Copyright © 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Chapter 9. Culinary Careers in Healthcare

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Text of Copyright © 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Chapter 9. Culinary Careers...

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Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Chapter 9. Culinary Careers in Healthcare Slide 2 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Learning Objectives 1. List four types of healthcare institutions where a chef might work. 2. Discuss three ways in which patients may order meals in a hospital. 3. List three foodservices, other than patient meals, that are often offered in hospitals. 4. Explain the following terms: trayline, Registered Dietitian, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, continuing care retirement community, assisted living, and nursing facility (home). Slide 3 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Learning Objectives 5. Discuss potential advantages and challenges of working in a hospital and in a continuing care retirement community. 6. Compare the earnings of a restaurant chef/head cook to those of a hospital chef/head cook. Slide 4 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Learning Objectives 7. Describe the job outlook for chefs in hospitals and continuing care retirement communities. 8. Explain why a chef would belong to these professional organizations. 9. Read an interview and identify the interviewees career path and current job functions. 10. Describe a typical organizational design for a hospital food and nutrition department. Slide 5 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Types of Healthcare Institutions Hospitals Continuing care retirement communities Assisted-living facilities Nursing facilities Community service programs such as Meals-on-Wheels Slide 6 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved How Patients May Order Meals In a Hospital Paper menu Spoken menu Room service menu Slide 7 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved In addition to feeding patients, hospital foodservices also are responsible for: Caf Catering Additional retail services (varies): Convenience store Kiosks or cart service Home meal replacement Bakeries Branded fast-food restaurants Vended foods and beverages Slide 8 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Trayline A conveyor belt that carries patient trays along as employees put certain foods and beverages on each tray. The last employee checks that the tray contains the right items and loads it into a cart to go up to the hospital floors. Slide 9 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Registered Dietitian (RD) An individual with extensive nutrition background who has completed: at least a bachelors degree from an accredited college or university a program of college level dietetics courses accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education a supervised practice experience a qualifying examination Slide 10 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations: A regulatory agency that evaluates and accredits thousands of healthcare facilities and programs in the U.S. Slide 11 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Long-Term Care Facilities Continuing Care Retirement Communities Assisted Living Facilities Nursing Facilities (commonly called nursing homes) Slide 12 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Potential Advantages & Challenges: Hospitals Potential advantages: Satisfaction of helping others. Good pay and benefits. More nights and weekends off than in restaurants. Catering and caf offer many culinary opportunities. Potential challenges: Patients can be very demanding. Making tasty food despite dietary restrictions. Multiple dining areas. Caf customers need value and variety. Finding good employees. Facility is open 24/7. Slide 13 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Potential Advantages & Challenges: Continuing Care Retirement Communities Potential advantages: Satisfaction of helping others. Good pay and benefits. More nights and weekends off than in restaurants. Catering offers opportunities for creativity. Potential challenges: Customers can be demanding, looking for value and variety. Modified diets. Multiple dining areas. Finding good employees. Slide 14 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Pay Comparisons Average Hourly Average Annual Pay Salary Restaurant Chef/Head Cook $14.80 $30,780 Hospital Chef/Head Cook $18.43 $34,740 Source: 2003 OES National Industry-Specific Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2003. Slide 15 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Job Outlook for Healthcare Chefs The population over 65 years old will continue to increase. Projected rates of employment growth range from 12.8% for hospitals to 34.3% for residential care facilities and nursing facilities. Excellent job outlook for chefs in CCRCs. Slide 16 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved American Society for Healthcare Food Service Administrators Affiliate of the American Hospital Association. Members include food and nutrition service management professionals in hospitals, CCRCs, nursing homes, and other healthcare facilities. Excellent for seminars, publications, and networking. Slide 17 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Dietary Managers Association Members work in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities as well as hospitals and other settings. Offers Certified Dietary Manager and Certified Food Protection Professional certifications. Offers publications, networking, seminars and conferences. Slide 18 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved National Society for Healthcare Food Service Management Offers advocacy for independent healthcare foodservices. Offers management tools to decrease costs, increase patient and staff satisfaction, and define successful operational performance. Offers publications, meetings, and networking. Open only to independent operators. Slide 19 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved More Professional Organizations American Association for Homes and Services for the Aging Members include not-for-profit nursing homes, CCRCs, assisted living, and other facilities/providers. American Healthcare Association: Provides information, education, and administrative tools to its members including assisted living, nursing facility, and other providers. Slide 20 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Brent Ruggles, CEC, Corporate Executive Chef, St. Paul and Zale Lipshy University Hospitals Career path: Restaurant prep cook Restaurant lead dinner cook Restaurant sous chef College and hotel chef Executive chef at the Dallas Market Center Executive chef for Dallas Cowboys and Texas Stadium Restaurant executive chef Current job functions: Provide foodservice for patients, employees, and visitors Do catering for several hospitals Provide a number of retail services such as a caf, convenience store, gourmet meals for two (to go) Write menus and develop recipes. Slide 21 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Organizational Chart - Hospital Fig 9-1 Slide 22 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Career Paths Figure PO 2-1 Slide 23 Copyright 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved Education Path Advice Figure PO 2-4