© The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 1 Latino Achievement in America

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Text of © The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 1 Latino Achievement in America

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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 1 Latino Achievement in America
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 2 B etween 1970 and 1990, the achievement gap between Latino and White students narrowed by one half or more. Since 1990, the gap has been flat, or in some subjects, is wider.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 3 Gap Narrows, Then Holds Steady Math Scores, 13 Year-Olds Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1 999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 108) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 4 Gap Narrows, Then Progress Stops Reading, 17 Year-Olds Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 107) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 5 The achievement gap: How far has the system left Latino students behind?
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 6 Nationally, 4 th Grade Latinos Lag Behind Their White Peers in Reading (2003) Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 7 And Things Are Similar in 8 th Grade Mathematics (2003) Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 8 The results of the Latino achievement gap by the end of high school?
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 9 Latino 17 Year Olds Have Been Taught Math to the Same Levels as White 13 Year Olds Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 10 Latino 17 Year Olds Have Been Taught to Read to the Same Levels as White 13 Year Olds Source: Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 11 T he consequences of the achievement gap reach beyond high school
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 12 College going rates for Latino and White students are close Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census, October Current Population Surveys, 1972-2000, in US DOE, NCES, The Condition of Education 2002, p.166 and 174.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 13 But BA completion rates are greater for Whites than for Latinos Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census, October Current Population Surveys, 1972-2000, in US DOE, NCES, The Condition of Education 2002, p.166 and 174.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 14 Regardless of Race/Ethnicity, More Than 9 in 10 Students in Grades 6-12 and Their Parents Expect the Student to Attend Postsecondary Ed. Source: NCES, Getting Ready to Pay for College, September 2003.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 15 Add it all up...
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 16 Of Every 100 White Kindergartners: (25-to 29-Year-Olds) Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. March Current Population Surveys, 1971-2001, in The Condition of Education 2002.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 17 Of Every 100 Latino Kindergartners : (25-to 29-Year-Olds) Source: US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. March Current Population Surveys, 1971-2001, In The condition of Education 2002.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 18 It doesnt have to be this way! Latino children will rise to the challenge when its presented to them
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 19 Latino students ARE succeeding in some schools...
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 20 Hambrick Middle School, Aldine, TX 72% Latino (state = 42%) 22% African American (state = 14%) 85% low-income (state = 50%) Source: Texas Education Agency Web site.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 21 Hambrick Middle School, Aldine, TX Source: Texas Education Agency Web site.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 22 Hambrick Middle School, Aldine, TX Has performed in the top fifth of all Texas middle schools in both reading and math in both 7 th and 8 th grades over a 3-year period. Source: Texas Education Agency Web site.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 23 Some districts...
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 24 Pueblo, CO: Raising Achievement for Students While Narrowing Gaps, Reading 3 rd Grade Source: Pueblo District 60 State Average 2003= 74%
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 25 SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2002 Trial Urban District Reading Assessment. * There is an 18 point gap between Los Angeles and Houston (equivalent to almost 2 years worth of learning) Scale Score
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 26 And some entire states...
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 27 Latino 8th Graders in Some States are Making Much Better Gains than the National Average in Math Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) * Gains Between 2000 and 2003
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 28 Delaware: Gains in Grade 4 Reading Outpace the Nation, 1998-2003 Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress Change in Average Scale Score
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 29 Latinos in Ohio Perform as Well or Better Than Whites in 21 States (2003 NAEP 8 th Grade Reading) Source: NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Scale Score
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 30 What do we know about the places that are improving results for Latino students?
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 31 Element 1: Clear, high goals for all students and curriculum aligned to those goals
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 32 Transcript Study: single biggest predictor of college success is the quality and intensity of students high school curriculum Cliff Adelman, Answers in the Tool Box, U.S. Department of Education 1999.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 33 Curriculum Counts: Chances for Bachelors Degree by High School Grads Source: Adlesman, Clifford, Answers in the tool Box, U.S. Department of Education, 1999. Table 40: Bachelors degree completion rates for students in the top two quintiles... who entered 4-year colleges directly from on-time high school graduation by race. Percentage
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 34 Element 2: Extra instruction for students who need it
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 35 When Kids Are Behind, Schools Must Provide More Instruction and Support: Kentucky provides extra time for struggling students in high-poverty schools Maryland offers extra dollars for 7th and 8th graders who need more support Indiana gives schools extra funding to provide instruction for students struggling to meet state standards
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 36 Element 3: Good teaching matters more than anything else
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 37 Source: Boston Public Schools, High School Restructuring, March 9, 1998.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 38 Cumulative Effects On Students Math Scores: Dallas (Grades 3-5) Source: Heather Jordan, Robert Mendro, & Dash Weerasinghe, Teacher Effects On Longitudinal Student Achievement 1997.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 39 Source: Sanders, William L. and Rivers, Joan C; Cumulative and Residual Effects of Teachers on Future Student Academic Achievement, 1996, Figure 1, p.12 Student gains over 3 years
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 40 But students who need these resources do not always get them
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 41 Latino students get less than their fair share of qualified teachers...
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 42 Minority Students Get More Inexperienced* Teachers *Teachers with 3 or fewer years of experience. High and low refer to top and bottom quartiles. Source: National Center for Education Statistics, Monitoring Quality: An Indicators Report, December 2000.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 43 More Math Classes in High-Minority High Schools are Taught by Teachers Lacking a Major in the Field Source: Richard M. Ingersoll, University of Pennsylvania. Original analysis for the Ed Trust of 1999- 2000 Schools and Staffing Survey.
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  • The Education Trust, Inc., 2003 44 More Courses in High-Latino High Schools Taught by Out-of-Field Teachers *Teachers lacking