Leisure activities Hobbies Games Sports 1 Time to spare? activities Hobbies Games Sports ... The only good thing you can say about the piano is that it provides you with a bit of extra

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  • Cambridge University Press978-0-521-63553-0 New Progress to ProficiencyLeo JonesExcerptMore information

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    Time to spare?

    Leisure activities Hobbies Games Sports

    In my spare time . . . TO P I C VO C A B U L A RY1.1

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    A Work in pairs. Discuss these questions with your partner: What do you think is going on in the photos? What do the people seem to be doing? Whats your favourite sport? Why do you enjoy playing or watching it? Do you have a hobby? If so, why do you enjoy it? If not, why not?

    B Before you listen to the recording, find out what your partner thinks are the attractions(or otherwise) of these hobbies and interests:

    Youll hear Ruth, Bill, Sarah, Emma and Jonathan describing their hobbies or interests. Asyou listen, note down:

    a the name of each persons hobby or interestb the reasons why they enjoy it and find it rewarding.

    Compare your notes with a partner. Listen to the recording again to settle any points ofdisagreement, or to fill any gaps in your notes.

    Discuss which of the activities sounded most and least attractive.

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    C Write down THREE more examples for each of the following lists:Hobbies: collecting stamps carpentryInterests: listening to music dancing going to the cinemaIndoor games: chess backgammonTeam sports: soccer rugbyIndividual competitive sports: boxing motor-racing tennisNon-competitive sports: aerobics windsurfing skateboardingOutdoor activities: bird-watching fishing hunting

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    When you meetsomeone for thefirst time (and inthe ProficiencySpeaking test), youmay well be askedabout your hobbiesand interests. SayingI dont have timefor any is aconversation killer.It may be better topretend that youare interested in acouple of sports orhobbies, addinglater that you regrethow little time youhave to pursuethem.

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  • Cambridge University Press978-0-521-63553-0 New Progress to ProficiencyLeo JonesExcerptMore information

    in this web service Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org

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    1 Join another pair. Compare your lists and then find out: which of the activities your partners participate in or watch which of the activities they dislike or disapprove of and why what hobbies or sports they might take up if they had more time

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    Comparing and contrasting G R A M M A R R E V I E W1.2

    A Match each sentence on the left with the sentence on the right that has the same meaningor implication.

    1 Water-skiing is less difficult than sailing. Both sports are equally hard.Sailing is as difficult as water-skiing. Sailing is harder than water-skiing.

    2 Like you, I wish I could play the piano. Neither of us can play the piano.I wish I could play the piano like you. You can play the piano well, I cant.

    3 Your essay was most interesting. Nobodys essay was better than yours.Your essay was the most interesting. It was a very interesting essay.

    4 The cliff was too hard for us to climb. We were able to climb it.The cliff was very hard for us to climb. We were unable to climb it.

    5 She is a much better pianist than her brother. They both play quite well.Her brother is a much worse pianist than she is. Neither of them plays well.

    6 She swims as well as she runs. She is equally good at both sports.She swims as well as runs. She takes part in both sports.

    7 Bob isnt as bright as his father. Bob is less intelligent than his father.Bobs father is bright, but Bob isnt that bright. His father is more intelligent than Bob.Bob isnt all that bright, like his father. Neither of them is particularly intelligent.

    B Fill each of the blanks with a suitable word or phrase. Think of TWO different ways ofcompleting each sentence, as in the example:

    1 His sister .................... that she can beat everyone in her age group.a plays tennis so well b is such a brilliant tennis player

    2 Track and field athletics .................... jogging.3 Learning English .................... learning to drive a car.4 On Saturday night .................... than stay at home studying.5 Shes a very good runner: she can run .................... .6 Fishing .................... energetic .................... swimming.7 Collecting antiques is .................... that I can think of.

    C Find the mistakes in these sentences, and correct them.1 It isnt true to say that London is as large than Tokyo.2 Hes no expert on cars: to him a Mercedes and a BMW are like.3 Her talk was most enjoyable and much more informative as we expected.4 Dont you think that the more something is difficult,

    the less it is enjoyable?5 Less people watched the last Olympics on TV than watched

    the soccer World Cup.6 Who is the less popular political leader of the world?7 My country is quite other than Britain.8 Shes such a faster runner as I cant keep up with her.

    These Grammar review sections will help you to revise the main problem areas of English grammar, giving you a chance to consolidate what youalready know and to discover what you still need to learn. The Advanced grammar sections will introduce you to more advanced structures.

    But they are no substitute for a good, comprehensive grammar reference book, to which you should refer for more detail and further examples.

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    1 D Compare and contrast the activities shown here. What are the similarities and differencesbetween them? Look at the example first.

    1 Riding a bike or riding a motorbike both require a good sense of balance. As far as safety isconcerned, neither cyclists nor motorcyclists are as safe as people in cars. A new bike costs muchless than a motorbike and riding one is good exercise. However, you can go much faster on amotorbike.

    Learning a musical instrument R E A D I N G1.3A Work in groups and discuss these questions:

    Do you know anyone who plays any of these instruments? Which of them would you like to be able to play? Give your reasons. What are the rewards of learning a musical instrument? Look at the title of the article opposite: what do you think its going to be about?

    Is it likely to be serious or humorous? Why?

    B Read the article opposite and note down your answers to these questions. Highlight therelevant information in the text.

    1 Nine instruments are mentioned: what are they?2 Three rewards of learning an instrument are mentioned: what are they?3 Four kinds of pain are mentioned: what are they?4 What is the difference between the two symptoms of Lipchitzs Dilemma?5 What reasons does the writer give for advising the reader NOT to take up eight of the nine

    instruments he mentions?6 Which of the instruments seems to have the fewest drawbacks?7 What happened at the end of the imaginary evening out with a drummer?

    Join a partner. Compare and discuss your answers to the questions.

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    C Highlight these words in the text the paragraph number is shown with .1 grudge 5 syndrome 6 maudlin 8 endeavour12 be misled physical co-ordination nuance14 unruffled equanimity 17 charisma

    Match their meanings to these words and phrases, using a dictionary if necessary:

    charm and magnetism condition control of ones movements dislike effortget the wrong idea perfect calmness self-pitying subtle variation

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    a/w 1.3 b:small photo

    of DavidStafford

    Tinkling the ivories,jangling the nerves

    DAVID STAFFORD

    EXCEPT perhaps for learning a foreign language andgetting your teeth properly sorted out once and for all,there is nothing more rewarding than learning amusical instrument. It provides a sense of accomplishment, acreative outlet and an absorbing pastime to while away thetedious hours between being born and dying. Musical AtHomes can be a fine way of entertaining friends, especiallyif you have a bitter grudge against them. Instrumental tuitionis widely available publicly, privately and by post.

    Before choosing an instrument to learn you should askyourself five questions. How much does it cost? How easy isit to play? How much does it weigh? Will playing it make mea more attractive human being? How muchdoes it hurt? All musical instruments, ifplayed properly, hurt.

    The least you can expect is low back painand shoulder strain, in some cases theremay also be bleeding and unsightlyswelling. Various relaxation methods suchas meditation can help.

    The most popular instrument forbeginners is the piano though I dont knowwhy this should be so. The piano isexpensive, its fiendishly difficult to play, itweighs a ton and it hasnt been sexy sinceLiszt died. If you sit at the keyboard in the approved positionfor more than a few minutes, the pain is such that you areliable to break down and betray the secrets of your closestfriends. The only good thing you can say about the piano isthat it provides you with a bit of extra shelf space around thehouse.

    Being difficult to