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“The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as best I could, but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge.” The Cask of Amontillado By Edgar Allan Poe A. Metaphor B. Foreshadowing C. Symbolism D. Theme

“One, two! One, two! and through and through

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“The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as best I could, but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge.” The Cask of Amontillado By Edgar Allan Poe Metaphor Foreshadowing Symbolism Theme. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Page 1: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as best I could, but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge.”

The Cask of AmontilladoBy Edgar Allan Poe

A. MetaphorB. ForeshadowingC. SymbolismD. Theme

Page 2: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as best I could, but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge.”

The Cask of AmontilladoBy Edgar Allan Poe

A. MetaphorB. ForeshadowingC. SymbolismD. Theme

Page 3: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“…the moon gazed on my midnight labours, while, with unrelaxed and breathless eagerness, I pursued nature to her hiding-places.”

FrankensteinBy Mary Shelley

A. PersonificationB. HyperboleC. OnomatopoeiaD. Allusion

Page 4: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“…the moon gazed on my midnight labours, while, with unrelaxed and breathless eagerness, I pursued nature to her hiding-places.”

FrankensteinBy Mary Shelley

A. PersonificationB. HyperboleC. OnomatopoeiaD. Allusion

Page 5: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“The greater part of the untested men appeared quiet and absorbed. They were going to look at the war, the red animal—the blood-swollen god.”

The Red Badge of CourageBy Stephen Crane

A. SimileB. SymbolC. MetaphorD. Understatement

Page 6: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“The greater part of the untested men appeared quiet and absorbed. They were going to look at the war, the red animal—the blood-swollen god.”

The Red Badge of CourageBy Stephen Crane

A. SimileB. SymbolC. MetaphorD. Understatement

Page 7: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“One, two! One, two! and throughand through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back.”

The JabberwockyBy Lewis Carroll

A. SettingB. Falling ActionC. ConnotationD. Onomatopoeia

Page 8: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“One, two! One, two! and throughand through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back.”

The JabberwockyBy Lewis Carroll

A. SettingB. Falling ActionC. ConnotationD. Onomatopoeia

Page 9: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping…”

The RavenBy Edgar Allan Poe

A. Figurative LanguageB. AlliterationC. ExpositionD. Hyperbole

Page 10: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping…”

The RavenBy Edgar Allan Poe

A. Figurative LanguageB. AlliterationC. ExpositionD. Hyperbole

Page 11: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“Let us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky, Like a patient etherized upon a table.”The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

By T.S. EliotA. ImageryB. AlliterationC. OxymoronD. Simile

Page 12: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“Let us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky, Like a patient etherized upon a table.”The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

By T.S. EliotA. ImageryB. AlliterationC. OxymoronD. Simile

Page 13: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“Here once the embattled farmers stoodAnd fired the shot heard round the world.”

The Concord HymnBy Ralph Waldo Emerson

A. HyperboleB. SettingC. SimileD. Foreshadowing

Page 14: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“Here once the embattled farmers stoodAnd fired the shot heard round the world.”

The Concord HymnBy Ralph Waldo Emerson

A. HyperboleB. SettingC. SimileD. Foreshadowing

Page 15: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“I celebrate myself and sing myself,And what I assume you shall assume,For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.”

Song of MyselfBy Walt Whitman

A. Figurative LanguageB. Free VerseC. ImageryD. Hyperbole

Page 16: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“I celebrate myself and sing myself,And what I assume you shall assume,For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.”

Song of MyselfBy Walt Whitman

A. Figurative LanguageB. Free VerseC. ImageryD. Hyperbole

Page 17: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate!O heavy lightness, serious vanity;Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!”

Romeo and JulietWilliam Shakespeare

A. MetaphorB. OxymoronC. SymbolismD. Alliteration

Page 18: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate!O heavy lightness, serious vanity;Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!”

Romeo and JulietWilliam Shakespeare

A. MetaphorB. OxymoronC. SymbolismD. Alliteration

Page 19: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“I have to have this operation. It isn’t very serious. I have this tiny little tumor on the brain.”

The Catcher in the RyeBy J.D. Salinger

A. Figurative LanguageB. SymbolismC. UnderstatementD. Connotation

Page 20: “One, two! One, two! and  through and through

“I have to have this operation. It isn’t very serious. I have this tiny little tumor on the brain.”

The Catcher in the RyeBy J.D. Salinger

A. Figurative LanguageB. SymbolismC. UnderstatementD. Connotation