The Erosion- Deposition Process Water and Wind Mass ...fa-ball. 3 Mass Wasting and Glaciers Chapter Wrap-Up. ... wind, glaciers, ... •Mass wasting is the downhill movement of

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  • Chapter Introduction

    Lesson 1 The Erosion-DepositionProcess

    Lesson 2 Landforms Shaped by Water and Wind

    Lesson 3 Mass Wasting and Glaciers

    Chapter Wrap-Up

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  • How do erosion and deposition shape Earths surface?

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  • What do you think?

    Before you begin, decide if you agree or disagree with each of these statements. As you view this presentation, see if you change your mind about any of the statements.

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  • 1. Wind, water, ice, and gravity continually shape Earths surface.

    2. Pieces of sediment in different sizes tend to mix when being moved along by water.

    3. A beach is a landform that does not change over time.

    Do you agree or disagree?

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  • 4. Windblown sediment can cut and polish exposed rock surfaces.

    5. Landslides are a natural process that cannot be influenced by human activities.

    6. A glacier leaves behind very smooth land as it moves through an area.

    Do you agree or disagree?

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  • Lesson 1 Reading Guide - KC

    How can erosion shape and sort sediment?

    How are erosion and deposition related?

    What features suggest whether erosion or deposition created a landform?

    The Erosion-Deposition Process

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  • Lesson 1 Reading Guide - Vocab

    erosion

    deposition

    The Erosion-Deposition Process

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  • Lesson 1-1

    A combination of constructive processes and destructive processes produce landforms.

    Constructive processes build up features on Earths surface.

    Destructive processes tear down features on Earths surface.

    Reshaping Earths Surface

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  • Lesson 1-2

    The breakdown of rockweatheringis one type of destructive process that changes Earths surface.

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  • Lesson 1-2

    Chemical weathering alters the chemical composition of rock.

    Physical weathering is the breaking of rock into pieces, called sediment, without changing the chemical composition of the rock.

    Water, wind, and ice are agents, or causes, of weathering.

    A Continual Process of Change

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  • Lesson 1-2

    A Continual Process of Change (cont.)

    The mineral composition of some rocks makes them less resistant than others are to weathering.

    The difference in the rate of weathering can produce unusual landforms.

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  • Lesson 1-2

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  • Lesson 1-2

    Erosion

    Erosion is the removal of weathered material from one location to another.

    Agents of erosion include water, wind, glaciers, and gravity.

    Factors that affect the rate of erosion include weather, climate, shape of the land, and type of rock.

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  • Lesson 1-2

    Erosion (cont.)

    The presence of plants and the way humans use the land affect the rate of erosion.

    The rate of erosion sometimes depends on the type of rock.

    Weathering breaks some types of rock into large pieces. Other rock types easily break into smaller pieces that are more easily transported.

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  • Lesson 1-2

    As rock fragments bump against each other during erosion, the shapes of the fragments can change.

    How can erosion affect the shape of sediment?

    Erosion (cont.)

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  • Lesson 1-2

    Erosion also affects the level of sortingseparating of items into groups according to one or more propertiesof sediment.

    Sediment is often well-sorted when it has been moved a lot by wind or waves.

    Erosion (cont.)

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  • Lesson 1-2

    Poorly sorted sediment often results from rapid transportation, perhaps by a storm, a flash flood, or a volcanic eruption.

    How can erosion sort sediment?

    Erosion (cont.)

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  • Lesson 1-2

    Deposition is the laying down or settling of eroded material.

    deposition

    from French deposer, means put down

    Deposition

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  • Lesson 1-2

    Deposition (cont.)

    As water or wind slows down, it has less energy and can hold less sediment, which can result in some of the sediment being deposited.

    Sediment is deposited in locations called depositional environments, such as swamps, deltas, beaches, and the ocean floor.

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  • Lesson 1-2

    High-energy environments, like rushing rivers and ocean shores with large waves, are those in which sediment is transported and deposited quickly.

    Small grains of sediment are often deposited in low-energy environments, like deep lakes, areas of slow-moving air, and swamps.

    Sediment deposited in water typically forms layers called beds.

    Deposition (cont.)

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  • Lesson 1-2

    Deposition (cont.)

    How are erosion and deposition related?

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  • Lesson 1-3

    Landforms can have features that are clearly produced by erosion.

    Different rates of erosion can create unusual landforms like tall, protruding landforms called hoodoos.

    Glacial erosion can produce ice-carved features in mountains.

    Interpreting Landforms

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  • Lesson 1-3

    Landforms created by deposition are often flat and low-lying.

    An apron of sediment, called an alluvial fan, often forms where a stream flows from a steep, narrow canyon onto a flat plain at the foot of a mountain.

    Interpreting Landforms (cont.)

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  • Lesson 1-3

    Interpreting Landforms (cont.)

    What features suggest whether erosion or deposition created a landform?

    Deposition along a riverbed occurs where the speed of the water slows down and can result in a sandbar.

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  • Lesson 1 - VS

    Erosion occurring at different rates can carve rock into interesting landforms.

    Rock fragments with rough edges are rounded during transportation.

    Landforms created by deposition are often flat and low-lying.

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  • Lesson 1 LR1

    A. chemical weathering

    B. physical weathering

    C. deposition

    D. erosion

    Which of these refers to the breaking of rocks into sediment without changing the chemical composition of the rock?

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  • Lesson 1 LR2

    A. swamp

    B. rushing river

    C. ocean shore with large waves

    D. none of the above

    Which is an example of a low-energy environment?

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  • Lesson 1 LR3

    A. erosion

    B. sediment

    C. weathering

    D. deposition

    Which term refers to the laying down or settling of eroded material?

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  • Lesson 1 - Now

    1. Wind, water, ice, and gravity

    continually shape Earths surface.

    2. Pieces of sediment in different sizes

    tend to mix when being moved along

    by water.

    Do you agree or disagree?

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  • Lesson 2 Reading Guide - KC

    What are the stages of stream development?

    How do water erosion and deposition change Earths surface?

    How do wind erosion and deposition change Earths surface?

    Landforms Shaped by Water and Wind

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  • Lesson 2 Reading Guide - Vocab

    meander

    longshore current

    delta

    Landforms Shaped by Water and Wind

    abrasion

    dune

    loess

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  • Lesson 2-1

    Water and wind are two important agents of weathering, erosion, and deposition.

    Erosion by water and wind can change the shape of landforms.

    Shaping the Land with Water and

    Wind

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  • Lesson 2-2

    Streams are active systems that erode land and transport sediment.

    The erosion produced by a stream depends on the streams energy. This energy is usually greatest in steep, mountainous areas where young streams flow rapidly downhill.