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Apple Devices History

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History & TechnologyApple

Apple Inc. is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Cupertino, California, that designs, develops, and sells consumer electronics, computer software, online services, and personal computers. Its best-known hardware products are the Mac line of computers, the iPod media player, the iPhone smartphone, and the iPad tablet computer. Its online services include iCloud, the iTunes Store, and the App Store. Apple's consumer software includes the OS X and iOS operating systems, the iTunes media browser, the Safari web browser, and the iLife and iWork creativity and productivity suites.

History of Apple Product Development

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1976 Apple I

EssentialsFamily: Pre-MacintoshCodename: ?Introduced: April 1976Terminated: March 1977ProcessorCPU: MOS Technology 6502CPU Speed: 1 MHzFPU: noneBus Speed: 1 MHzRegister Width: 8-bitData Bus Width: 8-bitAddress Bus Width: 16-bitOnboard RAM: 8 kBMaximum RAM: 65 kBVideoVRAM: 1 kBMax Resolution: 60.05 Hz, 40x24 charMiscellaneousPower: 58 Watts

Based on the MOStek 6502 chip, the Apple I included only the circuit board. A tape-interface was sold separately, but you had to build the case.

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1983 Lisa

EssentialsFamily: Pre-MacintoshCodename: LisaGestalt ID: 2Maximum OS: LisaOS/MacWorksIntroduced: January 1983Terminated: August 1986ProcessorCPU: Motorola MC68000CPU Speed: 5 MHzeBus Speed: 5 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitData Bus Width: 16-bitAddress Bus Width: 32-bitROM: 16 kB of diagnostic and bootstrap code presentVideoMonitor: 12" 720 x 364 built-in (B/W, rectangular pixels)StorageHard Drive: 5 MB external (10 MB in some configurations of Lisa 2/MacXL)Floppy Drive: two 871 kB 5.25" (one 400 kB 3.5" in Lisa2)

The first personal computer to use a GUI (Graphical User Interface). It contained a Motorola 68000 Processor running at 5 Mhz, 1 MB of RAM, two 5.25" 871k floppy drives, an external 5 MB hard drive, and a built-in 12" 720 x 360 monochrome monitor. Initial cost: $9,995.

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1983 Apple//e

EssentialsFamily: Pre-MacintoshCodename: DianaIntroduced: January 1983Terminated: March 1985ProcessorCPU: MOS Technology/SynerTek 6502CPU Speed: 1 MHzFPU: noneBus Speed: 1 MHzRegister Width: 8-bitData Bus Width: 8-bitAddress Bus Width: 16-bitROM: 16 kBOnboard RAM: 64 kBRAM slots: expansion via 1st slotMaximum RAM: 128 k, with Extended 80 Columns CardExpansion Slots: 8 proprietaryVideoMax Resolution: 40/80x24 text, 4-bit 40x48, 6 color 140x192, 4-bit 140x192, 1-bit 240x192, 1-bit 560x192

One of the most successful Apple computers ever. It used the 65C02 processor, running at 1.02 Mhz, and came with 64K of RAM, 32K ROM, BASIC (an assembly language interface), and several other hard-coded options.

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1984 Mac 128k

EssentialsFamily: Classic MacsCodename: MacintoshGestalt ID: 1Minimum OS: 1.0Maximum OS: System 3.2/Finder 5.3Introduced: January 1984Terminated: October 1985ProcessorCPU: Motorola MC68000CPU Speed: 8 MHzFPU: noneBus Speed: 8 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitData Bus Width: 16-bitAddress Bus Width: 32-bitROM: 64 kBOnboard RAM: 128 kBMaximum RAM: 128 kBVideoMonitor: 9" built-inVRAM: 1 bit 512x342StorageFloppy Drive: 3.5" 400 kB

The first affordable computer to include a GUI, and using the new 8 MHz Motorola 68000 chip. It came in a small beige case with a built-in black and white monitor, a keyboard, mouse, and a floppy drive that took 400k 3.5" disksthe first personal computer to do so.

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1989 Portable

EssentialsFamily: PowerBookGestalt ID: 10Minimum OS: 6.0.4Maximum OS: 7.5.5Introduced: September 1989Terminated: October 1991ProcessorCPU: Motorola MC68000CPU Speed: 16 MHzFPU: noneBus Speed: 16 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitData Bus Width: 16-bitAddress Bus Width: 32-bitROM: 256 kBRAM Type: proprietaryMinimum RAM Speed: 100 nsOnboard RAM: 1 MBRAM slots: 1Maximum RAM: 8 MBVideoScreen: 1-bit active matrix (backlit after 2/91)Max Resolution: 640x400StorageHard Drive: optional 40 MBFloppy Drive: 1 or 2 1.4 MB SuperDrive

Apple's first attempt at a more easily portable Macintosh. It had a bay for a 3.5" half-height drive, and could support up to two Super Drives. Its active matrix screen (later backlit) made it incredibly expensive

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1993 Color Classic

EssentialsFamily: Classic MacsGestalt ID: 49Minimum OS: 7.0.1Maximum OS: 7.6.1Introduced: February 1993Terminated: May 1994ProcessorCPU: Motorola MC68030CPU Speed: 16 MHzFPU: optional 68882Bus Speed: 16 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitData Bus Width: 32-bitAddress Bus Width: 32-bitROM: 1 MB ROMRAM Type: 30 pin SIMMMinimum RAM Speed: 100 nsOnboard RAM: 2 MBRAM slots: 2Maximum RAM: 10 MBLevel 1 Cache: 256 bytes data, 256 bytes instructionVideoMonitor: 10" built-inMax Resolution: 8 bit 512x384StorageHard Drive: 40-160 MBFloppy Drive: 1.4 MB SuperDrive

Identical to the Classic II, except for a color screen, a larger ROM, and a restyled case. Also released as the Performa 250.

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1997 Power Mac 9600

EssentialsFamily: PowerMacCodename: KansasGestalt ID: 67Minimum OS: 7.5.5Maximum OS: 9.1Introduced: February 1997Terminated: Early 1998ProcessorCPU: PowerPC 604eFPU: integratedBus Speed: 50 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitData Bus Width: 64-bitAddress Bus Width: 32-bitROM: 4 MBRAM Type: 168 pin DIMMMinimum RAM Speed: 70 nsOnboard RAM: 0 MBRAM slots: 12Maximum RAM: 1536 MBLevel 1 Cache: 32 kB data, 32 kB instructionLevel 2 Cache: 512 kB DIMMExpansion Slots: 6 PCIStorageHard Drive: 4.0 GB 7200 RPMFloppy Drive: 1.4 MB SuperDriveOptical Drive: 12x CD-ROM

The 9600 was built to make its insides more easily accessible. It ran on 233, 200, or dual 200 Mhz 604e's. Initial cost: $4,700 for the dual 200Mhz configuration, $4,200 for the single 233Mhz, and $3,700 for the single 200 Mhz.

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1997 Power Mac 9600

EssentialsFamily: PowerBook G3/G4Codename: Main Street, Wall StreetGestalt ID: 312Minimum OS: 8.1Maximum OS: 10.2.8Introduced: May 1998Terminated: August 1998ProcessorCPU: PowerPC 750 "G3"CPU Speed: 233/250/292 MHzFPU: integratedBus Speed: 83 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitROM: 4 MBRAM Type: SO-DIMMLevel 1 Cache: 32 kB data, 32 kB instructionLevel 2 Cache: 1 MB backside, 1:2

VideoScreen: 12.1/13.3/14.1" active matrix TFTMax Resolution: 1024x768Video Out: VGA, s-video

StorageHard Drive: 2 GBFloppy Drive: removable 1.4 MB SuperDriveZip Drive: optionalOptical Drive: 24x CD-ROM or optional DVD-

The G3 Series was available with a variety of built-to-order options including a 233, 250, or 292 Mhz PPC750 processor and either a 12" passive-matrix screen, a 13.3" TFT Active Matrix screen, or an incredible 14.1" TFT Active Matrix Screen. All models included two RAM slots which used industry standard RAM modules

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1999 G4Power Macintosh

EssentialsFamily: PowerMac G3/G4/G5Gestalt ID: 406Minimum OS: 8.6Maximum OS: 10.4.11Introduced: September 1999Terminated: December 1999ProcessorCPU: PowerPC 7400 "G4"CPU Speed: 350/400 MHzFPU: integratedBus Speed: 100 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitData Bus Width: 64-bitAddress Bus Width: 32-bitROM: 1 MB ROM + 3 MB toolbox ROM loaded into RAMRAM Type: PC100Level 1 Cache: 32 kB data, 32 kB instructionLevel 2 Cache: 1 MB backside, 1:2StorageHard Drive: 10 GB (up to 3 36 GB available BTO)ATA Bus: ATA-33Zip Drive: optionalOptical Drive: 32x CD-ROM, DVD/DVD-RAM available

Based on the Unified Motherboard Architecture, the G4 AGP used the MPC 7400 chip, AGP-based graphics, AirPort compatibility, a faster memory bus, DVD-ROM or RAM standard, an internal FireWire port, 2 separate USB buses for a combined 24 Mbs, a 2X (133 Mhz) AGP slot, and up to 1.5 GB of RAM.

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2000 G4 Cube

EssentialsFamily: PowerMac G3/G4/G5Gestalt ID: 406Minimum OS: 8.6Maximum OS: 10.4.11Introduced: September 1999Terminated: December 1999ProcessorCPU: PowerPC 7400 "G4"CPU Speed: 450/500 MHzFPU: integratedBus Speed: 100 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitData Bus Width: 64-bitAddress Bus Width: 32-bitROM: 1 MB ROM + 3 MB toolbox ROM loaded into RAMRAM Type: PC100RAM slots: 3Maximum RAM: 1.5 GBLevel 1 Cache: 32 kB data, 32 kB instructionLevel 2 Cache: 1 MB backside, 1:2StorageStorageHard Drive: 20/30/60 GBATA Bus: ATA-66Optical Drive: DVD-ROM or CD-RW

Housed in an 8x8x8 cube, the G4 Cube combined elegance and power, trading expandability for its diminutive size. It contained three RAM slots, an AirPort slot, two USB and FireWire ports, a 450Mhz G4 processor, a 20 GB hard drive, a 56k modem, 64 MB of RAM, Apple's Pro Mouse, and came with an external USB amplifier and a set of Harman Kardon speakers.

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2002 Flat-panel iMac

ProcessorCPU: PowerPC 7450 "G4"CPU Speed: 700/800 MHzFPU: integratedBus Speed: 100 MHzRegister Width: 32-bitData Bus Width: 64-bitAddress Bus Width: 32-bitROM: 1 MB ROM + 3 MB toolbox ROM loaded into RAMRAM Type: PC133 SDRAMMinimum RAM Speed: 133 MHzOnboard RAM: 0 MBRAM slots: 2Maximum RAM: 1 GBLevel 1 Cache: 32 kB data, 32 kB instructionLevel 2 Cache: 256 kB on-processorVideoScreen: 15" LCDGPU: NVidia GeForce2 MXVRAM: 32 MBMax Resolution: 1024x768Video Out: mini VGA, mirror onlyStorageHard Drive: 20/40/60 GBATA Bus: ATA-66Optical Drive: See Notes

Using a 15- or 17-inch LCD screen, G4 processor, and the CD-RW/DVD-R Super Drive, the iMac's Flat Panel screen easily rotates and changes angles. The 10.6" semi-spherical base houses the rest of the computer.

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2004 iMac G5

Housed in a completely new enclosure reminiscent of Apple's Cinema Display line, the iMac G5 was a marvel of miniaturization. The case was only two inches thick, yet housed a machine considerably faster and more advanced than its G4-based predecessor.

ProcessorCPU: PowerPC 970 "G5"CPU Speed: 1.6/1.8 GHzFPU: integratedBus Speed: 533/600 MHzROM: 1 MB ROM + 3 MB toolbox ROM loaded into RA

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