Revision Strategies, Spring 2015

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<ul><li><p>Writing Resources Center 1</p><p>Revision Strategies</p><p>Writing Resources Center</p><p>wrc.uncc.edu</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 2</p><p>Writing Resources Center (WRC)Locations:</p><p>125 CameronT1 Atkins Library (by Peets)Center for Graduate Life (CGL)</p><p>Phone:</p><p>704-687-1899</p><p>E-mail:</p><p>wrchelp@uncc.edu</p><p>Web:wrc.uncc.edu</p><p>Appointments:writing.uncc.edu/writing-resources-</p><p>center/schedule-appointment</p><p>2</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 3</p><p>Workshop Objectives</p><p> Become familiar with Reasons for revision Discover resources for help with revision Practice revision</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 4</p><p>What Is Revision?</p><p>Revision is: A stage in the writing process that is done before </p><p>proofreading and editing The careful examination of a paper for unity, coherence </p><p>and adequate developmentRevision is not:</p><p> Editing, proofreading or just changing errors</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 5</p><p>Why Revise?</p><p>Revision allows you to re-see your piece of writing in order to: Fulfill your purpose Review your focus Address your audience Generate additional ideas and information Omit what is not necessary</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 6</p><p>Tips For Revision</p><p> Give yourself plenty of time to revise; set a special amount of time aside just for revision</p><p> Stay flexible with your writing; be ready to change anything at any time</p><p> Read the paper out loud and listen to it; read it into a tape recorder or to a friend</p><p> Read through your paper focusing on one thing at a time: Read for content Read for organization Read for expressions</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 7</p><p>Reading for Content</p><p> Do you have a clear thesis that accurately presents your focus?</p><p> Are your points appropriate for your audience and purpose?</p><p> Does your conclusion wrap up all your points effectively?</p><p>Information taken from Barbara Fine Clouses A Troubleshooting Guide for Writers</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 8</p><p>Reading for Organization</p><p> Do your ideas follow logically from one to the next?</p><p> Do your paragraphs follow logically from one to the next?</p><p> Do you transition smoothly between paragraphs relating your ideas to each other?</p><p>Information taken from Barbara Fine Clouses A Troubleshooting Guide for Writers</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 9</p><p>Reading for Expression</p><p> Do you overuse any particular words? Have you avoided wordiness? Have you eliminated clichs? Do you vary your sentence structure?</p><p>Information taken from Barbara Fine Clouses A Troubleshooting Guide for Writers</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 10</p><p>Tips For Revision Questions to ask while revising</p><p> Have I met the requirements of the assignments? Did I focus on what I intended? Have I achieved my purpose? Have I written the paper so that audience and understands my </p><p>purpose? What is the main idea? Have I answered important questions about the main idea? Have I explored the subject fully?</p></li><li><p>Writing Resources Center 11</p><p>Revision Practice</p><p>Choose one of the following options, and try it out with your paper. Write 2 new introductions Write 2 new conclusions Put your draft aside, and quickly write down </p><p>all the points you want to make In a paragraph, describe how your paper </p><p>engages with the assignment topic</p></li></ul>

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