composting gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas Assessment of the alternatives for waste treatment

Alternative Description Justification M1 The project activity (ie composting

gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project

This alternative seems to be a realistic and plausible alternative The project activity not implemented as a CDM project is however not a feasible alternative as the project involves high investment cost in order to set up the processing plant whereas the return from the project activity is exceptionally low (As discussed in detail in Section B5) However M1 is still a plausible option and is subjected to further consideration as a baseline scenario

M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared

The cost of construction operation and maintenance of an engineered landfill is high as compared to the zerominimal expenditure in the dumping of waste Hence the scope of landfill gas recovery is minimized in India Hence this scenario M2 is not feasible and is thus eliminated from further consideration as baseline scenario

M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas

Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas is the most common practice in India as demonstrated in Section B5 The same has been found to be prevalent in Lucknow in the absence of the project activity9 Hence this is a common practice that faces no barriers because of low expenditure low O amp M cost non-requirement of skilled labor etc Thus this is the most widely practiced method for MSW disposal throughout the country

9 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf page 26 paragraph 34

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 17

This alternative M3 is considered as the most likely baseline scenario for the project activity

The methodology further states that ldquoIf energy is exported to a grid andor to a nearby industry or used on-site realistic and credible alternatives should also be separately determined for bull Power generation in the absence of the project activity bull Heat generation in the absence of the project activityrdquo Under the scope of the project activity neither heat nor power generation takes place Hence the clause as mentioned above is not applicable to the project activity Thus alternatives M1 and M3 are further subjected for baseline consideration Alternative M2 is not considered as a plausible and realistic baseline scenario for the project activity Sub-step 1b Consistency with mandatory laws and regulations The MSW (Management and Handling) Rules 2000 notified by Ministry of Environment and Forests Government of India makes it mandatory for proper and scientific management of solid waste Under this rule land filling of the waste is not allowed but based on the studies10 and surveys carried out it was observed that the most common practice in India to dispose the solid waste is open dumping and land filling without any treatment and processing It is observed that these rules are not implementedenforced systematically thus leading to the most widespread practice of dumping waste in the country Conclusion Thus the alternatives M1 and M3 has been considered further Outcome of Sub-step 1b The two identified realistic and credible alternative scenario(s) to the project activity that are in compliance with mandatory legislation and regulations taking into account the enforcement in the country and EB decisions on national andor sectoral policies and regulations are as follows Alternative M1 The project activity carried out without the CDM and Alternative M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas (Continuation of the current practice of disposal in landfill) Step 2 Identify the fuel for the baseline choice of energy source taking into account the national andor sectoral policies as applicable Since there is no power generation or heat utilization in the project activity thus baseline does not involve use of fuel for energy Outcome of Sub-step 2 Alternatives M1 and M3 have been subjected for further consideration Step 3 Step 2 andor Step 3 of the latest approved version of the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo shall be used to assess which of these alternatives should be excluded from further consideration (eg alternatives facing prohibitive barriers or those clearly economically unattractive) The above analysis in Step 1 and Step 2 leaves with two alternatives M1 and M3

10 Present Scenario of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Dumping Grounds in India by Amiya Kumar Sahu National Solid Waste Association of India Mumbai

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 18 The further analysis has been discussed in detail in Section B5 below Step 4 Where more than one credible and plausible alternative remains project participants shall as a conservative assumption use the alternative baseline scenario that results in the lowest baseline emissions as the most likely baseline scenario The least emission alternative will be identified for each component of the baseline scenario In assessing these scenarios any regulatory or contractual requirements should be taken into consideration As demonstrated in Section B5 only one alternative remains after applying the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo to assess exclusion of the alternatives from further consideration Hence this step is not applicable as there is only one alternative available to the project activity As demonstrated in section B5 it is evident that after investment analysis only one alternative ie M3 remains as the most plausible option and hence this has been considered as the baseline to the project activity B5 Demonstration of additionality gtgt As per the approved methodology Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has identified the above mentioned realistic and credible alternative(s) (M1 and M3) that were available to them and that would provide output and services comparable to the project activity (refer section B4) These alternatives are in compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements The Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality stipulates that either Step 2 (Investment Analysis) or Step 3 (Barrier Analysis) or both can be selected to demonstrate additionality As the Project faces financial barriers for its implementation in the absence of CDM it is appropriate to choose Step 2 to demonstrate its additionality Step 2 Investment analysis The alternative considered for further analysis is alternative ldquoM3rdquo being the most commonly followed practice Sub-step 2a Determine appropriate analysis method Since the project generates incomes other than CDM related income for the purpose of investment analysis Option III (Benchmark Analysis) is chosen as it is deemed as the most appropriate analysis method where the returns on the investment in the project activity is compared to benchmark returns Sub-step 2b Option III Apply benchmark analysis The indicator used for carrying out the investment analysis is IRR that will determine the feasibility of the project activity This is compared with the Prime Lending Rate available at the time of investment decision For this purpose the PLR of Reserve Bank of India has been considered which is found to be 1200 as per Benchmark PLR of RBI during Aug-200911 Sub-step 2c Calculation and comparison of financial indicators The IRR for the proposed project activity without CDM revenue is computed for a period of 20 years lifetime A detailed investment analysis has been carried out and presented in the supported excel sheets The data and analysis is presented here The techno-economical parameters used for IRR calculation of the project activity is provided in the table below

11 httpwwwrbiorginscriptsWSSViewaspxId=14988

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 19

Parameters Unit Value Source

Capacity (MSW per day) MTs day 1300 As per DPR

Project Lifetime Years 25 yrs 0 months

As per specification provided by tech supplier

Cost of the project Buildings amp Civil works Rs in Lacs 3541056 As per DPR Plant and Machinery Rs in Lacs 1781286 As per DPR Interest payable during construction Rs in Lacs 15781 As per DPR Contingencies Rs in Lacs 10444 As per DPR Margin Money for working capital Rs in Lacs 12011 As per DPR Total cost Rs in Lacs 5704709 As per DPR

Financing pattern

Promoterrsquos Contribution through equity Rs in Lacs 8934 As per DPR Promoterrsquos contribution through loan Rs in Lacs 2700 As per DPR Subsidy under JNNURM Rs in Lacs 2111 As per RFP

Applicable Interest Rate on term loan Percent 1250 As per bank terms

Benchmark Prime Lending Rate (PLR) Percent 1200 httpwwwibaorginviewplraspmemcatid=1

Compost and RDF related costs

Recovery of compost from total MSW processed Percent 18

As per DPR

Recovery of RDF from total MSW processed Percent 12

Recovery of recyclable materials from total MSW processed Percent 2

Percentage of compost produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year

Percent 70

Percentage of RDF produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year Percent 70

Sale price of compost RsTon 2000 As per quote received from distributor Sale price of RDF RsTon 2000

Yearly increment in percentage of compost and RDF for sale in the market Percent 5 CPI(Consumer Price

Index) data Yearly escalation in sale price of compost and RDF Percent 5

Packaging cost of Compost Rs TON 150

As per quote received from distributor

Marketing cost of Compost Rs TON 100 Transportation cost of Compost Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of compost Rs TON 100 Packaging cost of RDF Rs TON 150

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 20 Marketing cost of RDF Rs TON 100 Transportation of RDF Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of RDF Rs TON 100

MSW Processing cost

Power consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 16539

As per DPR

Diesel consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 18720 Plant maintenance cost including that of vehicles

of capital cost for plant machineries 2

Use of senitiler ml MT of MSW processing 50

Use of bio-culture kg MT of MSW processing 10

Cost of senitiler use Rslitre 150

As per quote received Cost of bio-culture use Rskg 180 Cost of daily consumables (oil lubricants and cotton waste) Rs Lacsannum 26

Salary and wages of employees and staff Rs Lacsannum 373 As per DPR

Escalation rates

Escalation in maintenance cost Percent 400 CPI(Consumer Price Index) data Escalation in employee wages Percent 714

Escalation in fuel cost Percent 874 WPI(WholeSale Price Index) data Escalation in electricity cost Percent 874

Other commodities escalation Percent 583

Depreciation

St line Depn - Buildings Percent 334 As per companyrsquos law 1956 wwwfastfactscoinresourcesDepCoActrtf

- Plant amp Machinery Percent 113 IT Depreciation - Buildings Percent 10 - Plant amp Machinery Percent 15 Income Tax ndash MAT Percent 1133 Income Tax Act-

httpwwwindiainbusinessnicininvestmenttaxationhtm

Income Tax Percent 3399

Based on the above assumptions the results of the financial analysis have been provided below

Location Benchmark IRR (Without CDM) Lucknow MSW project 1200 686

As evident the IRR of the project activity is below the benchmark This clearly indicates that investment barrier exists in project activity implementation which is mitigated by the revenue derived from the carbon credits that the project activity would obtain due to Clean Development Mechanism The additionality of the project is thus evident Sub-step 2d Sensitivity analysis

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 21 The purpose of sensitivity analysis is to examine whether the conclusion regarding the financial viability of the proposed project is sound and tenable with those reasonable variations in the assumptions The investment analysis provides a valid argument in favor of additionality only if it consistently supports (for realistic range of assumptions) the conclusion that the project activity is unlikely to be the most financially attractive or is likely to be financially attractive Thus a sensitivity analysis was also applied to the IRR calculations to measure the impact positive or negative of changes in the indicated parameters The project proponent has chosen various factors as critical to the operation of the project in accordance with Guidance on the Assessment of Investment Analysis (Version- 031 paragraph- 17) which states that only variables including the initial investment cost that constitute more than 20 of either total project costs or total project revenues should be subjected to reasonable variation Hence the sensitivity is carried out by varying the parameters to 10 on either side to ascertain the impact on the profitability and hence the IRR of the project The results of the sensitivity analysis are as presented below

Sensitivity Parameter Variation and resultant IRR +10 0 -10

Quantity of waste processed 1325

686

-ve value OampM cost -ve value

(12 increase leads to an IRR

of -104 ) Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1688 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the OampM cost is not

expected to decrease in future

Organic Manure sales 1369 However 10 increase in sale price of organic

manures is a highly

unrealistic under the higly

stringent market scenario for

compost sale (explained in subsequent

paragraphs on barrier analysis)

-ve value -5 leads to a

decrease of IRR to -302

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

Cost of bioculture used -ve value 16 leads to a decrease of IRR

to 091 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1513 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the bioculture cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from

the WPI for all commodities as

published by

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 22

RBI Fuel and electricity cost -ve value

24 leads to a decrease of IRR

to -057 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1279 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the fuel and

electricity cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from the WPI for fuel

power and electricity as published by

RBI Project capital cost 570

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

818 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Packaging marketing and transportation expense

077 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1040 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Thus the sensitivity analysis for the project reveals that even with significant changes in various parameters the project IRR does not cross benchmark rates Therefore the project activity is clearly additional and is not a businessndashasndashusual scenario Step 3 Barrier Analysis The major barrier applicable to the alternative M1 is A) Technology Barrier B) Other Barrier and C) Investment Barrier Sub-step 3a Identify barriers that would prevent the implementation of the proposed CDM project Activity

A) Technological Barrier The plant would use state of the art technology in the process of waste handling and compost manufacturing EOT (Electric Overhead Transport) cranes would transfer the wastes from one processing station to the other Automation will be ensured wherever possible Hydraulic type press system would be installed for the RDF manufacturing Thus the plant would employ the latest technologies in the field of waste handling and management that involves a lot of technology transfer from international suppliers and exorbitant costs Also smooth operation of the plant would require proper training of the operating personnel on the equipments and hence regular capacity building training programs would have to be organized by the project proponent Another threat posed by the variation in feedstock quality is the content of highly abrasive and corrosive materials in it These cause rapid wear and corrosion of the process equipments Hence all MSW plants entail high cost of operation and maintenance due to frequent repairs breakdowns and shutdowns

B) Market barrier

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 23

Organic waste recycling is still neglected by private initiatives because of its low value and the lack of a market for compost Limited markets for compost sales and low prices for compost are a major challenge that all systems face12 The persisting skepticism among the farmers about the quality of composts poses a constant threat on the marketability of the composts Misconceptions like soil contamination due to use of composts are still borne in the minds of many Thus the emphasis on quality control of final products is of utmost importance Also increased awareness among the farmers on the benefits derived out of compost usage as value added substitutes to chemical fertilizers have to be encouraged through campaigns and other promotional activities

Also high cost of transportation sometimes makes it difficult to justify the use of composts when compared to the benefits derived out of it

C) Investment barrier The project proponent has demonstrated through investment analysis that without CDM revenue the project activity is not a financially attractive proposition At the inception the project had received refusal for loans from financial institutions for unimpressive returns envisaged from the project and the project proponent was suggested to estimate the returns along with additional revenue as may be associated with the project activity (for eg revenue from carbon credits) The project proponent had re-submitted their application for loan with the consideration of the CDM revenue and thereafter received the sanction

All these factors substantiate to prove that additional efforts are required for overcoming the market barrier for the compost produced in the plant In this context the additional incentive available to the plant through Clean Development Mechanism would be utilized for market development of the compost produced in the plant and also to partially compensate for the losses for not being able to sell compost in the market Thus the barriers as illustrated above pose a serious obstacle to the project activity and thus would lead to high operational uncertainties if not implemented as a CDM project activity Sub-step 3 b Shows that the identified barriers would not prevent a wide spread implementation of at least one of the alternatives (except the proposed project activity) As discussed above dumping of the solid waste in a landfill without gas capture (M3) is a common practice in India and none of the barriers discussed above would prevent it from occurring The barriers identified ie technological barrier and the market barrier does not in any way prevent the continuation of the baseline scenario Hence project activity satisfies the additionality criteria as per clause 3b) of the tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality Version 0600 Step 4 Common practice analysis According to the methodology AM0025 project proponents should ldquoprovide evidence of the early stage of development of the project activity and that it is not common practice in the country To this end they should provide an analysis of waste management practicesrdquo In order to justify the early development of the project activity the chronology for the same has been presented below as we proceed further As per the ldquoTool to for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo (Version 0600) similar type of project is defined as follows

12 httpwwwtngovincmaswm_in_indiapdf page 145

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 24 Sub-step 4b Discuss any similar Options that are occurring The above analysis demonstrates the similar activities occurring as the project activity But it can be seen that all the treatment facilities are composting facilities and none of the plants have RDF production facility Most of these composting facilities have applied for CDM benefits and those that have not are facing difficulties The project activity conforms to the measures of ldquoMethane formation avoidancerdquo as mentioned in paragraph 6 of the Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Hence analysis of the project activity as per paragraph 47 is illustrated as follows Step 1 Calculate applicable output range as +-50 of the design output or capacity of the proposed project activity The capacity of the project activity is 1300 TPD Hence considering an output range of +-50 the analysis would entail all projects of capacities between 1950 TPD and 650 TPD Therefore as per the table of cities as listed above the cities considered for present analysis would include the following

City Waste

Quantity (TPD)

Processing of Waste Disposal of waste CDM status Composting Pelletisation Uncontrolled

dumping Sanitary landfill

Earth cover

Bangalore 1669 300 Ahmedabad 1302 500 Pune 1175 500 Surat 1000

Kanpur 1100

Jaipur 904

Ludhiana 735 Agra 654 Step 2 In the applicable geographical area identify all plants that deliver the same output or capacity within the applicable output range calculated in Step 1 as the proposed project activity and have started commercial operation before the start date of the project Note their number Nall Registered CDM project activities and projects activities undergoing validation shall not be included in this step The applicable geographical area for the project activity would entail the entire host country ie India Of the selected cities as listed above the same output ie organic composts and RDF is produced by Bangalore and Pune However all the projects are under validation Hence as per the given definitions Nall for the present analysis of the project activity is equal to 0 since all the plants with similar output and within the applicable capacity range have considered CDM benefits associated to the projects Nall = 0 Step 3 Within plants identified in Step 2 identify those that apply technologies different than the technology applied in the proposed project activity Note their number Ndiff All the plants as included in Nall use the same technology for compost production and RDF manufacturing Hence under the scope of the present analysis Ndiff = 0

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 25 Step 4 Calculate factor F=1-NdiffNall representing the share of plants using technology similar to the technology used in the proposed project activity in all plants that deliver the same output or capacity as the proposed project activity Under the scope of the project activity the factor is calculated as follows F = 1-NdiffNall = 1 ndash 0= 1 Therefore under the scope of the project activity the factor F cannot be determined The proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled (a) the factor F is greater than 02 and (b) Nall-Ndiff is greater than 3 Since as per the above analysis F = 1 which is greater than 02 Nall - Ndiff = 0 which is less than 3 As per the methodology the proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled Thus since one of the criterions as imposed by the tool is not satisfied by the project activity hence it is prudent to conclude that the project activity is not a common practice and hence additional the analysis shows that the project activity is additional

Also as per the India Infrastructure Report 2006 the few aerobic compost plants that have been set up are typically functioning much below installed capacity and most are ldquofacing a problem of marketing the compost due to an ineffective marketing mechanismrdquo Thus it can be concluded that extremely few similar activities can be observed in India and when they are observed they face considerable barriers and have not had much success from an economic perspective The experience provided by these composting attempts only serves to reinforce the fact that implementing composting activities is financially unviable Therefore as demonstrated by the investment and barrier analyses in Steps 2 and 3 it is clear that the project is not financially viable without the revenue from CDM and there are significant barriers to its implementation In addition as detailed in Step 4 the proposed project is not common practice either and in the limited cases where aerobic composting is taking place it is proving to be a failure from an economic perspective It can therefore be concluded that the proposed project is additional and would not occur without CDM due to the financial and technological barriers in place Moreover the CDM registration of the Project will also serve as a model for other projects and promote the dissemination of sustainable waste management practices Serious consideration of CDM As per paragraph 2 of EB 62 Annex 13 ldquoGuidelines to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDM for project activities with a start date after 2nd August 2008 ldquothe project proponent must inform a Host Party designated national authority (DNA) and the UNFCCC secretariat in writing of the commencement of the project activity and of their intension to seek CDM status Such notification must be made within six months of the project activity start date and shall contain the precise geographical location and brief description of the proposed project activity using the standardized form F-CDM ndash Prior considerationrdquo As mentioned in the section C11 the start date for the project activity is 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 26 The project proponent had intimated the Host Party designated national authority (DNA) ie Ministry of environment and Forests (Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat about the project activity on 09102011 This intimation was made in the F-CDM-Prior consideration format as prescribed by UNFCCC Thus the intimation to Host party DNA and UNFCCC secretariat was made within six months from the project start date as this is in accordance to the ldquoGuideline to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo As per the ldquoGuidelines on the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo version 04 EB 62 Annex 13 serious consideration of CDM has been demonstrated below

Date Project Related Activity CDM Related Activity Evidence 14092009 Financial proposal from

Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd Copy of proposal

28102009 Revised financial proposal from Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of proposal

11112009 Letter of award for development of Integrated Solid waste management facilities for Lucknow Municipal Corporation UP

Copy of the letter of award

07092010 Receipt of certificate of incorporation for Ms JYOTI ENVIROTECH PRIVATE LIMITED

Copy of certificate

23102010 Concession agreement signed between Lucknow Municipal Corporation Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam and Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of the Agreement

07062011 Environmental Clearance received for development of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill and processing facility at Village-Shiveri

Copy of letter of Approval

21092011 Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd appointed CDM consultants for the project

Copy of work order placed on the CDM consultants

03102011 No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

Copy of no objection certificate

09102011 Project proponent submitted the Prior consideration of the CDM form to host party DNA (Ministry of Environment and Forests Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat

Copy of Prior consideration of the CDM form as submitted to MoEF GoI and UNFCCC

10102011 Purchase order raised for Plant Machinery

Copy of Purchase order

23032012 Stakeholder Consultation Meeting

Copy of the Minutes of Meeting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 27 B6 Emission reductions B61 Explanation of methodological choices gtgt Approved baseline and monitoring methodology AM0025- Avoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processes Version 13 has been used to calculate emission reductions from the project The estimation of project emission baseline emission and leakage emission are described below Project emissions The proposed project uses MSW processing (RDF and compost production processes) to treat the organic waste Therefore the project emissions in year y are calculated as follows PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy + PEay + PEgy+ PEry + PEiy + PEwy + PEco-firingy (1) Where PEy = Is the project emissions during the year y (tCO2e) PEelecy = Is the emissions from electricity consumption on-site due to the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) PEfuel on-sitey =Is the emissions on-site due to fuel consumption on-site in year y (tCO2e) PEcy =Is the emissions during the composting process in year y (tCO2e) PEay =Is the emissions from the anaerobic digestion process in year y (tCO2e) PEgy =Is the emissions from the gasification process in year y (tCO2e) PEry =Is the emissions from the combustion of RDFstabilized biomass in year y (tCO2e) PEiy =Is the emissions from waste incineration in year y (tCO2e) PEwy =Is the emissions from wastewater treatment in year y (tCO2e) PEco-firingy =Is the emissions from thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on site

fossil fuel consumption during co-firing in year y (tCO2e) The project activity involves composting and mechanical treatment to produce compost and RDF It involves the electricity consumption onsite and on-site fuel consumption Hence the equation applicable to the project activity is as follows Hence for the project activity PEay =0 as the project does not entail anaerobic digestion PEgy =0 as the project does not entail gasification PEry =0 as the project does not entail combustion of RDFstabilized PEiy =0 as the project does not entail waste incineration PEwy =0 as the project does not entail wastewater treatment PEco-firingy =0 as the project does not entail thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on

site fossil fuel consumption Therefore PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy (2) Emissions from electricity use on site (PEelecy) The project uses electricity from the NEWNE grid at processing plant at Lucknow The emissions from electricity use are therefore calculated as PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec (3)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 28 Where EGPJFFy = Is the amount of electricity generated in an on-site fossil fuel fired power plant or

consumed from the grid as a result of the project activity measured using an electricity meter (MWh)

CEFelec = Is the carbon emissions factor for electricity consumed in the project activity (tCO2eMWh)

Under the scope of the project activity electricity use on site would include the electricity consumption due to the plant equipments and machineries on site that are used to produce the composts the RDF Emissions from fuel use on-site (PEfuelon-sitey) Project participants shall account for CO2 emissions from any on-site fuel combustion (other than electricity generation eg vehicles used on-site heat generation for starting the gasifier auxiliary fossil fuels need to be added into incinerator heat generation for mechanicalthermal treatment process etc) Emissions are calculated from the quantity of fuel used and the specific CO2-emission factor of the fuel as follows PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel (4) Where PEfuel on-sitey = Is the CO2 emissions due to on-site fuel combustion in year y (tCO2) Fconsy = Is the fuel consumption on site in year y (l or kg) NCVfuel = Is the net caloric value of the fuel (MJl or MJkg) EFfuel = Is the CO2 emissions factor of the fuel (tCO2MJ) As per methodology project participants may use IPCC default values for the net calorific values and CO2 emission factors Under the scope of the project activity fuel use on-site would include consumption of diesel fuel by the vehicles (eg excavators earth movers etc) as may be engaged for the project activity on-site Further the project may also include Diesel Generator(s) placed on site to provide necessary power back-up in incidents of exigency Thus the diesel fuel consumed by the DG set would also be monitored and be counted in fuel use quantity on-site Hence for the project activity NCVfuel = NCVydiesel And EFfuel = EFdiesel Emissions from composting (PEcy) As per the methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 Annex 09 emission from composting PEcy = PEECy + PEFCy + PECH4y + PEN2Oy + PEROy (5) Where PEECy = Project emissions from electricity consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEelecy as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 29 PEFCy = Project emissions from fossil fuel consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEfuelon-sitey as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

PECH4y = Project emissions of methane from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEN2Oy = Project emissions of nitrous oxide from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEROy =Project emissions of methane from run-off wastewater associated with co-composting

in year y (tCO2eyr) The leachate generated in the project activity will be gainfully utilized in maintaining the moist environment of the bio degradable waste Hence the project activity would not entail any project emission from run-off wastewater PEROy= 0

Therefore PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy (6) Determination of project emissions of methane (PECH4y ) Project emissions of methane from composting (PECH4y) are determined as follows PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 (7) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFCH4y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tCH4 t) For the value of EFCH4y a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFCH4y = EFCH4default GWPCH4 = Global Warming Potential of CH4 (tCO2e tCH4 ) Determination of project emissions of nitrous oxide (PEN2Oy ) The N2O emissions from composting are calculated as follows PEN2Oy = Qy EFN2Oy GWPN2O (8) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFN20y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tN2O t) For the value of EFN2Oy a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFN20y = EFN20default GWPN20 = Global Warming Potential of N20 (tCO2e tN2O ) Baseline emissions To calculate the baseline emissions project participants shall use the following equation BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy (9)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 30 Where BEy = Is the baseline emissions in year y (tCO2e) MBy = Is the methane produced in the landfill in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) MDregy = Is methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) BEENy = Baseline emissions from generation of energy displaced by the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) Since the project activity does not entail generation of energy hence BEENy= 0

Methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity (MDregy) The methodology states that In cases where regulatory or contractual requirements do not specify MDregy an Adjustment Factor (AF) shall be used and justified taking into account the project context In doing so the project participant should take into account that some of the methane generated by the landfill may be captured and destroyed to comply with other relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odour concerns MDregy = MBy AF Where AF = Is Adjustment Factor for MBy () The parameter AF shall be estimated as follows In cases where a specific system for collection and destruction of methane is mandated by regulatory or contractual requirements the ratio between the destruction efficiency of that system and the destruction efficiency of the system used in the project activity shall be used In the host country India there is no regulation for capture and destruction of methane generated by the landfill Hence the adjustment factor the project activity is 0 as per the present scenario ie AF = 0 Therefore MDregy = 0 However in due course of time the value of AF may undergo changes as per the governmental regulations imposed in the host country (India) with respect to MSW management Rate of compliance In cases where there are regulations that mandate the use of one of the project activity treatment options and which is not being enforced the baseline scenario is identified as a gradual improvement of waste management practices to the acceptable technical options expected over a period of time to comply with the MSW Management Rules The adjusted baseline emissions (BEya) are calculated as follows BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) (10) Where BEy = Is the CO2-equivalent emissions as determined from equation 14 RATECompliance

y = Is the state-level compliance rate of the MSW Management Rules in that year y The compliance rate shall be lower than 50 if it exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 31 The compliance ratio RATECompliance

y shall be monitored ex post based on the official reports for instance annual reports provided by municipal bodies For details on the consideration the value of RATECompliance

y for the purpose of ex ante calculation refer to annexure 1 Methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity (MBy) The amount of methane that is generated each year (MBy) is calculated as per the latest version of the approved methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo (Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46) Considering the following additional equation MBy = BECH4SWDSy Where BECH4SWDSy = Is the methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity at

year y that is methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the solid waste disposal site during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e) as calculated using Application B in the methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo The tool estimates methane generation adjusted for using adjustment factor (fy) any landfill gas in the baseline that would have been captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odor concerns As this is already accounted for in this methodology ldquofyrdquo in the tool shall be assigned a value 0

The amount of methane that is generated each year (BECH4SWDSy tCO2e) is calculated for each year with the recommended multi-phase model the First Order Decay (FOD) model The amount of methane produced in the year y is calculated as follows

(11) Where BECH4SWDSy = Methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the

solid waste disposal site (SWDS) during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e)

φ = Model correction factor to account for model uncertainties f = Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used in another

manner Since no such practice exists in the host country India hence for the project activity the value for ldquofrdquo has been considered 0

GWPCH4 =Global Warming Potential (GWP) of methane valid for the relevant commitment period OX =Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste) F =Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCf =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that can decompose For the

project activity the default value has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore DOCf = DOCf Default

MCF =Methane correction factor For the project activity the value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore MCFy = 08

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 32 Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) DOCj =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j kj =Decay rate for the waste type j j =Waste type category (index) x =Year during the crediting period x runs from the first year of the project activity

(x = 1) to the year y for which avoided emissions are calculated (x = y) y =Year for which methane emissions are calculated Where different waste types j are prevented from disposal the amount of different waste types (Wjx) is determined through sampling and the mean is calculated from the samples as follows Since the project activity corresponds to Application B as stated in the tool hence the values of few parameters have been adopted as explained in table 1 of the tool Determining the amounts of waste types j disposed in the SWDS (Wjx) Wjx = Wx pjx (12) Where Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) Wx =Total amount of waste prevented from from disposal in the SWDS in year x (t) pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from the

first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) The fraction of the waste type j in the waste for the year x or month i are calculated according to equations (7) and (8) as follows

(13)

Where pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) pnjx = Fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the year x (weight

fraction) zx = Number of samples collected during the year x n = Samples collected in year x j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from

the first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) Determining the fraction of DOC that decomposes in the SWDS (DOCfy) In the case that the tool is applied to MSW then project participants may choose to either apply a default value (DOCfy = DOCfdefault) or to determine DOCfy or DOCfm based on measurements of the biochemical methane potential of the MSW (BMPMSW) as follows

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 33

(14) Where DOCfy = Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that decomposes under the

specific conditions occurring in the SWDS for year y (weight fraction) BMPj = Biochemical methane potential for the MSW disposed or prevented from disposal

(t CH4 t waste) F = Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCj = Fraction of degradable organic carbon in the waste type j (weight fraction) pjy = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year y (weight fraction) pjm = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in month m (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste in the MSW y = Year of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated (y is a

consecutive period of 12 months) m = Month of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated Leakage The sources of leakage considered in the methodology are CO2 emissions from off-site transportation of waste materials in addition to CH4 and N2O emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digestion gasification processes and processingcombustion of RDF Leakage emissions should be estimated from the following equation Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy (15) Where Lty =Is the leakage emissions from increased transport in year y (tCO2e) Lry =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digester the

gasifier the processingcombustion of RDFstabilized biomass or compost in case it is disposed of in landfills in year y (tCO2e)

Liy =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from MSW incinerator in year y (tCO2e)

Lsy =Is the leakage emissions from end use of stabilized biomass (tCO2e) LCOMPy =Leakage emissions associated with composting in year y (t CO2e yr) Since the project activity does not include the use of MSW incinerator Lsy = 0 The project activity does not involve the disposal of residual waste from processing of RDF or compost in landfill Also for ex-ante estimations the residual waste is taken as 100 inerts Hence Lry =0 The produced compost and RDF will be sold in the market Also for ex-ante estimations for this project activity the weight of stabilized biomass sold offsite for which no sale invoices can be provided is considered as zero Hence Lsy =0 Emissions from Transportation (Lt y)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 34 This would occur when the waste is transported from waste collecting points in the collection area to the treatment facility instead of the existing landfills In this case project participants shall document the following data in the CDM-PDD an overview of collection points from where the waste will be collected their approximate distance (in km) to the treatment facility existing landfills and their approximate distance (in km) to the nearest end-user The emissions are calculated (As per AM0025) from the quantity of fuel (diesel) used and the specific CO2 emission factor of the fuel (diesel) for vehicles

(16) Where NOvehiclesiy =Is the number of vehicles for transport with similar loading capacity DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) NCVfuel =Is the Calorific value of the fuel (MJKg or TJGg) Dfuel =Is the fuel density (kgl) if necessary EFfuel =Is the Emission factor of the fuel (tCO2eMJ) For estimation of NOvehiclesiy the following equation has been used for ex-ante calculation NOvehiclesiy = QyCTy (17) Where Qy = Is the quantity of waste composted in the year ldquoyrdquo (tonnes) CTy = Is the average truck capacity for waste transportation (tonnestruck) Ltywaste is the emissions due to increased transportation from the waste collecting point to the waste treatment facility In this the incremental distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline is equalt to 0 Therefore Ltywaste = 0 For calculation of emissions from transport of compost to the users (Ltycompost) the same formula applies Qy is replaced by Mcompost where Mcompost is the total quantity of compost produced in year y Similarly for calculation of emissions from transport of RDF (LtyRDF) Qy is replaced by MRDF where MRDF is the total quantity of RDF produced in year y Thus Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF (18) Calculation of emission reductions To calculate the emission reductions the following equation has been applied ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly (19) Where ERy = Is the emissions reductions in year y (t CO2e) BEy = Is the emissions in the baseline scenario in year y (tCO2e) PEy = Is the emissions in the project scenario in year y (tCO2e) Ly = Is the leakage in year y (tCO2e)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 35 B62 Data and parameters fixed ex ante (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

Data Parameter AF

Unit

Description Methane destroyed due to regulatory or other requirements

Source of data Local andor national authorities

Value(s) applied 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per the approved methodology AM0025 Version 13 AF shall be assigned a value taking into account the amount of methane generated by the landfills that may be captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations and contractual requirements of the host country Since there exists no regulations or contractual requirement to capture and destroy the methane generated from the landfills in India hence AF has been fixed ex-ante and assigned a value of 0

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

Data Parameter φ Unit Unitless

Description Default value model corrections factor to account for model uncertainties

Source of data Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Value(s) applied 085

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per Table 3 the project activity conforms to HumidWet conditions in Application B Accordingly the default value for φ has been taken from table 3 This is in the absence of monitored data for φ as per Option 2 in the tool for determination of model correction factor

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 36

Data Parameter F

Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction)

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Upon biodegradation organic material is converted to a mixture of

methane and carbon dioxide

Data Parameter OX Unit Unitless

Description Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste)

Source of data Based on an extensive review of published literature on this subject including the IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 01

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment When methane passes through the top-layer part of it is oxidized by

methanotrophic bacteria to produce CO2 The oxidation factor represents the proportion of methane that is oxidized to CO2 This should be distinguished from the methane correction factor (MCF) which is to account for the situation that ambient air might intrude into the SWDS and prevent methane from being formed in the upper layer of SWDS

Data Parameter DOCfDefault

Unit Unitless

Description Default value for the fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) in MSW that decomposes in the SWDS

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 37

Data Parameter MCFy Unit Unitless

Description Methane correction factor

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 08

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46 This comprises all SWDS not meeting the criteria of managed SWDS and which have depths of greater than or equal to 5 meters

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment MCF accounts for the fact that unmanaged SWDS produce less methane

from a given amount of waste than managed SWDS because a larger fraction of waste decomposes aerobically in the top layers of unmanaged SWDS The baseline dumping sites have been found to be greater than 5 meters

Data Parameter DOCj Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Tables 24 and 25)

Value(s) applied

Waste type j DOCj ( wet waste)

Wood and wood products 43 Pulp paper and cardboard

(other than sludge) 40

Food food waste beverages and tobacco (other than sludge) 15

Textiles 24 Garden yard and park waste 20

Glass plastic metal other inert waste 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default values adopted from table 4 as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 38

Data Parameter kj

Unit Unitless

Description Decay rate for the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Table 33)

Value(s) applied Default values adopted from table 5 for Wet Type waste in tropical (Matgt20ordmC) conditions as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Waste type j kj

Slowly degrading

Pulp paper cardboard (other than sludge) textiles

0045

Wood wood products and straw 0025

Rapidly degrading Food food waste sewage sludge beverages and tobacco 0085

Moderately degrading Other (non-food) organic putrescible garden and park waste 0065

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

The annual temperature limits of Lucknow has been adopted from httpwwwnihernetinrbisindia_informationannual20temperaturehtm The average annual temp of Lucknow is thus estimated to be 2582ordmC Thus Lucknow is considered to be in the tropical zone with MAT gt 20ordmC And hence the default value has been obtained as per Table 5

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CEFelec Unit t CO2MWh Description Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid Source of data CEA CO2 Baseline Database Version 70 Jan 2012 (wwwceanicin) Value(s) applied 09216 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

This data is taken from publicly available CEA CO2 baseline database version 7 dated March 2012 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment This value is fixed for the entire crediting period

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 39

Data Parameter EFCH4Default Unit t CH4 t Description Default emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted (wet

basis) Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of

emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 0002 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFN2ODefault Unit t N20 t

Description Default emission factor of nitrous oxide per tonne of waste composted (wet basis)

Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 00002

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 40

Data Parameter NCVydiesel

Unit TJ Gg

Description Net calorific value of diesel consumed for power generation at the MSW processing unit

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Volume 2 Table 12 p118

Value(s) applied 43

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFdiesel Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 741

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter GWPCH4

Unit tCO2 tCH4

Description Global warming potential of CH4

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 21 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 41

Data Parameter GWPN20

Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 310 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter Ddiesel

Unit KgL

Description Density of fuel

Source of data Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) India

Value(s) applied 087

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data BEE value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission Additional comment

B63 Ex ante calculation of emission reductions gtgt For the purpose of ex-ante calculation of emission reduction the following assumptions have been taken into consideration Total quantity of MSW available (tonnesday) 1300 Annual Number of operating days 330 Percentage of organic content in the MSW 47 Rate of compliance 10 Total quantity of biodegradable wastes to be processed 201630 TPD (Calculated) Amount of electricity consumed per day due to the project 1550 kWh Specific gravity of diesel 087 kglitre Calculation of Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid (CEFelec) As the project activity utilises electricity from the NEWNE Grid the project uses the approach (a)

combined margin emission factor for the NEWNE grid following seven steps of ldquoTool to calculate the

emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) and using publicly available data of

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 42 ldquoCentral Electrical Authorityrdquo (the most recent version ldquoCO2 Baseline Database Version 70rdquo13 available

at the time of submission of the CDM PDD to the DOE for Global Stakeholders Consultation) As per the

stepwise approach to calculate the emission factor of an electricity system the EFy is being calculated as

follows

Step 1 Identify the relevant electricity system

As per the CEA CO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 combined emission factor is given

for northern eastern western and north-eastern girds taken together Therefore this combined emission

factor will be used for the NEWNE grid to evaluate the emission reductions

Step 2 Choose whether to include off-grid power plants in the project electricity system (optional)

As per the tool Option I is selected for the project activity as only grid connected power plants are

included in the calculation

Step 3 STEP3 Select a method to determine Operating Margin (OM)

The project proponent has chosen to adopt option a) of step 3 ie consideration of Simple Operating

Margin for the project As per the tool The simple OM method (Option a) can only be used if low-

costmust-run resources2 constitute less than 50 of total grid generation in 1) average of the five most

recent years or 2) based on long-term averages for hydroelectricity production

Referring the relevant data from the CEACO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 the below

table is drawn for the share of net generation by the must-run hydronuclear plants for the past 5 years

Region 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Average NEWNE 1850 1900 1740 1590 1760 177

Since the average is 177 and is below the threshold of 50 as prescribed in the tool hence Simple OM

method is applicable for the project activity

Step 4 Calculate the operating margin emission factor according to the selected method

Simple OM The Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2

Operating Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid The following information has been used for the

calculation of baseline emissions

Simple Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridOMy) (incl Imports) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference

13 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 43 Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2008-09 tCO2MWh 101 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10 tCO2MWh 098

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2010-11 tCO2MWh 097

3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor

tCO2MWh 09843 Calculated based on the most recent data available at the time of submission of the CDM-PDD to the DOE for validation

Note 3 year generation weighted average of Operating margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) STEP 5 Calculate the build margin (BM) emission factor Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2 Build Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid for the year 2010-2011 Build Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridBMy) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference Build Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10

tCO2MWh 0859 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Step 6 Calculate the combined margin emissions factor The Project proponent has opted for Option A ie estimation of Combined Margin by weighted average nethod EFy = wOM EFgridOMy + wBM EFgridBMy Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy) 3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (NEWNE grid) EFgridOMy

tCO2MWh 09843 Refer the above table

Build Margin (NEWNE grid) EFgridBMy

tCO2MWh 0859 Refer the above table

Weighting of operating margin emissions factor wOM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Weighting of build margin emissions factor wBM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy)

tCO2MWh 09216 Calculated

Note Combined margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) Hence CEFelec is calcualted to be 09216 for the Project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 44 Calculation of Project Emission As per equation 3) PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec = (1550 3301000) 09216 = 471 tCO2e Considering diesel consumption per day due to the project activity100 Litre Fconsy = 100 3300871000 = 29 tonnes As per equation 4) PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel = 29 43 741 = 91 tCO2e Considering composition of organic waste as follows Cloth 5 Garden Yard waste 30 Food Waste 55 Paper 10 Thus waste type category (j) = 4 Therefore Quantity of cloth waste = 1300 330 47 5 = 10082 tonnesannum Quantity of garden waste = 1300 330 47 30 = 60489 tonnesannum Quantity of food waste = 1300 330 47 55 = 110897 tonnesannum Quantity of paper waste = 1300 330 47 10 = 20163 tonnesannum Therefore total waste quantity = (10082 + 60489 + 110897 + 20163) = 201630 tonnesannum Therefore amount of waste composted is Qy = (50 of 201630) = 100815 tonnesannum (This is with the consideration of equal distribution of the total biodegradable waste for RDF production and for composting The parameter Qy will be monitored ex-post) As per equation 7) project emission of methane has been calculated as PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 = 100815 0002 21 = 4234 tCO2e As per equation 8) project emission of methane has been calculated as PEN20y = Qy EFN20y GWPN20 = 100815 00002 310 = 6251 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 6) emission from composting has been calculated as PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy = 3243 + 4788 = 10485 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 2) project emission has been calculated as PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy = (471 + 91 + 10485) tCO2e = 11048 tCO2e Calculation of Baseline Emission As per equation 11) methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity is calculated as

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 45 = 085(1-0)21(1-01)1612050508[10082024e-07(1)(1- e-07)] + [6048902e-017(1)(1- e-

017)]+ [110897015e-04(1)(1- e-04)] + [201630 4e-007(1)(1- e-007)] = 34633 tCO2e Considering a compliance rate of 4514 ie RATECompliance

y = 0045 Therefore as per equation 10) Adjusted baseline emission has been calculated as BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) = 38481 (1 ndash 0045) = 17316 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 9) Baseline emission has been calculated as BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy = (34633 ndash 0) + 0 = 33058 tCO2e Calculation of Leakage Emission As per equation 16)

Where DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) For ex-ante estimation this has been considered to be 200 Kms for both compost and RDF

VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) For ex-ante estimation the same has been assumed to be 02 lkm

Now as per equation 17) NOvehiclesiy is given by QyCTy For ex-ante estimation CTy has been considered to be 10 Tons Ltycompost = (18 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 856 tCO2e LtyRDF = (12 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 571 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 18) emission from transportation has been calculated as Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF = (856 + 571) = 1427 tCO2e As per equation 15) leakage emission has been calculated as Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy = 1427 + 0 + 0 + 0 +0 = 1427 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 19) emission reduction has been calculated as ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly = (33058 ndash 11048 ndash 1427) = 20584 tCO2e Emission reduction for all other years in the crediting period has been calculated in a similar manner 14 For details on the value considered refer to Annexure 1 below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 46 B64 Summary of ex ante estimates of emission reductions

Year Baseline

emissions (t CO2e)

Project emissions (t CO2e)

Leakage (t CO2e)

Emission reductions (t CO2e)

2012-2013 33058 11048 1427 20584 2013-2014 57319 11048 1427 44844 2014-2015 75420 11048 1427 62945 2015-2016 89168 11048 1427 76694 2016-2017 99805 11048 1427 87330 2017-2018 108188 11048 1427 95714 2018-2019 114916 11048 1427 102441 2019-2020 120408 11048 1427 107934 2020-2021 124963 11048 1427 112489 2021-2022 128795 11048 1427 116320

Total 952041 110476 14270 827294 Total number of crediting years 10

Annual average over the crediting period

95204 11408 1427 82729

B7 Monitoring plan B71 Data and parameters to be monitored (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 47

Data Parameter Mcompost Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 77220 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of compost produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of compost produced will be cross checked with the sale of

compost Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter M RDF Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 51480 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of RDF produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of RDF produced will be cross checked with the sale of RDF Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 48

Data Parameter Pnjx

Unit - Description Weight fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the

year x Source of data Sample analysis of the MSW by project participant Value(s) applied

SL No Waste type Composition

1 Cloth 5 2 Garden yard waste 30 3 Food Waste 55 4 Paper 10

Source These values are as mentioned in the DPR

Measurement methods and procedures

Sampling method will be selected in order to determine a constant weight fraction of the waste type treated As per the tool the size and frequency of sampling should be statistically with a maximum uncertainty range of 20 at 95 confidence level Since the number of operating days is 330 it is ensured that the waste will be delivered for all the 330 days and hence will be monitored daily Sampling will be done on a monthly basis

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures The sampling of the raw wastes will be done by a laboratory in the project

site The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months

Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter RATECompliancey

Unit Description Rate of compliance Source of data Reports published by Municipal bodies (Central Pollution Control Board

(CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority) Analysis for computation of value for RATECompliance

y has been presented in Annexure 1 provided in the last section of the document

Value(s) applied 45 Measurement methods and procedures

The ex-ante value has been taken as 45 For ex-post calculation of emission reductions compliance rates would be taken from the reports published by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per AM0025 Version 12 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 49

Data Parameter z Unit - Description Number of samples collected during the year x Source of data Lab Records Value(s) applied 12 per year Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter f Unit - Description Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used

in another manner Source of data Plant Log Book- Written information from the operator of the solid waste

disposal site Value(s) applied 0 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- - Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per the methodological tool to determine ldquoEmissions

avoided from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment At present there is no provision for capturing flaring or combusting the

methane emissions at the SWDS This justifies the choice of the data value Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years in both electronic and paper formats

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 50

Data Parameter EG PJFFy Unit MWhyr Description Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the project

activity Source of data Electricity meter reading from electricity meter bill Value(s) applied 512 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the energy meter is 05 Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Monthly QAQC procedures Electricity meter will be subject to regular (in accordance with stipulation

of the meter supplier) maintenance and testing to ensure accuracy Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Fconsy Unit litre Description Fuel (diesel) consumption on-site during year lsquoyrsquo of the crediting period Source of data Purchase invoices Value(s) applied 100 litresday Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 51

Data Parameter DT i compost y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for compost transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap Assumption to be approved by DOE

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Qy Unit Tonnesyr Description Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 100815 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of waste composted will be measured with belt scales installed in the conveyer belt coming out of the pre-sorting area Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Once in three yearsfrom NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the belt scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures The belt scales will be calibrated as per standards provided by the

manufacturer Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 52

Data Parameter DT i RDF y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for RDF transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CTt y Unit Tonnestruck Description Carrying capacity of each truck delivering waste to the composting

installation in year y Source of data The maximum carrying capacity as stated on the truckrsquos nameplate is

registered by personnel at the entrance gate of the composting installation Value(s) applied 10 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be monitored by the challan received from the transport contractors post the loading of the vehicle Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- - Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 5 kgs Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Every vehicle QAQC procedures Weighbridge or any other applicable weighing device is subject to periodic

calibration (in accordance with stipulation of the weighing device supplier)

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 53

Data Parameter VFcons Unit litre km Description Average fuel consumption per kilometre of vehicles for compost

transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 5 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- Transporterrsquos challan Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency-

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures Transporterrsquos challan is a third-party document Hence QAQC procedures

are not required Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

B72 Sampling plan gtgt The project proponent has proposed a sampling plan in accordance with ldquoStandard for sampling and surveys for CDM project activities and programme of activitiesrdquo Version 020 ( EB 65 Annex 2) Sampling will be done to determine weight fraction of the waste type treated Sampling procedures will be followed in-line with the sectoral best practices and as per the guidelines laid out Section 33 Chapter 3 of the Manual on Solid Waste Management as published by the Ministry of Urban Development for public information15 Therefore on each sample collection day about 100 Kg of incoming MSW will be withdrawn randomly from four incoming trucks entering the project site About 10 Kg of MSW each will be collected from ten randomly selected points from outside and inside of the solid waste heap so piled The total quantity of waste so collected (approx 100 Kg) will then be thoroughly mixed and then reduced by quartering till a sample of such a size was obtained which could be handled by the laboratory Thus each master sample of approximately 25 Kg will be sent to the accredited laboratory for composition analysis Sampling will be done once in a month in in-house laboratory The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months B73 Other elements of monitoring plan gtgt Monitoring refers to the collection and archiving of all relevant data necessary for determining the baseline measuring anthropogenic emissions by sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) within the project boundary of a CDM project activity and leakage as applicable The project activity is a GHG avoidance project where the waste materials (ie municipal solid wastes) collected will be treated aerobically to produce compost and mechanically to produce RDF and will be sold in an open market The financial performance of the project activity depends significantly on the CDM revenue to be availed through sale of Certified Emission Reduction (CER) units accrued from the project activity This will require monitoring of all the relevant GHG performance parameters Therefore

15 httpurbanindianicinpublicinfoswmchap3pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 54 the project proponent has developed a monitoring protocol which will be followed throughout the proposed crediting period in order to ensure proper operation of the project activity resulting in generation of carbon credits The same is explained below Monitoring Plan Monitoring the projectrsquos performance in terms of ERs achievement requires the fulfillment of operational data collection and processing obligations from the operator The operator of compost plant has the primary obligation to collect data that would facilitate the calculation of the project ERs The data shall be collected by the operator based on the most recent available information as per the Procedures presented in this PDD In addition roles and responsibilities of monitoring personnel would be well defined

10 Objective of monitoring plan sect To ensure smooth uninterrupted operation of the project activity and hence generation of carbon

credits sect To ensure proper monitoring reporting and verification of all the parameters required to evaluate

the GHG performance of the project activity sect To identify flaws in the monitoring system and open up opportunities for further improvement

20 Roles and Responsibilities

The project proponent has developed a team who will be involved in monitoring reporting and verification of all the GHG performance related parameters The following schematic diagram will explain the individual roles and responsibilities of all the members of the team

Team Responsibility

Shift Operator Monitoring and reporting the GHG performance related parameters following the guidance provided in the Project Design Document

Shift In-charge

- Reviewing the GHG performance related parameters as recorded by the Shift Operator in every shift - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the reported parameters - Preparation of daily and monthly reports

Plant Manager

- Reviewing the daily and monthly reports in consultation with the Shift In-charge - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the daily and monthly reports - Ensuring calibration of the monitoring equipments as and when required

Management Representative(s)-

Production Department

- Reviewing the monthly and annual production statistics - Evaluating the GHG performance of the project activity - Identify opportunities for further improvement

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 55 SECTION C Duration and crediting period C1 Duration of project activity C11 Start date of project activity gtgt 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity C12 Expected operational lifetime of project activity gtgt 25 years 0 months C2 Crediting period of project activity C21 Type of crediting period gtgt The project proponent has opted for a fixed crediting period C22 Start date of crediting period gtgt 01092012 or date of registration of the project activity with UNFCCC whichever is later C23 Length of crediting period 10 years 0 months

SECTION D Environmental impacts D1 Analysis of environmental impacts gtgt In the applicable EIA notification ie SO 3067(E)16 dated 01122009 Ministry of Environment amp Forests (MoEF) Govt of India the Municipal Solid Waste projects are not included in the list of projects that has to get Prior Environmental Clearance (EC) either from State or Central Govt authorities and hence no EIA study was conducted The project does not fall under the purview of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) notification of the Ministry of Environment and Forest Government of India However due weightage has been given to environmental aspects D2 Environmental impact assessment gtgt The environmental impacts of the project activity are not considered to be significant by the project participant or the host party The project activity would help in avoidance of emissions caused due to the combustion of fossil fuels such as SOx NOx and particulate matter

SECTION E Local stakeholder consultation E1 Solicitation of comments from local stakeholders gtgt Stakeholder meeting was convened by Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd at the plant site at Shiveri Lucknow on 23032012 to explain the salient details of the Project its benefits to the society and villagers Prior to the meeting individual invitation letters were sent to each of the identified stakeholder on 15032012 to obtain their consensus for attending the meeting The objective of the meeting was to conduct open discussion where stakeholders are encouraged to raise questions express their concern and

16 httpmoefnicindownloadsrules-and-regulations3067pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 56 comments about the proposed project through a participatory process and to list down any probable concern of stakeholders The various stakeholders present in the meeting were the local inhabitants employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd representatives from equipment supplier Eco Trademart Pvt Ltd representatives of Lucknow Development Agency and local NGO representatives The MD of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd then briefed them about the project activity as per the following schedule

bull Project Background and information about the company bull Technology Involved in the project activity bull Benefits and impacts of the project activity bull Process of Clean Development Mechanism

Later half of the meeting a dedicated session was allotted for question and answer session and comments from the stakeholders were invited E2 Summary of comments received gtgt Meeting was very interactive and got very encouraging response from stakeholders The local villagers and the office bearers expressed their happiness with the setting up of an environment friendly project in their village as it had resulted in generation of employment opportunities both for literate and illiterate people Development of infrastructure in the locality was highly appreciated Few of prominent attendees are as follows S No Name Age Sex

(MF) Occupation Village

1 MrDunna 65 M Gram Pradhan Shiveri

2 SdBalbir Singh Maan 26 M Secretary

NGO - Umeed Chowk

3 Abhishek Singh 36 M

Equipments Supplier ndash Eco Trademart Pvt

Ltd

Dubagga

4 MrPCMehrotra 72 M

Retired Chief EngineerLDALu

cknow Aliganj

The meeting also included employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd The project received unanimous acknowledgement and appreciation from all the attendees at the meeting The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech in their attempt to combat global warming and simultaneously improve the local hygiene and modernize municipal solid waste management of Lucknow has been applauded by all

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 57 E3 Report on consideration of comments received gtgt The project has received positive amp encouraging feedback from the stakeholders concerned All the stakeholders have appreciated and encouraged the project proponent for taking up this project activity In view of various direct and indirect benefits (social economical and environmental) all the stakeholders have supported the project activity The documents supporting the stakeholder consultation will be submitted to the DOE Examples of few questions as raised by the stakeholders and their respective clarifications as provided by the project proponent have been detailed below 1What is CER CERs or Certified Emission Reductions are a ldquocertificaterdquo just like a stock A CER is given by the CDM Executive Board to projects in developing countries to certify they have reduced greeen house gas emissions by one tonne of carbon dioxide per year 2-What is Global Warming Potential Ans Green house gases affect global warming with varying intensities This intensity is measured by the ldquoglobal warming potentialrdquo of the gas 3- Is there any negative impact on surrounding area Ans There is no negative impact on surrounding area 4-What are carbon credits How these will obtained Who will by them Ans Carbon credits are generated in the developing countries by reducing the greenhouse gases emission in the atmosphere One tonne of carbon dioxide saved is equal to one carbon credit All steps of CDM cycle was explained and the process of Credits monetization 5-How does CDM benefit society Ans CDM is clean development mechanism a tool to provide incentives to mitigate the emission of greenhouse gases which are enhancing the climate change The purpose of this programme is to reduce emission of GHGs as well as promote sustainable development in host country Therefore developing country like India will gain financial and environmental benefits by reducing the emission of ever increasing GHGs to save the earth 6Would the project provide employment opportunities and or improve economic development of area There would be generation of employment through this project activity At the same point of time there would be regular trainings that would be imparted to the local population 7 How this project will help to address the issues raised by the local villagers The project will help the stake holders in the following ways A Create jobs for the local masses B Create business opportunities for the contractors C Increase awareness of the people regarding the local and global environment D Help to conserve depleting resources of fossil fuel such as coal It was also mentioned in the meeting that 2 of the CER revenue earned from the project would be utilized in developmental works of the local community There would be a robust monitoring plan for the same and the plant manager Mr Sachin Mehta was appointed as the local contact person for the same

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 58 The project received unanimous appreciation from the stakeholders present The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd towards mitigation of global warming was applauded by all

SECTION F Approval and authorization gtgt The project has received the following approvalsclearances

1) No objection certificate from Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board Lucknow 2) Environmental clearance certificate from the State Level Environment Impact Assessment

Authority Uttar Pradesh 3) No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

The project has applied for Host Country Approval and will be provided to the DOE during the course of project validation

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 59 Appendix A 1 The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has committed to share 2 (mention

approximate amount in INR per year) of its Certified Emission Reduction (CERs) in connection with hisher CDM project based on the issuance and transaction of the CERs

2 The committed amount of money will be utilized for addressing the identified issues in the following villages Identified Villages Total Population Key issues for development Shiveri 1200 approx The project is located in a rural area and the economy

of the area where the project activity is located is heavily dependent on agriculture and other farm based livelihoods The process of stakeholder engagement undertaken as a part of social impact assessment came across community needs and expectations from the project The process of need assessment conducted recently and prioritization undertaken as part of an exercise to seek participation in the preparation of the community development plan and livelihood restoration plan came across the following community needs

bull Skill trainingup-gradation institute for youth and creation of employment opportunities

bull Education support to children for secondary and higher secondary education

bull Drinking water bull Strengthening health infrastructure bull Developing land resources

Enhancing agriculture productivity and market linkages

Pankhera 800 approx

3 Accordingly the project proponent has identified the activities support for the following villages

S No Village Name ActivitiesSupport proposed over the project life time

Approximate amount in INR

1 Shiveri Skill training and Capacity Building Initiative

a Objective To build skill sets of the youth in the community in order to realize the potential employment opportunities arising due to the project and also enhance employment options elsewhere

b Target Beneficiaries Youth especially belonging to the families of the nearby villagers and those belonging to the economically and socially vulnerable

It will be difficult to confirm the exact allocation of funds for individual activities and for individual villages now as the expenditure would depend upon the social needs of the identified stakeholders much nearer to the Commercial Operation Date

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 60

communities

c Proposed Activities

i) Self help group for the women will be formed and will be imparted skill development training for initiating some income generation activities One group will be formed in each target village

ii) Imparting of training to youths on various skills having potential for starting self employment program or to enable them to get wage employment

2 Health Intervention a Objective Improved health care access and

delivery systems and reduction in incidence of diseases and improved health behavior of the community

b c Target Beneficiaries General community

with focus on elderly women children and economically weaker section

d e Proposed Activities i)To organize health awareness among

community members especially women on various facets of reproductive and child health hygiene sanitation etc

ii) To organize general health camps in the target villages

iii) To establish network with Government health functionaries in strengthening the intervention in the target villages

To conduct the school health camps and also health education programs

3 Agriculture Natural Resource Management and Allied Activities

a Objective To work toward improving the agriculture and allied activities in the target area

b c Target beneficiaries Land owners

economically backward and marginal farmers

d Description of proposed activities i) To organize training programme for

(COD) of the Project The Project Proponent will allocate funds for each identified activity and for each village during each crediting period accordingly

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 61

farmers on latest agriculture methods and technologies

ii) To organize exposure visits for the farmers to Agriculture universities kisan melas and other modern agriculture farms

iii) To organize training programme on animal husbandry

iv) To organize cattle health camp v)To get the existing water bodies repaired

to increase the availability of water and also to increase the ground water recharge

4 Education a Objective To strengthen the education

infrastructure at village level to improve access and quality of existing education service

b Target Beneficiaries Children in school going age group especially girls and children belonging to economically and socially vulnerable community

c Proposed activities

i) Strengthening early childhood education and development by provisioning of quality pre school kits and skill development

ii)Provisioning of scholarship for students from socially and economically weaker sections of the society especially for girls for both academic and professional courses iii)Organizing sports and other competitions in schools and for village youth clubs

4 The implementation details along with local contact and money transfer mechanism are as follows

The plan as mentioned above was discussed in details with the stakeholders present at the local stakeholder meeting held at the project site During the meeting the project proponent received unanimous appreciation and encouragement from the meeting attendees The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd would be implementing the plan themselves The project manager of Jyoti Enviro Tech was nominated as the local contact for the developmental plan shared Local contact of project proponent Money transfer mechanism

Mr Sachin Mehta Manager Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd Adress Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Lucknow ndash 226003 Phone 0522 ndash4049397

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 62 5 Details of monitoring arrangement

Monitoring Committee

The expenditure details can be verified by the Designated Operational Entity (DOE) during the verification If required the same can also be certified by a chartered accountant The expenditure details would be made public in the annual report of the company

Monitoring Parameters

Expenditure of 2 earning (net realizable value) from sale of CER available from the project activity would be monitored The sustainability initiatives undertaken by the company would be analyzed in detail during the verification

Monitoring Frequency Yearly

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 63

Appendix 1 Contact information of project participants

Organization name Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd StreetPO Box Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Building City Lucknow StateRegion Uttar Pradesh Postcode 226003 Country India Telephone 0522 ndash4049397 Fax E-mail jyotienvirogmailcom Website Contact person Title Manager Salutation Mr Last name Mehta Middle name First name Sachin Department Projects Mobile Direct fax Direct tel 0522 ndash4049397 Personal e-mail jyotienvirogmailcom

Appendix 2 Affirmation regarding public funding

There is no public funding available for the project The same has been mentioned in section A4

Appendix 3 Applicability of selected methodology

The applicability of the project activity to the selected methodology has been demonstrated in section B2

Appendix 4 Further background information on ex ante calculation of emission reductions

All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 5 Further background information on monitoring plan

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 64 All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 6 Summary of post registration changes

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 65

Annexure 1 Analysis for value of RATECompliancey for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction

State level analysis of Municipal Solid Waste handling practice in the state of Uttar Pradesh reveals that at few locations scientific handling practices have been adopted with simultaneous consideration of CDM benefits associated with the project

While some municipal bodies still have plans for installation of plants for scientific handling of Municipal Solid Waste and subsequent compost manufacturing with consideration of carbon credits

Sl no Location Present practice CDM

consideration Source

1 Kanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex at Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh India

2 Ghaziabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source17

3 Agra

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) processing plant in Agra by Ultra Urban Infratech Limited

4 Varanasi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Varanasi India

5 Meerut

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Meerut India

6 Allahabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Allahabad Uttar Pradesh

7 Bareilly

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source18

8 Aligarh

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Aligarh India

17

httpncrpbnicinTechnical_assistance_report_comp_BVolume20IV20Solid20Waste20Management20GhaziabadWSA_ADB20NCRPB_FR_Vol_IV-A_(GZB20Main20Report)pdf

18 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPBarielly_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 66

9 Moradabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management Project at Moradabad India

10 Saharanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources19

11 Gorakhpur Unscientific practice of open dumping still persists

NA Publicly available sources20

12 Mathura

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Mathura Uttar Pradesh

13 Jhansi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources21

14 Muzaffarnagar

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex

15 Mirzapur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Mirzapur India

16 Amravati

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Amravati India

17 Sambhal Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Have been considered as a single bundled project

18 Badaun 19 Fatehpur 20 Jaunpur 21 Ballia Hence from the above list it is evident only one (as highlighted) out of 21 locations comply to the MSW rules Hence for ex ante estimation RATECompliance

y is computed as presented below RATECompliance

y = (1 21) = 47 = 0047

------------

19

httpwwwindiawaterportalorgsitesindiawaterportalorgfilesCII_Excellence20in20Water20Management_ITC20Saharanpur_2009pdf

20 httpwwwgeagindiaorgPDFSOLID20WASTEpdf 21 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPJhansi_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 67

History of the document

Version Date Nature of revision 041 11 April 2012 Editorial revision to change version 02 line in history box from Annex 06 to

Annex 06b 040 EB 66

13 March 2012 Revision required to ensure consistency with the ldquoGuidelines for completing the project design document form for CDM project activitiesrdquo (EB 66 Annex 8)

03 EB 25 Annex 15 26 July 2006

02 EB 14 Annex 06b 14 June 2004

01 EB 05 Paragraph 12 03 August 2002

Initial adoption

Decision Class Regulatory Document Type Form Business Function Registration

Page 6: Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 6

waste in homogenizers Thereafter the uniform mass of waste thus prepared is compressed by hydraulic systems to produce RDF units resembling the shape of soap blocks The lifetime of the project equipments is specified as 25 yrs 00 months Also it is to be noted that the project does not involve any technology transfer from Annex 1 countries The training required for the persons for operation and maintenance of the equipments would be provided through capacity building sessions by the technology provider and would be frequently organized by the project proponent

Brief description of type of monitoring equipments For monitoring the various parameters of the project the following equipments would be used Sl No Parameter Description of equipment type 1 Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 2 Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Weight scale 3 Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the

project activity Energy meter

4 Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Belt scales 5 Raw waste quantity Weigh bridge Further details on the same have been furnished in Section B71 under section ldquoData and parameters to be monitoredrdquo The various monitoring points in the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 7 A4 Parties and project participants

Party involved (host) indicates a host Party

Private andor public entity(ies) project participants

(as applicable)

Indicate if the Party involved wishes to be considered as

project participant (YesNo)

India(host)

Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd (Private entity)

No

A5 Public funding of project activity gtgt The project has not received any Official Development Assistance (ODA) from Annex I countries

SECTION B Application of selected approved baseline and monitoring methodology B1 Reference of methodology gtgt Title of the approved baseline and monitoring methodology ldquoAvoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processesrdquo Version 13 EB 65 Sectoral Scope 01 and 13 Reference ldquoTool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Version 0600 EB 65 Methodological tool for ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 ldquoTool to calculate the emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo Version 0221 EB 63 Methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 B2 Applicability of methodology gtgt The project meets all the applicability criteria as set out in the methodology The applicability conditions of the methodology AM0025 Version 13 for the project activity have been justified as below Sr No

Applicability Conditions as per AM0025 Version 13

Justification

1 The project activity involves one or a combination of the following waste treatment options for the fresh waste that in a given year would have otherwise been disposed of in a landfill (a) A composting process in aerobic conditions (b) Gasification to produce syngas and its use (c) Anaerobic digestion with biogas collection and flaring andor its use The anaerobic digester processes only the waste for which emission reductions are claimed in this methodology If the biogas is processed and upgraded to the quality of natural gas and it is distributed as energy via natural gas

The project activity involves a combination of the waste treatment options a) A composting process in aerobic conditions d) Mechanical treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) The project activity does not involve the use of RDF Also the project activity does not involve any thermal operation In the absence of the project the fresh waste would have been disposed off in a landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 8

distribution grid project activities may use approved methodology AM0053 in conjunction with this methodology In such cases the baseline scenario identification procedure and additionality assessment shall be undertaken for the combination of the two components of the project activity ie biomethane emission avoidance and displacement of natural gas (d) Mechanicalthermal treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) and its use The thermal treatment process (dehydration) occurs under controlled conditions (up to 300 degrees Celsius) In case of thermal treatment process the process shall generate a stabilized biomass that would be used as fuel or raw material in other industrial process The physical and chemical properties of the produced RDFSB shall be homogenous and constant over time (e) Incineration of fresh waste for energy generation electricity andor heat The thermal energy generated is either consumed on-site andor exported to a nearby facility Electricity generated is either consumed on-site exported to the grid or exported to a nearby facility The incinerator is rotating fluidized bed or circulating fluidized bed or hearth or grate type

2 In case of anaerobic digestion gasification or RDF processing of waste the residual waste from these processes is aerobically composted andor delivered to a landfill

In RDF processing of waste the residual biodegradable waste is aerobically composted and the remainder ie the inert portion is delivered to the pre-identified sanitary landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

3 In case of composting the produced compost is either used as soil conditioner or disposed of in landfills

The compost produced in the project activity will be sold in the market that will be used as a soil conditioner This justifies the applicability criteria

4 In case of RDFstabilized biomass processing the produced RDFstabilized biomass should not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 9

This justifies the applicability criteria

5 If RDFSB is disposed of in a landfill project proponent shall provide degradability analysis on an annual basis to demonstrate that the methane generation in the life-cycle of the SB is below 1 of related emissions It has to be demonstrated regularly that the characteristics of the produced RDFSB should not allow for re-absorption of moisture of more than 3 Otherwise monitoring the fate of the produced RDFSB is necessary to ensure that it is not subject to anaerobic conditions in its lifecycle

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be disposed in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

6 In the case of incineration of the waste the waste should not be stored longer than 10 days The waste should not be stored in conditions that would lead to anaerobic decomposition and hence generation of CH4

The project activity does not involve the incineration of waste Hence this condition is not applicable

7 The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity can be determined in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity

The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity will be determined as per the process described in section B72 of PDD in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity This justifies the applicability criteria

8 The project activity may include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation from the biogas syngas captured RDFstabilized biomass produced combustion heat generated in the incineration process respectively from the anaerobic digester the gasifier RDFstabilized biomass combustor and waste incinerator The electricity can be exported to the grid andor used internally at the project site In the case of RDFSB produced the emission reductions can be claimed only for the cases where the RDFSB used for electricity andor thermal energy generation can be monitored

The project activity does not include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation Hence this condition is not applicable

9 Waste handling in the baseline scenario The MSW 2000 rules stipulated by GoI mandated

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 10

shows a continuation of current practice of disposing the waste in a landfill despite environmental regulation that mandates the treatment of the waste if any using any of the project activity treatment options mentioned above

the municipal bodies to treat the municipal waste in a scientific manner 2 However despite the rules the common practice of handling the waste in the country is continuation of current practice of dumping the wastes in a disposal site 3 In addition no single municipality or local body has complied with the guidelines stipulated by MSW Rules 2000 in the country4 Further the present scenario of solid waste management in Lucknow is highly unsynchronized and inadequate and entails dumping of waste in open areas5 This justifies the applicability criteria

10 The compliance rate of the environmental regulations during (part of) the crediting period is below 50 if monitored compliance with the MSW rules exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit since the assumption that the policy is not enforced is no longer tenable

The compliance rate of Indian MSW Rules 2000 is below 50 No single municipality or local body in India has complied with the guidelines stipulated in the MSW Rules 20006 However a conservative value of 45 is taken for ex-ante estimations of emission reductions7 This justifies the applicability criteria

11 Local regulations do not constrain the establishment of RDF production plantsthermal treatment plants nor the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material

There is no such regulations that constrain the establishment of RDF production nor any regulation for the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material This justifies the applicability criteria

12 In case of RDFstabilized biomass production project proponent shall provide evidences that no GHG emissions occur other than biogenic CO2 due to chemical reactions during the thermal treatment process (such as Chimney Gas Analysis report)

The project activity does not involve any thermal treatment in case of RDF production The process involved is purely mechanical treatment Hence this condition is not applicable

13 The project activity does not involve thermal There is no waste incineration in the proposed

2 httpenvfornicinlegishsmmswmhrhtml 3 httpwwwnswaicomimagesnewslettersjun2010pdf 4 Sunil Kumar Bhattacharyya JK Vaidya AN Tapan Chakrabarti Sukumar Devotta Akolkar AB Assessment of the status of municipal solid waste management in metro cities state capitals class I cities and class II towns in India An insight pg 3 Waste Management journal homepage wwwelseviercomlocatewasman 5 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf Page 26 Paragraph 34 describes the present scenario of solid waste management in

Lucknow 6 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 8

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf 7 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 9

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 11

treatment process of neither industrial nor hospital waste

project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

14 In case of waste incineration if auxiliary fossil fuel is added into the incinerator the fraction of energy generated by auxiliary fossil fuel is no more than 50 of the total energy generated in the incinerator

There is no waste incineration in the proposed project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

15 This methodology is not applicable to project activities that involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill This should be treated as a separate project activity due to the difference in waste characteristics of existing and fresh waste which may have an implication on the baseline scenario determination

Project activity does not involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

Thus as per the methodology AM0025 the project activity involves the treatment of fresh waste (ie municipal solid waste) originally intended for dumping through a combination of the processes a) composting b) RDF processing without incineration The project activity avoids methane emissions by diverting organic waste from being dumped where methane emissions are caused by anaerobic decomposition By treating the fresh waste through alternative treatment options these methane emissions are avoided Therefore the project meets the applicability conditions of AM0025 B3 Project boundary As per AM0025 the spatial extent of the project boundary is the site of the project activity where the waste is treated This includes the facilities for processing the waste on-site electricity consumption onsite fuel use and the sanitary landfill site The project boundary does not include facilities for waste collection sorting and transport to the project site The summary of gases and sources included in the project boundary and justification explanation where gases and sources are not included is listed below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 12

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation B

asel

ine

scen

ario

Emissions from decomposition of waste at the landfill site

CO2 Excluded CO2 emissions from the decomposition of organic waste are not accounted

CH4 Included The major source of emissions in the baseline since the fresh waste is being disposed off in the landfill Hence included

N2O Excluded N2O emissions are small compared to CH4 emissions from landfills Exclusion of this gas is conservative

Emissions from electricity consumption

CO2 Excluded Electricity is not being consumed in the baseline Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

Proj

ect s

cena

rio

On-site fossil fuel consumption due to the project activity other than for electricity generation

CO2 Included The project activity involves on-site fossil fuel consumption Hence included

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

Emissions from on-site electricity use

CO2 Included The project activity involves consumption of electricity from the grid Hence included

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded

The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 13

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation Pr

ojec

t sce

nari

o

Direct emissions from the waste treatment processes

N2O Included May be an important emission source N2O can be emitted from composting activities Hence included

CO2 Included CO2 emissions from decomposition of organic waste are not accounted8

CH4 Included Composting process may not be complete and result in anaerobic decay resulting in CH4 emissions

Emissions from waste water treatment

CO2 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

CH4 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

A graphical representation of the project boundary is shown below

Bio degradable waste processing Segregated Inert Recyclables

Compost RDF Sanitary landfill

Open market

MSW Collection in Lucknow

MSW Processing Site

PROJECT BOUNDARY

Electricity fromDiesel

Electricity from Grid

Consumption of Electricity

8 CO2 emissions from the combustion or decomposition of biomass (see definition by the EB in Annex 8 of the EBs 20th meeting report) are not accounted as GHG emissions Where the combustion or decomposition of biomass under a CDM project activity results in a decrease of carbon pools such stock changes should be considered in the calculation of emission reductions This is not the case for waste treatment projects

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 14 The various monitoring points in the project activity as included within the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram as given below

B4 Establishment and description of baseline scenario gtgt The approved methodology AM0025 version 12 recommends the use of the latest version of the tool for demonstration and assessment of additionality (version 0600) to determine the most plausible baseline scenarios for the project The various steps to establish the additionality of the project as per the methodological tool is demonstrated pictorially as given below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 15

According to the approved methodology AM0025 the baseline scenario of the activity is defined as disposal of the waste in open dump yards without taking any measures to capture the landfill gas or avoid methane emission due to the anaerobic decomposition of waste The procedure to define the baseline scenario as per AM0025 is as follows Step 1 Identification of alternative scenarios The most realistic and credible alternatives available to the project activity have been identified using the following sub steps

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 16 Sub-step 1a Defining alternatives to project activity The approved methodology has provided the following alternatives for the disposaltreatment of the fresh waste in the absence of the project activity ie the scenario relevant for estimating baseline methane emissions to be analysed should include inter alia M1 The project activity (ie composting gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas Assessment of the alternatives for waste treatment

Alternative Description Justification M1 The project activity (ie composting

gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project

This alternative seems to be a realistic and plausible alternative The project activity not implemented as a CDM project is however not a feasible alternative as the project involves high investment cost in order to set up the processing plant whereas the return from the project activity is exceptionally low (As discussed in detail in Section B5) However M1 is still a plausible option and is subjected to further consideration as a baseline scenario

M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared

The cost of construction operation and maintenance of an engineered landfill is high as compared to the zerominimal expenditure in the dumping of waste Hence the scope of landfill gas recovery is minimized in India Hence this scenario M2 is not feasible and is thus eliminated from further consideration as baseline scenario

M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas

Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas is the most common practice in India as demonstrated in Section B5 The same has been found to be prevalent in Lucknow in the absence of the project activity9 Hence this is a common practice that faces no barriers because of low expenditure low O amp M cost non-requirement of skilled labor etc Thus this is the most widely practiced method for MSW disposal throughout the country

9 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf page 26 paragraph 34

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 17

This alternative M3 is considered as the most likely baseline scenario for the project activity

The methodology further states that ldquoIf energy is exported to a grid andor to a nearby industry or used on-site realistic and credible alternatives should also be separately determined for bull Power generation in the absence of the project activity bull Heat generation in the absence of the project activityrdquo Under the scope of the project activity neither heat nor power generation takes place Hence the clause as mentioned above is not applicable to the project activity Thus alternatives M1 and M3 are further subjected for baseline consideration Alternative M2 is not considered as a plausible and realistic baseline scenario for the project activity Sub-step 1b Consistency with mandatory laws and regulations The MSW (Management and Handling) Rules 2000 notified by Ministry of Environment and Forests Government of India makes it mandatory for proper and scientific management of solid waste Under this rule land filling of the waste is not allowed but based on the studies10 and surveys carried out it was observed that the most common practice in India to dispose the solid waste is open dumping and land filling without any treatment and processing It is observed that these rules are not implementedenforced systematically thus leading to the most widespread practice of dumping waste in the country Conclusion Thus the alternatives M1 and M3 has been considered further Outcome of Sub-step 1b The two identified realistic and credible alternative scenario(s) to the project activity that are in compliance with mandatory legislation and regulations taking into account the enforcement in the country and EB decisions on national andor sectoral policies and regulations are as follows Alternative M1 The project activity carried out without the CDM and Alternative M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas (Continuation of the current practice of disposal in landfill) Step 2 Identify the fuel for the baseline choice of energy source taking into account the national andor sectoral policies as applicable Since there is no power generation or heat utilization in the project activity thus baseline does not involve use of fuel for energy Outcome of Sub-step 2 Alternatives M1 and M3 have been subjected for further consideration Step 3 Step 2 andor Step 3 of the latest approved version of the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo shall be used to assess which of these alternatives should be excluded from further consideration (eg alternatives facing prohibitive barriers or those clearly economically unattractive) The above analysis in Step 1 and Step 2 leaves with two alternatives M1 and M3

10 Present Scenario of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Dumping Grounds in India by Amiya Kumar Sahu National Solid Waste Association of India Mumbai

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 18 The further analysis has been discussed in detail in Section B5 below Step 4 Where more than one credible and plausible alternative remains project participants shall as a conservative assumption use the alternative baseline scenario that results in the lowest baseline emissions as the most likely baseline scenario The least emission alternative will be identified for each component of the baseline scenario In assessing these scenarios any regulatory or contractual requirements should be taken into consideration As demonstrated in Section B5 only one alternative remains after applying the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo to assess exclusion of the alternatives from further consideration Hence this step is not applicable as there is only one alternative available to the project activity As demonstrated in section B5 it is evident that after investment analysis only one alternative ie M3 remains as the most plausible option and hence this has been considered as the baseline to the project activity B5 Demonstration of additionality gtgt As per the approved methodology Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has identified the above mentioned realistic and credible alternative(s) (M1 and M3) that were available to them and that would provide output and services comparable to the project activity (refer section B4) These alternatives are in compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements The Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality stipulates that either Step 2 (Investment Analysis) or Step 3 (Barrier Analysis) or both can be selected to demonstrate additionality As the Project faces financial barriers for its implementation in the absence of CDM it is appropriate to choose Step 2 to demonstrate its additionality Step 2 Investment analysis The alternative considered for further analysis is alternative ldquoM3rdquo being the most commonly followed practice Sub-step 2a Determine appropriate analysis method Since the project generates incomes other than CDM related income for the purpose of investment analysis Option III (Benchmark Analysis) is chosen as it is deemed as the most appropriate analysis method where the returns on the investment in the project activity is compared to benchmark returns Sub-step 2b Option III Apply benchmark analysis The indicator used for carrying out the investment analysis is IRR that will determine the feasibility of the project activity This is compared with the Prime Lending Rate available at the time of investment decision For this purpose the PLR of Reserve Bank of India has been considered which is found to be 1200 as per Benchmark PLR of RBI during Aug-200911 Sub-step 2c Calculation and comparison of financial indicators The IRR for the proposed project activity without CDM revenue is computed for a period of 20 years lifetime A detailed investment analysis has been carried out and presented in the supported excel sheets The data and analysis is presented here The techno-economical parameters used for IRR calculation of the project activity is provided in the table below

11 httpwwwrbiorginscriptsWSSViewaspxId=14988

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 19

Parameters Unit Value Source

Capacity (MSW per day) MTs day 1300 As per DPR

Project Lifetime Years 25 yrs 0 months

As per specification provided by tech supplier

Cost of the project Buildings amp Civil works Rs in Lacs 3541056 As per DPR Plant and Machinery Rs in Lacs 1781286 As per DPR Interest payable during construction Rs in Lacs 15781 As per DPR Contingencies Rs in Lacs 10444 As per DPR Margin Money for working capital Rs in Lacs 12011 As per DPR Total cost Rs in Lacs 5704709 As per DPR

Financing pattern

Promoterrsquos Contribution through equity Rs in Lacs 8934 As per DPR Promoterrsquos contribution through loan Rs in Lacs 2700 As per DPR Subsidy under JNNURM Rs in Lacs 2111 As per RFP

Applicable Interest Rate on term loan Percent 1250 As per bank terms

Benchmark Prime Lending Rate (PLR) Percent 1200 httpwwwibaorginviewplraspmemcatid=1

Compost and RDF related costs

Recovery of compost from total MSW processed Percent 18

As per DPR

Recovery of RDF from total MSW processed Percent 12

Recovery of recyclable materials from total MSW processed Percent 2

Percentage of compost produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year

Percent 70

Percentage of RDF produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year Percent 70

Sale price of compost RsTon 2000 As per quote received from distributor Sale price of RDF RsTon 2000

Yearly increment in percentage of compost and RDF for sale in the market Percent 5 CPI(Consumer Price

Index) data Yearly escalation in sale price of compost and RDF Percent 5

Packaging cost of Compost Rs TON 150

As per quote received from distributor

Marketing cost of Compost Rs TON 100 Transportation cost of Compost Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of compost Rs TON 100 Packaging cost of RDF Rs TON 150

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 20 Marketing cost of RDF Rs TON 100 Transportation of RDF Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of RDF Rs TON 100

MSW Processing cost

Power consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 16539

As per DPR

Diesel consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 18720 Plant maintenance cost including that of vehicles

of capital cost for plant machineries 2

Use of senitiler ml MT of MSW processing 50

Use of bio-culture kg MT of MSW processing 10

Cost of senitiler use Rslitre 150

As per quote received Cost of bio-culture use Rskg 180 Cost of daily consumables (oil lubricants and cotton waste) Rs Lacsannum 26

Salary and wages of employees and staff Rs Lacsannum 373 As per DPR

Escalation rates

Escalation in maintenance cost Percent 400 CPI(Consumer Price Index) data Escalation in employee wages Percent 714

Escalation in fuel cost Percent 874 WPI(WholeSale Price Index) data Escalation in electricity cost Percent 874

Other commodities escalation Percent 583

Depreciation

St line Depn - Buildings Percent 334 As per companyrsquos law 1956 wwwfastfactscoinresourcesDepCoActrtf

- Plant amp Machinery Percent 113 IT Depreciation - Buildings Percent 10 - Plant amp Machinery Percent 15 Income Tax ndash MAT Percent 1133 Income Tax Act-

httpwwwindiainbusinessnicininvestmenttaxationhtm

Income Tax Percent 3399

Based on the above assumptions the results of the financial analysis have been provided below

Location Benchmark IRR (Without CDM) Lucknow MSW project 1200 686

As evident the IRR of the project activity is below the benchmark This clearly indicates that investment barrier exists in project activity implementation which is mitigated by the revenue derived from the carbon credits that the project activity would obtain due to Clean Development Mechanism The additionality of the project is thus evident Sub-step 2d Sensitivity analysis

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 21 The purpose of sensitivity analysis is to examine whether the conclusion regarding the financial viability of the proposed project is sound and tenable with those reasonable variations in the assumptions The investment analysis provides a valid argument in favor of additionality only if it consistently supports (for realistic range of assumptions) the conclusion that the project activity is unlikely to be the most financially attractive or is likely to be financially attractive Thus a sensitivity analysis was also applied to the IRR calculations to measure the impact positive or negative of changes in the indicated parameters The project proponent has chosen various factors as critical to the operation of the project in accordance with Guidance on the Assessment of Investment Analysis (Version- 031 paragraph- 17) which states that only variables including the initial investment cost that constitute more than 20 of either total project costs or total project revenues should be subjected to reasonable variation Hence the sensitivity is carried out by varying the parameters to 10 on either side to ascertain the impact on the profitability and hence the IRR of the project The results of the sensitivity analysis are as presented below

Sensitivity Parameter Variation and resultant IRR +10 0 -10

Quantity of waste processed 1325

686

-ve value OampM cost -ve value

(12 increase leads to an IRR

of -104 ) Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1688 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the OampM cost is not

expected to decrease in future

Organic Manure sales 1369 However 10 increase in sale price of organic

manures is a highly

unrealistic under the higly

stringent market scenario for

compost sale (explained in subsequent

paragraphs on barrier analysis)

-ve value -5 leads to a

decrease of IRR to -302

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

Cost of bioculture used -ve value 16 leads to a decrease of IRR

to 091 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1513 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the bioculture cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from

the WPI for all commodities as

published by

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 22

RBI Fuel and electricity cost -ve value

24 leads to a decrease of IRR

to -057 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1279 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the fuel and

electricity cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from the WPI for fuel

power and electricity as published by

RBI Project capital cost 570

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

818 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Packaging marketing and transportation expense

077 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1040 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Thus the sensitivity analysis for the project reveals that even with significant changes in various parameters the project IRR does not cross benchmark rates Therefore the project activity is clearly additional and is not a businessndashasndashusual scenario Step 3 Barrier Analysis The major barrier applicable to the alternative M1 is A) Technology Barrier B) Other Barrier and C) Investment Barrier Sub-step 3a Identify barriers that would prevent the implementation of the proposed CDM project Activity

A) Technological Barrier The plant would use state of the art technology in the process of waste handling and compost manufacturing EOT (Electric Overhead Transport) cranes would transfer the wastes from one processing station to the other Automation will be ensured wherever possible Hydraulic type press system would be installed for the RDF manufacturing Thus the plant would employ the latest technologies in the field of waste handling and management that involves a lot of technology transfer from international suppliers and exorbitant costs Also smooth operation of the plant would require proper training of the operating personnel on the equipments and hence regular capacity building training programs would have to be organized by the project proponent Another threat posed by the variation in feedstock quality is the content of highly abrasive and corrosive materials in it These cause rapid wear and corrosion of the process equipments Hence all MSW plants entail high cost of operation and maintenance due to frequent repairs breakdowns and shutdowns

B) Market barrier

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 23

Organic waste recycling is still neglected by private initiatives because of its low value and the lack of a market for compost Limited markets for compost sales and low prices for compost are a major challenge that all systems face12 The persisting skepticism among the farmers about the quality of composts poses a constant threat on the marketability of the composts Misconceptions like soil contamination due to use of composts are still borne in the minds of many Thus the emphasis on quality control of final products is of utmost importance Also increased awareness among the farmers on the benefits derived out of compost usage as value added substitutes to chemical fertilizers have to be encouraged through campaigns and other promotional activities

Also high cost of transportation sometimes makes it difficult to justify the use of composts when compared to the benefits derived out of it

C) Investment barrier The project proponent has demonstrated through investment analysis that without CDM revenue the project activity is not a financially attractive proposition At the inception the project had received refusal for loans from financial institutions for unimpressive returns envisaged from the project and the project proponent was suggested to estimate the returns along with additional revenue as may be associated with the project activity (for eg revenue from carbon credits) The project proponent had re-submitted their application for loan with the consideration of the CDM revenue and thereafter received the sanction

All these factors substantiate to prove that additional efforts are required for overcoming the market barrier for the compost produced in the plant In this context the additional incentive available to the plant through Clean Development Mechanism would be utilized for market development of the compost produced in the plant and also to partially compensate for the losses for not being able to sell compost in the market Thus the barriers as illustrated above pose a serious obstacle to the project activity and thus would lead to high operational uncertainties if not implemented as a CDM project activity Sub-step 3 b Shows that the identified barriers would not prevent a wide spread implementation of at least one of the alternatives (except the proposed project activity) As discussed above dumping of the solid waste in a landfill without gas capture (M3) is a common practice in India and none of the barriers discussed above would prevent it from occurring The barriers identified ie technological barrier and the market barrier does not in any way prevent the continuation of the baseline scenario Hence project activity satisfies the additionality criteria as per clause 3b) of the tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality Version 0600 Step 4 Common practice analysis According to the methodology AM0025 project proponents should ldquoprovide evidence of the early stage of development of the project activity and that it is not common practice in the country To this end they should provide an analysis of waste management practicesrdquo In order to justify the early development of the project activity the chronology for the same has been presented below as we proceed further As per the ldquoTool to for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo (Version 0600) similar type of project is defined as follows

12 httpwwwtngovincmaswm_in_indiapdf page 145

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 24 Sub-step 4b Discuss any similar Options that are occurring The above analysis demonstrates the similar activities occurring as the project activity But it can be seen that all the treatment facilities are composting facilities and none of the plants have RDF production facility Most of these composting facilities have applied for CDM benefits and those that have not are facing difficulties The project activity conforms to the measures of ldquoMethane formation avoidancerdquo as mentioned in paragraph 6 of the Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Hence analysis of the project activity as per paragraph 47 is illustrated as follows Step 1 Calculate applicable output range as +-50 of the design output or capacity of the proposed project activity The capacity of the project activity is 1300 TPD Hence considering an output range of +-50 the analysis would entail all projects of capacities between 1950 TPD and 650 TPD Therefore as per the table of cities as listed above the cities considered for present analysis would include the following

City Waste

Quantity (TPD)

Processing of Waste Disposal of waste CDM status Composting Pelletisation Uncontrolled

dumping Sanitary landfill

Earth cover

Bangalore 1669 300 Ahmedabad 1302 500 Pune 1175 500 Surat 1000

Kanpur 1100

Jaipur 904

Ludhiana 735 Agra 654 Step 2 In the applicable geographical area identify all plants that deliver the same output or capacity within the applicable output range calculated in Step 1 as the proposed project activity and have started commercial operation before the start date of the project Note their number Nall Registered CDM project activities and projects activities undergoing validation shall not be included in this step The applicable geographical area for the project activity would entail the entire host country ie India Of the selected cities as listed above the same output ie organic composts and RDF is produced by Bangalore and Pune However all the projects are under validation Hence as per the given definitions Nall for the present analysis of the project activity is equal to 0 since all the plants with similar output and within the applicable capacity range have considered CDM benefits associated to the projects Nall = 0 Step 3 Within plants identified in Step 2 identify those that apply technologies different than the technology applied in the proposed project activity Note their number Ndiff All the plants as included in Nall use the same technology for compost production and RDF manufacturing Hence under the scope of the present analysis Ndiff = 0

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 25 Step 4 Calculate factor F=1-NdiffNall representing the share of plants using technology similar to the technology used in the proposed project activity in all plants that deliver the same output or capacity as the proposed project activity Under the scope of the project activity the factor is calculated as follows F = 1-NdiffNall = 1 ndash 0= 1 Therefore under the scope of the project activity the factor F cannot be determined The proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled (a) the factor F is greater than 02 and (b) Nall-Ndiff is greater than 3 Since as per the above analysis F = 1 which is greater than 02 Nall - Ndiff = 0 which is less than 3 As per the methodology the proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled Thus since one of the criterions as imposed by the tool is not satisfied by the project activity hence it is prudent to conclude that the project activity is not a common practice and hence additional the analysis shows that the project activity is additional

Also as per the India Infrastructure Report 2006 the few aerobic compost plants that have been set up are typically functioning much below installed capacity and most are ldquofacing a problem of marketing the compost due to an ineffective marketing mechanismrdquo Thus it can be concluded that extremely few similar activities can be observed in India and when they are observed they face considerable barriers and have not had much success from an economic perspective The experience provided by these composting attempts only serves to reinforce the fact that implementing composting activities is financially unviable Therefore as demonstrated by the investment and barrier analyses in Steps 2 and 3 it is clear that the project is not financially viable without the revenue from CDM and there are significant barriers to its implementation In addition as detailed in Step 4 the proposed project is not common practice either and in the limited cases where aerobic composting is taking place it is proving to be a failure from an economic perspective It can therefore be concluded that the proposed project is additional and would not occur without CDM due to the financial and technological barriers in place Moreover the CDM registration of the Project will also serve as a model for other projects and promote the dissemination of sustainable waste management practices Serious consideration of CDM As per paragraph 2 of EB 62 Annex 13 ldquoGuidelines to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDM for project activities with a start date after 2nd August 2008 ldquothe project proponent must inform a Host Party designated national authority (DNA) and the UNFCCC secretariat in writing of the commencement of the project activity and of their intension to seek CDM status Such notification must be made within six months of the project activity start date and shall contain the precise geographical location and brief description of the proposed project activity using the standardized form F-CDM ndash Prior considerationrdquo As mentioned in the section C11 the start date for the project activity is 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 26 The project proponent had intimated the Host Party designated national authority (DNA) ie Ministry of environment and Forests (Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat about the project activity on 09102011 This intimation was made in the F-CDM-Prior consideration format as prescribed by UNFCCC Thus the intimation to Host party DNA and UNFCCC secretariat was made within six months from the project start date as this is in accordance to the ldquoGuideline to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo As per the ldquoGuidelines on the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo version 04 EB 62 Annex 13 serious consideration of CDM has been demonstrated below

Date Project Related Activity CDM Related Activity Evidence 14092009 Financial proposal from

Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd Copy of proposal

28102009 Revised financial proposal from Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of proposal

11112009 Letter of award for development of Integrated Solid waste management facilities for Lucknow Municipal Corporation UP

Copy of the letter of award

07092010 Receipt of certificate of incorporation for Ms JYOTI ENVIROTECH PRIVATE LIMITED

Copy of certificate

23102010 Concession agreement signed between Lucknow Municipal Corporation Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam and Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of the Agreement

07062011 Environmental Clearance received for development of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill and processing facility at Village-Shiveri

Copy of letter of Approval

21092011 Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd appointed CDM consultants for the project

Copy of work order placed on the CDM consultants

03102011 No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

Copy of no objection certificate

09102011 Project proponent submitted the Prior consideration of the CDM form to host party DNA (Ministry of Environment and Forests Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat

Copy of Prior consideration of the CDM form as submitted to MoEF GoI and UNFCCC

10102011 Purchase order raised for Plant Machinery

Copy of Purchase order

23032012 Stakeholder Consultation Meeting

Copy of the Minutes of Meeting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 27 B6 Emission reductions B61 Explanation of methodological choices gtgt Approved baseline and monitoring methodology AM0025- Avoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processes Version 13 has been used to calculate emission reductions from the project The estimation of project emission baseline emission and leakage emission are described below Project emissions The proposed project uses MSW processing (RDF and compost production processes) to treat the organic waste Therefore the project emissions in year y are calculated as follows PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy + PEay + PEgy+ PEry + PEiy + PEwy + PEco-firingy (1) Where PEy = Is the project emissions during the year y (tCO2e) PEelecy = Is the emissions from electricity consumption on-site due to the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) PEfuel on-sitey =Is the emissions on-site due to fuel consumption on-site in year y (tCO2e) PEcy =Is the emissions during the composting process in year y (tCO2e) PEay =Is the emissions from the anaerobic digestion process in year y (tCO2e) PEgy =Is the emissions from the gasification process in year y (tCO2e) PEry =Is the emissions from the combustion of RDFstabilized biomass in year y (tCO2e) PEiy =Is the emissions from waste incineration in year y (tCO2e) PEwy =Is the emissions from wastewater treatment in year y (tCO2e) PEco-firingy =Is the emissions from thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on site

fossil fuel consumption during co-firing in year y (tCO2e) The project activity involves composting and mechanical treatment to produce compost and RDF It involves the electricity consumption onsite and on-site fuel consumption Hence the equation applicable to the project activity is as follows Hence for the project activity PEay =0 as the project does not entail anaerobic digestion PEgy =0 as the project does not entail gasification PEry =0 as the project does not entail combustion of RDFstabilized PEiy =0 as the project does not entail waste incineration PEwy =0 as the project does not entail wastewater treatment PEco-firingy =0 as the project does not entail thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on

site fossil fuel consumption Therefore PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy (2) Emissions from electricity use on site (PEelecy) The project uses electricity from the NEWNE grid at processing plant at Lucknow The emissions from electricity use are therefore calculated as PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec (3)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 28 Where EGPJFFy = Is the amount of electricity generated in an on-site fossil fuel fired power plant or

consumed from the grid as a result of the project activity measured using an electricity meter (MWh)

CEFelec = Is the carbon emissions factor for electricity consumed in the project activity (tCO2eMWh)

Under the scope of the project activity electricity use on site would include the electricity consumption due to the plant equipments and machineries on site that are used to produce the composts the RDF Emissions from fuel use on-site (PEfuelon-sitey) Project participants shall account for CO2 emissions from any on-site fuel combustion (other than electricity generation eg vehicles used on-site heat generation for starting the gasifier auxiliary fossil fuels need to be added into incinerator heat generation for mechanicalthermal treatment process etc) Emissions are calculated from the quantity of fuel used and the specific CO2-emission factor of the fuel as follows PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel (4) Where PEfuel on-sitey = Is the CO2 emissions due to on-site fuel combustion in year y (tCO2) Fconsy = Is the fuel consumption on site in year y (l or kg) NCVfuel = Is the net caloric value of the fuel (MJl or MJkg) EFfuel = Is the CO2 emissions factor of the fuel (tCO2MJ) As per methodology project participants may use IPCC default values for the net calorific values and CO2 emission factors Under the scope of the project activity fuel use on-site would include consumption of diesel fuel by the vehicles (eg excavators earth movers etc) as may be engaged for the project activity on-site Further the project may also include Diesel Generator(s) placed on site to provide necessary power back-up in incidents of exigency Thus the diesel fuel consumed by the DG set would also be monitored and be counted in fuel use quantity on-site Hence for the project activity NCVfuel = NCVydiesel And EFfuel = EFdiesel Emissions from composting (PEcy) As per the methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 Annex 09 emission from composting PEcy = PEECy + PEFCy + PECH4y + PEN2Oy + PEROy (5) Where PEECy = Project emissions from electricity consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEelecy as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 29 PEFCy = Project emissions from fossil fuel consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEfuelon-sitey as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

PECH4y = Project emissions of methane from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEN2Oy = Project emissions of nitrous oxide from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEROy =Project emissions of methane from run-off wastewater associated with co-composting

in year y (tCO2eyr) The leachate generated in the project activity will be gainfully utilized in maintaining the moist environment of the bio degradable waste Hence the project activity would not entail any project emission from run-off wastewater PEROy= 0

Therefore PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy (6) Determination of project emissions of methane (PECH4y ) Project emissions of methane from composting (PECH4y) are determined as follows PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 (7) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFCH4y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tCH4 t) For the value of EFCH4y a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFCH4y = EFCH4default GWPCH4 = Global Warming Potential of CH4 (tCO2e tCH4 ) Determination of project emissions of nitrous oxide (PEN2Oy ) The N2O emissions from composting are calculated as follows PEN2Oy = Qy EFN2Oy GWPN2O (8) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFN20y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tN2O t) For the value of EFN2Oy a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFN20y = EFN20default GWPN20 = Global Warming Potential of N20 (tCO2e tN2O ) Baseline emissions To calculate the baseline emissions project participants shall use the following equation BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy (9)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 30 Where BEy = Is the baseline emissions in year y (tCO2e) MBy = Is the methane produced in the landfill in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) MDregy = Is methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) BEENy = Baseline emissions from generation of energy displaced by the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) Since the project activity does not entail generation of energy hence BEENy= 0

Methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity (MDregy) The methodology states that In cases where regulatory or contractual requirements do not specify MDregy an Adjustment Factor (AF) shall be used and justified taking into account the project context In doing so the project participant should take into account that some of the methane generated by the landfill may be captured and destroyed to comply with other relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odour concerns MDregy = MBy AF Where AF = Is Adjustment Factor for MBy () The parameter AF shall be estimated as follows In cases where a specific system for collection and destruction of methane is mandated by regulatory or contractual requirements the ratio between the destruction efficiency of that system and the destruction efficiency of the system used in the project activity shall be used In the host country India there is no regulation for capture and destruction of methane generated by the landfill Hence the adjustment factor the project activity is 0 as per the present scenario ie AF = 0 Therefore MDregy = 0 However in due course of time the value of AF may undergo changes as per the governmental regulations imposed in the host country (India) with respect to MSW management Rate of compliance In cases where there are regulations that mandate the use of one of the project activity treatment options and which is not being enforced the baseline scenario is identified as a gradual improvement of waste management practices to the acceptable technical options expected over a period of time to comply with the MSW Management Rules The adjusted baseline emissions (BEya) are calculated as follows BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) (10) Where BEy = Is the CO2-equivalent emissions as determined from equation 14 RATECompliance

y = Is the state-level compliance rate of the MSW Management Rules in that year y The compliance rate shall be lower than 50 if it exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 31 The compliance ratio RATECompliance

y shall be monitored ex post based on the official reports for instance annual reports provided by municipal bodies For details on the consideration the value of RATECompliance

y for the purpose of ex ante calculation refer to annexure 1 Methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity (MBy) The amount of methane that is generated each year (MBy) is calculated as per the latest version of the approved methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo (Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46) Considering the following additional equation MBy = BECH4SWDSy Where BECH4SWDSy = Is the methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity at

year y that is methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the solid waste disposal site during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e) as calculated using Application B in the methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo The tool estimates methane generation adjusted for using adjustment factor (fy) any landfill gas in the baseline that would have been captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odor concerns As this is already accounted for in this methodology ldquofyrdquo in the tool shall be assigned a value 0

The amount of methane that is generated each year (BECH4SWDSy tCO2e) is calculated for each year with the recommended multi-phase model the First Order Decay (FOD) model The amount of methane produced in the year y is calculated as follows

(11) Where BECH4SWDSy = Methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the

solid waste disposal site (SWDS) during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e)

φ = Model correction factor to account for model uncertainties f = Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used in another

manner Since no such practice exists in the host country India hence for the project activity the value for ldquofrdquo has been considered 0

GWPCH4 =Global Warming Potential (GWP) of methane valid for the relevant commitment period OX =Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste) F =Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCf =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that can decompose For the

project activity the default value has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore DOCf = DOCf Default

MCF =Methane correction factor For the project activity the value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore MCFy = 08

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 32 Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) DOCj =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j kj =Decay rate for the waste type j j =Waste type category (index) x =Year during the crediting period x runs from the first year of the project activity

(x = 1) to the year y for which avoided emissions are calculated (x = y) y =Year for which methane emissions are calculated Where different waste types j are prevented from disposal the amount of different waste types (Wjx) is determined through sampling and the mean is calculated from the samples as follows Since the project activity corresponds to Application B as stated in the tool hence the values of few parameters have been adopted as explained in table 1 of the tool Determining the amounts of waste types j disposed in the SWDS (Wjx) Wjx = Wx pjx (12) Where Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) Wx =Total amount of waste prevented from from disposal in the SWDS in year x (t) pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from the

first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) The fraction of the waste type j in the waste for the year x or month i are calculated according to equations (7) and (8) as follows

(13)

Where pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) pnjx = Fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the year x (weight

fraction) zx = Number of samples collected during the year x n = Samples collected in year x j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from

the first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) Determining the fraction of DOC that decomposes in the SWDS (DOCfy) In the case that the tool is applied to MSW then project participants may choose to either apply a default value (DOCfy = DOCfdefault) or to determine DOCfy or DOCfm based on measurements of the biochemical methane potential of the MSW (BMPMSW) as follows

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 33

(14) Where DOCfy = Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that decomposes under the

specific conditions occurring in the SWDS for year y (weight fraction) BMPj = Biochemical methane potential for the MSW disposed or prevented from disposal

(t CH4 t waste) F = Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCj = Fraction of degradable organic carbon in the waste type j (weight fraction) pjy = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year y (weight fraction) pjm = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in month m (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste in the MSW y = Year of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated (y is a

consecutive period of 12 months) m = Month of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated Leakage The sources of leakage considered in the methodology are CO2 emissions from off-site transportation of waste materials in addition to CH4 and N2O emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digestion gasification processes and processingcombustion of RDF Leakage emissions should be estimated from the following equation Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy (15) Where Lty =Is the leakage emissions from increased transport in year y (tCO2e) Lry =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digester the

gasifier the processingcombustion of RDFstabilized biomass or compost in case it is disposed of in landfills in year y (tCO2e)

Liy =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from MSW incinerator in year y (tCO2e)

Lsy =Is the leakage emissions from end use of stabilized biomass (tCO2e) LCOMPy =Leakage emissions associated with composting in year y (t CO2e yr) Since the project activity does not include the use of MSW incinerator Lsy = 0 The project activity does not involve the disposal of residual waste from processing of RDF or compost in landfill Also for ex-ante estimations the residual waste is taken as 100 inerts Hence Lry =0 The produced compost and RDF will be sold in the market Also for ex-ante estimations for this project activity the weight of stabilized biomass sold offsite for which no sale invoices can be provided is considered as zero Hence Lsy =0 Emissions from Transportation (Lt y)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 34 This would occur when the waste is transported from waste collecting points in the collection area to the treatment facility instead of the existing landfills In this case project participants shall document the following data in the CDM-PDD an overview of collection points from where the waste will be collected their approximate distance (in km) to the treatment facility existing landfills and their approximate distance (in km) to the nearest end-user The emissions are calculated (As per AM0025) from the quantity of fuel (diesel) used and the specific CO2 emission factor of the fuel (diesel) for vehicles

(16) Where NOvehiclesiy =Is the number of vehicles for transport with similar loading capacity DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) NCVfuel =Is the Calorific value of the fuel (MJKg or TJGg) Dfuel =Is the fuel density (kgl) if necessary EFfuel =Is the Emission factor of the fuel (tCO2eMJ) For estimation of NOvehiclesiy the following equation has been used for ex-ante calculation NOvehiclesiy = QyCTy (17) Where Qy = Is the quantity of waste composted in the year ldquoyrdquo (tonnes) CTy = Is the average truck capacity for waste transportation (tonnestruck) Ltywaste is the emissions due to increased transportation from the waste collecting point to the waste treatment facility In this the incremental distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline is equalt to 0 Therefore Ltywaste = 0 For calculation of emissions from transport of compost to the users (Ltycompost) the same formula applies Qy is replaced by Mcompost where Mcompost is the total quantity of compost produced in year y Similarly for calculation of emissions from transport of RDF (LtyRDF) Qy is replaced by MRDF where MRDF is the total quantity of RDF produced in year y Thus Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF (18) Calculation of emission reductions To calculate the emission reductions the following equation has been applied ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly (19) Where ERy = Is the emissions reductions in year y (t CO2e) BEy = Is the emissions in the baseline scenario in year y (tCO2e) PEy = Is the emissions in the project scenario in year y (tCO2e) Ly = Is the leakage in year y (tCO2e)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 35 B62 Data and parameters fixed ex ante (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

Data Parameter AF

Unit

Description Methane destroyed due to regulatory or other requirements

Source of data Local andor national authorities

Value(s) applied 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per the approved methodology AM0025 Version 13 AF shall be assigned a value taking into account the amount of methane generated by the landfills that may be captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations and contractual requirements of the host country Since there exists no regulations or contractual requirement to capture and destroy the methane generated from the landfills in India hence AF has been fixed ex-ante and assigned a value of 0

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

Data Parameter φ Unit Unitless

Description Default value model corrections factor to account for model uncertainties

Source of data Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Value(s) applied 085

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per Table 3 the project activity conforms to HumidWet conditions in Application B Accordingly the default value for φ has been taken from table 3 This is in the absence of monitored data for φ as per Option 2 in the tool for determination of model correction factor

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 36

Data Parameter F

Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction)

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Upon biodegradation organic material is converted to a mixture of

methane and carbon dioxide

Data Parameter OX Unit Unitless

Description Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste)

Source of data Based on an extensive review of published literature on this subject including the IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 01

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment When methane passes through the top-layer part of it is oxidized by

methanotrophic bacteria to produce CO2 The oxidation factor represents the proportion of methane that is oxidized to CO2 This should be distinguished from the methane correction factor (MCF) which is to account for the situation that ambient air might intrude into the SWDS and prevent methane from being formed in the upper layer of SWDS

Data Parameter DOCfDefault

Unit Unitless

Description Default value for the fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) in MSW that decomposes in the SWDS

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 37

Data Parameter MCFy Unit Unitless

Description Methane correction factor

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 08

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46 This comprises all SWDS not meeting the criteria of managed SWDS and which have depths of greater than or equal to 5 meters

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment MCF accounts for the fact that unmanaged SWDS produce less methane

from a given amount of waste than managed SWDS because a larger fraction of waste decomposes aerobically in the top layers of unmanaged SWDS The baseline dumping sites have been found to be greater than 5 meters

Data Parameter DOCj Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Tables 24 and 25)

Value(s) applied

Waste type j DOCj ( wet waste)

Wood and wood products 43 Pulp paper and cardboard

(other than sludge) 40

Food food waste beverages and tobacco (other than sludge) 15

Textiles 24 Garden yard and park waste 20

Glass plastic metal other inert waste 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default values adopted from table 4 as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 38

Data Parameter kj

Unit Unitless

Description Decay rate for the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Table 33)

Value(s) applied Default values adopted from table 5 for Wet Type waste in tropical (Matgt20ordmC) conditions as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Waste type j kj

Slowly degrading

Pulp paper cardboard (other than sludge) textiles

0045

Wood wood products and straw 0025

Rapidly degrading Food food waste sewage sludge beverages and tobacco 0085

Moderately degrading Other (non-food) organic putrescible garden and park waste 0065

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

The annual temperature limits of Lucknow has been adopted from httpwwwnihernetinrbisindia_informationannual20temperaturehtm The average annual temp of Lucknow is thus estimated to be 2582ordmC Thus Lucknow is considered to be in the tropical zone with MAT gt 20ordmC And hence the default value has been obtained as per Table 5

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CEFelec Unit t CO2MWh Description Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid Source of data CEA CO2 Baseline Database Version 70 Jan 2012 (wwwceanicin) Value(s) applied 09216 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

This data is taken from publicly available CEA CO2 baseline database version 7 dated March 2012 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment This value is fixed for the entire crediting period

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 39

Data Parameter EFCH4Default Unit t CH4 t Description Default emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted (wet

basis) Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of

emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 0002 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFN2ODefault Unit t N20 t

Description Default emission factor of nitrous oxide per tonne of waste composted (wet basis)

Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 00002

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 40

Data Parameter NCVydiesel

Unit TJ Gg

Description Net calorific value of diesel consumed for power generation at the MSW processing unit

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Volume 2 Table 12 p118

Value(s) applied 43

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFdiesel Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 741

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter GWPCH4

Unit tCO2 tCH4

Description Global warming potential of CH4

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 21 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 41

Data Parameter GWPN20

Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 310 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter Ddiesel

Unit KgL

Description Density of fuel

Source of data Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) India

Value(s) applied 087

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data BEE value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission Additional comment

B63 Ex ante calculation of emission reductions gtgt For the purpose of ex-ante calculation of emission reduction the following assumptions have been taken into consideration Total quantity of MSW available (tonnesday) 1300 Annual Number of operating days 330 Percentage of organic content in the MSW 47 Rate of compliance 10 Total quantity of biodegradable wastes to be processed 201630 TPD (Calculated) Amount of electricity consumed per day due to the project 1550 kWh Specific gravity of diesel 087 kglitre Calculation of Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid (CEFelec) As the project activity utilises electricity from the NEWNE Grid the project uses the approach (a)

combined margin emission factor for the NEWNE grid following seven steps of ldquoTool to calculate the

emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) and using publicly available data of

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 42 ldquoCentral Electrical Authorityrdquo (the most recent version ldquoCO2 Baseline Database Version 70rdquo13 available

at the time of submission of the CDM PDD to the DOE for Global Stakeholders Consultation) As per the

stepwise approach to calculate the emission factor of an electricity system the EFy is being calculated as

follows

Step 1 Identify the relevant electricity system

As per the CEA CO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 combined emission factor is given

for northern eastern western and north-eastern girds taken together Therefore this combined emission

factor will be used for the NEWNE grid to evaluate the emission reductions

Step 2 Choose whether to include off-grid power plants in the project electricity system (optional)

As per the tool Option I is selected for the project activity as only grid connected power plants are

included in the calculation

Step 3 STEP3 Select a method to determine Operating Margin (OM)

The project proponent has chosen to adopt option a) of step 3 ie consideration of Simple Operating

Margin for the project As per the tool The simple OM method (Option a) can only be used if low-

costmust-run resources2 constitute less than 50 of total grid generation in 1) average of the five most

recent years or 2) based on long-term averages for hydroelectricity production

Referring the relevant data from the CEACO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 the below

table is drawn for the share of net generation by the must-run hydronuclear plants for the past 5 years

Region 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Average NEWNE 1850 1900 1740 1590 1760 177

Since the average is 177 and is below the threshold of 50 as prescribed in the tool hence Simple OM

method is applicable for the project activity

Step 4 Calculate the operating margin emission factor according to the selected method

Simple OM The Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2

Operating Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid The following information has been used for the

calculation of baseline emissions

Simple Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridOMy) (incl Imports) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference

13 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 43 Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2008-09 tCO2MWh 101 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10 tCO2MWh 098

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2010-11 tCO2MWh 097

3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor

tCO2MWh 09843 Calculated based on the most recent data available at the time of submission of the CDM-PDD to the DOE for validation

Note 3 year generation weighted average of Operating margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) STEP 5 Calculate the build margin (BM) emission factor Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2 Build Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid for the year 2010-2011 Build Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridBMy) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference Build Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10

tCO2MWh 0859 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Step 6 Calculate the combined margin emissions factor The Project proponent has opted for Option A ie estimation of Combined Margin by weighted average nethod EFy = wOM EFgridOMy + wBM EFgridBMy Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy) 3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (NEWNE grid) EFgridOMy

tCO2MWh 09843 Refer the above table

Build Margin (NEWNE grid) EFgridBMy

tCO2MWh 0859 Refer the above table

Weighting of operating margin emissions factor wOM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Weighting of build margin emissions factor wBM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy)

tCO2MWh 09216 Calculated

Note Combined margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) Hence CEFelec is calcualted to be 09216 for the Project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 44 Calculation of Project Emission As per equation 3) PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec = (1550 3301000) 09216 = 471 tCO2e Considering diesel consumption per day due to the project activity100 Litre Fconsy = 100 3300871000 = 29 tonnes As per equation 4) PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel = 29 43 741 = 91 tCO2e Considering composition of organic waste as follows Cloth 5 Garden Yard waste 30 Food Waste 55 Paper 10 Thus waste type category (j) = 4 Therefore Quantity of cloth waste = 1300 330 47 5 = 10082 tonnesannum Quantity of garden waste = 1300 330 47 30 = 60489 tonnesannum Quantity of food waste = 1300 330 47 55 = 110897 tonnesannum Quantity of paper waste = 1300 330 47 10 = 20163 tonnesannum Therefore total waste quantity = (10082 + 60489 + 110897 + 20163) = 201630 tonnesannum Therefore amount of waste composted is Qy = (50 of 201630) = 100815 tonnesannum (This is with the consideration of equal distribution of the total biodegradable waste for RDF production and for composting The parameter Qy will be monitored ex-post) As per equation 7) project emission of methane has been calculated as PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 = 100815 0002 21 = 4234 tCO2e As per equation 8) project emission of methane has been calculated as PEN20y = Qy EFN20y GWPN20 = 100815 00002 310 = 6251 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 6) emission from composting has been calculated as PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy = 3243 + 4788 = 10485 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 2) project emission has been calculated as PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy = (471 + 91 + 10485) tCO2e = 11048 tCO2e Calculation of Baseline Emission As per equation 11) methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity is calculated as

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 45 = 085(1-0)21(1-01)1612050508[10082024e-07(1)(1- e-07)] + [6048902e-017(1)(1- e-

017)]+ [110897015e-04(1)(1- e-04)] + [201630 4e-007(1)(1- e-007)] = 34633 tCO2e Considering a compliance rate of 4514 ie RATECompliance

y = 0045 Therefore as per equation 10) Adjusted baseline emission has been calculated as BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) = 38481 (1 ndash 0045) = 17316 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 9) Baseline emission has been calculated as BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy = (34633 ndash 0) + 0 = 33058 tCO2e Calculation of Leakage Emission As per equation 16)

Where DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) For ex-ante estimation this has been considered to be 200 Kms for both compost and RDF

VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) For ex-ante estimation the same has been assumed to be 02 lkm

Now as per equation 17) NOvehiclesiy is given by QyCTy For ex-ante estimation CTy has been considered to be 10 Tons Ltycompost = (18 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 856 tCO2e LtyRDF = (12 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 571 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 18) emission from transportation has been calculated as Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF = (856 + 571) = 1427 tCO2e As per equation 15) leakage emission has been calculated as Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy = 1427 + 0 + 0 + 0 +0 = 1427 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 19) emission reduction has been calculated as ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly = (33058 ndash 11048 ndash 1427) = 20584 tCO2e Emission reduction for all other years in the crediting period has been calculated in a similar manner 14 For details on the value considered refer to Annexure 1 below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 46 B64 Summary of ex ante estimates of emission reductions

Year Baseline

emissions (t CO2e)

Project emissions (t CO2e)

Leakage (t CO2e)

Emission reductions (t CO2e)

2012-2013 33058 11048 1427 20584 2013-2014 57319 11048 1427 44844 2014-2015 75420 11048 1427 62945 2015-2016 89168 11048 1427 76694 2016-2017 99805 11048 1427 87330 2017-2018 108188 11048 1427 95714 2018-2019 114916 11048 1427 102441 2019-2020 120408 11048 1427 107934 2020-2021 124963 11048 1427 112489 2021-2022 128795 11048 1427 116320

Total 952041 110476 14270 827294 Total number of crediting years 10

Annual average over the crediting period

95204 11408 1427 82729

B7 Monitoring plan B71 Data and parameters to be monitored (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 47

Data Parameter Mcompost Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 77220 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of compost produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of compost produced will be cross checked with the sale of

compost Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter M RDF Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 51480 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of RDF produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of RDF produced will be cross checked with the sale of RDF Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 48

Data Parameter Pnjx

Unit - Description Weight fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the

year x Source of data Sample analysis of the MSW by project participant Value(s) applied

SL No Waste type Composition

1 Cloth 5 2 Garden yard waste 30 3 Food Waste 55 4 Paper 10

Source These values are as mentioned in the DPR

Measurement methods and procedures

Sampling method will be selected in order to determine a constant weight fraction of the waste type treated As per the tool the size and frequency of sampling should be statistically with a maximum uncertainty range of 20 at 95 confidence level Since the number of operating days is 330 it is ensured that the waste will be delivered for all the 330 days and hence will be monitored daily Sampling will be done on a monthly basis

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures The sampling of the raw wastes will be done by a laboratory in the project

site The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months

Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter RATECompliancey

Unit Description Rate of compliance Source of data Reports published by Municipal bodies (Central Pollution Control Board

(CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority) Analysis for computation of value for RATECompliance

y has been presented in Annexure 1 provided in the last section of the document

Value(s) applied 45 Measurement methods and procedures

The ex-ante value has been taken as 45 For ex-post calculation of emission reductions compliance rates would be taken from the reports published by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per AM0025 Version 12 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 49

Data Parameter z Unit - Description Number of samples collected during the year x Source of data Lab Records Value(s) applied 12 per year Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter f Unit - Description Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used

in another manner Source of data Plant Log Book- Written information from the operator of the solid waste

disposal site Value(s) applied 0 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- - Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per the methodological tool to determine ldquoEmissions

avoided from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment At present there is no provision for capturing flaring or combusting the

methane emissions at the SWDS This justifies the choice of the data value Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years in both electronic and paper formats

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 50

Data Parameter EG PJFFy Unit MWhyr Description Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the project

activity Source of data Electricity meter reading from electricity meter bill Value(s) applied 512 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the energy meter is 05 Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Monthly QAQC procedures Electricity meter will be subject to regular (in accordance with stipulation

of the meter supplier) maintenance and testing to ensure accuracy Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Fconsy Unit litre Description Fuel (diesel) consumption on-site during year lsquoyrsquo of the crediting period Source of data Purchase invoices Value(s) applied 100 litresday Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 51

Data Parameter DT i compost y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for compost transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap Assumption to be approved by DOE

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Qy Unit Tonnesyr Description Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 100815 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of waste composted will be measured with belt scales installed in the conveyer belt coming out of the pre-sorting area Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Once in three yearsfrom NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the belt scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures The belt scales will be calibrated as per standards provided by the

manufacturer Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 52

Data Parameter DT i RDF y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for RDF transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CTt y Unit Tonnestruck Description Carrying capacity of each truck delivering waste to the composting

installation in year y Source of data The maximum carrying capacity as stated on the truckrsquos nameplate is

registered by personnel at the entrance gate of the composting installation Value(s) applied 10 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be monitored by the challan received from the transport contractors post the loading of the vehicle Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- - Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 5 kgs Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Every vehicle QAQC procedures Weighbridge or any other applicable weighing device is subject to periodic

calibration (in accordance with stipulation of the weighing device supplier)

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 53

Data Parameter VFcons Unit litre km Description Average fuel consumption per kilometre of vehicles for compost

transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 5 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- Transporterrsquos challan Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency-

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures Transporterrsquos challan is a third-party document Hence QAQC procedures

are not required Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

B72 Sampling plan gtgt The project proponent has proposed a sampling plan in accordance with ldquoStandard for sampling and surveys for CDM project activities and programme of activitiesrdquo Version 020 ( EB 65 Annex 2) Sampling will be done to determine weight fraction of the waste type treated Sampling procedures will be followed in-line with the sectoral best practices and as per the guidelines laid out Section 33 Chapter 3 of the Manual on Solid Waste Management as published by the Ministry of Urban Development for public information15 Therefore on each sample collection day about 100 Kg of incoming MSW will be withdrawn randomly from four incoming trucks entering the project site About 10 Kg of MSW each will be collected from ten randomly selected points from outside and inside of the solid waste heap so piled The total quantity of waste so collected (approx 100 Kg) will then be thoroughly mixed and then reduced by quartering till a sample of such a size was obtained which could be handled by the laboratory Thus each master sample of approximately 25 Kg will be sent to the accredited laboratory for composition analysis Sampling will be done once in a month in in-house laboratory The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months B73 Other elements of monitoring plan gtgt Monitoring refers to the collection and archiving of all relevant data necessary for determining the baseline measuring anthropogenic emissions by sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) within the project boundary of a CDM project activity and leakage as applicable The project activity is a GHG avoidance project where the waste materials (ie municipal solid wastes) collected will be treated aerobically to produce compost and mechanically to produce RDF and will be sold in an open market The financial performance of the project activity depends significantly on the CDM revenue to be availed through sale of Certified Emission Reduction (CER) units accrued from the project activity This will require monitoring of all the relevant GHG performance parameters Therefore

15 httpurbanindianicinpublicinfoswmchap3pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 54 the project proponent has developed a monitoring protocol which will be followed throughout the proposed crediting period in order to ensure proper operation of the project activity resulting in generation of carbon credits The same is explained below Monitoring Plan Monitoring the projectrsquos performance in terms of ERs achievement requires the fulfillment of operational data collection and processing obligations from the operator The operator of compost plant has the primary obligation to collect data that would facilitate the calculation of the project ERs The data shall be collected by the operator based on the most recent available information as per the Procedures presented in this PDD In addition roles and responsibilities of monitoring personnel would be well defined

10 Objective of monitoring plan sect To ensure smooth uninterrupted operation of the project activity and hence generation of carbon

credits sect To ensure proper monitoring reporting and verification of all the parameters required to evaluate

the GHG performance of the project activity sect To identify flaws in the monitoring system and open up opportunities for further improvement

20 Roles and Responsibilities

The project proponent has developed a team who will be involved in monitoring reporting and verification of all the GHG performance related parameters The following schematic diagram will explain the individual roles and responsibilities of all the members of the team

Team Responsibility

Shift Operator Monitoring and reporting the GHG performance related parameters following the guidance provided in the Project Design Document

Shift In-charge

- Reviewing the GHG performance related parameters as recorded by the Shift Operator in every shift - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the reported parameters - Preparation of daily and monthly reports

Plant Manager

- Reviewing the daily and monthly reports in consultation with the Shift In-charge - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the daily and monthly reports - Ensuring calibration of the monitoring equipments as and when required

Management Representative(s)-

Production Department

- Reviewing the monthly and annual production statistics - Evaluating the GHG performance of the project activity - Identify opportunities for further improvement

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 55 SECTION C Duration and crediting period C1 Duration of project activity C11 Start date of project activity gtgt 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity C12 Expected operational lifetime of project activity gtgt 25 years 0 months C2 Crediting period of project activity C21 Type of crediting period gtgt The project proponent has opted for a fixed crediting period C22 Start date of crediting period gtgt 01092012 or date of registration of the project activity with UNFCCC whichever is later C23 Length of crediting period 10 years 0 months

SECTION D Environmental impacts D1 Analysis of environmental impacts gtgt In the applicable EIA notification ie SO 3067(E)16 dated 01122009 Ministry of Environment amp Forests (MoEF) Govt of India the Municipal Solid Waste projects are not included in the list of projects that has to get Prior Environmental Clearance (EC) either from State or Central Govt authorities and hence no EIA study was conducted The project does not fall under the purview of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) notification of the Ministry of Environment and Forest Government of India However due weightage has been given to environmental aspects D2 Environmental impact assessment gtgt The environmental impacts of the project activity are not considered to be significant by the project participant or the host party The project activity would help in avoidance of emissions caused due to the combustion of fossil fuels such as SOx NOx and particulate matter

SECTION E Local stakeholder consultation E1 Solicitation of comments from local stakeholders gtgt Stakeholder meeting was convened by Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd at the plant site at Shiveri Lucknow on 23032012 to explain the salient details of the Project its benefits to the society and villagers Prior to the meeting individual invitation letters were sent to each of the identified stakeholder on 15032012 to obtain their consensus for attending the meeting The objective of the meeting was to conduct open discussion where stakeholders are encouraged to raise questions express their concern and

16 httpmoefnicindownloadsrules-and-regulations3067pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 56 comments about the proposed project through a participatory process and to list down any probable concern of stakeholders The various stakeholders present in the meeting were the local inhabitants employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd representatives from equipment supplier Eco Trademart Pvt Ltd representatives of Lucknow Development Agency and local NGO representatives The MD of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd then briefed them about the project activity as per the following schedule

bull Project Background and information about the company bull Technology Involved in the project activity bull Benefits and impacts of the project activity bull Process of Clean Development Mechanism

Later half of the meeting a dedicated session was allotted for question and answer session and comments from the stakeholders were invited E2 Summary of comments received gtgt Meeting was very interactive and got very encouraging response from stakeholders The local villagers and the office bearers expressed their happiness with the setting up of an environment friendly project in their village as it had resulted in generation of employment opportunities both for literate and illiterate people Development of infrastructure in the locality was highly appreciated Few of prominent attendees are as follows S No Name Age Sex

(MF) Occupation Village

1 MrDunna 65 M Gram Pradhan Shiveri

2 SdBalbir Singh Maan 26 M Secretary

NGO - Umeed Chowk

3 Abhishek Singh 36 M

Equipments Supplier ndash Eco Trademart Pvt

Ltd

Dubagga

4 MrPCMehrotra 72 M

Retired Chief EngineerLDALu

cknow Aliganj

The meeting also included employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd The project received unanimous acknowledgement and appreciation from all the attendees at the meeting The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech in their attempt to combat global warming and simultaneously improve the local hygiene and modernize municipal solid waste management of Lucknow has been applauded by all

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 57 E3 Report on consideration of comments received gtgt The project has received positive amp encouraging feedback from the stakeholders concerned All the stakeholders have appreciated and encouraged the project proponent for taking up this project activity In view of various direct and indirect benefits (social economical and environmental) all the stakeholders have supported the project activity The documents supporting the stakeholder consultation will be submitted to the DOE Examples of few questions as raised by the stakeholders and their respective clarifications as provided by the project proponent have been detailed below 1What is CER CERs or Certified Emission Reductions are a ldquocertificaterdquo just like a stock A CER is given by the CDM Executive Board to projects in developing countries to certify they have reduced greeen house gas emissions by one tonne of carbon dioxide per year 2-What is Global Warming Potential Ans Green house gases affect global warming with varying intensities This intensity is measured by the ldquoglobal warming potentialrdquo of the gas 3- Is there any negative impact on surrounding area Ans There is no negative impact on surrounding area 4-What are carbon credits How these will obtained Who will by them Ans Carbon credits are generated in the developing countries by reducing the greenhouse gases emission in the atmosphere One tonne of carbon dioxide saved is equal to one carbon credit All steps of CDM cycle was explained and the process of Credits monetization 5-How does CDM benefit society Ans CDM is clean development mechanism a tool to provide incentives to mitigate the emission of greenhouse gases which are enhancing the climate change The purpose of this programme is to reduce emission of GHGs as well as promote sustainable development in host country Therefore developing country like India will gain financial and environmental benefits by reducing the emission of ever increasing GHGs to save the earth 6Would the project provide employment opportunities and or improve economic development of area There would be generation of employment through this project activity At the same point of time there would be regular trainings that would be imparted to the local population 7 How this project will help to address the issues raised by the local villagers The project will help the stake holders in the following ways A Create jobs for the local masses B Create business opportunities for the contractors C Increase awareness of the people regarding the local and global environment D Help to conserve depleting resources of fossil fuel such as coal It was also mentioned in the meeting that 2 of the CER revenue earned from the project would be utilized in developmental works of the local community There would be a robust monitoring plan for the same and the plant manager Mr Sachin Mehta was appointed as the local contact person for the same

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 58 The project received unanimous appreciation from the stakeholders present The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd towards mitigation of global warming was applauded by all

SECTION F Approval and authorization gtgt The project has received the following approvalsclearances

1) No objection certificate from Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board Lucknow 2) Environmental clearance certificate from the State Level Environment Impact Assessment

Authority Uttar Pradesh 3) No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

The project has applied for Host Country Approval and will be provided to the DOE during the course of project validation

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 59 Appendix A 1 The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has committed to share 2 (mention

approximate amount in INR per year) of its Certified Emission Reduction (CERs) in connection with hisher CDM project based on the issuance and transaction of the CERs

2 The committed amount of money will be utilized for addressing the identified issues in the following villages Identified Villages Total Population Key issues for development Shiveri 1200 approx The project is located in a rural area and the economy

of the area where the project activity is located is heavily dependent on agriculture and other farm based livelihoods The process of stakeholder engagement undertaken as a part of social impact assessment came across community needs and expectations from the project The process of need assessment conducted recently and prioritization undertaken as part of an exercise to seek participation in the preparation of the community development plan and livelihood restoration plan came across the following community needs

bull Skill trainingup-gradation institute for youth and creation of employment opportunities

bull Education support to children for secondary and higher secondary education

bull Drinking water bull Strengthening health infrastructure bull Developing land resources

Enhancing agriculture productivity and market linkages

Pankhera 800 approx

3 Accordingly the project proponent has identified the activities support for the following villages

S No Village Name ActivitiesSupport proposed over the project life time

Approximate amount in INR

1 Shiveri Skill training and Capacity Building Initiative

a Objective To build skill sets of the youth in the community in order to realize the potential employment opportunities arising due to the project and also enhance employment options elsewhere

b Target Beneficiaries Youth especially belonging to the families of the nearby villagers and those belonging to the economically and socially vulnerable

It will be difficult to confirm the exact allocation of funds for individual activities and for individual villages now as the expenditure would depend upon the social needs of the identified stakeholders much nearer to the Commercial Operation Date

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 60

communities

c Proposed Activities

i) Self help group for the women will be formed and will be imparted skill development training for initiating some income generation activities One group will be formed in each target village

ii) Imparting of training to youths on various skills having potential for starting self employment program or to enable them to get wage employment

2 Health Intervention a Objective Improved health care access and

delivery systems and reduction in incidence of diseases and improved health behavior of the community

b c Target Beneficiaries General community

with focus on elderly women children and economically weaker section

d e Proposed Activities i)To organize health awareness among

community members especially women on various facets of reproductive and child health hygiene sanitation etc

ii) To organize general health camps in the target villages

iii) To establish network with Government health functionaries in strengthening the intervention in the target villages

To conduct the school health camps and also health education programs

3 Agriculture Natural Resource Management and Allied Activities

a Objective To work toward improving the agriculture and allied activities in the target area

b c Target beneficiaries Land owners

economically backward and marginal farmers

d Description of proposed activities i) To organize training programme for

(COD) of the Project The Project Proponent will allocate funds for each identified activity and for each village during each crediting period accordingly

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 61

farmers on latest agriculture methods and technologies

ii) To organize exposure visits for the farmers to Agriculture universities kisan melas and other modern agriculture farms

iii) To organize training programme on animal husbandry

iv) To organize cattle health camp v)To get the existing water bodies repaired

to increase the availability of water and also to increase the ground water recharge

4 Education a Objective To strengthen the education

infrastructure at village level to improve access and quality of existing education service

b Target Beneficiaries Children in school going age group especially girls and children belonging to economically and socially vulnerable community

c Proposed activities

i) Strengthening early childhood education and development by provisioning of quality pre school kits and skill development

ii)Provisioning of scholarship for students from socially and economically weaker sections of the society especially for girls for both academic and professional courses iii)Organizing sports and other competitions in schools and for village youth clubs

4 The implementation details along with local contact and money transfer mechanism are as follows

The plan as mentioned above was discussed in details with the stakeholders present at the local stakeholder meeting held at the project site During the meeting the project proponent received unanimous appreciation and encouragement from the meeting attendees The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd would be implementing the plan themselves The project manager of Jyoti Enviro Tech was nominated as the local contact for the developmental plan shared Local contact of project proponent Money transfer mechanism

Mr Sachin Mehta Manager Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd Adress Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Lucknow ndash 226003 Phone 0522 ndash4049397

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 62 5 Details of monitoring arrangement

Monitoring Committee

The expenditure details can be verified by the Designated Operational Entity (DOE) during the verification If required the same can also be certified by a chartered accountant The expenditure details would be made public in the annual report of the company

Monitoring Parameters

Expenditure of 2 earning (net realizable value) from sale of CER available from the project activity would be monitored The sustainability initiatives undertaken by the company would be analyzed in detail during the verification

Monitoring Frequency Yearly

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 63

Appendix 1 Contact information of project participants

Organization name Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd StreetPO Box Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Building City Lucknow StateRegion Uttar Pradesh Postcode 226003 Country India Telephone 0522 ndash4049397 Fax E-mail jyotienvirogmailcom Website Contact person Title Manager Salutation Mr Last name Mehta Middle name First name Sachin Department Projects Mobile Direct fax Direct tel 0522 ndash4049397 Personal e-mail jyotienvirogmailcom

Appendix 2 Affirmation regarding public funding

There is no public funding available for the project The same has been mentioned in section A4

Appendix 3 Applicability of selected methodology

The applicability of the project activity to the selected methodology has been demonstrated in section B2

Appendix 4 Further background information on ex ante calculation of emission reductions

All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 5 Further background information on monitoring plan

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 64 All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 6 Summary of post registration changes

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 65

Annexure 1 Analysis for value of RATECompliancey for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction

State level analysis of Municipal Solid Waste handling practice in the state of Uttar Pradesh reveals that at few locations scientific handling practices have been adopted with simultaneous consideration of CDM benefits associated with the project

While some municipal bodies still have plans for installation of plants for scientific handling of Municipal Solid Waste and subsequent compost manufacturing with consideration of carbon credits

Sl no Location Present practice CDM

consideration Source

1 Kanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex at Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh India

2 Ghaziabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source17

3 Agra

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) processing plant in Agra by Ultra Urban Infratech Limited

4 Varanasi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Varanasi India

5 Meerut

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Meerut India

6 Allahabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Allahabad Uttar Pradesh

7 Bareilly

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source18

8 Aligarh

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Aligarh India

17

httpncrpbnicinTechnical_assistance_report_comp_BVolume20IV20Solid20Waste20Management20GhaziabadWSA_ADB20NCRPB_FR_Vol_IV-A_(GZB20Main20Report)pdf

18 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPBarielly_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 66

9 Moradabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management Project at Moradabad India

10 Saharanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources19

11 Gorakhpur Unscientific practice of open dumping still persists

NA Publicly available sources20

12 Mathura

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Mathura Uttar Pradesh

13 Jhansi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources21

14 Muzaffarnagar

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex

15 Mirzapur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Mirzapur India

16 Amravati

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Amravati India

17 Sambhal Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Have been considered as a single bundled project

18 Badaun 19 Fatehpur 20 Jaunpur 21 Ballia Hence from the above list it is evident only one (as highlighted) out of 21 locations comply to the MSW rules Hence for ex ante estimation RATECompliance

y is computed as presented below RATECompliance

y = (1 21) = 47 = 0047

------------

19

httpwwwindiawaterportalorgsitesindiawaterportalorgfilesCII_Excellence20in20Water20Management_ITC20Saharanpur_2009pdf

20 httpwwwgeagindiaorgPDFSOLID20WASTEpdf 21 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPJhansi_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 67

History of the document

Version Date Nature of revision 041 11 April 2012 Editorial revision to change version 02 line in history box from Annex 06 to

Annex 06b 040 EB 66

13 March 2012 Revision required to ensure consistency with the ldquoGuidelines for completing the project design document form for CDM project activitiesrdquo (EB 66 Annex 8)

03 EB 25 Annex 15 26 July 2006

02 EB 14 Annex 06b 14 June 2004

01 EB 05 Paragraph 12 03 August 2002

Initial adoption

Decision Class Regulatory Document Type Form Business Function Registration

Page 7: Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 7 A4 Parties and project participants

Party involved (host) indicates a host Party

Private andor public entity(ies) project participants

(as applicable)

Indicate if the Party involved wishes to be considered as

project participant (YesNo)

India(host)

Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd (Private entity)

No

A5 Public funding of project activity gtgt The project has not received any Official Development Assistance (ODA) from Annex I countries

SECTION B Application of selected approved baseline and monitoring methodology B1 Reference of methodology gtgt Title of the approved baseline and monitoring methodology ldquoAvoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processesrdquo Version 13 EB 65 Sectoral Scope 01 and 13 Reference ldquoTool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Version 0600 EB 65 Methodological tool for ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 ldquoTool to calculate the emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo Version 0221 EB 63 Methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 B2 Applicability of methodology gtgt The project meets all the applicability criteria as set out in the methodology The applicability conditions of the methodology AM0025 Version 13 for the project activity have been justified as below Sr No

Applicability Conditions as per AM0025 Version 13

Justification

1 The project activity involves one or a combination of the following waste treatment options for the fresh waste that in a given year would have otherwise been disposed of in a landfill (a) A composting process in aerobic conditions (b) Gasification to produce syngas and its use (c) Anaerobic digestion with biogas collection and flaring andor its use The anaerobic digester processes only the waste for which emission reductions are claimed in this methodology If the biogas is processed and upgraded to the quality of natural gas and it is distributed as energy via natural gas

The project activity involves a combination of the waste treatment options a) A composting process in aerobic conditions d) Mechanical treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) The project activity does not involve the use of RDF Also the project activity does not involve any thermal operation In the absence of the project the fresh waste would have been disposed off in a landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 8

distribution grid project activities may use approved methodology AM0053 in conjunction with this methodology In such cases the baseline scenario identification procedure and additionality assessment shall be undertaken for the combination of the two components of the project activity ie biomethane emission avoidance and displacement of natural gas (d) Mechanicalthermal treatment process to produce refuse-derived fuel (RDF)stabilized biomass (SB) and its use The thermal treatment process (dehydration) occurs under controlled conditions (up to 300 degrees Celsius) In case of thermal treatment process the process shall generate a stabilized biomass that would be used as fuel or raw material in other industrial process The physical and chemical properties of the produced RDFSB shall be homogenous and constant over time (e) Incineration of fresh waste for energy generation electricity andor heat The thermal energy generated is either consumed on-site andor exported to a nearby facility Electricity generated is either consumed on-site exported to the grid or exported to a nearby facility The incinerator is rotating fluidized bed or circulating fluidized bed or hearth or grate type

2 In case of anaerobic digestion gasification or RDF processing of waste the residual waste from these processes is aerobically composted andor delivered to a landfill

In RDF processing of waste the residual biodegradable waste is aerobically composted and the remainder ie the inert portion is delivered to the pre-identified sanitary landfill This justifies the applicability criteria

3 In case of composting the produced compost is either used as soil conditioner or disposed of in landfills

The compost produced in the project activity will be sold in the market that will be used as a soil conditioner This justifies the applicability criteria

4 In case of RDFstabilized biomass processing the produced RDFstabilized biomass should not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be stored in a manner that may result in anaerobic conditions before its use

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 9

This justifies the applicability criteria

5 If RDFSB is disposed of in a landfill project proponent shall provide degradability analysis on an annual basis to demonstrate that the methane generation in the life-cycle of the SB is below 1 of related emissions It has to be demonstrated regularly that the characteristics of the produced RDFSB should not allow for re-absorption of moisture of more than 3 Otherwise monitoring the fate of the produced RDFSB is necessary to ensure that it is not subject to anaerobic conditions in its lifecycle

In the project activity the produced RDF will be sold in the market and will not be disposed in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

6 In the case of incineration of the waste the waste should not be stored longer than 10 days The waste should not be stored in conditions that would lead to anaerobic decomposition and hence generation of CH4

The project activity does not involve the incineration of waste Hence this condition is not applicable

7 The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity can be determined in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity

The proportions and characteristics of different types of organic waste processed in the project activity will be determined as per the process described in section B72 of PDD in order to apply a multiphase landfill gas generation model to estimate the quantity of landfill gas that would have been generated in the absence of the project activity This justifies the applicability criteria

8 The project activity may include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation from the biogas syngas captured RDFstabilized biomass produced combustion heat generated in the incineration process respectively from the anaerobic digester the gasifier RDFstabilized biomass combustor and waste incinerator The electricity can be exported to the grid andor used internally at the project site In the case of RDFSB produced the emission reductions can be claimed only for the cases where the RDFSB used for electricity andor thermal energy generation can be monitored

The project activity does not include electricity generation andor thermal energy generation Hence this condition is not applicable

9 Waste handling in the baseline scenario The MSW 2000 rules stipulated by GoI mandated

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 10

shows a continuation of current practice of disposing the waste in a landfill despite environmental regulation that mandates the treatment of the waste if any using any of the project activity treatment options mentioned above

the municipal bodies to treat the municipal waste in a scientific manner 2 However despite the rules the common practice of handling the waste in the country is continuation of current practice of dumping the wastes in a disposal site 3 In addition no single municipality or local body has complied with the guidelines stipulated by MSW Rules 2000 in the country4 Further the present scenario of solid waste management in Lucknow is highly unsynchronized and inadequate and entails dumping of waste in open areas5 This justifies the applicability criteria

10 The compliance rate of the environmental regulations during (part of) the crediting period is below 50 if monitored compliance with the MSW rules exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit since the assumption that the policy is not enforced is no longer tenable

The compliance rate of Indian MSW Rules 2000 is below 50 No single municipality or local body in India has complied with the guidelines stipulated in the MSW Rules 20006 However a conservative value of 45 is taken for ex-ante estimations of emission reductions7 This justifies the applicability criteria

11 Local regulations do not constrain the establishment of RDF production plantsthermal treatment plants nor the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material

There is no such regulations that constrain the establishment of RDF production nor any regulation for the use of RDFstabilized biomass as fuel or raw material This justifies the applicability criteria

12 In case of RDFstabilized biomass production project proponent shall provide evidences that no GHG emissions occur other than biogenic CO2 due to chemical reactions during the thermal treatment process (such as Chimney Gas Analysis report)

The project activity does not involve any thermal treatment in case of RDF production The process involved is purely mechanical treatment Hence this condition is not applicable

13 The project activity does not involve thermal There is no waste incineration in the proposed

2 httpenvfornicinlegishsmmswmhrhtml 3 httpwwwnswaicomimagesnewslettersjun2010pdf 4 Sunil Kumar Bhattacharyya JK Vaidya AN Tapan Chakrabarti Sukumar Devotta Akolkar AB Assessment of the status of municipal solid waste management in metro cities state capitals class I cities and class II towns in India An insight pg 3 Waste Management journal homepage wwwelseviercomlocatewasman 5 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf Page 26 Paragraph 34 describes the present scenario of solid waste management in

Lucknow 6 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 8

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf 7 Sustainable Waste Management Issues in India by Shikha Saxena R K Srivastava and A B Samaddar Page no 9

httpstaticglobaltradenetfilespdf20100318081000pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 11

treatment process of neither industrial nor hospital waste

project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

14 In case of waste incineration if auxiliary fossil fuel is added into the incinerator the fraction of energy generated by auxiliary fossil fuel is no more than 50 of the total energy generated in the incinerator

There is no waste incineration in the proposed project activity Hence this condition is not applicable

15 This methodology is not applicable to project activities that involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill This should be treated as a separate project activity due to the difference in waste characteristics of existing and fresh waste which may have an implication on the baseline scenario determination

Project activity does not involve capture and flaring of methane from existing waste in the landfill Hence this condition is not applicable

Thus as per the methodology AM0025 the project activity involves the treatment of fresh waste (ie municipal solid waste) originally intended for dumping through a combination of the processes a) composting b) RDF processing without incineration The project activity avoids methane emissions by diverting organic waste from being dumped where methane emissions are caused by anaerobic decomposition By treating the fresh waste through alternative treatment options these methane emissions are avoided Therefore the project meets the applicability conditions of AM0025 B3 Project boundary As per AM0025 the spatial extent of the project boundary is the site of the project activity where the waste is treated This includes the facilities for processing the waste on-site electricity consumption onsite fuel use and the sanitary landfill site The project boundary does not include facilities for waste collection sorting and transport to the project site The summary of gases and sources included in the project boundary and justification explanation where gases and sources are not included is listed below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 12

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation B

asel

ine

scen

ario

Emissions from decomposition of waste at the landfill site

CO2 Excluded CO2 emissions from the decomposition of organic waste are not accounted

CH4 Included The major source of emissions in the baseline since the fresh waste is being disposed off in the landfill Hence included

N2O Excluded N2O emissions are small compared to CH4 emissions from landfills Exclusion of this gas is conservative

Emissions from electricity consumption

CO2 Excluded Electricity is not being consumed in the baseline Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This is conservative

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no thermal energy generation in the project activity

Proj

ect s

cena

rio

On-site fossil fuel consumption due to the project activity other than for electricity generation

CO2 Included The project activity involves on-site fossil fuel consumption Hence included

CH4 Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

N2O Excluded Excluded for simplification This emission source is assumed to be very small

Emissions from on-site electricity use

CO2 Included The project activity involves consumption of electricity from the grid Hence included

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded

The project activity does not involve on-site electricity generation Hence excluded

Emissions from thermal energy generation

CO2 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

CH4 Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

N2O Excluded The project activity does not involve thermal energy generation Hence excluded

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 13

Source GHGs Included JustificationExplanation Pr

ojec

t sce

nari

o

Direct emissions from the waste treatment processes

N2O Included May be an important emission source N2O can be emitted from composting activities Hence included

CO2 Included CO2 emissions from decomposition of organic waste are not accounted8

CH4 Included Composting process may not be complete and result in anaerobic decay resulting in CH4 emissions

Emissions from waste water treatment

CO2 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

CH4 Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

N2O Excluded There is no waste water treatment involved in the project activity

A graphical representation of the project boundary is shown below

Bio degradable waste processing Segregated Inert Recyclables

Compost RDF Sanitary landfill

Open market

MSW Collection in Lucknow

MSW Processing Site

PROJECT BOUNDARY

Electricity fromDiesel

Electricity from Grid

Consumption of Electricity

8 CO2 emissions from the combustion or decomposition of biomass (see definition by the EB in Annex 8 of the EBs 20th meeting report) are not accounted as GHG emissions Where the combustion or decomposition of biomass under a CDM project activity results in a decrease of carbon pools such stock changes should be considered in the calculation of emission reductions This is not the case for waste treatment projects

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 14 The various monitoring points in the project activity as included within the project boundary have been schematically represented in the diagram as given below

B4 Establishment and description of baseline scenario gtgt The approved methodology AM0025 version 12 recommends the use of the latest version of the tool for demonstration and assessment of additionality (version 0600) to determine the most plausible baseline scenarios for the project The various steps to establish the additionality of the project as per the methodological tool is demonstrated pictorially as given below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 15

According to the approved methodology AM0025 the baseline scenario of the activity is defined as disposal of the waste in open dump yards without taking any measures to capture the landfill gas or avoid methane emission due to the anaerobic decomposition of waste The procedure to define the baseline scenario as per AM0025 is as follows Step 1 Identification of alternative scenarios The most realistic and credible alternatives available to the project activity have been identified using the following sub steps

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 16 Sub-step 1a Defining alternatives to project activity The approved methodology has provided the following alternatives for the disposaltreatment of the fresh waste in the absence of the project activity ie the scenario relevant for estimating baseline methane emissions to be analysed should include inter alia M1 The project activity (ie composting gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas Assessment of the alternatives for waste treatment

Alternative Description Justification M1 The project activity (ie composting

gasification anaerobic digestion RDF processingthermal treatment without incineration of organic waste or incineration of waste) not implemented as a CDM project

This alternative seems to be a realistic and plausible alternative The project activity not implemented as a CDM project is however not a feasible alternative as the project involves high investment cost in order to set up the processing plant whereas the return from the project activity is exceptionally low (As discussed in detail in Section B5) However M1 is still a plausible option and is subjected to further consideration as a baseline scenario

M2 Disposal of the waste at a landfill where landfill gas captured is flared

The cost of construction operation and maintenance of an engineered landfill is high as compared to the zerominimal expenditure in the dumping of waste Hence the scope of landfill gas recovery is minimized in India Hence this scenario M2 is not feasible and is thus eliminated from further consideration as baseline scenario

M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas

Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas is the most common practice in India as demonstrated in Section B5 The same has been found to be prevalent in Lucknow in the absence of the project activity9 Hence this is a common practice that faces no barriers because of low expenditure low O amp M cost non-requirement of skilled labor etc Thus this is the most widely practiced method for MSW disposal throughout the country

9 httplmcupnicinnnfinalpdf page 26 paragraph 34

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 17

This alternative M3 is considered as the most likely baseline scenario for the project activity

The methodology further states that ldquoIf energy is exported to a grid andor to a nearby industry or used on-site realistic and credible alternatives should also be separately determined for bull Power generation in the absence of the project activity bull Heat generation in the absence of the project activityrdquo Under the scope of the project activity neither heat nor power generation takes place Hence the clause as mentioned above is not applicable to the project activity Thus alternatives M1 and M3 are further subjected for baseline consideration Alternative M2 is not considered as a plausible and realistic baseline scenario for the project activity Sub-step 1b Consistency with mandatory laws and regulations The MSW (Management and Handling) Rules 2000 notified by Ministry of Environment and Forests Government of India makes it mandatory for proper and scientific management of solid waste Under this rule land filling of the waste is not allowed but based on the studies10 and surveys carried out it was observed that the most common practice in India to dispose the solid waste is open dumping and land filling without any treatment and processing It is observed that these rules are not implementedenforced systematically thus leading to the most widespread practice of dumping waste in the country Conclusion Thus the alternatives M1 and M3 has been considered further Outcome of Sub-step 1b The two identified realistic and credible alternative scenario(s) to the project activity that are in compliance with mandatory legislation and regulations taking into account the enforcement in the country and EB decisions on national andor sectoral policies and regulations are as follows Alternative M1 The project activity carried out without the CDM and Alternative M3 Disposal of the waste on a landfill without the capture of landfill gas (Continuation of the current practice of disposal in landfill) Step 2 Identify the fuel for the baseline choice of energy source taking into account the national andor sectoral policies as applicable Since there is no power generation or heat utilization in the project activity thus baseline does not involve use of fuel for energy Outcome of Sub-step 2 Alternatives M1 and M3 have been subjected for further consideration Step 3 Step 2 andor Step 3 of the latest approved version of the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo shall be used to assess which of these alternatives should be excluded from further consideration (eg alternatives facing prohibitive barriers or those clearly economically unattractive) The above analysis in Step 1 and Step 2 leaves with two alternatives M1 and M3

10 Present Scenario of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Dumping Grounds in India by Amiya Kumar Sahu National Solid Waste Association of India Mumbai

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 18 The further analysis has been discussed in detail in Section B5 below Step 4 Where more than one credible and plausible alternative remains project participants shall as a conservative assumption use the alternative baseline scenario that results in the lowest baseline emissions as the most likely baseline scenario The least emission alternative will be identified for each component of the baseline scenario In assessing these scenarios any regulatory or contractual requirements should be taken into consideration As demonstrated in Section B5 only one alternative remains after applying the ldquoTool for demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo to assess exclusion of the alternatives from further consideration Hence this step is not applicable as there is only one alternative available to the project activity As demonstrated in section B5 it is evident that after investment analysis only one alternative ie M3 remains as the most plausible option and hence this has been considered as the baseline to the project activity B5 Demonstration of additionality gtgt As per the approved methodology Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has identified the above mentioned realistic and credible alternative(s) (M1 and M3) that were available to them and that would provide output and services comparable to the project activity (refer section B4) These alternatives are in compliance with all applicable legal and regulatory requirements The Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality stipulates that either Step 2 (Investment Analysis) or Step 3 (Barrier Analysis) or both can be selected to demonstrate additionality As the Project faces financial barriers for its implementation in the absence of CDM it is appropriate to choose Step 2 to demonstrate its additionality Step 2 Investment analysis The alternative considered for further analysis is alternative ldquoM3rdquo being the most commonly followed practice Sub-step 2a Determine appropriate analysis method Since the project generates incomes other than CDM related income for the purpose of investment analysis Option III (Benchmark Analysis) is chosen as it is deemed as the most appropriate analysis method where the returns on the investment in the project activity is compared to benchmark returns Sub-step 2b Option III Apply benchmark analysis The indicator used for carrying out the investment analysis is IRR that will determine the feasibility of the project activity This is compared with the Prime Lending Rate available at the time of investment decision For this purpose the PLR of Reserve Bank of India has been considered which is found to be 1200 as per Benchmark PLR of RBI during Aug-200911 Sub-step 2c Calculation and comparison of financial indicators The IRR for the proposed project activity without CDM revenue is computed for a period of 20 years lifetime A detailed investment analysis has been carried out and presented in the supported excel sheets The data and analysis is presented here The techno-economical parameters used for IRR calculation of the project activity is provided in the table below

11 httpwwwrbiorginscriptsWSSViewaspxId=14988

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 19

Parameters Unit Value Source

Capacity (MSW per day) MTs day 1300 As per DPR

Project Lifetime Years 25 yrs 0 months

As per specification provided by tech supplier

Cost of the project Buildings amp Civil works Rs in Lacs 3541056 As per DPR Plant and Machinery Rs in Lacs 1781286 As per DPR Interest payable during construction Rs in Lacs 15781 As per DPR Contingencies Rs in Lacs 10444 As per DPR Margin Money for working capital Rs in Lacs 12011 As per DPR Total cost Rs in Lacs 5704709 As per DPR

Financing pattern

Promoterrsquos Contribution through equity Rs in Lacs 8934 As per DPR Promoterrsquos contribution through loan Rs in Lacs 2700 As per DPR Subsidy under JNNURM Rs in Lacs 2111 As per RFP

Applicable Interest Rate on term loan Percent 1250 As per bank terms

Benchmark Prime Lending Rate (PLR) Percent 1200 httpwwwibaorginviewplraspmemcatid=1

Compost and RDF related costs

Recovery of compost from total MSW processed Percent 18

As per DPR

Recovery of RDF from total MSW processed Percent 12

Recovery of recyclable materials from total MSW processed Percent 2

Percentage of compost produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year

Percent 70

Percentage of RDF produced envisaged to be sold in the market in the first year Percent 70

Sale price of compost RsTon 2000 As per quote received from distributor Sale price of RDF RsTon 2000

Yearly increment in percentage of compost and RDF for sale in the market Percent 5 CPI(Consumer Price

Index) data Yearly escalation in sale price of compost and RDF Percent 5

Packaging cost of Compost Rs TON 150

As per quote received from distributor

Marketing cost of Compost Rs TON 100 Transportation cost of Compost Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of compost Rs TON 100 Packaging cost of RDF Rs TON 150

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 20 Marketing cost of RDF Rs TON 100 Transportation of RDF Rs TON 250 Loadingunloading cost of RDF Rs TON 100

MSW Processing cost

Power consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 16539

As per DPR

Diesel consumption cost Rs Lacsannum 18720 Plant maintenance cost including that of vehicles

of capital cost for plant machineries 2

Use of senitiler ml MT of MSW processing 50

Use of bio-culture kg MT of MSW processing 10

Cost of senitiler use Rslitre 150

As per quote received Cost of bio-culture use Rskg 180 Cost of daily consumables (oil lubricants and cotton waste) Rs Lacsannum 26

Salary and wages of employees and staff Rs Lacsannum 373 As per DPR

Escalation rates

Escalation in maintenance cost Percent 400 CPI(Consumer Price Index) data Escalation in employee wages Percent 714

Escalation in fuel cost Percent 874 WPI(WholeSale Price Index) data Escalation in electricity cost Percent 874

Other commodities escalation Percent 583

Depreciation

St line Depn - Buildings Percent 334 As per companyrsquos law 1956 wwwfastfactscoinresourcesDepCoActrtf

- Plant amp Machinery Percent 113 IT Depreciation - Buildings Percent 10 - Plant amp Machinery Percent 15 Income Tax ndash MAT Percent 1133 Income Tax Act-

httpwwwindiainbusinessnicininvestmenttaxationhtm

Income Tax Percent 3399

Based on the above assumptions the results of the financial analysis have been provided below

Location Benchmark IRR (Without CDM) Lucknow MSW project 1200 686

As evident the IRR of the project activity is below the benchmark This clearly indicates that investment barrier exists in project activity implementation which is mitigated by the revenue derived from the carbon credits that the project activity would obtain due to Clean Development Mechanism The additionality of the project is thus evident Sub-step 2d Sensitivity analysis

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 21 The purpose of sensitivity analysis is to examine whether the conclusion regarding the financial viability of the proposed project is sound and tenable with those reasonable variations in the assumptions The investment analysis provides a valid argument in favor of additionality only if it consistently supports (for realistic range of assumptions) the conclusion that the project activity is unlikely to be the most financially attractive or is likely to be financially attractive Thus a sensitivity analysis was also applied to the IRR calculations to measure the impact positive or negative of changes in the indicated parameters The project proponent has chosen various factors as critical to the operation of the project in accordance with Guidance on the Assessment of Investment Analysis (Version- 031 paragraph- 17) which states that only variables including the initial investment cost that constitute more than 20 of either total project costs or total project revenues should be subjected to reasonable variation Hence the sensitivity is carried out by varying the parameters to 10 on either side to ascertain the impact on the profitability and hence the IRR of the project The results of the sensitivity analysis are as presented below

Sensitivity Parameter Variation and resultant IRR +10 0 -10

Quantity of waste processed 1325

686

-ve value OampM cost -ve value

(12 increase leads to an IRR

of -104 ) Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1688 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the OampM cost is not

expected to decrease in future

Organic Manure sales 1369 However 10 increase in sale price of organic

manures is a highly

unrealistic under the higly

stringent market scenario for

compost sale (explained in subsequent

paragraphs on barrier analysis)

-ve value -5 leads to a

decrease of IRR to -302

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

Cost of bioculture used -ve value 16 leads to a decrease of IRR

to 091 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1513 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the bioculture cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from

the WPI for all commodities as

published by

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 22

RBI Fuel and electricity cost -ve value

24 leads to a decrease of IRR

to -057 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1279 However this is not a realistic

scenario as the fuel and

electricity cost is not expected to

decrease in future as is evident from the WPI for fuel

power and electricity as published by

RBI Project capital cost 570

Hence it is less than the

benchmark PLR

818 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Packaging marketing and transportation expense

077 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

1040 Hence it is less

than the benchmark PLR

Thus the sensitivity analysis for the project reveals that even with significant changes in various parameters the project IRR does not cross benchmark rates Therefore the project activity is clearly additional and is not a businessndashasndashusual scenario Step 3 Barrier Analysis The major barrier applicable to the alternative M1 is A) Technology Barrier B) Other Barrier and C) Investment Barrier Sub-step 3a Identify barriers that would prevent the implementation of the proposed CDM project Activity

A) Technological Barrier The plant would use state of the art technology in the process of waste handling and compost manufacturing EOT (Electric Overhead Transport) cranes would transfer the wastes from one processing station to the other Automation will be ensured wherever possible Hydraulic type press system would be installed for the RDF manufacturing Thus the plant would employ the latest technologies in the field of waste handling and management that involves a lot of technology transfer from international suppliers and exorbitant costs Also smooth operation of the plant would require proper training of the operating personnel on the equipments and hence regular capacity building training programs would have to be organized by the project proponent Another threat posed by the variation in feedstock quality is the content of highly abrasive and corrosive materials in it These cause rapid wear and corrosion of the process equipments Hence all MSW plants entail high cost of operation and maintenance due to frequent repairs breakdowns and shutdowns

B) Market barrier

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 23

Organic waste recycling is still neglected by private initiatives because of its low value and the lack of a market for compost Limited markets for compost sales and low prices for compost are a major challenge that all systems face12 The persisting skepticism among the farmers about the quality of composts poses a constant threat on the marketability of the composts Misconceptions like soil contamination due to use of composts are still borne in the minds of many Thus the emphasis on quality control of final products is of utmost importance Also increased awareness among the farmers on the benefits derived out of compost usage as value added substitutes to chemical fertilizers have to be encouraged through campaigns and other promotional activities

Also high cost of transportation sometimes makes it difficult to justify the use of composts when compared to the benefits derived out of it

C) Investment barrier The project proponent has demonstrated through investment analysis that without CDM revenue the project activity is not a financially attractive proposition At the inception the project had received refusal for loans from financial institutions for unimpressive returns envisaged from the project and the project proponent was suggested to estimate the returns along with additional revenue as may be associated with the project activity (for eg revenue from carbon credits) The project proponent had re-submitted their application for loan with the consideration of the CDM revenue and thereafter received the sanction

All these factors substantiate to prove that additional efforts are required for overcoming the market barrier for the compost produced in the plant In this context the additional incentive available to the plant through Clean Development Mechanism would be utilized for market development of the compost produced in the plant and also to partially compensate for the losses for not being able to sell compost in the market Thus the barriers as illustrated above pose a serious obstacle to the project activity and thus would lead to high operational uncertainties if not implemented as a CDM project activity Sub-step 3 b Shows that the identified barriers would not prevent a wide spread implementation of at least one of the alternatives (except the proposed project activity) As discussed above dumping of the solid waste in a landfill without gas capture (M3) is a common practice in India and none of the barriers discussed above would prevent it from occurring The barriers identified ie technological barrier and the market barrier does not in any way prevent the continuation of the baseline scenario Hence project activity satisfies the additionality criteria as per clause 3b) of the tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionality Version 0600 Step 4 Common practice analysis According to the methodology AM0025 project proponents should ldquoprovide evidence of the early stage of development of the project activity and that it is not common practice in the country To this end they should provide an analysis of waste management practicesrdquo In order to justify the early development of the project activity the chronology for the same has been presented below as we proceed further As per the ldquoTool to for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo (Version 0600) similar type of project is defined as follows

12 httpwwwtngovincmaswm_in_indiapdf page 145

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 24 Sub-step 4b Discuss any similar Options that are occurring The above analysis demonstrates the similar activities occurring as the project activity But it can be seen that all the treatment facilities are composting facilities and none of the plants have RDF production facility Most of these composting facilities have applied for CDM benefits and those that have not are facing difficulties The project activity conforms to the measures of ldquoMethane formation avoidancerdquo as mentioned in paragraph 6 of the Tool for the demonstration and assessment of additionalityrdquo Hence analysis of the project activity as per paragraph 47 is illustrated as follows Step 1 Calculate applicable output range as +-50 of the design output or capacity of the proposed project activity The capacity of the project activity is 1300 TPD Hence considering an output range of +-50 the analysis would entail all projects of capacities between 1950 TPD and 650 TPD Therefore as per the table of cities as listed above the cities considered for present analysis would include the following

City Waste

Quantity (TPD)

Processing of Waste Disposal of waste CDM status Composting Pelletisation Uncontrolled

dumping Sanitary landfill

Earth cover

Bangalore 1669 300 Ahmedabad 1302 500 Pune 1175 500 Surat 1000

Kanpur 1100

Jaipur 904

Ludhiana 735 Agra 654 Step 2 In the applicable geographical area identify all plants that deliver the same output or capacity within the applicable output range calculated in Step 1 as the proposed project activity and have started commercial operation before the start date of the project Note their number Nall Registered CDM project activities and projects activities undergoing validation shall not be included in this step The applicable geographical area for the project activity would entail the entire host country ie India Of the selected cities as listed above the same output ie organic composts and RDF is produced by Bangalore and Pune However all the projects are under validation Hence as per the given definitions Nall for the present analysis of the project activity is equal to 0 since all the plants with similar output and within the applicable capacity range have considered CDM benefits associated to the projects Nall = 0 Step 3 Within plants identified in Step 2 identify those that apply technologies different than the technology applied in the proposed project activity Note their number Ndiff All the plants as included in Nall use the same technology for compost production and RDF manufacturing Hence under the scope of the present analysis Ndiff = 0

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 25 Step 4 Calculate factor F=1-NdiffNall representing the share of plants using technology similar to the technology used in the proposed project activity in all plants that deliver the same output or capacity as the proposed project activity Under the scope of the project activity the factor is calculated as follows F = 1-NdiffNall = 1 ndash 0= 1 Therefore under the scope of the project activity the factor F cannot be determined The proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled (a) the factor F is greater than 02 and (b) Nall-Ndiff is greater than 3 Since as per the above analysis F = 1 which is greater than 02 Nall - Ndiff = 0 which is less than 3 As per the methodology the proposed project activity is a common practice within a sector in the applicable geographical area if both the following conditions are fulfilled Thus since one of the criterions as imposed by the tool is not satisfied by the project activity hence it is prudent to conclude that the project activity is not a common practice and hence additional the analysis shows that the project activity is additional

Also as per the India Infrastructure Report 2006 the few aerobic compost plants that have been set up are typically functioning much below installed capacity and most are ldquofacing a problem of marketing the compost due to an ineffective marketing mechanismrdquo Thus it can be concluded that extremely few similar activities can be observed in India and when they are observed they face considerable barriers and have not had much success from an economic perspective The experience provided by these composting attempts only serves to reinforce the fact that implementing composting activities is financially unviable Therefore as demonstrated by the investment and barrier analyses in Steps 2 and 3 it is clear that the project is not financially viable without the revenue from CDM and there are significant barriers to its implementation In addition as detailed in Step 4 the proposed project is not common practice either and in the limited cases where aerobic composting is taking place it is proving to be a failure from an economic perspective It can therefore be concluded that the proposed project is additional and would not occur without CDM due to the financial and technological barriers in place Moreover the CDM registration of the Project will also serve as a model for other projects and promote the dissemination of sustainable waste management practices Serious consideration of CDM As per paragraph 2 of EB 62 Annex 13 ldquoGuidelines to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDM for project activities with a start date after 2nd August 2008 ldquothe project proponent must inform a Host Party designated national authority (DNA) and the UNFCCC secretariat in writing of the commencement of the project activity and of their intension to seek CDM status Such notification must be made within six months of the project activity start date and shall contain the precise geographical location and brief description of the proposed project activity using the standardized form F-CDM ndash Prior considerationrdquo As mentioned in the section C11 the start date for the project activity is 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 26 The project proponent had intimated the Host Party designated national authority (DNA) ie Ministry of environment and Forests (Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat about the project activity on 09102011 This intimation was made in the F-CDM-Prior consideration format as prescribed by UNFCCC Thus the intimation to Host party DNA and UNFCCC secretariat was made within six months from the project start date as this is in accordance to the ldquoGuideline to the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo As per the ldquoGuidelines on the demonstration and assessment of prior consideration of the CDMrdquo version 04 EB 62 Annex 13 serious consideration of CDM has been demonstrated below

Date Project Related Activity CDM Related Activity Evidence 14092009 Financial proposal from

Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd Copy of proposal

28102009 Revised financial proposal from Jyoti Build-Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of proposal

11112009 Letter of award for development of Integrated Solid waste management facilities for Lucknow Municipal Corporation UP

Copy of the letter of award

07092010 Receipt of certificate of incorporation for Ms JYOTI ENVIROTECH PRIVATE LIMITED

Copy of certificate

23102010 Concession agreement signed between Lucknow Municipal Corporation Uttar Pradesh Jal Nigam and Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd

Copy of the Agreement

07062011 Environmental Clearance received for development of Municipal Solid Waste Landfill and processing facility at Village-Shiveri

Copy of letter of Approval

21092011 Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd appointed CDM consultants for the project

Copy of work order placed on the CDM consultants

03102011 No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

Copy of no objection certificate

09102011 Project proponent submitted the Prior consideration of the CDM form to host party DNA (Ministry of Environment and Forests Govt of India) and the UNFCCC secretariat

Copy of Prior consideration of the CDM form as submitted to MoEF GoI and UNFCCC

10102011 Purchase order raised for Plant Machinery

Copy of Purchase order

23032012 Stakeholder Consultation Meeting

Copy of the Minutes of Meeting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 27 B6 Emission reductions B61 Explanation of methodological choices gtgt Approved baseline and monitoring methodology AM0025- Avoided emissions from organic waste through alternative waste treatment processes Version 13 has been used to calculate emission reductions from the project The estimation of project emission baseline emission and leakage emission are described below Project emissions The proposed project uses MSW processing (RDF and compost production processes) to treat the organic waste Therefore the project emissions in year y are calculated as follows PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy + PEay + PEgy+ PEry + PEiy + PEwy + PEco-firingy (1) Where PEy = Is the project emissions during the year y (tCO2e) PEelecy = Is the emissions from electricity consumption on-site due to the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) PEfuel on-sitey =Is the emissions on-site due to fuel consumption on-site in year y (tCO2e) PEcy =Is the emissions during the composting process in year y (tCO2e) PEay =Is the emissions from the anaerobic digestion process in year y (tCO2e) PEgy =Is the emissions from the gasification process in year y (tCO2e) PEry =Is the emissions from the combustion of RDFstabilized biomass in year y (tCO2e) PEiy =Is the emissions from waste incineration in year y (tCO2e) PEwy =Is the emissions from wastewater treatment in year y (tCO2e) PEco-firingy =Is the emissions from thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on site

fossil fuel consumption during co-firing in year y (tCO2e) The project activity involves composting and mechanical treatment to produce compost and RDF It involves the electricity consumption onsite and on-site fuel consumption Hence the equation applicable to the project activity is as follows Hence for the project activity PEay =0 as the project does not entail anaerobic digestion PEgy =0 as the project does not entail gasification PEry =0 as the project does not entail combustion of RDFstabilized PEiy =0 as the project does not entail waste incineration PEwy =0 as the project does not entail wastewater treatment PEco-firingy =0 as the project does not entail thermal energy generationelectricity generation from on

site fossil fuel consumption Therefore PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy (2) Emissions from electricity use on site (PEelecy) The project uses electricity from the NEWNE grid at processing plant at Lucknow The emissions from electricity use are therefore calculated as PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec (3)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 28 Where EGPJFFy = Is the amount of electricity generated in an on-site fossil fuel fired power plant or

consumed from the grid as a result of the project activity measured using an electricity meter (MWh)

CEFelec = Is the carbon emissions factor for electricity consumed in the project activity (tCO2eMWh)

Under the scope of the project activity electricity use on site would include the electricity consumption due to the plant equipments and machineries on site that are used to produce the composts the RDF Emissions from fuel use on-site (PEfuelon-sitey) Project participants shall account for CO2 emissions from any on-site fuel combustion (other than electricity generation eg vehicles used on-site heat generation for starting the gasifier auxiliary fossil fuels need to be added into incinerator heat generation for mechanicalthermal treatment process etc) Emissions are calculated from the quantity of fuel used and the specific CO2-emission factor of the fuel as follows PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel (4) Where PEfuel on-sitey = Is the CO2 emissions due to on-site fuel combustion in year y (tCO2) Fconsy = Is the fuel consumption on site in year y (l or kg) NCVfuel = Is the net caloric value of the fuel (MJl or MJkg) EFfuel = Is the CO2 emissions factor of the fuel (tCO2MJ) As per methodology project participants may use IPCC default values for the net calorific values and CO2 emission factors Under the scope of the project activity fuel use on-site would include consumption of diesel fuel by the vehicles (eg excavators earth movers etc) as may be engaged for the project activity on-site Further the project may also include Diesel Generator(s) placed on site to provide necessary power back-up in incidents of exigency Thus the diesel fuel consumed by the DG set would also be monitored and be counted in fuel use quantity on-site Hence for the project activity NCVfuel = NCVydiesel And EFfuel = EFdiesel Emissions from composting (PEcy) As per the methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo Version 0100 EB 65 Annex 09 emission from composting PEcy = PEECy + PEFCy + PECH4y + PEN2Oy + PEROy (5) Where PEECy = Project emissions from electricity consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEelecy as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 29 PEFCy = Project emissions from fossil fuel consumption associated with composting in year y

(tCO2yr) This has already been accounted for under the variable PEfuelon-sitey as explained previously and hence may not be further included to avoid double counting

PECH4y = Project emissions of methane from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEN2Oy = Project emissions of nitrous oxide from the composting process in year y (tCO2eyr) PEROy =Project emissions of methane from run-off wastewater associated with co-composting

in year y (tCO2eyr) The leachate generated in the project activity will be gainfully utilized in maintaining the moist environment of the bio degradable waste Hence the project activity would not entail any project emission from run-off wastewater PEROy= 0

Therefore PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy (6) Determination of project emissions of methane (PECH4y ) Project emissions of methane from composting (PECH4y) are determined as follows PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 (7) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFCH4y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tCH4 t) For the value of EFCH4y a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFCH4y = EFCH4default GWPCH4 = Global Warming Potential of CH4 (tCO2e tCH4 ) Determination of project emissions of nitrous oxide (PEN2Oy ) The N2O emissions from composting are calculated as follows PEN2Oy = Qy EFN2Oy GWPN2O (8) Where Q y = Quantity of waste composted in year y (t yr) EFN20y = Emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted valid for year y (tN2O t) For the value of EFN2Oy a default value as provided in section IV of the tool will be considered ie EFN20y = EFN20default GWPN20 = Global Warming Potential of N20 (tCO2e tN2O ) Baseline emissions To calculate the baseline emissions project participants shall use the following equation BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy (9)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 30 Where BEy = Is the baseline emissions in year y (tCO2e) MBy = Is the methane produced in the landfill in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) MDregy = Is methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity in year y

(tCO2e) BEENy = Baseline emissions from generation of energy displaced by the project activity in year

y (tCO2e) Since the project activity does not entail generation of energy hence BEENy= 0

Methane that would be destroyed in the absence of the project activity (MDregy) The methodology states that In cases where regulatory or contractual requirements do not specify MDregy an Adjustment Factor (AF) shall be used and justified taking into account the project context In doing so the project participant should take into account that some of the methane generated by the landfill may be captured and destroyed to comply with other relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odour concerns MDregy = MBy AF Where AF = Is Adjustment Factor for MBy () The parameter AF shall be estimated as follows In cases where a specific system for collection and destruction of methane is mandated by regulatory or contractual requirements the ratio between the destruction efficiency of that system and the destruction efficiency of the system used in the project activity shall be used In the host country India there is no regulation for capture and destruction of methane generated by the landfill Hence the adjustment factor the project activity is 0 as per the present scenario ie AF = 0 Therefore MDregy = 0 However in due course of time the value of AF may undergo changes as per the governmental regulations imposed in the host country (India) with respect to MSW management Rate of compliance In cases where there are regulations that mandate the use of one of the project activity treatment options and which is not being enforced the baseline scenario is identified as a gradual improvement of waste management practices to the acceptable technical options expected over a period of time to comply with the MSW Management Rules The adjusted baseline emissions (BEya) are calculated as follows BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) (10) Where BEy = Is the CO2-equivalent emissions as determined from equation 14 RATECompliance

y = Is the state-level compliance rate of the MSW Management Rules in that year y The compliance rate shall be lower than 50 if it exceeds 50 the project activity shall receive no further credit

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 31 The compliance ratio RATECompliance

y shall be monitored ex post based on the official reports for instance annual reports provided by municipal bodies For details on the consideration the value of RATECompliance

y for the purpose of ex ante calculation refer to annexure 1 Methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity (MBy) The amount of methane that is generated each year (MBy) is calculated as per the latest version of the approved methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo (Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46) Considering the following additional equation MBy = BECH4SWDSy Where BECH4SWDSy = Is the methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity at

year y that is methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the solid waste disposal site during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e) as calculated using Application B in the methodological tool ldquoEmissions from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo The tool estimates methane generation adjusted for using adjustment factor (fy) any landfill gas in the baseline that would have been captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations or contractual requirements or to address safety and odor concerns As this is already accounted for in this methodology ldquofyrdquo in the tool shall be assigned a value 0

The amount of methane that is generated each year (BECH4SWDSy tCO2e) is calculated for each year with the recommended multi-phase model the First Order Decay (FOD) model The amount of methane produced in the year y is calculated as follows

(11) Where BECH4SWDSy = Methane emissions avoided during the year y from preventing waste disposal at the

solid waste disposal site (SWDS) during the period from the start of the project activity to the end of the year y (tCO2e)

φ = Model correction factor to account for model uncertainties f = Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used in another

manner Since no such practice exists in the host country India hence for the project activity the value for ldquofrdquo has been considered 0

GWPCH4 =Global Warming Potential (GWP) of methane valid for the relevant commitment period OX =Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste) F =Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCf =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that can decompose For the

project activity the default value has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore DOCf = DOCf Default

MCF =Methane correction factor For the project activity the value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep has been adopted from the Methodological tool for Emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 48 Therefore MCFy = 08

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 32 Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) DOCj =Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j kj =Decay rate for the waste type j j =Waste type category (index) x =Year during the crediting period x runs from the first year of the project activity

(x = 1) to the year y for which avoided emissions are calculated (x = y) y =Year for which methane emissions are calculated Where different waste types j are prevented from disposal the amount of different waste types (Wjx) is determined through sampling and the mean is calculated from the samples as follows Since the project activity corresponds to Application B as stated in the tool hence the values of few parameters have been adopted as explained in table 1 of the tool Determining the amounts of waste types j disposed in the SWDS (Wjx) Wjx = Wx pjx (12) Where Wjx =Amount of organic waste type j prevented from disposal in the SWDS in the year x

(tons) Wx =Total amount of waste prevented from from disposal in the SWDS in year x (t) pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from the

first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) The fraction of the waste type j in the waste for the year x or month i are calculated according to equations (7) and (8) as follows

(13)

Where pjx = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year x (weight fraction) pnjx = Fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the year x (weight

fraction) zx = Number of samples collected during the year x n = Samples collected in year x j = Types of solid waste x = Years in the time period for which waste is disposed at the SWDS extending from

the first year in the time period (x = 1) to year y (x = y) Determining the fraction of DOC that decomposes in the SWDS (DOCfy) In the case that the tool is applied to MSW then project participants may choose to either apply a default value (DOCfy = DOCfdefault) or to determine DOCfy or DOCfm based on measurements of the biochemical methane potential of the MSW (BMPMSW) as follows

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 33

(14) Where DOCfy = Fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) that decomposes under the

specific conditions occurring in the SWDS for year y (weight fraction) BMPj = Biochemical methane potential for the MSW disposed or prevented from disposal

(t CH4 t waste) F = Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction) DOCj = Fraction of degradable organic carbon in the waste type j (weight fraction) pjy = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in year y (weight fraction) pjm = Average fraction of the waste type j in the waste in month m (weight fraction) j = Types of solid waste in the MSW y = Year of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated (y is a

consecutive period of 12 months) m = Month of the crediting period for which methane emissions are calculated Leakage The sources of leakage considered in the methodology are CO2 emissions from off-site transportation of waste materials in addition to CH4 and N2O emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digestion gasification processes and processingcombustion of RDF Leakage emissions should be estimated from the following equation Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy (15) Where Lty =Is the leakage emissions from increased transport in year y (tCO2e) Lry =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from the anaerobic digester the

gasifier the processingcombustion of RDFstabilized biomass or compost in case it is disposed of in landfills in year y (tCO2e)

Liy =Is the leakage emissions from the residual waste from MSW incinerator in year y (tCO2e)

Lsy =Is the leakage emissions from end use of stabilized biomass (tCO2e) LCOMPy =Leakage emissions associated with composting in year y (t CO2e yr) Since the project activity does not include the use of MSW incinerator Lsy = 0 The project activity does not involve the disposal of residual waste from processing of RDF or compost in landfill Also for ex-ante estimations the residual waste is taken as 100 inerts Hence Lry =0 The produced compost and RDF will be sold in the market Also for ex-ante estimations for this project activity the weight of stabilized biomass sold offsite for which no sale invoices can be provided is considered as zero Hence Lsy =0 Emissions from Transportation (Lt y)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 34 This would occur when the waste is transported from waste collecting points in the collection area to the treatment facility instead of the existing landfills In this case project participants shall document the following data in the CDM-PDD an overview of collection points from where the waste will be collected their approximate distance (in km) to the treatment facility existing landfills and their approximate distance (in km) to the nearest end-user The emissions are calculated (As per AM0025) from the quantity of fuel (diesel) used and the specific CO2 emission factor of the fuel (diesel) for vehicles

(16) Where NOvehiclesiy =Is the number of vehicles for transport with similar loading capacity DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) NCVfuel =Is the Calorific value of the fuel (MJKg or TJGg) Dfuel =Is the fuel density (kgl) if necessary EFfuel =Is the Emission factor of the fuel (tCO2eMJ) For estimation of NOvehiclesiy the following equation has been used for ex-ante calculation NOvehiclesiy = QyCTy (17) Where Qy = Is the quantity of waste composted in the year ldquoyrdquo (tonnes) CTy = Is the average truck capacity for waste transportation (tonnestruck) Ltywaste is the emissions due to increased transportation from the waste collecting point to the waste treatment facility In this the incremental distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline is equalt to 0 Therefore Ltywaste = 0 For calculation of emissions from transport of compost to the users (Ltycompost) the same formula applies Qy is replaced by Mcompost where Mcompost is the total quantity of compost produced in year y Similarly for calculation of emissions from transport of RDF (LtyRDF) Qy is replaced by MRDF where MRDF is the total quantity of RDF produced in year y Thus Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF (18) Calculation of emission reductions To calculate the emission reductions the following equation has been applied ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly (19) Where ERy = Is the emissions reductions in year y (t CO2e) BEy = Is the emissions in the baseline scenario in year y (tCO2e) PEy = Is the emissions in the project scenario in year y (tCO2e) Ly = Is the leakage in year y (tCO2e)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 35 B62 Data and parameters fixed ex ante (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

Data Parameter AF

Unit

Description Methane destroyed due to regulatory or other requirements

Source of data Local andor national authorities

Value(s) applied 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per the approved methodology AM0025 Version 13 AF shall be assigned a value taking into account the amount of methane generated by the landfills that may be captured and destroyed to comply with relevant regulations and contractual requirements of the host country Since there exists no regulations or contractual requirement to capture and destroy the methane generated from the landfills in India hence AF has been fixed ex-ante and assigned a value of 0

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

Data Parameter φ Unit Unitless

Description Default value model corrections factor to account for model uncertainties

Source of data Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Value(s) applied 085

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

As per Table 3 the project activity conforms to HumidWet conditions in Application B Accordingly the default value for φ has been taken from table 3 This is in the absence of monitored data for φ as per Option 2 in the tool for determination of model correction factor

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 36

Data Parameter F

Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of methane in the SWDS gas (volume fraction)

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Upon biodegradation organic material is converted to a mixture of

methane and carbon dioxide

Data Parameter OX Unit Unitless

Description Oxidation factor (reflecting the amount of methane from SWDS that is oxidized in the soil or other material covering the waste)

Source of data Based on an extensive review of published literature on this subject including the IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 01

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment When methane passes through the top-layer part of it is oxidized by

methanotrophic bacteria to produce CO2 The oxidation factor represents the proportion of methane that is oxidized to CO2 This should be distinguished from the methane correction factor (MCF) which is to account for the situation that ambient air might intrude into the SWDS and prevent methane from being formed in the upper layer of SWDS

Data Parameter DOCfDefault

Unit Unitless

Description Default value for the fraction of degradable organic carbon (DOC) in MSW that decomposes in the SWDS

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 05

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value adopted from Methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 37

Data Parameter MCFy Unit Unitless

Description Methane correction factor

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 08

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Value for unmanaged solid waste disposal sites ndash deep as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46 This comprises all SWDS not meeting the criteria of managed SWDS and which have depths of greater than or equal to 5 meters

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment MCF accounts for the fact that unmanaged SWDS produce less methane

from a given amount of waste than managed SWDS because a larger fraction of waste decomposes aerobically in the top layers of unmanaged SWDS The baseline dumping sites have been found to be greater than 5 meters

Data Parameter DOCj Unit Unitless

Description Fraction of degradable organic carbon (by weight) in the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Tables 24 and 25)

Value(s) applied

Waste type j DOCj ( wet waste)

Wood and wood products 43 Pulp paper and cardboard

(other than sludge) 40

Food food waste beverages and tobacco (other than sludge) 15

Textiles 24 Garden yard and park waste 20

Glass plastic metal other inert waste 0

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default values adopted from table 4 as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 38

Data Parameter kj

Unit Unitless

Description Decay rate for the waste type j

Source of data IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (adapted from Volume 5 Table 33)

Value(s) applied Default values adopted from table 5 for Wet Type waste in tropical (Matgt20ordmC) conditions as per the methodological tool for emission from solid waste disposal sites Version 0601 EB 66 Annex46

Waste type j kj

Slowly degrading

Pulp paper cardboard (other than sludge) textiles

0045

Wood wood products and straw 0025

Rapidly degrading Food food waste sewage sludge beverages and tobacco 0085

Moderately degrading Other (non-food) organic putrescible garden and park waste 0065

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

The annual temperature limits of Lucknow has been adopted from httpwwwnihernetinrbisindia_informationannual20temperaturehtm The average annual temp of Lucknow is thus estimated to be 2582ordmC Thus Lucknow is considered to be in the tropical zone with MAT gt 20ordmC And hence the default value has been obtained as per Table 5

Purpose of data Calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CEFelec Unit t CO2MWh Description Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid Source of data CEA CO2 Baseline Database Version 70 Jan 2012 (wwwceanicin) Value(s) applied 09216 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

This data is taken from publicly available CEA CO2 baseline database version 7 dated March 2012 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment This value is fixed for the entire crediting period

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 39

Data Parameter EFCH4Default Unit t CH4 t Description Default emission factor of methane per tonne of waste composted (wet

basis) Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of

emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 0002 Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFN2ODefault Unit t N20 t

Description Default emission factor of nitrous oxide per tonne of waste composted (wet basis)

Source of data The emission factor was selected based on studying published results of emission measurements from composting facilities literature reviews on the subject and published emission factors Data from recent high quality sources was analyzed and a value conservatively selected from the higher end of the range in results

Value(s) applied 00002

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

Default value applied for a conservative estimation Default value adopted from section IV of methodological tool for ldquoProject and leakage emissions from compostingrdquo (Version 0100) EB 65 Annex 09

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 40

Data Parameter NCVydiesel

Unit TJ Gg

Description Net calorific value of diesel consumed for power generation at the MSW processing unit

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Volume 2 Table 12 p118

Value(s) applied 43

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter EFdiesel Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 741

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission and project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter GWPCH4

Unit tCO2 tCH4

Description Global warming potential of CH4

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 21 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 41

Data Parameter GWPN20

Unit tCO2 TJ

Description Emission factor of diesel

Source of data Used IPCC 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories

Value(s) applied 310 for the first commitment period Shall be updated for future commitment periods according to any future COPMOP decisions

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data IPCC 2006 default value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of project emission Additional comment

Data Parameter Ddiesel

Unit KgL

Description Density of fuel

Source of data Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) India

Value(s) applied 087

Choice of data or Measurement methods and procedures

In the absence of project specific data and region specific data BEE value has been taken

Purpose of data Calculation of leakage emission Additional comment

B63 Ex ante calculation of emission reductions gtgt For the purpose of ex-ante calculation of emission reduction the following assumptions have been taken into consideration Total quantity of MSW available (tonnesday) 1300 Annual Number of operating days 330 Percentage of organic content in the MSW 47 Rate of compliance 10 Total quantity of biodegradable wastes to be processed 201630 TPD (Calculated) Amount of electricity consumed per day due to the project 1550 kWh Specific gravity of diesel 087 kglitre Calculation of Combined emission factor of NEWNE Grid (CEFelec) As the project activity utilises electricity from the NEWNE Grid the project uses the approach (a)

combined margin emission factor for the NEWNE grid following seven steps of ldquoTool to calculate the

emission factor for an electricity systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) and using publicly available data of

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 42 ldquoCentral Electrical Authorityrdquo (the most recent version ldquoCO2 Baseline Database Version 70rdquo13 available

at the time of submission of the CDM PDD to the DOE for Global Stakeholders Consultation) As per the

stepwise approach to calculate the emission factor of an electricity system the EFy is being calculated as

follows

Step 1 Identify the relevant electricity system

As per the CEA CO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 combined emission factor is given

for northern eastern western and north-eastern girds taken together Therefore this combined emission

factor will be used for the NEWNE grid to evaluate the emission reductions

Step 2 Choose whether to include off-grid power plants in the project electricity system (optional)

As per the tool Option I is selected for the project activity as only grid connected power plants are

included in the calculation

Step 3 STEP3 Select a method to determine Operating Margin (OM)

The project proponent has chosen to adopt option a) of step 3 ie consideration of Simple Operating

Margin for the project As per the tool The simple OM method (Option a) can only be used if low-

costmust-run resources2 constitute less than 50 of total grid generation in 1) average of the five most

recent years or 2) based on long-term averages for hydroelectricity production

Referring the relevant data from the CEACO2 baseline database version 7[0] January 2012 the below

table is drawn for the share of net generation by the must-run hydronuclear plants for the past 5 years

Region 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Average NEWNE 1850 1900 1740 1590 1760 177

Since the average is 177 and is below the threshold of 50 as prescribed in the tool hence Simple OM

method is applicable for the project activity

Step 4 Calculate the operating margin emission factor according to the selected method

Simple OM The Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2

Operating Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid The following information has been used for the

calculation of baseline emissions

Simple Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridOMy) (incl Imports) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference

13 httpwwwceanicinreportsplanningcdm_co2cdm_co2htm

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 43 Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2008-09 tCO2MWh 101 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10 tCO2MWh 098

Simple Operating Margin (NEWNE grid)

2010-11 tCO2MWh 097

3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor

tCO2MWh 09843 Calculated based on the most recent data available at the time of submission of the CDM-PDD to the DOE for validation

Note 3 year generation weighted average of Operating margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) STEP 5 Calculate the build margin (BM) emission factor Central Electricity Authority (CEA) of Government of India has calculated the CO2 Build Margin emission factor of NEWNE Grid for the year 2010-2011 Build Margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridBMy) Parameter Year Unit Value SourceReference Build Margin (NEWNE grid)

2009-10

tCO2MWh 0859 ldquoCO2 Baseline Database for Indian Power Sectorrdquo version 070 published by the Central Electricity Authority Ministry of Power Government of India available at wwwceanicin

Step 6 Calculate the combined margin emissions factor The Project proponent has opted for Option A ie estimation of Combined Margin by weighted average nethod EFy = wOM EFgridOMy + wBM EFgridBMy Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy) 3 year generation weighted average of Operating Margin CO2 emission factor (NEWNE grid) EFgridOMy

tCO2MWh 09843 Refer the above table

Build Margin (NEWNE grid) EFgridBMy

tCO2MWh 0859 Refer the above table

Weighting of operating margin emissions factor wOM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Weighting of build margin emissions factor wBM

50 ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63)

Combined margin CO2 emission factor (EFgridCMy or EFy)

tCO2MWh 09216 Calculated

Note Combined margin CO2 emission factor has been calculated following the guidelines provided in ldquoTool to Calculate the emission Factor for an Electricity Systemrdquo (Version 0221 EB 63) Hence CEFelec is calcualted to be 09216 for the Project activity

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 44 Calculation of Project Emission As per equation 3) PEelecy = EGPJFFy CEFelec = (1550 3301000) 09216 = 471 tCO2e Considering diesel consumption per day due to the project activity100 Litre Fconsy = 100 3300871000 = 29 tonnes As per equation 4) PEfuelon-sitey = Fconsy NCVfuel EFfuel = 29 43 741 = 91 tCO2e Considering composition of organic waste as follows Cloth 5 Garden Yard waste 30 Food Waste 55 Paper 10 Thus waste type category (j) = 4 Therefore Quantity of cloth waste = 1300 330 47 5 = 10082 tonnesannum Quantity of garden waste = 1300 330 47 30 = 60489 tonnesannum Quantity of food waste = 1300 330 47 55 = 110897 tonnesannum Quantity of paper waste = 1300 330 47 10 = 20163 tonnesannum Therefore total waste quantity = (10082 + 60489 + 110897 + 20163) = 201630 tonnesannum Therefore amount of waste composted is Qy = (50 of 201630) = 100815 tonnesannum (This is with the consideration of equal distribution of the total biodegradable waste for RDF production and for composting The parameter Qy will be monitored ex-post) As per equation 7) project emission of methane has been calculated as PECH4y = Qy EFCH4y GWPCH4 = 100815 0002 21 = 4234 tCO2e As per equation 8) project emission of methane has been calculated as PEN20y = Qy EFN20y GWPN20 = 100815 00002 310 = 6251 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 6) emission from composting has been calculated as PEcy = PECH4y + PEN2Oy = 3243 + 4788 = 10485 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 2) project emission has been calculated as PEy = PEelecy + PEfuel on-sitey + PEcy = (471 + 91 + 10485) tCO2e = 11048 tCO2e Calculation of Baseline Emission As per equation 11) methane generation from the landfill in the absence of the project activity is calculated as

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 45 = 085(1-0)21(1-01)1612050508[10082024e-07(1)(1- e-07)] + [6048902e-017(1)(1- e-

017)]+ [110897015e-04(1)(1- e-04)] + [201630 4e-007(1)(1- e-007)] = 34633 tCO2e Considering a compliance rate of 4514 ie RATECompliance

y = 0045 Therefore as per equation 10) Adjusted baseline emission has been calculated as BEya = BEy ( 1 minus RATECompliance

y) = 38481 (1 ndash 0045) = 17316 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 9) Baseline emission has been calculated as BEy = (MBy - MDregy) + BEENy = (34633 ndash 0) + 0 = 33058 tCO2e Calculation of Leakage Emission As per equation 16)

Where DTiy =Is the average additional distance travelled by vehicle type i compared to baseline in

year y (km) For ex-ante estimation this has been considered to be 200 Kms for both compost and RDF

VFcons =Is the vehicle fuel consumption in litres per kilometre for vehicle type i (lkm) For ex-ante estimation the same has been assumed to be 02 lkm

Now as per equation 17) NOvehiclesiy is given by QyCTy For ex-ante estimation CTy has been considered to be 10 Tons Ltycompost = (18 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 856 tCO2e LtyRDF = (12 1300 330 10) 200 02 087 43 10^6 741 = 571 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 18) emission from transportation has been calculated as Lty = Ltycompost + LtyRDF = (856 + 571) = 1427 tCO2e As per equation 15) leakage emission has been calculated as Ly = Lty + Lry + Liy + Lsy + LCOMPy = 1427 + 0 + 0 + 0 +0 = 1427 tCO2e Therefore as per equation 19) emission reduction has been calculated as ERy = BEy - PEy - Ly = (33058 ndash 11048 ndash 1427) = 20584 tCO2e Emission reduction for all other years in the crediting period has been calculated in a similar manner 14 For details on the value considered refer to Annexure 1 below

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 46 B64 Summary of ex ante estimates of emission reductions

Year Baseline

emissions (t CO2e)

Project emissions (t CO2e)

Leakage (t CO2e)

Emission reductions (t CO2e)

2012-2013 33058 11048 1427 20584 2013-2014 57319 11048 1427 44844 2014-2015 75420 11048 1427 62945 2015-2016 89168 11048 1427 76694 2016-2017 99805 11048 1427 87330 2017-2018 108188 11048 1427 95714 2018-2019 114916 11048 1427 102441 2019-2020 120408 11048 1427 107934 2020-2021 124963 11048 1427 112489 2021-2022 128795 11048 1427 116320

Total 952041 110476 14270 827294 Total number of crediting years 10

Annual average over the crediting period

95204 11408 1427 82729

B7 Monitoring plan B71 Data and parameters to be monitored (Copy this table for each piece of data and parameter)

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 47

Data Parameter Mcompost Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of compost produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 77220 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of compost produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of compost produced will be cross checked with the sale of

compost Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter M RDF Unit Tonnesyear Description Quantity of RDF produced in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 51480 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of RDF produced will be weighed on calibrated scale Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annually from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Continuous QAQC procedures The quantity of RDF produced will be cross checked with the sale of RDF Purpose of data For calculation of project baseline and leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 48

Data Parameter Pnjx

Unit - Description Weight fraction of the waste type j in the sample n collected during the

year x Source of data Sample analysis of the MSW by project participant Value(s) applied

SL No Waste type Composition

1 Cloth 5 2 Garden yard waste 30 3 Food Waste 55 4 Paper 10

Source These values are as mentioned in the DPR

Measurement methods and procedures

Sampling method will be selected in order to determine a constant weight fraction of the waste type treated As per the tool the size and frequency of sampling should be statistically with a maximum uncertainty range of 20 at 95 confidence level Since the number of operating days is 330 it is ensured that the waste will be delivered for all the 330 days and hence will be monitored daily Sampling will be done on a monthly basis

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures The sampling of the raw wastes will be done by a laboratory in the project

site The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months

Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter RATECompliancey

Unit Description Rate of compliance Source of data Reports published by Municipal bodies (Central Pollution Control Board

(CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority) Analysis for computation of value for RATECompliance

y has been presented in Annexure 1 provided in the last section of the document

Value(s) applied 45 Measurement methods and procedures

The ex-ante value has been taken as 45 For ex-post calculation of emission reductions compliance rates would be taken from the reports published by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India or State level Municipal Authority

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per AM0025 Version 12 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 49

Data Parameter z Unit - Description Number of samples collected during the year x Source of data Lab Records Value(s) applied 12 per year Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter f Unit - Description Fraction of methane captured at the SWDS and flared combusted or used

in another manner Source of data Plant Log Book- Written information from the operator of the solid waste

disposal site Value(s) applied 0 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- - Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency Annually QAQC procedures Not required as per the methodological tool to determine ldquoEmissions

avoided from solid waste disposal sitesrdquo Version 0601 EB 66 Annex 46 Purpose of data For calculation of baseline emission Additional comment At present there is no provision for capturing flaring or combusting the

methane emissions at the SWDS This justifies the choice of the data value Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years in both electronic and paper formats

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 50

Data Parameter EG PJFFy Unit MWhyr Description Amount of electricity consumed from the grid as a result of the project

activity Source of data Electricity meter reading from electricity meter bill Value(s) applied 512 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years from NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the energy meter is 05 Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Monthly QAQC procedures Electricity meter will be subject to regular (in accordance with stipulation

of the meter supplier) maintenance and testing to ensure accuracy Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Fconsy Unit litre Description Fuel (diesel) consumption on-site during year lsquoyrsquo of the crediting period Source of data Purchase invoices Value(s) applied 100 litresday Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The electricity consumption data will be measured through electricity meter Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Annual or Once in 3 years

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 51

Data Parameter DT i compost y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for compost transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap Assumption to be approved by DOE

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter Qy Unit Tonnesyr Description Quantity of waste composted in year lsquoyrsquo Source of data Plant records Value(s) applied 100815 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The quantity of waste composted will be measured with belt scales installed in the conveyer belt coming out of the pre-sorting area Data Type- Measured amp Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- Once in three yearsfrom NABL accredited laboratories as per NABL standards Accuracy class Accuracy class of the belt scale is +- 10 gms Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Daily QAQC procedures The belt scales will be calibrated as per standards provided by the

manufacturer Purpose of data For calculation of project emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 52

Data Parameter DT i RDF y Unit km Description Average additional distance travelled by vehicle type lsquoirsquo compared to

baseline in year lsquoyrsquo for RDF transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 200 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be obtained from map and online sources Data Type- Calculated Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- -

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures The location to which the compost will be transported will be obtained

from the transporterrsquos challans The distance of this location will be obtained from online sourcesmap

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

Data Parameter CTt y Unit Tonnestruck Description Carrying capacity of each truck delivering waste to the composting

installation in year y Source of data The maximum carrying capacity as stated on the truckrsquos nameplate is

registered by personnel at the entrance gate of the composting installation Value(s) applied 10 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- The data will be monitored by the challan received from the transport contractors post the loading of the vehicle Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency- - Accuracy class Accuracy class of the weight scale is +- 5 kgs Responsibility Site supervisor will be responsible for recording the data

Monitoring frequency Every vehicle QAQC procedures Weighbridge or any other applicable weighing device is subject to periodic

calibration (in accordance with stipulation of the weighing device supplier)

Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 53

Data Parameter VFcons Unit litre km Description Average fuel consumption per kilometre of vehicles for compost

transportation Source of data Plant Records Value(s) applied 5 Measurement methods and procedures

Monitoring- Transporterrsquos challan Data Type- Measured Archiving- Paper amp Electronic Responsibility- The site in-charge shall be responsible for the regular recording of data Calibration Frequency-

Monitoring frequency For every vehicle QAQC procedures Transporterrsquos challan is a third-party document Hence QAQC procedures

are not required Purpose of data For calculation of leakage emission Additional comment Data will be archived for a period of crediting period + 2 years

B72 Sampling plan gtgt The project proponent has proposed a sampling plan in accordance with ldquoStandard for sampling and surveys for CDM project activities and programme of activitiesrdquo Version 020 ( EB 65 Annex 2) Sampling will be done to determine weight fraction of the waste type treated Sampling procedures will be followed in-line with the sectoral best practices and as per the guidelines laid out Section 33 Chapter 3 of the Manual on Solid Waste Management as published by the Ministry of Urban Development for public information15 Therefore on each sample collection day about 100 Kg of incoming MSW will be withdrawn randomly from four incoming trucks entering the project site About 10 Kg of MSW each will be collected from ten randomly selected points from outside and inside of the solid waste heap so piled The total quantity of waste so collected (approx 100 Kg) will then be thoroughly mixed and then reduced by quartering till a sample of such a size was obtained which could be handled by the laboratory Thus each master sample of approximately 25 Kg will be sent to the accredited laboratory for composition analysis Sampling will be done once in a month in in-house laboratory The results of sampling will be further checked by an independent accredited laboratory once in three months B73 Other elements of monitoring plan gtgt Monitoring refers to the collection and archiving of all relevant data necessary for determining the baseline measuring anthropogenic emissions by sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) within the project boundary of a CDM project activity and leakage as applicable The project activity is a GHG avoidance project where the waste materials (ie municipal solid wastes) collected will be treated aerobically to produce compost and mechanically to produce RDF and will be sold in an open market The financial performance of the project activity depends significantly on the CDM revenue to be availed through sale of Certified Emission Reduction (CER) units accrued from the project activity This will require monitoring of all the relevant GHG performance parameters Therefore

15 httpurbanindianicinpublicinfoswmchap3pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 54 the project proponent has developed a monitoring protocol which will be followed throughout the proposed crediting period in order to ensure proper operation of the project activity resulting in generation of carbon credits The same is explained below Monitoring Plan Monitoring the projectrsquos performance in terms of ERs achievement requires the fulfillment of operational data collection and processing obligations from the operator The operator of compost plant has the primary obligation to collect data that would facilitate the calculation of the project ERs The data shall be collected by the operator based on the most recent available information as per the Procedures presented in this PDD In addition roles and responsibilities of monitoring personnel would be well defined

10 Objective of monitoring plan sect To ensure smooth uninterrupted operation of the project activity and hence generation of carbon

credits sect To ensure proper monitoring reporting and verification of all the parameters required to evaluate

the GHG performance of the project activity sect To identify flaws in the monitoring system and open up opportunities for further improvement

20 Roles and Responsibilities

The project proponent has developed a team who will be involved in monitoring reporting and verification of all the GHG performance related parameters The following schematic diagram will explain the individual roles and responsibilities of all the members of the team

Team Responsibility

Shift Operator Monitoring and reporting the GHG performance related parameters following the guidance provided in the Project Design Document

Shift In-charge

- Reviewing the GHG performance related parameters as recorded by the Shift Operator in every shift - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the reported parameters - Preparation of daily and monthly reports

Plant Manager

- Reviewing the daily and monthly reports in consultation with the Shift In-charge - Implementation of appropriate corrective measures in case any discrepancies are identified in the daily and monthly reports - Ensuring calibration of the monitoring equipments as and when required

Management Representative(s)-

Production Department

- Reviewing the monthly and annual production statistics - Evaluating the GHG performance of the project activity - Identify opportunities for further improvement

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 55 SECTION C Duration and crediting period C1 Duration of project activity C11 Start date of project activity gtgt 10102011 ie date of placing the first purchase order for the project activity C12 Expected operational lifetime of project activity gtgt 25 years 0 months C2 Crediting period of project activity C21 Type of crediting period gtgt The project proponent has opted for a fixed crediting period C22 Start date of crediting period gtgt 01092012 or date of registration of the project activity with UNFCCC whichever is later C23 Length of crediting period 10 years 0 months

SECTION D Environmental impacts D1 Analysis of environmental impacts gtgt In the applicable EIA notification ie SO 3067(E)16 dated 01122009 Ministry of Environment amp Forests (MoEF) Govt of India the Municipal Solid Waste projects are not included in the list of projects that has to get Prior Environmental Clearance (EC) either from State or Central Govt authorities and hence no EIA study was conducted The project does not fall under the purview of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) notification of the Ministry of Environment and Forest Government of India However due weightage has been given to environmental aspects D2 Environmental impact assessment gtgt The environmental impacts of the project activity are not considered to be significant by the project participant or the host party The project activity would help in avoidance of emissions caused due to the combustion of fossil fuels such as SOx NOx and particulate matter

SECTION E Local stakeholder consultation E1 Solicitation of comments from local stakeholders gtgt Stakeholder meeting was convened by Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd at the plant site at Shiveri Lucknow on 23032012 to explain the salient details of the Project its benefits to the society and villagers Prior to the meeting individual invitation letters were sent to each of the identified stakeholder on 15032012 to obtain their consensus for attending the meeting The objective of the meeting was to conduct open discussion where stakeholders are encouraged to raise questions express their concern and

16 httpmoefnicindownloadsrules-and-regulations3067pdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 56 comments about the proposed project through a participatory process and to list down any probable concern of stakeholders The various stakeholders present in the meeting were the local inhabitants employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd representatives from equipment supplier Eco Trademart Pvt Ltd representatives of Lucknow Development Agency and local NGO representatives The MD of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd then briefed them about the project activity as per the following schedule

bull Project Background and information about the company bull Technology Involved in the project activity bull Benefits and impacts of the project activity bull Process of Clean Development Mechanism

Later half of the meeting a dedicated session was allotted for question and answer session and comments from the stakeholders were invited E2 Summary of comments received gtgt Meeting was very interactive and got very encouraging response from stakeholders The local villagers and the office bearers expressed their happiness with the setting up of an environment friendly project in their village as it had resulted in generation of employment opportunities both for literate and illiterate people Development of infrastructure in the locality was highly appreciated Few of prominent attendees are as follows S No Name Age Sex

(MF) Occupation Village

1 MrDunna 65 M Gram Pradhan Shiveri

2 SdBalbir Singh Maan 26 M Secretary

NGO - Umeed Chowk

3 Abhishek Singh 36 M

Equipments Supplier ndash Eco Trademart Pvt

Ltd

Dubagga

4 MrPCMehrotra 72 M

Retired Chief EngineerLDALu

cknow Aliganj

The meeting also included employees of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd The project received unanimous acknowledgement and appreciation from all the attendees at the meeting The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech in their attempt to combat global warming and simultaneously improve the local hygiene and modernize municipal solid waste management of Lucknow has been applauded by all

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 57 E3 Report on consideration of comments received gtgt The project has received positive amp encouraging feedback from the stakeholders concerned All the stakeholders have appreciated and encouraged the project proponent for taking up this project activity In view of various direct and indirect benefits (social economical and environmental) all the stakeholders have supported the project activity The documents supporting the stakeholder consultation will be submitted to the DOE Examples of few questions as raised by the stakeholders and their respective clarifications as provided by the project proponent have been detailed below 1What is CER CERs or Certified Emission Reductions are a ldquocertificaterdquo just like a stock A CER is given by the CDM Executive Board to projects in developing countries to certify they have reduced greeen house gas emissions by one tonne of carbon dioxide per year 2-What is Global Warming Potential Ans Green house gases affect global warming with varying intensities This intensity is measured by the ldquoglobal warming potentialrdquo of the gas 3- Is there any negative impact on surrounding area Ans There is no negative impact on surrounding area 4-What are carbon credits How these will obtained Who will by them Ans Carbon credits are generated in the developing countries by reducing the greenhouse gases emission in the atmosphere One tonne of carbon dioxide saved is equal to one carbon credit All steps of CDM cycle was explained and the process of Credits monetization 5-How does CDM benefit society Ans CDM is clean development mechanism a tool to provide incentives to mitigate the emission of greenhouse gases which are enhancing the climate change The purpose of this programme is to reduce emission of GHGs as well as promote sustainable development in host country Therefore developing country like India will gain financial and environmental benefits by reducing the emission of ever increasing GHGs to save the earth 6Would the project provide employment opportunities and or improve economic development of area There would be generation of employment through this project activity At the same point of time there would be regular trainings that would be imparted to the local population 7 How this project will help to address the issues raised by the local villagers The project will help the stake holders in the following ways A Create jobs for the local masses B Create business opportunities for the contractors C Increase awareness of the people regarding the local and global environment D Help to conserve depleting resources of fossil fuel such as coal It was also mentioned in the meeting that 2 of the CER revenue earned from the project would be utilized in developmental works of the local community There would be a robust monitoring plan for the same and the plant manager Mr Sachin Mehta was appointed as the local contact person for the same

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 58 The project received unanimous appreciation from the stakeholders present The efforts of Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd towards mitigation of global warming was applauded by all

SECTION F Approval and authorization gtgt The project has received the following approvalsclearances

1) No objection certificate from Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board Lucknow 2) Environmental clearance certificate from the State Level Environment Impact Assessment

Authority Uttar Pradesh 3) No objection certificate from Airports Authority of India

The project has applied for Host Country Approval and will be provided to the DOE during the course of project validation

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 59 Appendix A 1 The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd has committed to share 2 (mention

approximate amount in INR per year) of its Certified Emission Reduction (CERs) in connection with hisher CDM project based on the issuance and transaction of the CERs

2 The committed amount of money will be utilized for addressing the identified issues in the following villages Identified Villages Total Population Key issues for development Shiveri 1200 approx The project is located in a rural area and the economy

of the area where the project activity is located is heavily dependent on agriculture and other farm based livelihoods The process of stakeholder engagement undertaken as a part of social impact assessment came across community needs and expectations from the project The process of need assessment conducted recently and prioritization undertaken as part of an exercise to seek participation in the preparation of the community development plan and livelihood restoration plan came across the following community needs

bull Skill trainingup-gradation institute for youth and creation of employment opportunities

bull Education support to children for secondary and higher secondary education

bull Drinking water bull Strengthening health infrastructure bull Developing land resources

Enhancing agriculture productivity and market linkages

Pankhera 800 approx

3 Accordingly the project proponent has identified the activities support for the following villages

S No Village Name ActivitiesSupport proposed over the project life time

Approximate amount in INR

1 Shiveri Skill training and Capacity Building Initiative

a Objective To build skill sets of the youth in the community in order to realize the potential employment opportunities arising due to the project and also enhance employment options elsewhere

b Target Beneficiaries Youth especially belonging to the families of the nearby villagers and those belonging to the economically and socially vulnerable

It will be difficult to confirm the exact allocation of funds for individual activities and for individual villages now as the expenditure would depend upon the social needs of the identified stakeholders much nearer to the Commercial Operation Date

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 60

communities

c Proposed Activities

i) Self help group for the women will be formed and will be imparted skill development training for initiating some income generation activities One group will be formed in each target village

ii) Imparting of training to youths on various skills having potential for starting self employment program or to enable them to get wage employment

2 Health Intervention a Objective Improved health care access and

delivery systems and reduction in incidence of diseases and improved health behavior of the community

b c Target Beneficiaries General community

with focus on elderly women children and economically weaker section

d e Proposed Activities i)To organize health awareness among

community members especially women on various facets of reproductive and child health hygiene sanitation etc

ii) To organize general health camps in the target villages

iii) To establish network with Government health functionaries in strengthening the intervention in the target villages

To conduct the school health camps and also health education programs

3 Agriculture Natural Resource Management and Allied Activities

a Objective To work toward improving the agriculture and allied activities in the target area

b c Target beneficiaries Land owners

economically backward and marginal farmers

d Description of proposed activities i) To organize training programme for

(COD) of the Project The Project Proponent will allocate funds for each identified activity and for each village during each crediting period accordingly

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 61

farmers on latest agriculture methods and technologies

ii) To organize exposure visits for the farmers to Agriculture universities kisan melas and other modern agriculture farms

iii) To organize training programme on animal husbandry

iv) To organize cattle health camp v)To get the existing water bodies repaired

to increase the availability of water and also to increase the ground water recharge

4 Education a Objective To strengthen the education

infrastructure at village level to improve access and quality of existing education service

b Target Beneficiaries Children in school going age group especially girls and children belonging to economically and socially vulnerable community

c Proposed activities

i) Strengthening early childhood education and development by provisioning of quality pre school kits and skill development

ii)Provisioning of scholarship for students from socially and economically weaker sections of the society especially for girls for both academic and professional courses iii)Organizing sports and other competitions in schools and for village youth clubs

4 The implementation details along with local contact and money transfer mechanism are as follows

The plan as mentioned above was discussed in details with the stakeholders present at the local stakeholder meeting held at the project site During the meeting the project proponent received unanimous appreciation and encouragement from the meeting attendees The project proponent Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd would be implementing the plan themselves The project manager of Jyoti Enviro Tech was nominated as the local contact for the developmental plan shared Local contact of project proponent Money transfer mechanism

Mr Sachin Mehta Manager Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd Adress Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Lucknow ndash 226003 Phone 0522 ndash4049397

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 62 5 Details of monitoring arrangement

Monitoring Committee

The expenditure details can be verified by the Designated Operational Entity (DOE) during the verification If required the same can also be certified by a chartered accountant The expenditure details would be made public in the annual report of the company

Monitoring Parameters

Expenditure of 2 earning (net realizable value) from sale of CER available from the project activity would be monitored The sustainability initiatives undertaken by the company would be analyzed in detail during the verification

Monitoring Frequency Yearly

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 63

Appendix 1 Contact information of project participants

Organization name Jyoti Enviro Tech Pvt Ltd StreetPO Box Plot No - 5 Neebu Bagh Chowk Building City Lucknow StateRegion Uttar Pradesh Postcode 226003 Country India Telephone 0522 ndash4049397 Fax E-mail jyotienvirogmailcom Website Contact person Title Manager Salutation Mr Last name Mehta Middle name First name Sachin Department Projects Mobile Direct fax Direct tel 0522 ndash4049397 Personal e-mail jyotienvirogmailcom

Appendix 2 Affirmation regarding public funding

There is no public funding available for the project The same has been mentioned in section A4

Appendix 3 Applicability of selected methodology

The applicability of the project activity to the selected methodology has been demonstrated in section B2

Appendix 4 Further background information on ex ante calculation of emission reductions

All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 5 Further background information on monitoring plan

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 64 All relevant information pertaining to ex ante calculation of emission reduction has been provided in section B6 Additional information and anaylsis pertaining to value of RATECompliance

y for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction has been presented in Annexure 1 below

Appendix 6 Summary of post registration changes

- - - - -

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 65

Annexure 1 Analysis for value of RATECompliancey for ex ante clauclation of emission reduction

State level analysis of Municipal Solid Waste handling practice in the state of Uttar Pradesh reveals that at few locations scientific handling practices have been adopted with simultaneous consideration of CDM benefits associated with the project

While some municipal bodies still have plans for installation of plants for scientific handling of Municipal Solid Waste and subsequent compost manufacturing with consideration of carbon credits

Sl no Location Present practice CDM

consideration Source

1 Kanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex at Kanpur in Uttar Pradesh India

2 Ghaziabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source17

3 Agra

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) processing plant in Agra by Ultra Urban Infratech Limited

4 Varanasi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Varanasi India

5 Meerut

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management project at Meerut India

6 Allahabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Allahabad Uttar Pradesh

7 Bareilly

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Publicly available source18

8 Aligarh

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Aligarh India

17

httpncrpbnicinTechnical_assistance_report_comp_BVolume20IV20Solid20Waste20Management20GhaziabadWSA_ADB20NCRPB_FR_Vol_IV-A_(GZB20Main20Report)pdf

18 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPBarielly_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 66

9 Moradabad

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste Management Project at Moradabad India

10 Saharanpur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources19

11 Gorakhpur Unscientific practice of open dumping still persists

NA Publicly available sources20

12 Mathura

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Solid Waste Management Project at Mathura Uttar Pradesh

13 Jhansi

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

No Publicly available sources21

14 Muzaffarnagar

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Integrated Municipal Solid Waste processing complex

15 Mirzapur

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Mirzapur India

16 Amravati

Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes

Project title as published in UNFCCC website Municipal Solid Waste management project at Amravati India

17 Sambhal Installation of MSW handling and compost manufacturing plant is in process

Yes Have been considered as a single bundled project

18 Badaun 19 Fatehpur 20 Jaunpur 21 Ballia Hence from the above list it is evident only one (as highlighted) out of 21 locations comply to the MSW rules Hence for ex ante estimation RATECompliance

y is computed as presented below RATECompliance

y = (1 21) = 47 = 0047

------------

19

httpwwwindiawaterportalorgsitesindiawaterportalorgfilesCII_Excellence20in20Water20Management_ITC20Saharanpur_2009pdf

20 httpwwwgeagindiaorgPDFSOLID20WASTEpdf 21 httpwwwurbanindianicinprogrammeuwssCSPDraft_CSPJhansi_CSPpdf

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 67

History of the document

Version Date Nature of revision 041 11 April 2012 Editorial revision to change version 02 line in history box from Annex 06 to

Annex 06b 040 EB 66

13 March 2012 Revision required to ensure consistency with the ldquoGuidelines for completing the project design document form for CDM project activitiesrdquo (EB 66 Annex 8)

03 EB 25 Annex 15 26 July 2006

02 EB 14 Annex 06b 14 June 2004

01 EB 05 Paragraph 12 03 August 2002

Initial adoption

Decision Class Regulatory Document Type Form Business Function Registration

Page 8: Jyoti Envirotech Solid Waste Project

UNFCCCCCNUCC CDM ndash Executive Board Page 8

distribution grid project activities may use approved methodology AM0053 in conjunction with this methodology