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  • SIP Tutorial Presenters: Stephen Kingham Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.auAndProf Dr Quincy Wu (aka Aaron Solomon)solomon@ipv6.club.tw

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • VoIP BasicsPresenters: Stephen Kingham Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.Copyright Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au 2006

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • OutlineIntroductionWhat is VoIPRound table introductions10:30 Morning tea11:00 SIP Protocol, some demonstrations12:30 Lunch, 90 minutes14:00 SIP Protocol15:30 Afternoon Tea16:00 Some case studies and questions17:30 or earlier FINISH

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • Other relevant talks at APAN Tokyo 2006Monday 23 JanSIP User Agents Configuration and Fault FindingSpeaker: Quincy Wu SER Configuration and SIP Peering including ENUMSpeaker: Stephen Kingham From Taiwan SIP Mobility in IPV4/IPV6 NetworkSpeaker: Using Radius and LDAP with SER SIP Proxy for user Authentication Speaker: Nimal Ratnayake 9:30 Wednesday 25 JanGlobal SIP Dialling Plans (Ben Teitelbaum and Dennis Barron)16:00 Wednesday 25 JanAPAN SIP-H.323 Working Group BoF

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • What is IP Telephony, VoIP and VIDEO?

    Presenter: Stephen KinghamStephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • OutlineRealise there is a difference between:VoIPIP Telephones PABXIP Telephones roamingVideo

    In terms ofDesignSupportView to the userBusiness Case

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • VoIP StandardsIn 1995 we got the standard H.323. This is a Video Standard from the Carrier world and is based on ISDN.In June 2002 we got SIP from the Internet Standards body (IETF). It uses all the other Internet standards. Is Video, Presence, and Instant Messaging, plus more. Is extreamly simple (read scary with potential).And we have some proprietary protocols/technology (read painful).Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • Telephones BEFORE the 2000sBasic Telephone service

    PABXs generally provided by Carriers, usually on Carrier recommended PABX equipment.

    In Universities it was provided by the Buildings and Grounds departments in Universities.

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • Telephones in the 80s - deregulationStill Basic Telephone serviceShared structured cabling between LAN and Telephones

    Generally still provided by Carriers. Some private networks using TDM and some tie-lines and voice compression.More choice of PABX platform.

    (Tele)Communications Section created by bringing the Voice and Data Communications together as separate Sections under one management group.

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • Telephones in 2000-2004 H.323 and VoIPStill Basic Telephone serviceBut VoIP used to link PABXs together, and some VIDEO conferencing.

    Replaced TDM based.Huge improvement in reliability.

    VoIP needs WAN Section to work with Voice Section.VoIP is NOT IP Telephony

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.auA common thread for all successful VoIP and IP Telephony is the Voice expertise. The same can be said for the Video.

  • VoIP is like the Wide Area NetworkTechnically VoIP contains theRouteingServers, such as Voice Mail, IVR etcBillingQoS on WANSupport involves supporting Level 2/3 and Carrier connections (not Users!)Business case is around Toll By PassSupporting IP Telephones and or Video

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • VoIPStephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    PABX

    SIP Serveror H.323 GatekeeperTranslate telephone numbers to IP addresses

    Otheradvanced IP network

    SIP & H323 Voice GATEWAY

    AARNetInternet withQoS bandwidth

    SIP & H323 Voice GATEWAY

    PABX

    PSTNCarrier

    Voice GATEWAY

  • 2000-2004 here comes H.323 and Proprietary protocols for IP TelephonesProprietary IP Telephones deployments:H.323 too hard (although Avaya did it).whole University Campuses (some of the largest Universities in Australia).Some hybrids (IP Telephones with PABX left) and some entirely IP Telephony.IP Telephony based on top of solid VoIP network.Long term better investment and large reductions in adds moves and changes

    VoIP needs WAN Section to work with Voice Section.IP Telephony needs LAN Section to work with Voice SectionThere is a difference between VoIP and IP Telephony

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.auA common thread for all successful VoIP and IP Telephony is the Voice expertise. The same can be said for the Video.

  • IP Telephones are like LOCAL Area NetworkTechnically it contains thePABX replacementSecurityIP PhonesPower to IP TelephonesBillingQoS on LANAccess to emergency servicesSupport involves supporting UsersBusiness case is around PABX ReplacementReduce Costs for Adds Moves and ChangesImproved productivity and integration

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • IP PhoneStephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Drag the side handles to change the width of the text block.

    SIP UA (IP Telephone)

    PABX

    SIP Serveror H.323 GatekeeperTranslate telephone numbers to IP addresses

    SIP & H323 Voice GATEWAY

    AARNetInternet withQoS bandwidth

  • PABX IP Telephones : Emergency ServicesMake sure calls to Emergency Services (eg 119 in Japan, 911 in USA, 000 in Australia, etc) go to the VoIP Gateway that is at the same site as the IP Telephone.Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Call Manager Server

    Site A

    PSTNCarrier

    Voice GATEWAY

    PSTNCarrier

    Voice GATEWAY

    Site B

    Important question to ask your IP Phone vendor in a multiple site environment:When I dial Emergency Services in one site which PSTN Gateway does the call go out.Now I dial the same Emergency Services number at another site which Gateway?How hard is it to make the Emergency Services call go out the local PSTN Gateway 1st.

    New generation PBX programming is done using exception routing, some look more like programmes in perl or C.

    So a routing entry might look like thisIF call from phone with IP Address 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0 AND calling Emergency Services THEN send call to Gateway A first, Gateway B secondIF call from phone with IP Address 10.10.1.0/255.255.255.0 AND calling Emergency Services THEN send call to Gateway B first then Gateway AIF call to Emergency Services (The default) THEN send call to Gateway B first then Gateway A

  • Telephones in 2005+ The impact of SIP and 3rd party Carriers - The revolution begins!Explosion of SIP UAs and PABXs into the market.Many 3rd party providers of sip: accounts.Some proprietary solutions (eg Skype) plus some who lock customer in using SIP (eg MSN and Yahoo) sometimes called islands.All the IP Phone and traditional PABX vendors are moving to SIP.SIP based PBXs with exceptional capabilities and features, at a fraction of traditional TDM switches.Control given back to the user.

    Introduction of the Unix System Administrator (and programmer) skills into the Voice Section.

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.auA common thread for all successful VoIP and IP Telephony is the Voice expertise. The same can be said for the Video.

  • So in summary we have described three characteristics:VoIPWAN, Gateways, QoS, MCUs, Toll Bypass, different support processes.IP TelephonesLAN, PABX stuff, Emergency Services, built on VoIP, different Business Case to VoIP, different support processes.Roaming IP TelephoneA different type of IP Telephone!Issues to be determined.

    And lets not forget that V stands for Video, Instant Messaging and Presence as well as Voice, plus who knows what elseStephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.auA common thread for all successful VoIP and IP Telephony is the Voice expertise. The same can be said for the Video.

  • Affordable SIP products (NOT H.323)Basic SIP IP phones below US$75802.11 phones (need certificate support)Video phonesSpeakerphonesPDAs with SIP softwareMAC, Unix, and MSoft.

    Combination of Stephen Kingham and Quincy Wus talk, www.apan.net Cairns 2004

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • Also SIP ClientsPDAs with SIP softwareMAC, Unix, and MSoft.

    Combination of Stephen Kingham and Quincy Wus talk, www.apan.net Cairns 2004Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • SIP based PABXs (The SIP Server)SIP is so easy to develop in.Many quality Open Source SIP PABXs. Some of the VoIP Carriers use these Open Source Products!They include Call Routing, Forwarding, IVR, and Voice Mail.All the PABX Vendors are moving to SIP based technology.All the Carriers are deploying their VoIP and IP Telephone Services using SIP Technology.With SIP it is easy to mix and match products.SIP is really easy to support.

    Stephen Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

    Stephen.Kingham@aarnet.edu.au

  • Here is a possible view of the future (today commercial product) a full Voicemail System in 20 lines of Perl (Slipper