THE PAN-AMERICAN ARBITRATION TREATY

  • Published on
    10-Jan-2017

  • View
    213

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • World Affairs Institute

    THE PAN-AMERICAN ARBITRATION TREATYSource: The American Advocate of Peace and Arbitration, Vol. 52, No. 3 (MAY, 1890), p. 86Published by: World Affairs InstituteStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27898092 .Accessed: 14/05/2014 23:17

    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

    .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.

    .

    World Affairs Institute and Heldref Publications are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extendaccess to The American Advocate of Peace and Arbitration.

    http://www.jstor.org

    This content downloaded from 194.29.185.139 on Wed, 14 May 2014 23:17:21 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

    http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=waihttp://www.jstor.org/stable/27898092?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

  • 86 THE AMERICAN ADVOCATE OF PEACE AND ARBITRATION.

    THE ADVOCATE OF PEACE.

    ?John G. Whittier, speaking of his correspondence with Messrs. Blaine and Coolidge of the Pan-American Congress, writes: "They seem disposed to do all that is possible for the cause of Peace." We hear that he wrote Secretary Blaine that if he would secure peace for the American Continent by a general system of arbitration it would be a greater honor than to be President of the United States.

    UNIVERSAL PEACE CONGRESS, 1890.

    The following circular letter has been addressed to officers of societies throughout the ivorld icho are specially inter ested in the cause of Peace.

    47 New Broad Street, London, E.G., April, 1890.

    Dear Sir?We have the pleasure to inform you that a General and an Executive Committee have been consti

    tuted in order to make arrangements for the Second Annual Peace Congress, to be held, as decided by the Congress in Paris last June, in London in July next, from the 14th to the 19th inclusive. The meetings will be held at the Westminster Town Hall, London, W.

    It is desirable that the General Committee should comprise among its Vice-Presidents well known and dis tinguished friends of international concord belonging to different nationalities. We shall, therefore, be particu

    larly obliged if you will indicate the names of any rep resenting your country who might fitly be nominated, and we shall be glad to have this information at your earliest convenience.

    Being anxious to facilitate the attendance of a large number of guests from foreign countries, we shall en

    deavor to secure for many of our visitors, if not all$ a

    home with some of our London friends during the week of the Congress.

    A fund will be raised to meet the expense attending the organization of the Congress and the arrangements for the convenience of visitors?English and Foreign. We hope that your Society will be largely represented

    at the Congress, and that in due course we shall receive from you an intimation of the number of members of your Society, both ladies and gentlemen, whom we shall have the pleasure of seeing, together with their names and addresses.

    We shall be happy to afford any information you may desire, and to receive any suggestions which your Com mittee may offer in connection with the Congress

    It has been considered advisable to draw up a pro gramme of the subjects to be discussed at the Congress, copies of which are sent herewith, and we shall feel obliged by your making its contents known as widely as

    possible. You will observe that our Committee have excluded

    from this list of subjects every question of international politics which involves pending controversies. We have thought this course necessary in order to secure calm deliberation and to avoid debates which might wound national susceptibilities. We hope that competent members of your Society may

    be induced to furnish carefully prepared writt* n com munications on any of the subjects specified in the pro- ]

    gramme. It will be readily understood that as such papers will require careful selection and classification, it will be desirable that they should be forwarded as early

    5 as possible for the consideration of the Committee. Such L communications will be received up to the 14th June. , Meanwhile we shall be glad if you will kindly bring the , matter before }rour members, and invite their co-operation. , Each communication should be accompanied, if prac ticable, by a, precis of its contents. We are, Dear Sir, very faithfully yours,

    HODGSON PRATT, Chairman of Executive Committee.

    W. Evans Darby, ) 0 . .

    J. Fred. Green, '

    \ Secretaries.

    j

    THE LONDON CONGRESS. The

    " following letter has been issued to some persons

    known to be specially interested in Peace and Arbitration measures :

    No. 1 Somerset Street, Boston, Mass., May 1, 1890.

    Dear Sir?The American Peace Society has received the programme (page 87) of a Universal Peace Congress to be held as indicated therein.

    The Executive Committee wish to respond to the invi tation accompanying this promptly and cordially. They will feel obliged to you if you will suggest the name of any known friend and advocate of Peace, who may be willing to represent this Society at the Congress, and, if practicable, prepare and submit a paper on some one of the topics suggested in the enclosed programme. Will you be able to attend if chosen delegate? Our London friends kindly offer their hospitalities during the session of the Congress, July 14-19. Our Society will not be able to pay travelling expenses. The election of delegates will take place at the annual meeting of the Society at Pilgrim Hall, Boston, Tuesday, May 27, at 2.30 p. m.

    R. B. Howard, Secretary.

    THE PAN- AMERICAN ARBITRATION TREATY. The representatives of nine nations have already (May

    1) signed theArbitration Treaty, which was one of the most important fruits of the All-America Conference, and the signatures of three more are promised. The only difficulty liable to be experienced is with Chili and the Argentine Republic. But even these two countries can hardly hold out when arbitration has been formally ac cepted as the governing policy by all the remaining inde pendent Powers of the continent. The treaty, when approved by the representatives of the contracting States, will go to the several Governments for ratification. The New York Tribune says : "The United States and Brazil, having taken the initiative, can impart a powerful impulse to the international movement by prompt and decisive action in ratifying the treaty.

    * * * The two chief Republics of the New World ought to be among the first to unite in sanctioning the scheme of compulsory arbitra tion."

    Our lives should be as pure as snowfields, where our footsteps leave a mark but not a stain.?Anon.

    This content downloaded from 194.29.185.139 on Wed, 14 May 2014 23:17:21 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

    http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

    Article Contentsp. 86

    Issue Table of ContentsThe American Advocate of Peace and Arbitration, Vol. 52, No. 3 (MAY, 1890), pp. 69-92Front MatterTHE ATTITUDE OF THE UNITED STATES [pp. 71-71]CLOSE OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE [pp. 71-72]GOOD NEWS FROM WASHINGTON [pp. 72-72]INTERNATIONAL LAW [pp. 73-73]A REQUEST TO THE PRESIDENT. THE POSITION OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS [pp. 73-73]THE POPE ON SOCIAL REFORM AND DISARMAMENT [pp. 73-73]MEMORIAL DAY [pp. 74-74]DIARY OF THE SECRETARY [pp. 74-77]EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE [pp. 77-78]A WAR SONGAMENDED [pp. 78-78]THE ANNUAL MEETING [pp. 79-79]THE COMING LONDON CONGRESS [pp. 79-79]GONE UP HIGHER [pp. 80-80]THE NATIONAL REFORM CONFERENCE [pp. 80-80]PROVOKING A CHINESE WAR [pp. 80-80]AT BERLIN [pp. 80-80]TO A SISTER REPUBLIC [pp. 80-80]EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING [pp. 80-80]REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE AT WASHINGTON [pp. 80-81]COMMERCE, AGRICULTURE AND WARSHIPS [pp. 81-81]GERMANY AND FRANCE [pp. 81-81]AN INQUIRY UPON THE WAR SUBJECT [pp. 81-81]THE FORTUNE BAY TROUBLE [pp. 81-81]THE EUROPEAN WAR CLOUD [pp. 82-82]ANNUAL MEETING OF THE RHODE ISLAND RADICAL PEACE SOCIETY. The Emperor of Germany addressed [pp. 82-82]THE FIRST PARISH CHURCH. Founded A. D. 1632 [pp. 83-83]FRENCH COUNCILS OF ARBITRATION [pp. 83-83]BARBARISM IN CHURCH [pp. 83-83]THE GOSPEL AND WAR [pp. 84-84]SAVING LIFE.THE FRANCIS MEDAL [pp. 84-84]PEACE [pp. 85-85]THE LOMBARDY UNION FOR INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION AND PEACE [pp. 85-85]OPPOSED TO GREAT ARMANENTS. PETITION TO CONGRESS [pp. 85-85]UNIVERSAL PEACE CONGRESS, 1890 [pp. 86-86]THE LONDON CONGRESS [pp. 86-86]THE PAN-AMERICAN ARBITRATION TREATY [pp. 86-86]UNIVERSAL PEACE CONGRESS. PROGRAMME FOR THE UNIVERSAL PEACE CONGRESS, TO BE HELD AT THE WESTMINSTER TOWN HALL, LONDON W., JULY 14th to 19th, 1890 [pp. 87-88]ANGLO-AMERICAN CORRESPONDENCE [pp. 88-88]WELL DONE, MR. BLAINE [pp. 88-88]HON. ROBERT C. WINTHROP [pp. 89-89]Back Matter

Recommended

View more >