composition – Part 1: simplicity COMPOSITION – PART 1: ... PHOTOGRAPHY Mr. Eric Buckalew | Composition – Part 1: Simplicity 1 Now that we have investigated the components ...

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    08-Feb-2018

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<ul><li><p>[COMPOSITION PART 1: SIMPLICITY] DESN3310 - PHOTOGRAPHY </p><p>Mr. Eric Buckalew | Composition Part 1: Simplicity 1 </p><p>Now that we have investigated the components of the camera and seen how POV (perspective) can change how our photographs look, lets investigate how to actually compose a picture. What should we have in the photograph and what should we eliminate? In Part 1 of Composition we are going to see how keeping it simply student (KISS) is one of the key areas in telling an impactful and compelling story. Below will be guidelines that should be considered when you are framing out your pictures. </p><p>GUIDELINES FOR BETTER PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPOSITION: SIMPLICITY </p><p>The first and perhaps the most important guideline is simplicity. Look for ways to give the center of interest in your pictures the most visual attention. One way is to select uncomplicated backgrounds that will not steal attention from your subjects. </p><p> Figure 1 - What is the main idea in this picture? </p><p> Let's see how we can improve this photo by looking for visual simplicity. First, let's decide if we want our center of interest to be the public telephone, the bridge, or the cactus. Lets chose the cactus as the main subject. By moving in closer and using a plain sky as the background, we have simplified and improved the appearance of this photograph. </p></li><li><p>[COMPOSITION PART 1: SIMPLICITY] DESN3310 - PHOTOGRAPHY </p><p>Mr. Eric Buckalew | Composition Part 1: Simplicity 2 </p><p> Figure 2 - The original is too busy, but the one on the right is now telling a simple story. </p><p>Lets look at another example of how we can keep our photographs from becoming over complicated and just simplify the image. </p><p>Figure 3 - Again the one on the right has too many things happening, but the one on the right is showcasing the bird. </p><p>We're certainly close enough to our subject in both pictures, but the busy background on the left camouflages the seagull. Just change your point of view (POV) a little bit and, presto, your seagull stands out with more visual prominence against the blue sky. </p></li><li><p>[COMPOSITION PART 1: SIMPLICITY] DESN3310 - PHOTOGRAPHY </p><p>Mr. Eric Buckalew | Composition Part 1: Simplicity 3 </p><p>Compose your photograph so that your reason for taking the picture is clearly seen. Arrange other parts of the picture area in such a way as to complement what you choose to be the center of interest. Most of us would prefer the picture on the right because the parking lot tends to contradict the feeling of antiquity related to this mission. </p><p>Figure 4 - The one on the left is just too busy where the one on the right highlights the mission. </p><p>Remember: we're talking about composition simplicity, and here's another decision you'll probably have to make. How much of your subject should you include, and should it be framed horizontally as we have done here? </p><p>Figure 5 - In the horizontal we are drawing the viewer to the people and then moving them through the picture. </p></li><li><p>[COMPOSITION PART 1: SIMPLICITY] DESN3310 - PHOTOGRAPHY </p><p>Mr. Eric Buckalew | Composition Part 1: Simplicity 4 </p><p>Or perhaps you'd prefer to frame your subject in the vertical format, as we've indicated with these frame lines. The choice is yours. </p><p>Figure 6 - Here inside the frame we are showing just our subject and part of where they are. </p><p>So, you can simplify your pictures and strengthen your center of interest by selecting uncomplicated backgrounds, avoiding unrelated subjects, and moving in close. If you want to make your center of interest even more dynamic, place it slightly off center in your frame as we have done with this young artist. </p></li><li><p>[COMPOSITION PART 1: SIMPLICITY] DESN3310 - PHOTOGRAPHY </p><p>Mr. Eric Buckalew | Composition Part 1: Simplicity 5 </p><p>Figure 7 - Here we are adding to the interest of the photo by pushing the center of the image to the left. </p><p>Generally, pictures with subjects directly in the center tend to be more static and less interesting than pictures with off-center subject placement. Therefore, it is important to really look at what you want to photograph and decide on what you are trying to shoot. Remember, that by just changing the POV (perspective) or eliminating a busy background can truly make the difference between an ok photograph and a great one. </p><p>Guidelines For Better Photographic Composition: Simplicity</p></li></ul>

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