Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

  • Published on
    23-Nov-2015

  • View
    88

  • Download
    2

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    A Survival Guide For Primary School

    Relief Teachers

    By Kari Finsen Dip. Ed. B. Ed. M.Ed.

    www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au kari@survivalguideforteachers.com

    0411 053 514

    This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for purposes of reproduction.

    Copyright Kari Finsen 2012

    Copyright Information

  • Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Contents

    What to take with you on your Relief Teaching Day ................................................................................ 1

    Tips for having a successful Relief Teaching Day ....................................................................................... 3

    Getting to Know You Activities for Relief Teachers ................................................................................... 6

    Behaviour Management Strategies for Relief Teachers ........................................................................... 8

    Attention Grabbers ................................................................................................................................ 8

    Positive Reinforcements ...................................................................................................................... 10

    Discipline Plans & Strategies ................................................................................................................ 12

    Tips for having success with Behaviour Management ........................................................................ 14

    No Equipment Games for Primary School Teachers ............................................................................... 17

    Popular games for Years Prep 4 ........................................................................................................ 23

  • A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    Page 1

    What to take with you on your Relief Teaching Day

    The following is a list of things you need to have in your bag:

    Your lunch & water bottle A hat & whistle for playgroup duty & sport An insulated mug with lid and your favourite tea bag or spoonful

    of coffee A diary or note pad for writing down dates for other supply

    days, keeping a log of your hours or notes on children A pencil case which should contain - pens, pencils, eraser, sharpener,

    highlighters, colouring pencils, felt pens, scissors, blu-tack, stapler & white board pens & eraser

    A dictionary or download a dictionary app onto your smart phone The Pocket Basics for Maths and Language booklet a compact spiral book

    which lists all the numeracy and literacy rules and definitions ( may be able to get this in an App for your phone these days)

    Reward items stamps, stickers, raffle tickets, small jar of marbles, and or a prize box

    Kitchen timer or stopwatch (can use your phone) to use with games or setting time for work to be finished

    A joke book & poetry book are always fun to have Dice & a pack of cards to play games with. Have a look online or in Educational

    resource stores for fun activities using dice and cards, there are plenty around. A roll of sticky labels to write childrens names on and place on the corner of

    their desk

  • A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    Page 2

    A collection of childrens reading books go to your local library and select some books which are fun to base a language lesson around. Picture books are great because you can do so much with the pictures for writing and art ideas. Just make sure the books you choose are appropriate for your school. Some popular authors are:

    Terry Jones Middle/Senior school Mem Fox Junior school Pamela Allen Junior school Paul Jennings Middle/Senior school Lynley Dodd - Junior school Roald Dahl Middle/Senior school

    A folder of activities which should include: five minute filler activities getting to know you activities fast finishers activities fun pictures for writing activities word puzzles, crosswords, and dot to dot puzzles physical activity games which require no equipment

    You can look online for puzzles or the easiest thing to do is buy a big book of puzzles from your local newsagency or supermarket. They usually have a selection of puzzles for all ages. Also have a look at their educational resource books. You can buy books that cover all the curriculum areas in one book for each grade level. This allows you to get an understanding of what each year level is covering.

  • A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    Page 3

    Tips for having a successful Relief Teaching Day

    Get to school early and be prepared. Having an understanding of what you need to do for the day is vital for having a successful day.

    If your relief day is pre-arranged make time to go and meet with the teacher to discuss class routines and planning.

    Take your Relief Bag packed full of resources that are interesting and challenging just in case there is no planning left for you.

    Conduct yourself in a professional and confident manner. You may have to explain to the class that things are going to be run a little differently today.

    Walk into the school happy and positive and dressed appropriately. You are likely to get more work if you show you enjoy being there.

    When you arrive report to the schools Administration Office and introduce yourself. The school may give you a Relief Teachers Resource folder which should contain information on: the school behaviour management policy, lock down procedures, evacuation plans, students listed on medical alert, intercom phone numbers, playground duty rosters, a timetable for specialist lessons, a list of staff names, a map of the school and any other important information relevant to that school. If no such folder exists, ask for this information as it is very important. You may need to sign in and sign for a room key, and you will be given a badge to show you have been approved to be on school grounds.

  • A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    Page 4

    Ask your Administration staff if you have any specialist lessons for that day and where these lessons will be conducted. Also ask if youre required for a playground duty & where that may be in relation to your classroom. PLEASE NOTE - expect to have a playground duty every day you teach relief and if you don't, ask for one. It is such a lovely surprise for a teacher to have one less duty for the week. It also makes a great impression!

    Find out where the toilets are and the teachers staffroom so you can put your lunch in the fridge and read any notices that may be displayed in the staffroom.

    Stand at your classroom door when the first bell rings and greet your children as they walk in.

    Introduce yourself to your class and tell them a little about yourself before asking questions about them.

    Learn childrens names quickly. Start the day with some Getting to Know You Activities. It makes behaviour management a lot easier when you can address a student by their name.

    Have your behaviour management plan clear and ready to explain. Remember to think about both positive rewards and negative consequences. Most classrooms will have their rules and behavioural procedures on the wall for you to follow or if you are going to follow your own, have it printed out, laminated and place it on the whiteboard so it can be clearly seen and is easy to refer to.

    Identify children who can help you out when you need it. Difficult children in the class enjoy taking on responsible roles.

    Follow the teachers planning if it has been left for you. There may be important tasks that need to be done for that day. Most teachers find it rude if they have gone to the trouble to leave set tasks and they are not completed.

  • A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    Page 5

    Mark childrens work. All work that you set for the children should be marked

    by you. Dont leave it for the teacher you are replacing.

    The class teacher aide is a great source of information. Take the time to speak with them and ask about how best to handle the class.

    Introduce yourself to the teacher next door. They can be a great help when wanting some help with routines or behaviour management.

    Any issues that happen during the day should be resolved before you leave. If it was a serious issue, it needs to be discussed with the Principal or deputy Principal.

    Leave the classroom neat and tidy at the end of the day. Teachers love coming back to a tidy classroom and it makes a great impression.

    Leave a note at the end of the day for the teacher. Inform the teacher of what you did that day and let them know if there were any incidences with certain children.

    Make a point of thanking either the Principal or administration staff for your day. This makes a great impression and it may just get you more work.

    Enjoy your day!

  • A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    Page 6

    Getting to Know You Activities for Relief Teachers

    Here are 8 of my favourite activities

    1. Name tags (all grades) Give the children a strip of cardboard with or without their name on it and ask them to decorate it with drawings that represent themselves. When they are finished, blu tack them to the front of their desk so you can clearly see them. You can have a competition for the best designed name tag.

    2. Sticky labels (all grades) If you dont want to spend a lot of time on Getting To Know You Activities, write the students names on a sticky label and place them at the top corner of each desk. Remove them at the end of the day.

    3. Name game (all grades) Ask a student at the very back of the classroom to

    introduce themselves and tell you something that begins with the same letter as their name e.g. My name is Peter and I like Pumpkins. Move on to the student next to Peter but before they introduce themselves they have to repeat what Peter said e.g. Peter likes Pumpkins and my name is Toby and I like toffee. The third child along the row then has to say Peter likes pumpkins, Toby likes toffee and my name is Aaron and I like apples. You continue until every child has participated. An excellent listening and memory game.

    4. Who am I (all grades) Not only do you get to know your students but they also learn a little about you. Sit the students in a circle and introduce yourself by using a personal box. The box should contain items that represent you. This may include things such as, a favourite CD, a picture of your family or pet, your favourite book, or something that may represent your favourite sport or hobby. Discuss these items with your class and encourage them to share their name and 3 things about themselves.

  • A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    Page 7

    5. Skipping rope (middle/senior) Senior students love this and are only too happy to go and locate a large skipping rope for you. Take the class outside and ask one student to take the other end of the rope while the rest of the class lines up behind you. The students run in one at a time, skip while introducing themselves and saying something they like doing, then run out e.g. , Hi my name is Jessica and I love to dance. Continue through the whole class. A variation is to nominate how many jumps they have to do before running out and each time they jump they say their name.

    6. Seating plan (all grades) Draw the desk arrangement on a sheet of paper. Walk over to each child, shake their hand and introduce yourself. When they reply with their name write it on your seating plan. Place it at the front of the classroom or blu tack it to your ipad and walk around with it.

    7. True or False (middle/senior) Write 4 things on the board about yourself.

    Three of them are true and one is false. Ask the class to decide which statement is false. Now it is the students turn. They write on a piece of paper 4 things about themselves. Three are true and one is false. You and the class then have to decide which things are true and which one is false.

    8. Alphabet flashcards (junior/middle) Shuffle a pack of alphabet flashcards. Randomly take one card out and hold it up. Ask all the children whose names start with that letter to stand up and introduce themselves one at a time to you. You can also blu tack the letter onto the whiteboard and ask the children to come and write their name beside it. Reshuffle the pack and pull out the next card until you have gone through all the cards. If you dont have cards you can write each letter on the board and the children write their names underneath it.

  • A Survival Guide for Primary School Relief Teachers

    Finsen Educational Resources 2012 www.primaryschoolteachersurvival.com.au

    Page 8

    Behaviour Management Strategies for Relief Teachers

    Attention Grabbers

    Being able to gain the students attention quickly and effectively is very important when faced with a new class. Here is a list of the most popular attention grabbers used in todays classrooms:

    Rhythm clapping Clap a pattern with your hands and the students have to repeat the pattern. Keep giving a clapping pattern until you have their attention.

    Hands up Raise one of your hands in the air without saying anything. The children who are focussed on you should copy what you are doing. It is important that children do this action without any speaking. When all the children in the class are sitting quietly with their hand up you can begin to speak. Another variation to this is raise one hand and put a finger up to your mouth to represent Shhhh.

    Silence Sit or stand in silence at the front of the class and wait for them to be quiet. This technique is more effective when you put an action with it e.g. look at your watch, start putting tally marks on the board, or start a stopwatch. Explain to the children that you are keeping a record of how long you have to wait for them and that they will have to work hard to get the time off the board before lunch.

    Simon says Quietly start saying If you are listening touch your head, If you are listening fold your arms, If you are listening touch your nose. Keep a record of how many instructions were giv...