A PARTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS OF ARIZONA’S HORSE PARTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS OF ARIZONA’S ... THE STRUCTURE OF ARIZONA’S HORSE ... “pleasure horse” segment. A final

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  • A PARTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS

    OF ARIZONAS HORSE INDUSTRY

    PROJECT COMPLETION REPORT

    Project Sponsor: Arizona State Horsemans Association

    Phase I: Pleasure Horse and Racing Impact Update

    Phase II: Horse Show Impact

    Bruce R. Beattie, Trent Teegerstrom, Jorgen Mortensen, and Eric Monke

    Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    The University of Arizona, Tucson

    October 31, 2001

  • A PARTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS OF ARIZONAS HORSE INDUSTRY ii

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................... iv

    LIST OF TABLES ....................................................................................................... iv

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.............................................................................................. v

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................... vi

    Preamble ..................................................................................................................... 1

    I. INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................. 2

    II. THE STRUCTURE OF ARIZONAS HORSE INDUSTRY .............................. 4Direct Effects ...................................................................................................... 4Indirect Effects .................................................................................................... 6Induced Effects.................................................................................................... 7Components of Arizonas Horse Industry Included and Not Included .................. 7

    III. GENERAL RESEARCH APPROACH AND PROCEDURES ........................... 9

    IV. EXPENDITURES OF ARIZONA RESIDENTS FOR OWNERSHIP

    AND CARE OF PLEASURE HORSES.............................................................10Costs of Maintenance and Ownership of a Pleasure Horse.................................10Summary of Per Household Costs of Ownership and Maintenanceof Pleasure Horses .............................................................................................16Direct Economic Impact of Pleasure Horse Ownershipby Arizona Households .....................................................................................17

    V. EXPENDITURES OF ARIZONA RESIDENTS AND NON-RESIDENTS

    ASSOCIATED WITH HORSE RACING...........................................................20

    VI. EXPENDITURES OF ARIZONA RESIDENTS AND NON-RESIDENTS

    AS PARTICIPANTS AND SPECTATORS AT NON-RACING EVENTS .....22Questionnaire Survey ........................................................................................23Expenditures According to Surveys ...................................................................23Participant Entry and Stall Fees and Spectator Admission Fees .........................27Summary of Expenditures Related to Four Surveyed Horse Shows....................27Direct Economic Activity at Other Arizona Horse Shows..................................28Arizona Resident Spectators at Rodeos, Gymkhana, and Polo Events ................29

  • A PARTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS OF ARIZONAS HORSE INDUSTRY iii

    VII. CONTRIBUTION OF SUB-SECTORS OF ARIZONAS HORSE

    INDUSTRY TO THE ARIZONA ECONOMY...................................................30 A Word of Caution ............................................................................................ 30

    Estimation Methodology ...................................................................................31The Direct, Indirect and Induced, and Total Impact Estimates ...........................31

    VIII. HORSE AND HOUSEHOLD NUMBERS AND COMPARISON WITH

    OTHER SECTORS............................................................................................33

    References ..............................................................................................................36

  • A PARTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS OF ARIZONAS HORSE INDUSTRY iv

    LIST OF FIGURES

    Figure 1. Schematic of Arizona Horse Industry by Principal and Related Sectors............ 5

    Figure 2. Comparison of Direct Expenditures on Horses to Agricultural CommoditySales and State Government Expenditures on Protection and Safety...............35

    LIST OF TABLES

    Table 1. Pleasure Horse Summary Budget ................................................................... 11

    Table 1a. Commercial Boarding Budget........................................................................12

    Table 1b.Owner Care and Maintenance Budget ............................................................ 13

    Table 2. Investment and Ownership Costs: Pleasure Horses.........................................14

    Table 3. Estimated Expenditures of Various Components of ArizonasHorse Racing Industry, 2001.......................................................................... 21

    Table 4. Estimated Average Daily Lodging Prices during Show Period .......................25

    Table 5. Total Direct Economic Activity at Four Surveyed Horse Shows.....................27

    Table 6. Estimated Economic Impacts of Arizonas Horse Industry, 2001 ...................32

    Table 7. Projection of Horse Household and Horse Numbers for 2001 from 1990Estimates .......................................................................................................34

  • A PARTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS OF ARIZONAS HORSE INDUSTRY v

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    Several individuals and organizations were generous in providing financial support forthis study. Partial funding was provided by individual and organization contributionsthrough the Arizona Horse Lovers Foundation. The Department of Agricultural andResource Economics, the Cardon Endowment for Agricultural Economics and Policy,and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at the University of Arizona alsoprovided financial and other resources in support of the study.

    Chuck Lakin, Past-President, Glen Jordan, President, and Rick Johns, Past-President, ofthe Arizona State Horsemans Association provided invaluable advice and counsel atevery stage of the study. Many horse owners, veterinarians, and other knowledgeablepersons responded to queries regarding the ownership, care, maintenance, and associatedcosts of horses and related infrastructure in Arizona. In particular, we acknowledge theinsightful input of Dr. Jim Sprinkle, Area Livestock Agent (Coconino, Gila, and YavapaiCounties) and Drs. William Schurg and Mark Arns, Equine Specialists in the Departmentof Animal Science at the University of Arizona. Alberta Charney, Research Specialist inEconomic and Business Research at the University of Arizona, provided much adviceand interpretation regarding economic multiplier effects and directed the authors toappropriate research literature and data.

    We owe a large debt to Carol Whittaker, Senior Research Specialist in PublicAdministration and Policy at the University of Arizona and a member of the Board ofDirectors of the Arizona Quarter Horse Association. Carol not only assisted greatly withthe design of our horse-show-participant questionnaire, she single handedly took it uponherself to coordinate the data collection effort at four major Arizona horse shows.

    Lastly, we are indebted to Nancy Bannister in the Department of Agricultural andResource Economics for design and skillful formatting of the final report, includingtabular and graphic materials.

  • A PARTIAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS OF ARIZONAS HORSE INDUSTRY vi

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    Three major activities make up Arizonas horse industrypleasure riding (private andcommercial), participant and spectator events (racing, shows, rodeos, roping, polo), andbreeding. This report provides estimates of Arizona economic activity associated withprivate pleasure horses, horse racing, horse shows, and resident spectators at rodeos,roping, polo, and gymkhana events. Major categories not accounted for includecommercial pleasure riding, participants at rodeo, roping, and polo events, and breedingof horses for export sale (outside Arizona). Despite these omissions, Arizonas horseindustry exceeds a billion dollars annually in direct, indirect, and inducedexpendituresbetween $1.1 to $1.3 Billion.

    TOTAL DIRECT EXPENDITURES: Direct expenditures on private pleasure horsemaintenance and ownership, horse racing and horse show activity, and by residentspectators at other horse-related events was estimated to be between $660 to $760Million in 2001.

    Arizona Pleasure Horse Owners spend an estimated $500 to $600 Million on thecare and maintenance of pleasure horses and related infrastructure (including theannualized cost of horse, tack, equipment, land and facilities ownership).

    Horse Racing in Arizona generates an estimated $108 Million in expenditures.

    Horse Show Events contributes an estimated $43 Million in expenditures.

    Arizona-Resident Expenditures as Spectators at Other Horse-Related Events(rodeos, roping, polo, gymkhana) come to $9 Million.

    INDIRECT AND INDUCED EXPENDITURES: The combined indirect and induced(ripple) effect of the above direct expenditures contributes an additional $444 to $504Million owing to horse-related activity in Arizona.

    HOUSEHOLDS AND HORSES: The number of Arizona households owning one ormore pleasure horses or commercially involved in the horse industry falls in the range or48,000 to 64,000. The number of horses in Arizona likely exceeds 170,000 head.

    BY WAY OF COMPARISON: Direct expenditures on horses exceed gross salesreceipts of mos