Hospice 101 Phases Of Grief Nov 3 2006

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Text of Hospice 101 Phases Of Grief Nov 3 2006

  • 1. HOSPICE 101 Midwest Palliative & Hospice CareCenter 2050 Claire Ct., Glenview, IL 60025 847-467-7423

2. Presenters

  • Midwest Palliative & Hospice CareCenter
  • Families with Children Counselors

3. What is Hospice?

  • A special way of caring for people with life limiting illness.

4. GOALS OF HOSPICE

  • Comfort and quality of lifeas defined by the patient.
  • Support for the family as the primary unit of care.

5. WHERE ARE PATIENTS CARED FOR ?

  • At home
  • Independent or Assisted Living facility
  • Long Term Care or Skilled Care Facility
  • Hospital
  • Hospice Inpatient Unit

6. ELIGIBILITY

  • Patients who desire to end curative phase of treatment
  • Patients who want to be kept as physically, emotionally and spiritually comfortable as possible.
  • Patients whose doctors certify that they have a prognosis of 6 months or less

7. THE HOSPICE TEAM

  • Patient
  • Patients family
  • Primary physician
  • Hospice physician
  • Nurses
  • Chaplains
  • Social workers
  • Nursing Assistants
  • Volunteer
  • Others as needed by plan of care

8. COMMON QUESTIONS

  • Can I change my mind?
  • Nutrition, hydration, CPR
  • Giving Up
  • For cancer patients only

9. HOW DO I TALK ABOUT THIS? 10.

  • ASK YOUR LOVED ONE WHAT S/HE THINKS IS HAPPENING.

11.

  • WHAT ARE YOUR LOVED ONES GOALS?
  • WHAT IT IS S/HE REALLY WANTS?

12.

  • HELP THE PERSON IDENTIFY AND ASSESS THE BENEFITS AND BURDENS OF VARIOUS TREATMENTS.

13. BEREAVEMENT

  • Telephone Contact
  • Memorial Services
  • Support Groups
  • Individual Counseling
  • Referral

14. RESOURCES

  • National Palliative Care & Hospice Organization
  • 800.658.8898
  • www.nhpco.org
  • www.Medicare.com

15. Personal Loss Activity 16. Phases of Grief 17. Helping Children Cope with Grief

  • Author:Alan Wolfelt, Ph.D
  • 13 Dimensions

18. Shock/Denial/Disbelief/Numbness

  • Most intense 6-8 weeks after death
  • Can resurface over time

19. Lack of Feelings

  • Appear unaffected by death
  • Continue with age appropriate activities to avoid intense emotions

20. Physiological Changes

  • Grief may be expressed through physical symptoms
  • Symptoms are usually temporary and normal

21. Regression

  • Occurs when previously mastered tasks are no longer completed
  • Can represent need for protection and security
  • If ongoing, may need therapeutic intervention

22. Big Man/Big Woman Syndrome

  • Opposite of regression
  • Take on adult roles
  • Can be an attempt to replace the deceased

23. Disorganization and Panic

  • Feeling of being overwhelmed and anxious
  • Manifestations
    • Restlessness
    • Irritability
    • Inability to concentrate
  • Routines are important

24. Explosive Emotions

  • Feelings
    • Anger
    • Hatred
    • Terror
  • Directed at anyone or anything
  • Enjoyable events lose their appeal
  • Important to validate feelings of pain, frustration and hurt

25. Acting-Out Behavior

  • Result of Explosive Emotions
  • May be associated with feelings of abandonment

26. Fear

  • Who will take care ofme?
  • Fear of own death
  • Fatalistic View
  • Consistency is important

27. Relief

  • Natural expression after witnessing prolonged illness
  • Difficult to admit
  • Associated with guilt

28. Loss/Emptiness/Sadness

  • Most difficult emotions
  • May demonstrate physiological changes

29. Guilt and Self-Blame

  • May assume responsibility of death
  • If only I had done something differently

30. Reconciliation

  • Grief no longer overwhelms daily functioning
  • Begin to feel hope and anticipation for the future

31. Questions