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Faculty of Architecture and Design TE WA - HANGA WAIHANGA-HOAHOA 2014

Faculty of Architecture and Design Handbook

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2014 Handbook for Victoria University's School of Architecture and Design.

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Page 1: Faculty of Architecture and Design Handbook

Faculty of Architecture and Design

TE WA- HANGA WAIHANGA-HOAHOA

2014

Page 2: Faculty of Architecture and Design Handbook

The Trading City of Ersilla, an algorithmic city by Saul Paley.

Page 3: Faculty of Architecture and Design Handbook

KNOW WHATYOU STAND FOR.KNOW WHERE

YOUR PASSIONS LIE.KNOW YOURNEXT MOVE.

The Trading City of Ersilla, an algorithmic city by Saul Paley.

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Familial clouds exhibition at the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale.

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ContentsIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

School of Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Undergraduate overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Postgraduate overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 First Light: New Zealand’s entry to the Solar Decathlon . . . 15 Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Architecture History and Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Interior Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Landscape Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Bachelor of Building Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Sustainable Engineering Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

School of Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Undergraduate overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Postgraduate overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 First-year Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Culture+Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Industrial Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Media Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 MDI with Computer Graphics specialisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

Te Rōpū Āwhina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107

Services and facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Victoria Overseas Exchange (Vic OE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Careers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Support, services and resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 STUDiO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Architecture and Design Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Technical resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126

Key dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside back cover

IMPORTANT NOTICE Victoria University uses all reasonable skill and care to ensure the information contained in this document is accurate at the time of being made available . However, matters covered by this document are subject to change due to a continuous process of review, and to unanticipated circumstances . The University therefore reserves the right to make any changes without notice . So far as the law permits, the University accepts no responsibility for any loss suffered by any person due to reliance (either whole or in part) on the information contained in this document, whether direct or indirect, and whether foreseeable or not .

IMPORTANT DATESTo find lists of important dates, including enrolment deadlines, accommodation, scholarships and deadlines for international student dates, visit the following websites: www.victoria.ac.nz/home/study/dates www.victoria.ac.nz/accommodation www.victoria.ac.nz/scholarships www.victoria-international.ac.nz

Faculty oF architecture and design Te Wāhanga Waihanga-Hoahoa 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus, Wellington 6011 Phone 04-463 6200 Fax 04-463 6204 Email [email protected] [email protected] Websites www.victoria.ac.nz/fad www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture www.victoria.ac.nz/design

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IntroductionThe Faculty of Architecture and Design, Te Wāhanga Waihanga-Hoahoa, is one of New Zealand’s leading providers of innovative education in a wide selection of disciplines encompassing design and the built environment .

The Faculty consists of the School of Architecture and the School of Design and offers an extensive range of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees that cater for the growing requirements of the creative sector .

Our campus occupies a central city location just off cosmopolitan Cuba Street . We offer world-class exhibition spaces, lecture theatres, workshops, computer labs and design studios . Our location means we can easily engage with working practitioners in our teaching environment .

The Faculty’s programmes address the growing need for cross-disciplinary study and will provide students with greater capabilities for the professions they enter, and better prepare them for the increasingly complex society they engage with .

Beyond undergraduate study, the Faculty offers a range of Master’s-level qualifications in Architecture and Design that can lead to traditional careers as architects and designers as well as a diverse range of other possible career paths .

For suitably qualified candidates the Faculty offers doctoral (PhD)-level study and supervision in architecture- and design- related fields . Contact the Faculty of Graduate Research (FGR) for further information by emailing [email protected]

Three undergraduate qualificationsBachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) has specialisations in Architecture, Interior Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Architecture History and Theory . The BAS is a three-year degree programme of full-time study that provides students with a comprehensive grounding in the built environment, specific to their chosen specialisation . More information is on page 8 .

Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) has specialisations in Project Management and Sustainable Engineering Systems . The BBSc is a three-year degree programme of full-time study that provides a thorough grounding in the science and technology of building and an understanding of architecture . This provides students with the skills and knowledge to create solutions to technical construction situations . More information is on page 49 .

Bachelor of Design Innovation (BDI) is a three-year degree programme of full-time study . Students can choose to specialise in one of three design disciplines (Culture+Context, Industrial Design and Media Design) and have the unique opportunity to combine study with a minor in another discipline such as Psychology, Cultural Anthropology, Māori or Pacific Studies, writing, Film or Media Studies . This provides students with the opportunity to configure their studies to suit their individual interests and intended careers . More information is on page 60 .

www.victoria.ac.nz/fad

www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture

www.victoria.ac.nz/design

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The built environmentThe School of Architecture at Victoria University is well placed to provide intellectual leadership on a range of issues around contemporary practice and the built environment . With its unique combination of four disciplines—Architecture, Interior Architecture, Building Science and Landscape Architecture—it offers a multidisciplinary perspective from which to speculate on the implication of these issues for Wellington, New Zealand and the broader context of the Pacific rim . Teaching, learning and research opportunities are structured around five research clusters that align with the School’s strengths and aspirations . The clusters—Critical Practices, Constructing Ecologies, Resilience, Spatial Praxis and Habitations—operate schoolwide and provide thematic umbrellas to frame inquiries, curate the curriculum and consolidate the School’s knowledge and expertise .

Design-based research is a central part of the curriculum and provides the platform from which students are able to synthesise the various subjects—history, theory, technology, communications—through a design proposition . Environmental design practice increasingly demands of graduates the ability to integrate and collaborate . In preparation for this the course structure enables students to occasionally undertake projects with all or some of the four disciplines on a common project and in a studio setting . This provides opportunities for students to work as part of a team and for genuine cross-disciplinary learning experiences and research outcomes . The particular expertise of each discipline is understood and applied within a broader context of related disciplines, moving towards an enriched understanding of today’s most pressing challenges for a more sustainable future .

www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture

School of

Architecture

6 - Victoria University of Wellington

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Final-year project by Master of Architecture (Professional) candidate Grace Mills, highly commended in the 2012 NZIA Graphisoft Awards.

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Undergraduate overviewBachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS)The BAS is a three-year undergraduate degree offered in four specialisations:

Architecture

Architecture History and Theory

Interior Architecture

Landscape Architecture .

All four specialisations share a first-year programme in which design, technology, environmental studies and communication practices are studied in the context of all disciplines offered within the School . These courses give an overview of design knowledge for the built environment and introduce concepts, vocabularies and skills in an interdisciplinary context .

In the second year students apply for selection into one of the BAS disciplines to specialise in . The second year is discipline-specific, inclusive of technological, theoretical and design subjects that relate to the chosen specialisation . The third year reintegrates the disciplines and offers a richer and more complex interdisciplinary approach .

This undergraduate degree alone does not qualify Architecture or Landscape Architecture students for professional registration . Students aspiring to become professional architects or landscape architects will need to look into postgraduate programmes (see pages 20 and 44) . Similarly, Interior Architecture students should undertake postgraduate study in order to pursue careers as specialised designers (professional registration is not available in New Zealand for Interior Architecture) .

(top) ARCI 211 project by Brett Nicholas.

(bottom) ARCI 211 project by Megat Othman.

8 - Victoria University of Wellington

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First-year experience The first year at the School of Architecture is the start of an exciting educational journey . There is much to learn which, by way of exploratory design work, makes for a vibrant and exciting learning experience . There are over 300 students participating in a common first year of Architecture, Building Science, Interior Architecture and Landscape Architecture . Students are taught through lectures, tutorials and studios . Studio tutorials are a significant part of learning at the School of Architecture and allow students to develop their projects in a collaborative atmosphere .

In the first trimester, each discipline is introduced to the students: a sequence of Architecture, Interiors, Landscape and Building Science studios enable students to understand each discipline and support their choices as to which they are interested in .

A big part of the first-year experience is integrating with campus culture . Support to enhance this journey is provided by the University and at the School of Architecture there are regular student representative meetings and Te Rōpū Āwhina to support new students in reaching their aspirations . The first-year student body is an important component of the School and contributes to its vitality .

(left—top) SARC 111 project by Vanessa Coxhead.

(left—middle) SARC 162 project by Paul Dey.

(left—bottom) SARC 111 project by Eliot Blenkarne.

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Postgraduate overviewMaster’s degrees overviewThe two-year Master’s degrees in Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Interior Architecture prepare students for professional careers .

The entry requirement is a B average in core subjects in years two and three of the undergraduate degree .

Students specialising in Architecture History and Theory can continue studies with a one-year Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory . This leads into a non-professional thesis-based Master of Architecture (see page 29) .

Part One is a consolidation and integration of previous knowledge gained in Design, Technology, Environmental Studies, Communication Practice and Professional and Business Studies as a precursor to professional practice . Research methods are taught to prepare students for a Master’s thesis in Part Two .

Part Two involves a major design thesis that tests a research proposition and demonstrates a degree of academic rigour and professional specialisation prior to graduation .

SpecialisationYear of study

One Two Three Part One Part Two

Architecture

BAS year one

BAS (Architecture)MArch (Prof)

Master of Architecture (Professional)

Architecture History and Theory

BAS (Architecture History and Theory)PGDipAHT Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture

History and Theory

MArch Master of Architecture

Interior Architecture BAS (Interior Architecture)MIA

Master of Interior Architecture

Landscape Architecture BAS (Landscape Architecture)MLA

Master of Landscape Architecture

(opposite page) Final-year projects by Master of Architecture students selected for the NZIA Graphisoft Awards 2012.

(top) An Agora Anew by Grace Mills.

(middle) Intimate Vastness by Josephine de Guzman.

(bottom) (Re) Constructing History by Duncan Harding.

10 - Victoria University of Wellington

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Postgraduate experience The Master’s Thesis Studio is the culmination of five years of academic study that prepares students for a professional career in Architecture, Interior Architecture and Landscape Architecture . Professional practice is increasingly research led, so students’ final year of study is devoted to self-directed, design-led research . The outcome of the Master’s thesis programme is a range of coherent, rigorous and well-resolved design projects that demonstrate mastery of a particular aspect of the discipline . This positions design practice, and the various outputs that emerge from that process, as the primary mode of conducting research, with the evidence of discovery and mastery reflected upon in a written exegesis .

In 2012 the Master’s Thesis Studio was made up of nine thematic streams . In 2013 a new framework was established where students develop individual research propositions under a staff-led topic . The topics offered by staff are diverse, ranging from parametric design to questions of resilience to catastrophic events . Academic staff direct their individual studio groups and offer potential areas of inquiry, while students are encouraged to take command of their specific area of research and establish mastery .

The Master’s Thesis Studio introduces students to a broader scholarly and professional community, and the Thesis project often segues into employment as a specialist practitioner in the design industry . As Master’s graduates, the authors of these schemes are not just job-ready; they are able to take a leadership role within an emerging area of practice . For these reasons, students are encouraged to disseminate their research findings . This occurs within the School through an annual series of seminars, publications and exhibitions .

Master’s Thesis students have an unprecedented opportunity to define the scope and direction of their work . This freedom is both exhilarating and confronting, and it leads to fresh thinking which can expand the boundaries of practice . Insight and innovation begin by asking a new question . This year we have a wide range of research topics, from Grace Mills looking at emergent urban centres through to Hannah Wolter using shadows as a tool to design . The School of Architecture is proud to introduce these ideas into current discourse on architecture and design .

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Graduate programmes in Designed EnvironmentsThe School of Architecture has two graduate programmes—a Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma in Designed Environments .

Both the Certificate and Diploma provide an attractive professional development vehicle for architects, interior architecture specialists, landscape architects, designers, planners, project managers, building inspectors and people working in related areas .

The Graduate Certificate in Designed Environments (GCertDE) is a development programme for practising professionals . Graduates should have enhanced up-to-date specialist knowledge of an aspect of their professional discipline .

The Graduate Diploma in Designed Environments (GDipDE) offers specialised study in six areas:

Architecture

Architecture History and Theory

Interior Architecture

Landscape Architecture

Project Management

Sustainable Engineering Systems .

The Graduate Diploma provides a pathway into postgraduate study for students who have graduated in one of the undergraduate disciplines of the BAS or BBSc degrees, who wish to transfer to a related discipline .

Programme structureGraduate Certificate in Designed Environments (GCertDE)

One trimester of full-time study or up to two years part-time (equivalent to four trimesters)

60 points

Admission requires an academically strong Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) in Architecture, Building Science or Design

Endorsement of a specialised area of study of your choosing:

→ Architecture

→ Architecture History and Theory

→ Interior Architecture

→ Landscape Architecture

→ Project Management

→ Sustainable Engineering Systems .

Graduate Diploma in Designed Environments (GDipDE) One year of full-time study or up to four years part-time

(equivalent to eight trimesters)

120 points

Admission requires an academically strong Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) in Architecture, Building Science or Design

Endorsement of a specialised area of study of your choosing:

→ Architecture

→ Architecture History and Theory

→ Interior Architecture

→ Landscape Architecture

→ Project Management

→ Sustainable Engineering Systems .

Students wishing to pursue further study from our range of postgraduate-level qualifications at Master’s level

Entry into Master’s qualifications is based on academic performance in the GDipDE .

12 - Victoria University of Wellington

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Specialisation information/programme structureGraduate CertificateA Graduate Certificate requires 30 points (typically two courses) from your selected programme and 30 other points from courses offered by the School of Architecture .

Graduate DiplomaFor a Graduate Diploma you will need to take the courses listed below plus courses as necessary to complete 120 points (usually five) .

ArchitectureARCI 311 Architecture Design

ARCI 312 Architecture Design Integration

and one of:

SARC 321 Construction

SARC 351 Urban Design Theory and Practice

Interior ArchitectureINTA 311 Interior Architecture Design

INTA 312 Interior Architecture Design Integration

and one of:

INTA 321 Interior Fit-out Technologies

SARC 323 Colour, Pattern, Light

Landscape ArchitectureLAND 311 Landscape Architecture Design

LAND 312 Landscape Architecture Design Integration

LAND 321 Landscape Architecture Construction

Architecture History and TheoryThree of:

SARC 351 Urban Design Theory and Practice

SARC 352 Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 353 History of Architecture

SARC 354 Interior Architecture Conservation

Project ManagementBILD 361 Project Management

BILD 362 Construction Law

and one of:

BILD 322 Structures

SARC 321 Construction

SARC 362 Introduction to Practice and Management

SARC 364 Building Code Compliance

Sustainable Engineering SystemsBILD 321 Sustainable Engineering Systems Design

BILD 331 Sustainable and Regenerative Design

and one of:

BILD 322 Structures

SARC 321 Construction

SARC 362 Introduction to Practice and Management

SARC 364 Building Code Compliance

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First Light: New Zealand’s entry to the Solar DecathlonEvery two years the U .S . Department of Energy challenges 20 international teams to design, build and operate solar-powered NetZero energy houses that are aesthetically pleasing and affordable . The winner of the biennial competition is the team that best blends design excellence, market appeal and cost-effectiveness with optimised energy use and production . Victoria University of Wellington entered the 2011 competition as the first team ever from the southern hemisphere .The solar-powered NetZero energy house uses only one-third of the energy of a typical New Zealand home . Energy savings have been obtained by carefully implementing solar passive design strategies . Features of the building include a canopy structure that provides shading, a well-insulated and airtight building envelope, thermal mass that helps keep temperatures consistent, an energy efficient heating and cooling system and energy efficient appliances . The power required for health and comfortable living is generated through photovoltaic cells and solar thermal collectors . A building management system measures the power harvested and energy used, and provides data to assist dwellers making smart choices about future energy consumption .

The project is a prime example of the Faculty’s multidisciplinary research and design approaches that involve versatile capabilities from around the University . It is aligned with our philosophy to work collaboratively with industry partners and provided students with a praxis-oriented education .

The First Light House was built in New Zealand, competed in Washington DC and returned to a permanent site at Waimarama Beach . More than 350,000 people attended the 10-day Solar Decathlon event in 2011 . The house won first place in the Engineering, Energy Balance and the Hot Water Competition, second place in the Architecture Competition, third place in the Market Appeal Competition and third place overall . Back in New Zealand the house gained further recognition in national design competitions . The house most recently won a New Zealand Institute of Architecture Award for International Architecture .

Detailed information about the project can be found at www.firstlighthouse.ac.nz

Image credit: Ron Blunt

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ArchitectureSpecialisation overviewArchitecture is a science, responsive to the timeless needs of human inhabitation as well as new challenges such as environmental sustainability and rapidly evolving technologies . For these reasons, people are constantly making or remaking their physical world, producing the special buildings and places we call ‘architecture’ .

Our Architecture programme encompasses the technologies of building such as construction, structures and environmental science . It also situates architecture within a world of ideas, examining the different meanings of buildings through history and from various theoretical perspectives . All these subjects are brought together under the umbrella of design in a series of studio-based courses .

At Victoria, this diverse learning experience occurs within a broader multidisciplinary environment . Our BAS in Architecture combined with the Master of Architecture (Professional) (MArch(Prof)) is recognised nationally and internationally as meeting the academic requirements for registration as a professional architect .

Graduates from the programme possess the skills, practical knowledge and theoretical understanding required in the architecture profession . These include an ability to think visually and three-dimensionally, particularly in relation to spatial subjects .

Career opportunitiesGraduates move on to satisfying careers in the architecture profession, either establishing their own practices or working as employees in large firms or government agencies . Before registering as an architect in New Zealand, graduates must gain practical experience usually under the supervision of a registered architect . Not all Architecture graduates choose to follow this path . Because their skills and education are so broad, some pursue careers outside conventional architectural practice .

Career opportunities are diverse, and some require further specialised courses of study:

urban planning/urban design

interior design

environmental design

stage/movie set design

property management

property development

facilities management

building conservation

project management .

(opposite page) Creating Territories, ARCI 411 studio project by Gordon Yung.

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Undergraduate degree structureYear oneAt Victoria the first year is unique because it is based on a diverse learning experience from the artistic to the scientific and from sustainable concerns to communicating design concepts . This multidisciplinary approach to the spatial environment provides you with a foundation of skills and vocabulary to design, question and research . This foundation will take you into your graduate studies in Architecture .

Year oneSARC 111 Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 112 Design Processes

SARC 121 Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 122 Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers*

SARC 131 Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151 Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161 Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162 Design Communication

*SARC 122 may be replaced by an elective course by students who have at least 14 credits at Level 3 in each of two of the following: calculus, statistics, physics or modelling .

(top) SARC 162 project by Paul Dey.

(bottom) SARC 112 project by Rory Tungatt.

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Years two and threeYear two of the BAS in Architecture introduces discipline-specific courses in Architectural Design and Architectural History and Theory . These are supported by a solid grounding in building technologies including structures, construction and human environmental science . Year three builds on this foundation, and presents increasingly challenging design issues at larger scales . At this stage students are also introduced to urban design, Pacific architecture, professional practice and management . Each year culminates with an extended design studio that requires students to integrate what they have learnt in other courses .

Year twoARCI 211 Architecture Design

ARCI 212 Architecture Design Integration

ARCI 251 History and Theory of Architecture

SARC 221 Building Materials and Construction

SARC 222 Structural Systems

SARC 223 Human Environmental Science

and one elective course

Year threeARCI 311 Architecture Design

ARCI 312 Architecture Design Integration

SARC 321 Construction

SARC 351 Urban Design Theory and Practice

SARC 352 Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 362 Introduction to Practice and Management

and one elective course

(top) ARCI 312 New Zealand School of Music project by Rachel Murray.

(middle and bottom) ARCI 312 New Zealand School of Music project by Ben Allnatt.

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Postgraduate studyThe Master of Architecture (Professional) (MArch(Prof)) is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections .

Degree structure (MArch(Prof))Part OneIn Part One students demonstrate their command of a broad range of architectural knowledge and skills . Once again, integration is the key . The technical aspects of building are addressed through an extended studio which allows students to demonstrate near-professional competency in dealing with large structures and complex accommodation needs . At the same time, studio courses emphasise research-led approaches to design . Students prepare proposals for a design-based thesis project which will be undertaken in Part Two of Master’s study .

Part OneARCI 411 Architecture Design Research

ARCI 412 Architecture Design Research

ARCI 421 Integrated Technologies

ARCI 451 Architecture History and Theory

SARC 461 Professional Practice

SARC 491 Research Methodologies

and one elective course

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Part TwoPart Two is devoted to the Architecture Research Thesis . During a minimum nine-month period, students identify a novel research question then devise and implement an appropriate research strategy . A design project features prominently in this process . At the end of the course, students draw conclusions about their own design and about the broader architectural question that prompted the work . Students complete the year with specialised knowledge in one aspect of architecture . They also possess research skills relevant to modern professional practice or further academic study .

Part TwoARCI 591 Architecture Research Thesis—120 points

or in special circumstances

ARCI 592 Architecture Research Thesis—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses numbered 400–599

-

(opposite page) Creating Territories, ARCI 411 studio project by Gordon Yung.

(right—top) Final-year project by Master of Architecture (Professional) candidate Hannah Wolter.

(right—bottom) Final-year project by Master of Architecture (Professional) candidate Oliver Booth.

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Patrick LiSecond-year Architecture studentHaving already studied overseas, Patrick Li can say with conviction that Victoria provides a good student experience . “In terms of social opportunities, student development and health and financial services, I feel like Victoria is resourceful and balanced .”

Originally from Costa Rica, Patrick had an early interest in fine arts and geography, leading him to study Architecture . “I enjoy observing landscapes and built environments, and architecture seemed like a discipline that merges the creative and the practical to influence society at all scales .”

Academically, Patrick finds the competitive environment of the School of Architecture a positive challenge: “In first year, the competitiveness may seem daunting, but I feel like it really motivates students to bring out the best in themselves, and the high-quality work produced keeps coming through in second year, where I am now .”

Despite the challenges, the setting of Wellington provides an inspirational and welcoming atmosphere . “Overall, I feel like Wellington is a very calm city to live in . My favourite place is the waterfront, where I can release stress and take in the fresh air . I ended up in Wellington due to my love of travelling, and I like to take on such opportunities as they come . Victoria can offer me a strong foundation in architecture that I can use as a step to extend my studies around the world .

“One of my life goals is to create something that is both remembered and studied by future generations .”

22 - Victoria University of Wellington

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Grace MillsMaster of Architecture (Professional) studentStudying architecture at Victoria has afforded Grace a huge amount of experiential opportunities both within and beyond the capital, enriching her academic success . “I have grown up in Wellington and still enjoy it after what has been a pretty long run, and definitely to the credit of my architectural education at Victoria .

“Victoria has offered me many wider opportunities, including an overseas exchange to Copenhagen to study at one of the oldest schools in Europe, various design competitions and a research job over summer .”

In particular, Grace found her participation in the NZIA Graphisoft Student Design Awards a rewarding experience, and achieved a highly commended award for her thesis, ‘An Agora Anew’, which investigated architectural opportunities within an urban sub-centre context, a question of particular relevance to Christchurch . “As finalists for the competition, we were flown up to Auckland . We presented our work with final-year students from other architectural schools in the country, so it was a fabulous opportunity to meet lots of interesting like-minded people, see a wide range of design projects and to present your own thesis to an interested panel of international judges .”

Grace credits Victoria for the support it provided over this experience . “The School of Architecture was really supportive in this process, helping with costs, pre-competition practice, design advice and keeping us on our toes at all times … they also kept us well nourished .

“It was a good way to end my time at Victoria and great to share the experience with architecture friends I had been studying with for five years . It is definitely something to aim for .”

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Gordon YungMaster of Architecture (Professional) studentIn Gordon’s third year of undergraduate study at Victoria’s School of Architecture he began a blog to record his work. It has since become a collection of precedents and online resources from his time at the University and has amassed about 4,000 followers.

Gordon’s success in his chosen area of study and the interest he draws from other like-minded people is motivated by an enjoyment of drawing. “I have always been interested in the creative fields and the process of creating through design.

“My fascination with drawing throughout school was a massive driver for me to try my hand at architecture, which I saw as both a challenging and exciting profession.”

Once he got to Victoria, the preconceptions he had about what the field entailed expanded greatly, moving him to participate in the community wherever he could. “I have been a part of both national and international competitions, an opportunity that allowed me to receive personal feedback from architects and compare my work against other students from around the world. In particular, the chance to enter my project in the RIBA President’s Medal was the most challenging and rewarding experience of my university studies.”

Gordon’s project ‘Proximity and Architecture—Constructing Territories’ explored the relationship between occupation, food and the city. It was shortlisted for the RIBA President’s Medal in 2012, was the runner-up in the AAA Cavalier Bremworth Unbuilt Architecture Awards 2012 and won the Team Architects Scholarship in Architecture 2012 alongside projects from his peers. Modestly, Gordon credits a lot of this to the University. “The success of this project would not have been possible without the guidance and support I received from my design tutor and course coordinator at Victoria.”

Gordon’s blog can be found at arkitekcher.tumblr.com(opposite page) Creating Territories, ARCI 411 studio project by Gordon Yung.

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Architecture History and TheorySpecialisation overviewArchitecture History and Theory is a three-year specialisation of the BAS . This programme focuses on the historical, social, political and a critical understanding of the built environment . Architecture History and Theory students at Victoria have a unique advantage of an interdisciplinary approach to learning as they share courses with Architecture, Building Science, Interior Architecture and Landscape Architecture .

In this programme, importance is placed on the originality of information uncovered, the creativity of the interpretations made and the rigour of the methodological procedures adopted . Graduates can pursue further studies by carrying out a Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PGDipAHT) then move on to a non-professional Master of Architecture (MArch) .

Career opportunitiesCareer opportunities are diverse, and some require further specialised courses of study:

architectural conservator

archivist

critic or writer

curator

historian

theorist

librarian

museum researcher .

Undergraduate degree structureYear oneYear one of the BAS in Architecture History and Theory provides you with a diverse learning experience from the artistic to the scientific and from sustainable concerns to communicating design concepts . This provides you with a foundation to understand the built environment which you will take into graduate studies in your history and theory specialisation .

Year oneSARC 111 Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 112 Design Processes

SARC 121 Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 131 Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151 Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161 Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162 Design Communication

and one elective course

(opposite page) Final-year project by Master of Architecture (Professional) candidate Sam Skogstad.

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Years two and threeYears two and three teach students to acquire key skills and knowledge and a solid foundation in terms of history and theory, urban design, Pacific culture and heritage . Students in years two and three can take history and theory courses within the Landscape and Interior Architecture programmes . Students can also combine their studies with a wide variety of theory-based subjects including Culture+Context, Art History, Classics or History .

Year twoYear two requires a total of 120 points that include at least two courses from:

ARCI 251 History and Theory of Architecture

INTA 251 History of Interior Architecture

LAND 251 Landscape Architecture History and Theory

SARC 251 History of Building Technology

and elective courses to the value of 90 points*

Year threeYear three requires a total of 120 points that include two courses from:

SARC 351 Urban Design Theory and Practice

SARC 352 Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 353 History of Architecture

SARC 354 Interior Heritage Conservation

and elective courses to the value of 90 points including 45 points at 300 level from courses labelled ARCI, INTA, LAND or SARC*

*Elective courses are to include 120 points at 200–300 level of which 75 points must be from ARCI, INTA, LAND or SARC .

(right) Final-year studio project by Master of Architecture (Professional) graduate Teresa Fitzgerald.

(opposite page) Time Passes, final-year studio project by Master of Architecture (Professional) graduate Renee Nankivell.

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Postgraduate degree structurePostgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PGDipAHT)Students specialising in Architecture History and Theory can continue studies with a one-year PGDipAHT . This leads into the non-professional thesis-based Master of Architecture . Students can take approved courses from Architecture, Interior and Landscape Architecture at 400 level for at least two trimesters .

The PGDipAHT requires a total of 120 points consisting of:SARC 451 Critical Theory of the Designed Environment

SARC 491 Research Methodologies

One of:

ARCI 451 Architecture History and Theory

INTA 451 Theory and Criticism in Interior Architecture

LAND 451 Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism

three further courses from:

ARCI 451 Architecture History and Theory

INTA 451 Theory and Criticism in Interior Architecture

LAND 451 Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism

SARC 452 History of the City in Landscape

SARC 453 History of Architecture

SARC 454 Interior Architecture in Conservation

and a further 30 points numbered 400–499 from courses labelled ARCI, INTA, LAND or SARC

Master of Architecture (MArch)Students who wish to specialise further in Architecture History and Theory can undertake a non-professional MArch thesis . A thesis allows students the flexibility to pursue and test their own research interests . The work that has been produced in the MArch stream is rigorous and innovative and graduates from this programme have gone on to teach and publish at other universities and institutions .

MArch by thesisARCH 591 Thesis—120 points

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Alice BrittendenThird-year Architecture History and Theory and Bachelor of Arts in Art History and History studentAfter completing high school in Christchurch, Alice chose to study Architecture in Wellington because of advice she received from teachers and friends . “During my first year, however, I realised that I was more interested in the actual theory behind architecture rather than the practical application of it, so I chose to move into Architectural History and Theory,” she says .

The flexible structure of the Architecture and History specialisation encourages taking courses from multiple disciplines, allowing for a highly tailored course of study, which suited Alice well . “There is a huge diversity in the courses offered, and the lecturers are all passionate about the subjects that they teach .

“Taking courses in Design, Art History, Classics and History all relate and contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the history of architecture .”

Alice has always had plans to travel and work overseas, and studying the History and Theory Specialisation has given her all the more reason to do so, “the result of studying History and Theory is the endless list of amazing buildings to visit!” Alice was given the opportunity to study at Penn State University in the USA as a part of the Vic Overseas Exchange programme and will travel there for the second trimester .

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Interior ArchitectureSpecialisation overviewInterior architecture is defined as the study of spaces and spatial experiences at the scale of intimate human experience . Interior architecture operates at the interface between architecture and industrial design . The discipline considers the social-cultural, the ecological, the historical and the contemporary context of interiors . Our Interior Architecture students have a unique advantage in sharing common courses with Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Architecture History and Theory and Building Science students, within a facility devoted to the study of the built environment . Students are encouraged to take a strong personal position in relation to design, to experiment and to reflect on the implications of their design position . Our programme aims to prepare students for leadership roles in the interior discipline .

Our Interior Architecture graduates have the tools to become specialists in the design of architectural space and spatial experience . Students are taught to explore how time, movement and perception challenge presumed boundaries between the pragmatic and the theoretical, and even between the habitable and the mythological . Our graduates have gone on to design interior spaces for buildings, spaces for movie narratives, spaces for video games—any career that requires a specialised knowledge of how we interact within space .

Career opportunitiesVictoria’s Master of Interior Architecture degree is internationally recognised . It is affiliated to the Interior Design/Interior Architecture Educators Association (IDEA) . Our graduates find compelling careers as specialists within interior design and architecture firms—others find career opportunities in the following:

interior architecture

stage/movie set design

gaming design

retail design

lighting design

exhibition and furniture design

event and set design

environmental design .

(opposite page) INTA 412 project by Chloe Walbran.

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Undergraduate degree structureYear oneYear one of the BAS in Interior Architecture provides a multidisciplinary approach to exploring design communication, and technological processes relating to the built environment . Students pursuing Interior Architecture share common courses with students interested in Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Building Science and Architecture History and Theory .

Year oneSARC 111 Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 112 Design Processes

SARC 121 Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 122 Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers*

SARC 131 Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151 Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161 Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162 Design Communication

*SARC 122 may be replaced by an elective course by students who have at least 14 credits at Level 3 in each of two of the following: calculus, statistics, physics or modelling .

(left—top) Between Instability and Rejuvenation, Master’s project by Samuel Whitburn.

(left—bottom) Third-year studio project by Zhentiao Lin.

(opposite—top) Third-year studio project by Cameron Price.

(opposite—bottom) Third-year studio project by Marco Duthie.

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Years two and threeYear two of the BAS in Interior Architecture teaches students to acquire and use core skills related explicitly to the discipline, especially design, history of the discipline and communication . Year three provides a deeper knowledge of the specialisation, emphasising independence, self-reflection and engagement with applied problems . Year three involves research-focused learning, in preparation for entering the two-year Master of Interior Architecture (MIA) .

Year twoINTA 211 Interior Architecture Design

INTA 212 Interior Architecture Design Integration

INTA 251 History of Interior Architecture

INTA 261 Drawing and Modelling for Interior Architecture

SARC 221 Building Materials and Construction

SARC 223 Human Environmental Science

and one elective course

Year threeINTA 311 Interior Architecture Design

INTA 312 Interior Architecture Design Integration

INTA 321 Interior Fit-out Technologies

SARC 323 Colour, Pattern, Light

SARC 352 Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 362 Introduction to Practice and Management

and one elective course

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Postgraduate degree structureThe Master of Interior Architecture (MIA) is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections .

Part OnePart One is structured as taught courses that embrace substantive disciplinary material, theory, research methodologies and research through design projects .

Part OneINTA 411 Interior Architecture Design

INTA 412 Interior Architecture Design Research

INTA 421 Integrated Technologies

INTA 451 Theory and Criticism in Interior Architecture

SARC 461 Professional Practice

SARC 491 Research Methodologies

and one elective course

(left) Guardian to Self-Empowerment, Master’s project by Asia-Rae Ormsby.

(opposite page) The Interiority of Sleep, Master’s project by Chloe Walbran.

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Part TwoPart Two, which completes the degree, is structured as a one-year studio-based design research project, from a selected range of research topics . Students will learn to establish a strong personal position in response to social, cultural and theoretical imperatives, while independently researching interior architecture-specific issues through advanced modes of design inquiry .

Part TwoINTA 591 Interior Architecture Research Thesis—120 points

or in special circumstances

INTA 592 Interior Architecture Research Thesis—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses numbered 400–599

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Matthew ReidMaster of Interior Architecture studentAfter a Victoria University representative came to talk to Matthew’s secondary school in New Plymouth, he was convinced Victoria was where he wanted to study Interior Architecture .

Matthew believes that the Interior Architecture programme has exceeded his expectations . He says that it has “been a lot of hard work, but has definitely been worth it” .

During his studies at Victoria, he has received a Summer Scholarship in his third year where he “produced a number of drawings for research that Daniel Brown (Interior Architecture Lecturer) was doing on tombs in Milan” .

His advice to students considering postgraduate study is: “understanding how the University functions, as well as knowing the staff would be an advantage when doing Master’s … it will help in future job opportunities” .

Upon finishing his Master’s degree, Matthew intends to “get involved in sport architecture, designing stadiums and facilities for major sporting events around the world” .

“Wellington is a great city to be a student in . I have been here for five years and it keeps getting better . Always so much to see and do . There are definitely a number of hidden treasures in and around Wellington, such as areas along the coast around Shelly Bay, Island Bay and even out at Makara .”

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Ariana PiaMaster of Interior Architecture student Te Rōpū Āwhina MentorAfter completing high school Ariana moved from Nelson to Wellington and began working in the Display department at Kirkcaldie & Stains creating window installations . After two years, she moved to Germany for 18 months before realising that she wanted to go to university .

“I was curious about the Architecture and Design School so I went and had a talk with someone helpful up at Kelburn Campus who took me through the degrees that I could take and gave me the information that I’d need . He encouraged me to go down to the Te Aro Campus and have a look around, regardless of the fact that it wasn’t an open day . I came down to have a look and there was an exhibition on covering all the disciplines . It inspired me,” she says .

“Being able to put my ideas into 3D forms always surprises me, and I’ve learnt a lot without realising it . Getting to fifth year was a surprise . Every year I’ve always wondered whether I could do this project, this design, this essay because sometimes it seems like a lot of work to get through, but once I’ve found something within it that I’m passionate about then it gets easier,” she says .

Her advice to students considering doing postgraduate studies is to “make sure that what you’re considering for your thesis is something that you’re passionate about . If you’ve ever wanted a chance to design something but haven’t been able to do it during your studies then this is your opportunity . Do it and be prepared to work hard .

“I’ve met some amazing and extremely talented people here who continue to inspire me to reach for my goals . Being a part of Te Rōpū Āwhina has opened a lot of doors for me; helping mentees shows me another perspective of my own work which I normally wouldn’t consider .”

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Landscape ArchitectureSpecialisation overviewLandscape architecture sits at the forefront of rising global interest in the environment, the sustainability of cities and the quality of urban life . As facilitators of change, landscape architects draw together diverse disciplinary interests in the creation of landscapes that are culturally, economically, socially and environmentally responsive .

Landscape architecture blends the rigorous understanding of the sciences, focusing on ecology and natural systems, with the creative process of embracing art and human interactions with the landscape . Victoria’s Landscape Architecture programme encompasses the technology of site development and site systems, historical and contemporary interactions of people in the landscape and design as critical methods of facilitating landscape change . All of these subjects are offered in an integrated programme anchored by the studio experience .

Opportunities for the integration of teaching across disciplines are widespread at the School of Architecture and across the academic community at Victoria . Landscape Architecture students work on projects that address place, community, activity, meaning, form and aesthetics . The outcomes include integrated solutions for open space networks, transport routes, street typologies, built form, land use mixes, recreation space, community facilities and urban ecology .

Our BAS in Landscape Architecture combined with the Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) is recognised nationally and internationally as meeting the academic requirements for registration as a professional landscape architect . The programme’s vigorous interdisciplinary design culture promotes the skills and values necessary to practise as a landscape architect in a wide variety of contexts within this rapidly growing and pivotal field of the built environment .

Career opportunitiesLandscape architects work in private, public and academic organisations and typically collaborate with artists, ecologists, architects, planners and engineers to plan and design a wide variety of projects at regional, urban and local scales . These may include large-scale infrastructure projects and the rehabilitation and design of post-industrial and residual urban sites as well as parks, gardens and public open spaces . Victoria’s Landscape Architecture programme is accredited by the New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects (NZILA) and prepares students for registration as landscape architects .

Graduates from the programme are working in many different capacities throughout New Zealand and abroad . Possible career opportunities include:

parks and recreation planning

site design and planning

urban design

civil design and public infrastructure consultant

sustainable development consultant

landscape assessor .

(previous page) Master’s project by Brad Ward.

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Undergraduate degree structureYear oneThe first year of study provides a common foundation for all students in the School of Architecture including course content spanning design, technology, history and theory .

Year oneSARC 111 Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 112 Design Processes

SARC 121 Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 131 Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151 Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161 Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162 Design Communication

and one elective course

(left top and bottom) LAND 211/261 assignment by Anna Furniss.

(opposite page) Anticipating the Big One, Master’s project by James Fischer.

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Years two and threeIn the second year students are introduced to courses in landscape architectural design, technology, site systems/ ecology, history and theory . The third year introduces greater complexity and broad-scale issues related to landscape planning and urban interventions requiring more sophisticated integration of human and natural conditions into the design process .

With successful completion of the first three years, students can be awarded the BAS in Landscape Architecture .

Year twoLAND 211 Landscape Architecture and Design

LAND 212 Landscape Architecture Design Integration

LAND 221 Landscape Architecture Sites and Systems

LAND 222 Landscape Architecture Application

LAND 251 Landscape Architecture History and Theory

LAND 261 Landscape Architecture Communication

and one elective course

Year threeLAND 311 Landscape Architecture Design

LAND 312 Landscape Architecture Design Integration

LAND 321 Landscape Architecture Construction

SARC 351 Urban Design Theory and Practice

SARC 352 Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 362 Introduction to Practice and Management

and one elective course

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Postgraduate degree structureThe Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections .

Part OneStudents interested in postgraduate study may continue for two additional years and earn the MLA degree . In Part One students are introduced to design-based research, they develop greater understanding of theory and criticism in landscape architecture and are engaged in additional courses that provide exposure to contemporary practice in landscape architecture .

Part OneLAND 411 Landscape Architecture Design

LAND 412 Landscape Architecture Design Research

LAND 421 Urban Technologies

LAND 451 Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism

SARC 461 Professional Practice

SARC 491 Research Methodologies

and one elective course

(left—top) Restoring Mauri to the Land (site—Lake Waiorongomai, Otaki), fourth-year project by Winston Dewhirst.

(left—bottom) Fourth-year studio project by Brad Dobson.

(opposite page) Fourth-year studio project by Landscape Architecture graduate Nicholas Griffin.

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Part TwoIn Part Two students’ work is devoted to the development of original work through preparation of the Master’s thesis . This is intended to be a culminating experience that demonstrates the capability for individual thought and creativity in landscape architecture .

Part TwoLAND 591 Landscape Architecture Research Thesis—120 points

or in special circumstances

LAND 592 Landscape Architecture Research Thesis—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses numbered 400–599

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Maria RodgersGraduate Diploma in Designed Environments (Landscape Architecture) studentComing from a family of gardeners, Maria Rodgers grew up surrounded by plants . “Gardens have always been a part of my life, as has creating beautiful things and images .” Looking back, she feels this planted the seed of a desire to work in landscape architecture .

She embarked on an artist’s career, studying at Elam Art School and continuing to create and exhibit her work . The decision to venture into landscape architecture came more recently . “I decided to combine my two interests and started studying landscape and doing some photography and writing on gardens for various magazines . I realised I wanted to learn more and try returning to university .”

Maria made some enquiries and discovered that with her previous study she was able to enrol for the Graduate Diploma in Designed Environments with the School of Architecture, a shorter course to get her to the Master’s level .

“Initially, going back to study was hard, but with the help of staff and my peers I got up to speed with the computer skills necessary .”

The help of and communication with fellow students in particular is a highlight for Maria . “I enjoy working alongside my fellow students . I feel at home in the Landscape Architecture programme and enjoy the community of people who have a shared passion . It has opened up the expansive field of landscape architecture for me .”

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Natasha MilneMaster of Landscape Architecture studentDesign means different things to different people, and for Natasha Milne it is first and foremost a form of expression . “For as long as I can remember I have been drawing, painting, modelling or doing something creative because it is what I get enjoyment from and the way in which my brain works … unlike my sister, I never quite grasped numbers .”

Studying Landscape Architecture at Victoria was the perfect fit as a creative outlet for Natasha . “Landscape architects have a larger scope (outdoors) to work with than architects, which is why the field is good for me . I had always been interested in the outdoors, and was introduced to native plant names from a young age after spending years walking around the forest with Dad . Landscape architecture just made sense . I treat each design as unique, with different opportunities and limitations .”

Victoria also offered Natasha opportunities beyond the University that helped to expand her creativity and form her design approaches . “The IFLA (International Federation of Landscape Architects) conference was a great opportunity, and the chance to work with iwi and do a project for them . This has given me a huge insight about working with different cultures as we will be doing this throughout our profession in New Zealand .

“Victoria has great lecturers who are very passionate about the course . There have also been good-quality guest lecturers who have been very knowledgeable and interesting to listen to . We had a lecturer from France . She taught the class a lot as we were exposed to different ways of learning and it really tested the way we think about design .”

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Bachelor of Building ScienceUndergraduate overviewOur Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) examines and analyses the built environment and the way people interact with it . It gives a thorough grounding in the development of construction methods, materials and systems, as well as an awareness of the impact and importance of trends in the development of sustainable building technologies . It introduces the science of comfort in terms of air quality, heat, light and sound . You will develop an understanding of structural engineering, and of the legal and economic environments in which buildings are constructed and inhabited .

At Victoria, Building Science is taught alongside the Architecture, Architecture History and Theory, Interior Architecture and Landscape Architecture programmes, enabling BBSc students to engage with these related disciplines and ensure the science of buildings is explored in the context of an awareness of architectural design issues .

Students of Building Science should have a keen interest in the complexities of the building construction process and an ability to interact well with others . With the increasing emphasis on project management, students should develop a sharp business mind as well .

We expect a majority of the BBSc graduates to continue their education and undertake the Master’s degree in Building Science .

For more information on the BBSc and its specialisations, go to www.victoria.ac.nz/bbsc

(opposite page) Inside First Light House. Image credit: Ron Blunt

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Undergraduate degree structureYear oneIn your first year you study core courses alongside students in the first year of the Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) . This maximises your exposure to all aspects of the built environment and is designed to increase your awareness of different disciplines contributing to it . The first year of the programme consists of seven introductory courses that lay the foundations for the following years, plus an elective course of your choice . Two technically-orientated courses focus on the technologies inherent in today’s buildings and sustainability . Four others cover basic aspects of design and the associated history and theory . They will introduce you to the world of architecture in which building science plays a crucial role .

Year oneSARC 111 Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 121 Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 122 Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers*

SARC 131 Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151 Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161 Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162 Design Communication

and one elective course

*SARC 122 may be replaced by an elective course by students who have at least 14 credits at Level 3 in each of two of the following: calculus, statistics, physics or modelling .

Years two and threeIn the following two years you will study core Building Science topics including construction, structures, environmental science, systems and management . At the end of three years’ study you will have knowledge and skills to either begin a satisfying career in some aspect of the building industry or continue your study in the two-year Master of Building Science programme . Depending on your choice of courses you can specialise in either Sustainable Engineering Systems or Project Management . The Master’s will present the opportunity for a graduate to focus on a specialist subject area of their choice . Some students will continue on beyond that to undertake a PhD in Building Science .

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Postgraduate overviewMaster of Building Science (MBSc)The MBSc is a two-year postgraduate degree with a focus on examining the science of the built environment in depth . Entry into the MBSc will be available to BBSc graduates with grades of B average in years two and three of the BBSc degree . You can specialise in either Sustainable Engineering Systems or Project Management .

During the first year of the MBSc students will enrol in courses such as Project Integration, Integrated Technologies, Sustainable Engineering, Buildings and Energy, Green Building Assessment, Building Project Management, Built Facilities Management and Research Methodologies .

In the second year of the MBSc students undertake a Building Science Research Thesis, where a student’s interests in a topic of their choice are fully researched and developed . The thesis allows students to establish a strong academic position in the analysis of an aspect of a building, researched in both theoretical and practical form .

SpecialisationYear of study

One Two Three Four Five

Project Management

BBSc year one

BBSc Project ManagementMBSc Master of Building Science Project

Management

Sustainable Engineering Systems

BBSc Sustainable Engineering SystemsMBSc Master of Building Science Sustainable

Engineering Systems

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Project ManagementSpecialisation overviewProject management is the methodical approach to planning and guiding project processes from start to finish . The processes are guided through five stages: initiation, planning, executing, controlling and closing . Project management can be applied to almost any type of project .

Victoria offers a specialisation in Project Management within our Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) degree that is designed for students who want a professional career at the core of the building industry . This specialisation focuses on the logistics surrounding the built economic environment . Some key topics include the feasibility analysis, planning, cost control and the critical path of building and urban environments .

The Project Management specialisation is taken alongside the core Building Science and elective courses of your choosing . In this specialisation, students will study topics including economics, cost planning, project management and construction law in the second and third years of study . These courses can be enhanced by carefully selected elective courses related to Project Management .

This specialisation is available as a postgraduate specialisation within the Master of Building Science (MBSc), for students who wish to pursue further study at postgraduate level for a professionally recognised qualification .

Career opportunitiesThere are many career opportunities in this area of expertise that include the following:

construction project management

building consultant

building research

consultant on city council buildings consent processes

technician in a structural engineering consultancy, perhaps beginning with computerised drafting and moving into management

quantity surveying

technical writing .

(opposite page) Project by Phd student Anastasia Globa.

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Sustainable Engineering SystemsSpecialisation overviewSustainability is an important component in the built environment . It involves the promotion of energy efficient buildings and minimising the harm to our environment . At Victoria, we offer a new specialisation in Sustainable Engineering Systems within our Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) degree that is designed for students who want a professional career at the core of the building industry .

Sustainable Engineering Systems focuses on the study and performance simulation of environmental engineering systems and sustainability at both the building and urban level . Students will study and develop appropriate design systems to address the quality of the built environment from heating to lighting to air quality and acoustics, while incorporating the efficient use of sustainable materials and building resources .

This specialisation is taken alongside the core Building Science and elective courses of your choosing . In this specialisation, students will study topics including environmental engineering systems, sustainable architecture, sustainable engineering systems design and sustainable and regenerative design in buildings in the second and third years of study . These courses can be enhanced by carefully selected elective courses related to sustainability or engineering .

This specialisation is available at a postgraduate level within the Master of Building Science (MBSc), for students who wish to pursue further study at postgraduate level for a professionally recognised qualification .

Career opportunitiesThere are many career opportunities in this area of expertise that include the following:

sustainable engineering systems designer

consultant advising design teams on energy conservation

lighting adviser, designer or supplier

researching building materials’ performance either in a private company or a research institution such as the Building Research Association of New Zealand (BRANZ)

consultant for the city council buildings consent processes

technician in a structural engineering consultancy, perhaps beginning with computerised drafting and moving into management

fire design and regulations

quantity surveying

acoustic engineering

technical writing .

(opposite page) Third-year Studio project by Loren Pingol.

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Keshi MeyerThird-year Building Science studentKeshi Meyer fell in love with Wellington when she moved to the city from the Waikato to study in the Building Science programme at Victoria . “I absolutely love Wellington! It’s so different to any other place I have visited . All the people just fit in, no matter who they are or what they do .”

This sense of being is also what drew Keshi to Building Science, because it was “down-to-earth” and could be used in many different ways . Keshi felt that the programme assisted her in finding her career path . “I was drawn into the construction field early on, but it wasn’t until the end of my first year when I really looked into building science as a possible career .” This is a typical experience for students in the School of Architecture, where the first year is shared before the student chooses their specialisation for the second year, allowing them to discover their passions and where their strengths lie .

Once that passion is ignited, students are able to find their niche in the professional world .

“Being able to go on site visits and talk with some of the professionals really helps to understand what happens in the ‘real world’, it puts everything in perspective .”

And what happens after students graduate is, of course, just as important as their time at Victoria . “At the moment, my plan would be to stay in Wellington to get a job, or head down to Christchurch to help out with the Christchurch rebuild .”

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We’ve known for some time that the School of Design is a leader in New Zealand design education, with pioneering programmes, the latest digital technologies, world-class facilities and passionate, dedicated educators and researchers . And now we can proudly back up that claim with the results of the Tertiary Education Commission’s recent ranking of New Zealand universities, which placed Victoria University as number one university in the nation for research quality and number one in the design subject area . We are delighted with these results and are inspired to continue to grow our strengths, develop new areas of expertise and to remain ahead of the pack .

One of the reasons we have been able to establish such a reputation for excellence is the distinctive character of innovation at the School of Design . We recognise that design, as a relatively young discipline, thrives in an environment of porous boundaries, innovates with the fertilisation of diverse teams and imagines the as yet unimagined through conceptual thinking and collaboration . Building such porosities into our curriculum and research programmes provides clear areas of focus and expertise in key areas, while also allowing opportunities for cross- and interdisciplinary teamwork . In a number of our studios, you will find students from across our specialisations working together, forging new design approaches, pathways and solutions . This environment of

creative collaboration is mirrored in the multidisciplinary teaching and research capabilities of the School of Design, as well as the significant international profile, expertise and experience of our academic staff .

The commitment to foresee and lead the latest developments in design education, and to engage with local, national and global contexts is core to our methodology of design education . Such willingness to accommodate change and to adapt to new challenges is essential for design in the 21st century . As a young discipline and a practice design is constantly evolving . We have composed our academic programmes to meet new trends, technologies and approaches as they emerge . The Bachelor of Design Innovation (BDI), the Master of Design Innovation (MDI) and the Design Research Innovation Lab (DRIL) PhD programme all demonstrate a clear commitment to research, innovation and value creation ‘by, through and for design’ . This approach ensures that our graduates are prepared for the changes they will face in their professional careers, and provides them with the tools, skills and methods necessary not only to recognise their potential but also to actively implement meaningful change .

www.victoria.ac.nz/design

www.schoolofdesign.ac.nz

School of

Design

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Shiping Toohey’s wearable technology design, Cinderella Intoxication, which featured in the World of Wearable Arts show.

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Undergraduate overviewBachelor of Design Innovation (BDI) overviewAt the School of Design we offer a three-year BDI with three specialisations—Industrial Design, Media Design and Culture+Context .

The BDI then leads into a two-year Master of Design Innovation (MDI) . These degree structures give students a greater variety of recognised qualifications and a much greater opportunity to customise their course of study to their individual interests and intended careers .

Students are encouraged to include minors within the BDI, thereby allowing them to easily customise their course of study with a secondary field . Culture+Context emphasises the importance of this outside field requiring enrolled students to pursue a minor in a non-design discipline, while Media Design and Industrial Design students may also choose to pursue a minor in a second discipline, but it is not compulsory . Minors offer Design students a unique ability to construct courses of study not available elsewhere—nationally or internationally .

A core characteristic of Design at Victoria is the emphasis on interdisciplinarity . This is a result of our belief that design and design education are enriched through interaction with disciplines not typically associated with design . This approach has real-world benefits, as demonstrated by our graduates who occupy a great diversity of professional positions and are

pursuing exciting career pathways, both in New Zealand and abroad . The BDI and MDI degrees are aimed at educating future generations of designers, design consultants, design educators, curators, critics and advocates . The breadth of expertise and interest held by these future design leaders will strengthen the operating framework for design by contextualising it within theoretical, technological, commercial, social and cultural contexts . Because of this emphasis, whatever direction our design graduates choose to follow, they take with them the knowledge that design is an agent for positive change, and the skill set to realise their goals .

Innovation is also a central aspect of design education at Victoria, as reflected in the names of our qualifications . In studios and seminars an experimental approach to design and design education is practised at the School . This methodology encourages creative and critically reflective design solutions . Innovation is a key part of any research project, and at the School of Design we are proud of our research-led programmes . This is true for both the BDI and the MDI, with staff research informing the undergraduate experience, and at the Master’s level, with students actively engaged in research and the creation of new knowledge through good design .

For more information on the BDI and its specialisations, go to www.victoria.ac.nz/bdi

(opposite page—left to right, top to bottom) Projects by Yun Jeen Loh and Zhou Fang, Cole Holyoake, Rebekah Dorman, William Barber, Warren Ariston-Smith, Christopher Callus, Lily West, Dylan Gordon and Jeremy Hooper.

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Postgraduate overviewMaster of Design Innovation (MDI) overviewThe MDI is available in all three specialisations—Industrial Design, Media Design and Culture+Context . Additionally, students can complete an MDI degree with a Computer Graphics specialisation .

This offers students a structured qualification that provides necessary support throughout the two-year programme . The MDI acknowledges that a Master’s degree is becoming the standard entry-level professional qualification in Europe and provides students with the skills necessary to confidently navigate an impressive professional career pathway .

The MDI will: prepare students for advanced levels of professional

employment

enable students to develop a critical view of new technologies and the social and cultural implications of design today

develop high-level skills for conceiving and constructing artefacts, systems and environments

ensure a high level of expertise in human-focused research methodologies and design in multicultural contexts in combination with a concentration on the user/technology interface

enable students to actively participate in the process of creating value by design, to shape business strategy and to differentiate according to strategic design objectives

engage with industry and cultural organisations through applied research projects

encourage international exchanges at the postgraduate level .

New postgraduate programme in Computer Graphics announcedIn 2012, the School of Design introduced Computer Graphics as a new Master’s programme within the MDI . The emerging career opportunities in the region’s internationally acknowledged digital creative sector make Wellington and the Victoria School of Design an optimal location to study this unique and exciting new specialisation . Refer to page 102 for details .

Graduate Diploma in Design Innovation (GradDipDI)The 120-point GradDipDI is a flexible programme designed for BDI graduates (or those who have completed a similar degree) wishing to broaden their design education with a further year of study at 300 level in one of the other specialisations at the School of Design . It will also be particularly useful for students coming from other institutions prior to entry to the two-year MDI programme .

PhD overviewThe Design Research and Innovation Lab (DRIL) provides the context and community for innovative design research to develop and flourish at the School of Design . The PhD in Design Innovation is intended for students who are highly skilled designers and aspire to exceptional creative and analytical process, or for students who would like to pursue the study of design from a theoretical, philosophical or cultural perspective . For further information and the call for candidates, see www.victoria.ac.nz/design/study/postgraduate/phd

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Undergraduate and postgraduate chart

SpecialisationYear of study

One Two Three Part One MDI Part Two MDI

Culture+Context

BDI year one

BDI Culture+ContextMDI

Master of Design Innovation Culture+Context

Industrial Design BDI Industrial DesignMDI

Master of Design Innovation Industrial Design

Media Design BDI Media Design

MDI Master of Design Innovation

Media Design

MDI Master of Design Innovation

Computer Graphics

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Online success—Pinokio“Sometimes, things are not what they seem .” This is the opening line of the project video about Pinokio, an animatronic lamp created by Design School students Shanshan Zhou, Adam Ben-Dror and Joss Doggett . This video has close to 900,000 views on vimeo .com and also made the ‘Staff Pick’ list .

Pinokio was a collaborative project between Media Design and Industrial Design students . The brief was to ‘bring an everyday object to life, with a surprise’, and Zhou says coming up with the concept of Pinokio took a lot of discussion and creative brainstorming . Pinokio is a robotic lamp, equipped with camera and sensors, driven by an Arduino microprocessor and programmed with Processing . Pinokio responds to both humans and its environment based on what it sees and hears, and also exercises its ‘free will’ by disobeying human command when it is switched off, switching itself back on again .

Shanshan Zhou was in charge of the designing and programming of Pinokio’s Artificial Intelligence, and says she approached this by drawing inspiration from the knowledge she had gained studying different fields of Media Design at Victoria . “From object-oriented programming to game design and 3D animation, I was lucky because only Victoria would allow their undergraduates to learn so many different things in just three years .

“I have always wanted to pursue a career in the creative and new media industry,” says Shanshan . “Studying Media Design at Victoria University of Wellington has not only equipped me with professional skills and a better understanding of cutting-edge topics in new media, it has also taught me to think forward, stay curious and be open to new ideas .”

These are precisely the traits that brought the team great success with Pinokio, and Shanshan would argue that they “not only make us better designers, but more open-minded and adaptable people” as well .

http://vimeo.com/channels/staffpicks/53476316

(right) Pinokio looking for someone to play with.

(opposite page) Shanshan and Pinokio interacting.

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First-year DesignProgramme overviewA unique and distinguishing feature of the School of Design’s first-year Design programme is its cross-disciplinary nature, which allows for relationships across Culture+Context, Industrial Design and Media Design to be investigated and redefined . In an intense and integrated programme of study, first-year students investigate a broad range of essential design ideas, principles, histories, theories, practices and strategies . Reflections on two-, three- and four-dimensional design ideas are also undertaken during this first year, allowing students to challenge traditional and presumptive definitions of design .

The first-year Design programme offers a highly structured learning environment that supports creative exploration, helping students to develop the discipline necessary for working in an innovative design practice . Study is structured around the concept of ‘designing by making’ where students develop design confidence and commitment through a series of strategically formulated and progressively complex design challenges . All students are encouraged and assisted to develop a strong, individual approach to design that allows them to engage with both the physical and the digital while evolving a commitment to a specific design discipline .

Following the first-year Design programme, students apply for selection into a specialisation .

(opposite page, left to right, top to bottom) First year projects by Jack Hawke, Janice Lum, Frances McMichael and Sebastien Voerman.

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Culture+ContextSpecialisation overviewCulture+Context combines design research, thinking and critical practice in the pursuit of creative solutions . A unique programme in New Zealand, the specialisation gives students the opportunity to design objects, systems and environments (both real and virtual) within a critical, analytical and conceptual framework . Culture+Context is conceived around an understanding that cultures shape design, and in turn, design shapes cultures . Topics explored in Culture+Context courses include:

conceptual and experimental design practices

design research methods including ethnographic and psychological approaches

social design for/and with communities

sustainable design theory and practice

DIY design and maker cultures

design for the cultural sector including exhibition design and curation

photography, digital imaging and computer culture .

The Culture+Context specialisation offers a cross-disciplinary qualification for students who have a strong interest in design and who seek professional career opportunities in a wide variety of design and design-related fields, both enhancing and complementing traditional design practice .

Culture+Context minorsAll Culture+Context students are required to include one minor in their programme of study to complete their degree . The minor must be made up of courses from outside the BDI schedule . Suggested minors include:

Architecture History and Theory

Art History

Asian Studies

Computer Science

Creative Writing

Cultural Anthropology

Development Studies

Electronic and Computer Systems

English Literature

European Studies

Film

Geography

Management

Māori Studies

Marketing

Media Studies

Music

Pacific Studies

Philosophy

Psychology

Religious Studies

Sociology

Theatre .(opposite page) Working from the poetry of Bauldelaire, Walter Benjamin describes the flaneur as “someone abandoned in the crowd”. In Domestic Cityspaces, a photo-essay for CCDN 331 Live Theory, Mata Freshwater subverts this idea of the flaneur, literally abandoning the crowd of a bustling metropolis and seeking a quiet domestic stillness.

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Career opportunitiesThere are unlimited opportunities potentially within reach for students with a Culture+Context background, as this programme aligns with contemporary expectations and the developing needs across the creative industries, businesses and cultural organisations .

The BDI and MDI in Culture+Context provide a wide variety of career opportunities, a few of which are listed below:

Culture+Context specialisation with one minor*Minor subject CareerArt History Museum/gallery curator, design critic, event/experience designer

Asian Studies International design ambassador, policy advisor, design consultant

Cultural Anthropology Design researcher/consultant, trend analyst

Development Studies NGO strategist/consultant, service designer, policy advisor

Film Film industry writer, critic, producer

Management Agency manager, design srategist, marketing and advertising executive

Māori Studies Māori design advocate/curator/specialist

Marketing Marketing and advertising executive, advertising planner, design strategist, entrepreneur

Media Studies Media researcher, producer, entrepreneur

Psychology Product/system interface and usability designer

Sociology Design consultant/design critic/social issues advocate

*Culture+Context students are also able to select two minors .

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Lomographic Flight by Marius Myklebust was produced for CCDN 244 Expanded photographics and explores the relationship between flight and film.

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Undergraduate degree structureYear oneThe first year of study is shared across all specialisations and introduces students to the fundamentals of design practice and theory in a cross-disciplinary context . Students will learn to take ownership of their course of study and configure it accordingly with a view to their ultimate specialisation or intended areas of focus . Students need to identify and commit to their outside minor in the first trimester of study .

Year oneDSDN 101 Design Visualisation

DSDN 111 Ideas and Principles of Design

DSDN 171 Design in Context

WRIT 101/151 Writing English or Writing English as a Second Language*

one further DSDN course from courses numbered 100–199 (DSDN 144 is recommended)

and three elective courses≠

*WRIT 101/151 may be replaced with any 100-level course offered by Victoria University by students who have achieved 14 credits in NCEA Level 3 English, history, art history, classics, geography or economics .

(left) Alexandre Bannwarth’s project for DSDN 101 Design Visualisation explores his own national identity in a flash animation of a stork and pūkeko.

(opposite page) The Subverse by Rob Chesney is a guitar amp system designed for corporate disruption, infiltration and guerrilla tactics. Produced for CCDN 231, a guitar amp is built into a plain-looking business briefcase and can be used wirelessly from up to 9m away.

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Years two and threeIn year two of the BDI, Culture+Context students will gain insightful and critical understanding of design research, design thinking and critical practice.

In year three, students will acquire a broad appreciation of how design contributes to the fields of material and visual culture as well as the diversity of other disciplines and practices. Year three culminates in the innovative and integrative course, Design +, where students explore the affinities between design and their minor in a studio context.

Year twoCCDN 271 Design as Inquiry

and two of:

CCDN 231 Experimental Design Ideas

CCDN 233 Design Ethnography

CCDN 244 Expanded Photographics

and elective courses to the value of 60 points≠

Year threeCCDN 331 Live Theory

CCDN 332 Design +

CCDN 371 Cultures of Design

and elective courses to the value of 60 points≠

≠Electives within the BDI in Culture+Context must include:

[+] a minor in a recognised subject requiring 60 points from courses numbered 200–399 from a set of courses offered for a major, including at least 15 points from courses at 300 level

[+] 75 points from BDI courses

[+] a total of at least 80 points from courses numbered 200–399, including at least 20 points at 300 level.

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Postgraduate degree structureThe Master of Design Innovation (MDI) specialising in Culture+Context is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections .

Part OneIn Part One students can customise their course of study by selecting from a range of cross-disciplinary and/or Culture+Context-specific electives . All students are introduced to design research methods as well as sharing their unique expertise in the cross-disciplinary Design Led Futures course .

Part OneDSDN 411 Design Led Futures

DSDN 481 Research Methods

one course from:

CCDN 431 Conceptual Design Ideas

CCDN 444 Computer Generated Culture

CCDN 471 Cultural Factors

CCDN 472 Advanced Theory

and elective courses at 400 level to the value of 30 points

(left—top) Designing Death by Lauren Wickens, Amanda Symon, Joy Whittington and Brian Kristensen, produced for CCDN 371 Cultures of Design, critically explores attitudes to euthanasia.

(left—bottom) AquaLeg Prosthesis by Francis Guerin and Mark Ewing, produced for CCDN 371 Cultures of Design, critically explores the future power and usuability of bionic limbs.

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Part TwoIn Part Two work is devoted to the development of an original creative or theoretical work by thesis . Each student will complete one elective course and a 90-point thesis . The thesis offers the opportunity to explore design issues to significant levels of complexity, sophistication and resolution .

Part TwoCCDN 592 Thesis—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses numbered 400–599

All courses are subject to approval .

(right—top) Indigenous Knowledge: A Visual Exploration by Jodi Meadows, produced for CCDN 332 Design +, visually explores products and customs involved in food rituals in Fiji.

(right— bottom) What is Metaphor? by Lee Woodman is a creative interpretation of the rhetorical device of metaphor produced for CCDN 332 Design +.

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Kelly Ann McKercherBDI in Culture+Context graduateKelly Ann McKercher was snapped up by the professional world almost immediately after graduating, which she thinks was more than just luck . “The Culture+Context programme helped me to become a better critical thinker in the design space . I was able to speak the language of design and that opened up a lot of doors for me .”

Not one to settle for the ordinary, Kelly was drawn to Victoria University’s School of Design because she wanted to learn how to think critically . “I wanted not only to learn how to do design, but also to think and to talk about it .” Victoria more than lived up to these expectations . “I was blown away by the calibre of lecturers and methodologies taught at undergraduate level . The Culture+Context programme set me up for a career .”

Now working for New Zealand’s leading Usability Consultancy, Kelly Ann is carving out the career she desired as a Service Designer, facilitating the creation of new social services as well as helping to shape the ideas of start-up companies working in the medical innovation space . “I hope to carry on this path and also take my practice overseas to the best international consulting firms .”

(left, top and bottom) The Ethnography of Sheet Fort Building by Kelly Ann McKercher produced for CCDN 332 Design +.

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Mata FreshwaterCulture+Context and Bachelor of Arts in Cultural Anthropology and Film studentMata Freshwater has experimented with some interesting mediums over the course of her undergraduate degree in Culture+Context design at Victoria . “The best thing about the Culture+Context programme is being able to try big ideas and new mediums in thought-provoking ways .

“I worked as a Research Assistant over the summer for a lecturer, where we made a ‘Grow Your Own Lamb’ service, making (speculative) in-vitro meat for customers . I had to sew a few different cuts of lamb out of felt for an online service, where one could choose to grow lamb either the ‘natural’ way or with biotechnology … getting paid to craft in-vitro meat was one of the best jobs I’ve had!”

Mata has also had the opportunity to work using film, complementing her Bachelor of Arts . “Culture+Context gave me the opportunity to hone and learn practical skills—my current

niche being illustrating and video making . This was a fun way of combining my majors—I’ve made a couple of videos, which is a great way to add my own humour and quirkiness to more serious topics .”

In her final year of her degree, and working as a tutor at Victoria, Mata is drawn to both the academic and the professional world of Culture+Context design, and feels that her time at Victoria has prepared her for both .

“Victoria has allowed me to try new ideas, learn and hone my skills and find what I am really interested in . I have had a variety of job experiences, and have met and had my work recognised by industry professionals—which is amazing!”

Mata was also awarded the Gibson Group prize for Excellence in the Culture+Context programme .

Social Design produced by Mata Freshwater is a video piece that explores the definition and role of social design.

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Fall Off by Sam Stringleman. Computer generated through a web interface in which surface density is defined by the placement of objects on a virtual table. Runner-up in the 2012 NZ Student Craft/Design Awards.

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Industrial DesignSpecialisation overviewIndustrial design questions complex social and cultural issues and seeks solutions through the medium of manufactured products . Using technology in innovative ways, industrial design pursues new and unexpected insights that result in original, useful and meaningful products or systems to enrich daily life .

The programme encourages a hands-on experimental approach to design with a focus on creative applications of digital technologies that result in physical outputs . Through these technologies students are encouraged to consider new and more sustainable forms of manufacturing and distribution . With full access to the School’s extensive digital prototyping capabilities, students quickly build expertise in digital creation, 3D modelling and visualisation, digital fabrication with a particular emphasis on 3D printing and additive manufacturing .

Another area of the specialisation is the investigation of the human body and mind through design experiments that address people’s physiological, cognitive, behavioural and emotional systems .

The Industrial Design programme also encourages creative exchange with other specialisations, such as Culture+Context, allowing students to explore the theoretical, social and cultural aspects of the discipline . In conjunction with Media Design, students can investigate interactive, responsive and intelligent technologies, products and environments . Industrial Design students can elect to include a minor (for example, with engineering or commerce), to enhance their practice-based studies, although this is not required .

The programme is committed to collaboration with industry leaders in New Zealand and internationally, and encourages students to reach wider audiences and explore ideas within a business and entrepreneurial context .

Career opportunitiesThe Industrial Design specialisation prepares graduates for work as designers in an exciting variety of professional product design areas such as healthcare, office and industrial equipment, furniture, home entertainment, homeware, personal accessories, sports and leisure, transportation, agricultural products, lighting and architectural and urban products . Depending on interests and expertise, graduates may target a specific product category as an in-house designer or may prefer the diversity offered by consultancy . Specialisations within the discipline such as computer-aided design (CAD) expertise or human factors will lead to more focused career niches, while careers in related fields such as design education are also possible .

Opportunities include: Product designer

Design consultant/design strategist

CAD and digital prototyping designer

Product development project manager

Film prop/set designer

Exhibition designer

Human-focused designer

Academic/corporate design researcher

Design and technology educator

Biodesign/bio-medical designer .

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Undergraduate degree structureYear oneThe first year of study is shared across all specialisations and introduces students to the fundamentals of design practice and theory in a cross-disciplinary context . Students will learn to take ownership of their course of study and configure it accordingly with a view to their ultimate specialisation or intended areas of focus . Students enrolling in a minor outside the Faculty need to identify and commit to the minor in the first trimester of study .

Year oneDSDN 101 Design Visualisation

DSDN 111 Ideas and Principles of Design

DSDN 171 Design in Context

DSDN 104 Digital Creation

DSDN 141 Experimenting with Materials

WRIT 101/151 Writing English or Writing English as a Second Language*

and two elective courses

*WRIT 101/151 may be replaced with any 100-level course offered by Victoria University by students who have achieved 14 credits in NCEA Level 3 English, history, art history, classics, geography or economics .

(left—top) Ongka by Vimal Patel is based on the culture of tribal gift exchanges in Papua New Guinea.

(left—bottom) POD by Greenfingers, a team of second-year Industrial Design students: Adam Ben-Dror, Casey Lin, Robert Skene and Nick Johnston. POD suggests a new way of socialising by growing herbs and vegetables in the kitchen and sharing them with neighbours. The students developed the slogan ‘Grow Share Enjoy’.

(opposite page—top) Sugar Spoon by Ashleigh Woodmass, Umar Green and Alice McGall is a teaspoon made of sugar that is placed within sugar sachets, causing people to think twice before adding sugar to their coffee.

(opposite page—bottom) Revival Vest by James McNab, a self-inflated life jacket that is triggered to inflate by bodily changes that indicate drowning. Runner-up in the 2012 International James Dyson Award.

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Years two and threeYear two of the BDI in Industrial Design teaches students how to acquire and use the core skills and knowledge of the discipline . Students may choose to complement their core courses with electives in a specific area of focus, currently digital fabrication and manufacture or human aspects of design, or they may choose a more general approach . Year three provides deeper design knowledge with an emphasis on agility, thoughtfulness, resourcefulness and inventiveness to answer more complex design questions .

Year twoCCDN 271 Design as Inquiry

INDN 211 Object Based Experiments

INDN 212 Product Based Experiments

and elective courses to the value of 60 points

Year threeCCDN 331 Live Theory

INDN 311 Digital Form

INDN 312 Brand + Identity

INDN 341 Mass Production + Digital Manufacturing

and elective courses to the value of 40 points

Year two and year three electives must include at least 60 points from courses numbered 200–399 .

The BDI will be awarded with a minor when your personal course of study includes at least 60 points in a cohesive set of courses numbered 200–399 in the relevant subject, of which at least 15 points are at 300 level .

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Postgraduate degree structureThe Master of Design Innovation (MDI) specialising in Industrial Design is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections .

Part OneIn Part One students can customise their course of study by selecting from a range of cross-disciplinary and/or Industrial Design-specific electives . All students are introduced to design research methods as well as sharing their unique expertise in the cross-disciplinary Design Led Futures course .

Part OneDSDN 411 Design Led Futures

DSDN 481 Research Methods

one course from:

INDN 441 Creative Digital Manufacturing

INDN 452 Design and the Human Body

and one elective course at 400 level from the MDI schedule

(left) Memoirs by Ashleigh Woodmass. 3D-printed jewellery with USB capabilities.

(opposite—top) Datavores by Sarah Kong is a future study of edible data storage creatures.

(opposite—bottom) Weaving Code by Earl Stewart, a 3D-printed shoe that is parametrically designed to adapt to an individual’s foot.

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Part TwoIn Part Two students’ work is devoted to the development of an original creative work by thesis . Each student will complete one elective course and a 90-point thesis . The thesis is a self-initiated project offering the opportunity to explore industrial design to significant levels of complexity, sophistication and resolution .

Part TwoINDN 592 Thesis—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses numbered 400–599

All courses are subject to approval .

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An inflated flower from Seamless Blossom shows the inner design detail.

(right—top) Richard interacting with the complete Seamless Blossom installation, with the addition of some escaping flowers.

(right—bottom ) Close-up of the blossoms.

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Richard ClarksonBDI in Industrial Design graduateAfter graduating with a BDI and starting his Master’s, Richard Clarkson was offered a scholarship to continue his studies in New York . In taking up this opportunity, he reflects how the city, and the School of Design, have shaped his views and design philosophy . “New York is incredible but I don’t think I could have made it coming from a small farm in Hawke’s Bay without Wellington as a middle ground .”

Richard has always valued Kiwi ingenuity and resourcefulness, and appreciated Victoria’s School of Design as a programme that not only accepts this but fully embraces inventiveness and pushing all avenues within design .

“Going into the programme, I was a little unsure of what to expect, but the solid foundation in the physical, theoretical and digital was well balanced, placing the programme in very good stead to deserve international respect .”

While at Victoria, Richard has produced exceptional design work that has been heavily internationally blogged . Before leaving for New York, Richard’s Seamless Blossom featured in the DeSForM 2012 conference at Victoria University and drew attention from internationally renowned Canadian architect Philip Beesley .

“The Seamless Blossom project was all about creating an inflatable 3D print . It explored the potential of the technology combined with the generative potential of 3D CAD programs . Basically, it’s a curved hollow chamber with flexible rubber . As you inflate it, it creates a gap of air that pushes against the inner layer, forcing the outer layers open . It almost blooms, like a flower .”

Not only is Richard’s design stunningly beautiful when interacted with but it also pushes the boundaries of 3D printing technology . Indeed, it is the world’s first inflatable 3D print and as such will gain Richard further international recognition .

Richard’s work is available online at www.richardclarkson.com

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(right—top) Coloured viscous liquids indicate earthquake magnitude in Quakescape.

(right—bottom) Quakescape. The unprecedented 3D printer has garnered worldwide media attention, including the Smithsonian magazine blog’s compliment, “Probably the world’s most beautiful seismograph”.

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James BoockBDI in Industrial Design graduateJames Boock has a bright future overseas after completing his undergraduate-level study at Victoria . James will be starting his Master’s in Product Design at The Royal College of Art in London this year, and feels ready to take this challenge on with the skills he has picked up at Victoria . “Victoria has given me the tools to succeed as a designer . It has taught me how to get noticed through marketing and publicising products using specific media such as the internet . It has also given me contact with companies offering experience for students .”

James was drawn to his field of study because of “its broadness as a subject, which enabled me to find my own niche within it” .

“I feel as though I got the correct amount of guidance throughout the programme leaving myself near the end of my studies with a lot of freedom to explore areas I really found interesting .”

In particular, James enjoyed the opportunity to explore these broad areas and skills in a group project in his final year, ‘Quakescape’ . “Quakescape is a 3D fabricator that works by taking earthquake data from the site GeoNet (www .geonet .org .nz) and transferring it into the medium of art by using Arduino technology . Quakescape creates a transformation of data that is often seen as negative and changes it into a completely different medium that is artistic, physical and unique .”

The project was a collaborative project with fellow Industrial Design students Josh Newsome-White, George Redmond, Philippa Shipley, Hannah Warren, Brooke Bowers and Richie Stewart . “It was a really ambitious project but we always knew it had pulling power and would create interest because it was relevant (around the time of the Christchurch earthquakes) and utterly unique . I found the heart of the concept uplifting because it takes what is referred to as ‘dark data’ and turns it into a beautiful piece of art . We all worked very hard as a group and thoroughly enjoyed it .”

James aims to take these skills and explore them while in London . “Overseas I will continue to explore design and express my ‘design beliefs’ and values . One day I would like to own my own studio .”

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Media DesignSpecialisation overviewThe Media Design programme’s primary objective is to develop curious and dedicated students into promising design professionals, exemplary citizens and learned scholars .

The programme guides this process by teaching valuable skills and studio approaches that will yield immediate advantages in the media design professions . Particular attention is given to computer and media literacy, virtuosity with digital production methods and promotion of cross-disciplinary collaboration .

Another hallmark of the programme is its ties with local and international industry . Over a given term, the media lab showcases several in-house lectures from design professionals across a diverse range of digital media industries .

Media Design courses are predominantly studio-based . This means that most of the time students are brainstorming and concept-building, crafting projects and developing new software skills in our state-of-the-art media lab . Course coordinators and tutors monitor and guide this work, which culminates in critique and presentations that mirror professional practice .

Career opportunitiesMedia Design has a profusion of career opportunities that grows larger each year . To meet these varied demands for employment, the programme has identified three areas that are prominent both locally and internationally—postproduction, game design and interaction design . These areas also align closely with the expertise of the Media Design lecturers .

All of Media Design course work falls within these three areas which clearly indicate professional pathways with significant potential and growth . New Zealand excels in these fields, and is especially well represented in Wellington .

Possible careers include: 3D modeller/animator

Artistic director

Character artist/animator

Digital video editor

Flash animator

Experience designer

Game designer

Game programmer

Interaction designer

Media installation designer

Mobile applications designer

Motion graphics designer

Multimedia artist

Special effects artist

Video production specialist .

(opposite page) Zobeide, an algorithmic city by Chris Callus.

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Undergraduate degree structureYear oneThe first year of study is shared across all specialisations and introduces students to the fundamentals of design practice and theory in a cross-disciplinary context . Students will learn to take ownership of their course of study and configure it accordingly with a view to their ultimate specialisation or intended areas of focus . Students enrolling in a minor outside the Faculty need to identify and commit to the minor in the first trimester of study .

Year oneDSDN 101 Design Visualisation

DSDN 111 Ideas and Principles of Design

DSDN 112 Introduction to Interaction Design

DSDN 142 Creative Coding

DSDN 171 Design in Context

WRIT 101/151 Writing English or Writing English as a Second Language*

and two or three elective courses

*WRIT 101/151 may be replaced with any 100–level course offered by Victoria University by students who have achieved 14 credits in NCEA Level 3 English, history, art history, classics, geography or economics .

(top) Screen capture from Mesi, iPhone application to connect students, by Maurizio Frances, Zhou Fang, Amber Martin Van Velzen.

(bottom) Reactionary Evolution, character model render by Jordon Shand.

(opposite page—top) Screen capture from Torsion, space-based digital game by Max O’Brien-Bowling, Alastair St Pierre, James Greenwood, Devyish Gandhi, Kieren Carenegie and Rolan Bewick.

(opposite page—bottom) Screen capture from TrickShot, futuristic trick basketball game by Maruzio Frances, Kade Lee, Thomas Creagh, Owen Bannister, Carl McMillan and Luke Bravenboer.

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Years two and threeYear two of the BDI in Media Design teaches students how to acquire and use the core skills and knowledge of the specialisation . The Media Design curriculum uses a menu system that allows students to complement their core courses with electives in a specific area of focus such as interaction design, game design or postproduction, or they may choose a more general approach .

Year three provides deeper knowledge of the specialisation with an emphasis on agility, resourcefulness and inventiveness in solving more complex design problems .

Year twoCCDN 271 Design as Inquiry

three courses from:

MDDN 211 Digital Video Creation

MDDN 241 3D Modelling and Animation

MDDN 242 Computer Graphics Production

MDDN 243 Introduction to Computer Game Design

MDDN 251 Physical Computing

and elective courses to the value of 40 points

Year threeCCDN 331 Live Theory

three courses from:

MDDN 311 Postproduction and Special Effects

MDDN 314 Audio-Visual Space

MDDN 343 Advanced Computer Game Design

MDDN 351 Wearable Technology

MDDN 352 Ubiquitous Computing

and elective courses to the value of 40 points

The BDI will be awarded with a minor when your personal course of study includes at least 60 points in a cohesive set of courses numbered 200–399 in the relevant subject, of which at least 15 points are at 300 level .

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Postgraduate degree structureThe Master of Design Innovation (MDI) specialising in Media Design is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections .

Part OneIn Part One students can customise their course of study by selecting from a range of cross-disciplinary and/or Media Design-specific electives . The Media Design electives reflect the three discipline areas the programme aligns with: interaction design, game design and postproduction . All students are introduced to design research methods as well as sharing their unique expertise in the cross-disciplinary Design Led Futures course .

Part OneDSDN 411 Design Led Futures

DSDN 481 Research Methods

one course from:

MDDN 412 Interaction Design

MDDN 414 Topics in Postproduction and Special Effects

MDDN 415 Topics in Computer Game Design

MDDN 441 Computer Graphics for Film

MDDN 442 Computer Graphics for Interaction Design

and one elective course at 400 level

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Part TwoIn Part Two students’ work is devoted to the development of an original creative work by thesis . Each student will complete one elective course and a 90-point thesis . The thesis is a self-initiated project offering the opportunity to explore design to significant levels of complexity, sophistication and resolution .

Part TwoMDDN 592 Thesis in Media Design—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses at 400–500 level

All courses are subject to approval .

(opposite page —top) Physical Computing project Wool Keep a City Warm by Emily Steel.

(opposite page—bottom) Quadrocopter design Flyris by Hadley Boks-Wilson.

(right—top) Sound sculpture Skatescape by Martin Lim.

(right—bottom) Levana, an interactive, illuminated wedding dress by Anindita Candrika and Tamtawan Minwong.

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Ben HartleyBDI in Media Design graduateBen Hartley was drawn to Wellington from Auckland in 2010 by the vibrant culture and creativity the capital offers, ultimately leading him to study in the Media Design programme at Victoria .

What struck Ben about the programme is the development over the course of the degree, and the wide range of skills involved .

“During my three years of study, I have acquired a diverse range of skills, spanning various forms of design, many of which I was previously unaware of .”

First-year Design opened my mind to creative expression with classes that led me to explore the fundamentals of design . Second year expanded on these ideas, encouraging me to develop a more refined approach to creative thinking . Finally, third year took me in depth into some powerful tools that would see me realise my full potential .”

A crucial part of this development was the practical work involved in his projects, which have been unique experiences in themselves . Ben learned about the abstract relationship between sound and aesthetics through producing a steampunk inspired sculpture that emits an industrialised soundtrack composed of mechanical sounds . These skills and experiences were invaluable for Ben, adding professional standard work to his growing portfolio, and equipping him for the workforce, which he was almost immediately hired into . Now a Junior Designer at mobile app development company Alphero, Ben is able to practically apply the skills and interaction design knowledge he developed at Victoria in a professional environment, working on user interface and user experience for iPhone, Android and web apps .

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Valrada, an algorithmic city.

(previous page) Requiem for the Machine: The Hidden Chronometer, a collaborative project by Ben Hartley and Romy Bromley.

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Micah SargissonBDI in Media Design graduateInitially, Micah Sargisson decided to study Media Design at Victoria to complement a Sonic Arts minor at the New Zealand School of Music, but an interest in design developed into a passion over the course of his undergraduate degree .

“Studying Design at Victoria offered me an insight into a broad range of design disciplines, some that I had no idea even existed, and that I would not have experienced in a different course of study .

“The Media Design programme sits at the forefront of technological design . I feel like many of the technologies I have touched on over my three-year degree will become even more useful to me down the track .”

This insight into a broad range of disciplines has had both academic and real-world benefits for Micah . “It taught me that learning is a constant process in design, and how to be proactive in problem solving … this has allowed me a great amount of flexibility when working with clients, as each project is concept driven rather than relying on an established and often limited skill set .”

Micah has been able to apply the skills picked up at Victoria in his freelance work, and has just finished designing his first album cover (pictured)—for platinum New Zealand band Shapeshifter . “It has been a great experience working from concept stage right through to final product . I will start working on live visual content and stage production soon . I am relishing the opportunity to work across such a diverse range of mediums .”

(previous page) Screen capture from a promotional video made in MDDN 211.

(right) Album and single release cover design for Shapeshifter .

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MDI with Computer Graphics specialisationSpecialisation overviewSince 2012, the School of Design proudly offers the Master’s qualification (MDI) with a specialisation in Computer Graphics . Uniting design and computation, this degree blends computer programming and scripting processes with studio approaches to deliver cutting-edge computer graphics compositions . The degree was developed in close consultation with Wellington’s internationally recognised entertainment industries and digital technologies sectors . This relationship with local industry is continued in the Computer Graphics degree programme through sponsored scholarships, consultation, guest lectures and internship opportunities . Another hallmark of the degree is its cross-disciplinary nature, as the degree structure features shared courses with the School of Engineering and Computer Science .

Computer Graphics students will use industry-standard languages, libraries and software packages, with the aim of exploring how these can be pushed to produce new modes of creative visualisation . Emphasising the aesthetics and craft of computer graphics techniques, students graduating from the programme can expect to have developed a rich portfolio of computer graphics work, enabling them to enter the field with a highly competitive advantage .

Career opportunitiesComputer Graphics has a well-established pool of career opportunities . Given the wealth of local companies that are world renowned for computer graphics excellence, the career paths we selectively focus on reflect these creative industries .

3D Modeller/animator

Computer graphics developer

Digital video editor

Game designer

Game programmer

Information visualisation

Interactive designer

Motion graphics designer

Multimedia artist

Pre-visualisation artist

Production engineer

Software engineer

Special effects artist

Technical director for special effects

Video production specialist .

(opposite page) Cecilia, The Continuous City, an algorithmic city by Shanshan Zhou.

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Undergraduate degree structureYear oneThe first year of study is shared across all specialisations and introduces students to the fundamentals of design practice and theory in a cross-disciplinary context . However, Media Design students planning for the Master’s in Computer Graphics will enrol in a minor in Computer Science in order to systematically build the unique skill set and knowledge base required by this specialisation .

Year oneDSDN 101 Design Visualisation

DSDN 111 Ideas and Principles of Design

DSDN 112 Introduction to Interaction Design

DSDN 142 Creative Coding

DSDN 171 Design in Context

COMP 102 Introduction to Computer Program Design

COMP 103 Introduction to Data Structure and Algorithms

MATH 161 Discrete Mathematics and Logic

Students are expected to have a suitable level of written English prior to enrolling .

(left—top) Ersilla, algorithmic design by Emma Taylor.

(left—bottom) Entanglement by Andrew Millar.

(opposite—top) Agria, algorithmic design by Rosanna Fong.

(opposite—bottom) The Trading City of Ersilla, an algorithmic city by Saul Paley.

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Years two and threeFor Media Design students planning for the Master’s programme in Computer Graphics, years two and three of the BDI will continue to build the minor with the requisite courses in Computer Science in order to properly prepare for this special qualification .

Year twoCCDN 271 Design as Inquiry

MATH 151 Algebra

COMP 261 Algorithms and Data Structures

MDDN 241 3D Modelling and Animation

MDDN 242 Computer Graphics Production

MDDN 243 Intro to Computer Game Design

and one further MDDN course at 200 level

Year threeCOMP 308 Introduction to Computer Graphics

CCDN 331 Live Theory

MDDN 311 Postproduction and Special Effects

two further MDDN courses at 300 level and at least 35 pts of electives must be completed in years two and three . Electives must include one course numbered 200–300 level*

*Students wishing to complete a minor in Computer Science must replace the elective course with two courses from COMP, SWEN or NWEN at 200–300 level .

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Postgraduate degree structureThe Master of Design Innovation (MDI) with a specialisation in Computer Graphics is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections . At postgraduate level Computer Graphics can be undertaken within either the Master of Design Innovation (MDI) or the Master of Science (MSc), depending on the student’s focus and background . (Refer to the Faculty of Science for information on the MSc in Computer Graphics .)

Part OneIn Part One students can customise their course of study by selecting from a range of Computer Graphics-specific electives . All students are introduced to design research methods as well as sharing their unique expertise in the cross-disciplinary Design Led Futures course .

Part OneDSDN 411 Design Led Futures

DSDN 481 Research Methods

COMP 408 Computer Graphics Rendering

COMP 409 Three-Dimensional Modelling for Computer Graphics

and one of:

MDDN 441 Computer Graphics for Film

MDDN 442 Computer Graphics for Interaction Design

(left—top) Bernice, an algorithmic city by Toby de Friez.

(left—bottom) Cecilia, an algorithmic city by Zhou Fang.

(right—top) City of the Lost, an algorithmic city by Kris Bacaling.

(right—bottom) Zaira, an algorithmic design by Seon Mi Yoon.

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Part TwoIn Part Two students’ work is devoted to the development of an original creative work by thesis . Each student will complete one elective course and a 90-point thesis . The thesis is a self-initiated project offering the opportunity to explore Computer Graphics to significant levels of complexity, sophistication and resolution .

Part TwoMDDN 594 Thesis in Computer Graphics—90 points

and one of:

MDDN 441 Computer Graphics for Film

MDDN 442 Computer Graphics for Interaction Design

DSDN 463 Practicum

All courses are subject to approval .

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Byron MallettMDI specialising in Computer Graphics student After completing his undergraduate study specialising in Media Design, Byron took a year out to help the School of Architecture First Light House team (see page 15) develop the energy monitoring interface used in the entry, called Tring . He then moved on to pursue his Master’s in Computer Graphics .

“Initially I was drawn to the Media Design programme offered at Victoria when I saw the variety of computer-related design and electronic art courses on offer . Being interested in such a wide variety of things, from electronic music, gaming, programming, animation and interactive web design, the melting pot of opportunities was very attractive .”

Byron’s current Master’s thesis work revolves around the improvement of pre-visualisation software for creating 3D animations . The project involves the marriage of a cinematographic

language with procedural cinematography to allow pre-visualisation artists the ability to manipulate scenes as fast as they can type .

Though Byron is now strong in his involvement in gaming and animation, with goals of helping to programme or design narratives for games or animation, when he first started at Victoria, he was less certain of this path . “When I began my undergraduate programme, I had very little idea about where I eventually wanted to go with my degree apart from to ‘use computers to do amazing things’ .

“The variety of courses offered over the span of my degree was brilliant for helping me to cement my interests into the world of animation and programming .”

Byron now feels he is “well-versed” in a variety of digital media skills, and plans to use the Master’s programme to perfect these skills and turn them into a career .

(above and opposite page) One of Byron’s most recent works, a gestural musical interface titled Sonoromancer. Designed as an experiment in alternate forms of audio-visual performance, the work allows players to use their entire body to manipulate a cloud of smoke-like energy in order to generate music.

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Te Rōpū ĀwhinaTe Rōpū Āwhina is the on-campus whānau (family) for Māori and Pacific students in the Faculties of Science, Engineering and Architecture and Design . Āwhina whānau values are high expectations, aspirations and achievements, reciprocity and collective success .

The goal (kaupapa) of Āwhina is to produce Māori and Pacific scientists, technologists, engineers, mathematicians, architects and designers who will contribute to Māori and Pacific development and leadership . Āwhina has an inclusive environment that enables non-Māori and Pacific students to contribute as whānau members . To achieve the Āwhina kaupapa requires academic success at all levels including the workplace, and working in partnership with pupils’ whānau and their communities .

Notable achievements are 920 degree completions including 12 PhDs (one being a Pacific mathematician), seven Postdoctoral Fellowships, six secondary science/mathematics/computer science teachers, $7 .6 million of nationally and internationally contested scholarships (including a prestigious scholarship for overseas PhD study), one iwi Director of Fisheries, the development of Āwhina Schools and Community Clusters and an Āwhina incubator at VUCEL (Victoria University Coastal Ecology Lab) to grow more Māori and Pacific marine scientists .

Āwhina outreach brings pupils and their whānau together to engage with the STEAD (Science, Technology, Engineering, Architecture and Design) disciplines through ‘hands-on’ activities . Over the last three years Āwhina published four essential outreach resources designed to normalise and increase Māori, Pacific and other low-income groups’ participation and success; three Cybrospace booklets and the STEP into STEAD DVD are available free from [email protected]

te rōpū Āwhina in the Faculty oF architecture and design Room 123, Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Phone 04-463 6172 Email [email protected] Website www.victoria.ac.nz/fad/awhina

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Collective successSummer research projectsAt the beginning of this year, three of our Te Rōpū Āwhina whānau members conducted summer research projects; a scholarship funded by Te Rōpū Āwhina . Jeff Bartlett (Interior Architecture), Jodi Meadows (Culture+Context) and Lionel Taito-Matamua (Industrial Design), utilised this opportunity as preparation to explore topics for postgraduate study . The projects, inspired from the students’ Māori/Pacific identities, were unique expressions of their cultures .

Jeff’s research project Toi Raranga explored the Māori art form of weaving through examining meanings and processes of traditional Māori tukutuku panels . Jeff then translated these patterns producing 3D forms . This contributed to his supervisor’s current research project of creating acoustic panels inspired from the traditional tukutuku weaving patterns .

Jodi’s research project Pasifika Styles took a more theoretical approach . By researching interpretations of identity for Pacific people living in New Zealand Jodi argued for the need of Pacific design as a niche market . Her research process involved in-depth research into how academics have defined identity for diasporic Pacific people, who might benefit from it and whether there is a place for Pacific Design in the future .

Lionel’s research project Patterns of Age explored how his indigenous Samoan culture could be expressed through 3D manufacturing processes while still retaining the essence of Samoan culture . Lionel used photos of his family’s hands that were then weaved together with Samoan motifs to make a physical 3D-printed model representing individual members of his family .

Each of the students highly valued this opportunity made possible by Te Rōpū Āwhina . Consistent support from the Te Rōpū Āwhina whānau has been a motivating source for the collective success of not only these students, but also many others within the whānau . Many success stories and great leaders have been fostered by Te Rōpū Āwhina and there are many more to come in the future!

(left—top) Toi Raranga by Jeff Bartlett.

(left—bottom) Patterns of Age by Lionel Taito-Matamua.

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Collective successOutreachTe Rōpū Āwhina has helped inspire pupils and teachers alike through various community and school initiatives . These initiatives focus on broadening possibilities, encouraging higher education and inspiring rangatahi (youth) to think about possible careers in science, technology, engineering, architecture and design .

Earlier this year, Āwhina hosted the annual Summer Cybrospace Wānanga . Rangatahi (young people) from 13 different secondary schools located around the North Island travelled to Wellington to participate in a series of fun and challenging workshops run by Āwhina mentors .

The first half of the day started with a tour of the Architecture and Design workshop and focused mainly on the 3D printer and laser cutters . Students were able to watch the printers churn out pieces of work made of wood, plastic and resin . They were then given the challenge to create their own unique digital designs which were then laser cut out and given to them as a surprise, allowing students to marvel at turning their digital ideas into 3D objects .

During the second half of the day, students were put into teams and faced with the challenge of designing and building a small catapult made from popsicle sticks, tape and rubber gloves . This activity brought out the students’ competitive streak as the teams battled each other to throw an object the longest distance; there were many mishaps and laughs to be had .

Work by Āwhina Architecture and Design students was put on display to show the different disciplines on offer and also to inspire them . Visiting rangatahi then had the opportunity to ask mentors about various design avenues that they could study, with a few of them going away determined to return .

(right—top) Students partake in the Summer Cybrospace Wānanga.

(right—bottom) Students observe project XPAND by Oliver Bucher, Henry Roberts, Toby Mannis, Patrick Crowe, Greer Garner, Lauren Young and Tunyada Kampeng.

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Elyjana RoachBachelor of Architectural Studies student Te Rōpū Āwhina mentor Samoan“Architecture is the mother of all arts .”

This is the quote that sparked an interest in the subject for Elyjana Roach, quickly to become a passion for architectural study . “Ever since I was young I loved art and I loved maths . I loved the idea that I could study something and become someone who practises the subject that is considered to be the mother that births all art . I knew that many great architects had studied at Victoria .”

Elyjana was unsure of what to expect when arriving at Victoria, having heard that studying architecture was ‘intense’ . “Initially I didn’t know exactly what to think about university life … but Victoria gave me the opportunity to be involved with the Te Rōpū Āwhina whānau, which made me feel a lot more confident in my study .” Elyjana owes a lot of her success through first year to the help she gained from Āwhina .

She quickly gained the confidence and skills necessary to achieve in, and make the most of, the programme of study, with Āwhina offering further opportunities .

“Āwhina has allowed me to draw knowledge from the wise, which has been a catalyst for my own growth . We visited a few architecture firms in Wellington and met some very influential people from the industry, which would never have happened if I wasn’t a part of the Āwhina programme .”

Elyjana has bright plans for her future, cemented in an underlying confidence of what it is to be an architect . “Architecture, when implemented in real projects, leaves a lasting imprint . I find it cool to think that as an architect you can design and create buildings that people will make memories in, and have a connection to .”

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Ryan GuyBDI in Industrial Design student Te Rōpū Āwhina mentor Ngāi TahuAfter completing one year of a Commerce and Psychology degree, Ryan Guy decided it wasn’t for him and took a bold step in moving to Wellington to study at Victoria’s School of Design . “I had never done design at high school so it was a very radical change, but I wanted to be a part of the field of innovation, design and entrepreneurship .”

Now in his second year of his undergraduate degree, Ryan knows that he made the right move, supported through the process by the Te Rōpū Āwhina programme . “Āwhina immediately made me feel welcome and reassured . It can be hard to be innovative and draw inspiration from limited experience, so it is important to share knowledge and pass on the lessons learned from mistakes . It is nice to know that there are others who have been through the same ups and downs of the process .”

Ryan now has the tools and motivation to help make his aspirations in design a reality . “I am very passionate about products, brand identity, the manufacturing process and bringing a product to market . I hope to move into the area of 3D printing; I love the idea of mixing the digital world with the real world and making products that help people, community and environment .

“I think it is very important to have a whānau environment like Āwhina for students … the more knowledge shared the greater the community will grow and develop .”

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Jay VaaiMaster of Building Science in Project Management student Te Rōpū Āwhina mentor SamoanHaving always enjoyed art-based subjects at high school, Jay was drawn to study architecture upon leaving, and quickly discovered an interest in building science in particular . “Building Science drew my attention after my first year in Architecture—I found it appealing as it had courses in Project Management, Sustainability, Code Compliance and a high attention to the structural engineering aspects of architecture .”

The huge variety in courses available in the Building Science programme exceeded Jay’s expectations and led him towards his postgraduate study . “I wanted a mix of courses that expanded my projects and my skill set not only in design, but in the many other facets of the construction industry .

“After my undergraduate degree I had a wider set of tools in management, sustainability and design, all of which are transferable to other industries beyond construction .”

Though Jay is now in his fifth year of study, he still remembers what it was like as a first-year student new to the city . “When I came from Samoa I had to adjust to the culture and lifestyle of university study in Wellington which was a very steep learning curve . I found the Te Rōpū Āwhina whānau supportive over this process, I had a whole range of mentors helping me out and I have made a lot of friends over the five years of study .”

Jay hopes to move into the professional world once he completes his Master’s, and become a Building Information Modelling (BIM) specialist at a firm either here or overseas .

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Riini PiahanaBAS in Interior Architecture student Te Rōpū Āwhina mentor Ngati Ranginui, Kahangungu TuhoeRiini Piahana was destined to study architecture from the first time he played with Lego as a child . “I was always engaged with designing through playing with Lego—it was the initial contribution to my love for design and the built environment!”

Exploring this passion has been a progressive journey for Riini throughout his degree . “The development from first year to the specialised Interior Architecture degree has been a great experience of understanding the means to design and the impact of space . The more direct approach in third year has opened so many opportunities to design for more practical functions . I have discovered areas of design which have connected me with my own culture .”

A highlight of his degree was the chance to participate in a full-scale project, Luxcity, in Christchurch . Riini worked with a team to create several ‘light structures’ around the red-zone (after the 2011 Christchurch earthquake) for the community to enjoy, and the project was a huge success . “It challenged

communication and design skills, working in a large group, but the emotion on people’s faces as they walked through the pavilions was so overwhelming, you could read their expressions of rejoice .”

He attributes the confidence that he has gained over his time at Victoria University to his role as a mentee, and now mentor, in Te Rōpū Āwhina . “I highly appreciated my involvement in the whānau as it has helped me gain confidence in presenting my work, communicating with others and expanding my knowledge on my own Cook Island heritage .”

Riini plans to take his passion overseas when he graduates, to further develop his skills and experience . “I want to see the adaptations of architecture from other traditions and cultures and see how this influences the communities … I would love to see first-hand the craftsmanship that goes into designing in remote destinations .”

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Services and facilities

114 - Victoria University of Wellington

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Victoria Overseas Exchange (Vic OE)Victoria Overseas Exchange (Vic OE) offers you the opportunity to broaden your personal, academic and cultural horizons . Study towards your degree for one or two trimesters on an exchange overseas and receive a grant of up to $2,000 . Both domestic and international students are eligible for Vic OE (international students pay Victoria international fees) .

Vic OE gives you the chance to complete part of your degree abroad at one of more than 100 prestigious exchange partners in over 30 countries worldwide . You can attend an institution overseas and study for credit towards your degree while still paying normal Victoria fees . The benefits of having an international academic experience as part of your studies are invaluable . It is an opportunity to explore a new country, to learn new languages and study novel academic disciplines while you encounter different cultures . Participants in Victoria International Leadership Programme (VILP) can count an overseas exchange as a component (see www.victoria.ac.nz/vilp) .

Faculty of Architecture and Design exchange students may attend universities throughout Asia (including Seoul National University and National University of Singapore), North America (including Carnegie Mellon University, University of British Columbia), Latin America (including University of Brasilia, Pontifica University of Chile) and Europe (including the University of Applied Sciences Schwaebisch Gmuend and the Technical University of Munich) . See http://www.victoria.ac.nz/exchange/partners/arch-design.aspx for more details .

EligibilityIn order to be eligible for exchange, you must:

be enrolled as a full-time student at Victoria University (at the time of application)

have completed a year of full-time study by the time you leave for your exchange

be an academically-sound student with a B average overall in your studies at Victoria

meet language requirements (in some non-English taught universities)

be able to demonstrate that you would be a good ambassador for Victoria .

Funding Students eligible for StudyLink Loans and Allowances can receive these while on exchange . All accepted students receive a travel grant of up to $2,000, and a number of other scholarship opportunities are available for specific destinations or specific types of students .

There are accommodation subsidies and travel grants offered at specific locations . Students on VILP can receive extra funding . See www.victoria.ac.nz/vilp for more information .

Application deadlines 16 July 2013 (for study in Trimester One, 2014)

16 January 2014 (for study in Trimester Two, 2014)

University of California applications should be submitted as early as possible . See the Vic OE website for the most up-to-date application deadlines .

www.victoria.ac.nz/exchange/howtoapply.aspx

student exchange oFFice Victoria International, Easterfield Building, Level 2, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5667, 04-463 6794 Email [email protected] Website www.victoria.ac.nz/exchange

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ScholarshipsVictoria has a range of scholarships and awards for students, including hundreds of scholarships awarded each year for school leavers .

The two main school leaver scholarships are the Victoria Excellence Scholarship (with 400 to be awarded for 2014) and the Victoria Achiever Scholarship (with 75 to be awarded for 2014) . Both scholarships are valued at $5,000 for the first year of study . The top 20 Excellence applicants and the top five Achiever applicants will be awarded a $20,000 scholarship, over three years of study, provided a certain grade point average is maintained .

To see if you are eligible to apply, and for up-to-date information and application forms, see www.victoria.ac.nz/scholarships

(opposite page) Final-year project by Master of Architecture student Jake Tindall, selected for the NZIA Graphisoft Awards.

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AdmissionThere are various ways you can gain admission to Victoria University of Wellington . For full details of admission and enrolment requirements, see www.victoria.ac.nz/home/admisenrol

Applications for limited-entry degrees and courses are due before 10 December 2013, and open-entry degrees and courses are due before 10 January 2014 . Online enrolment will be open from 1 October 2013 .

PublicationsThe Online Course Catalogue has the most up-to-date course information: www.victoria.ac.nz/coursecatalogue

All of our publications can be downloaded from www.victoria.ac.nz/publications or requested in hardcopy by contacting Student Recruitment, Admission and Orientation (see back cover for details) .

Your Introduction to Victoria (February) gives a brief overview to Victoria’s degrees and student life .

Guide to Undergraduate Study (July) includes all information students need about first-year courses, degrees, student life and how to apply .

Guide for Parents (May) answers questions parents have about sending their children to university .

Accommodation Guide (May) gives information about each Hall of Residence and how to apply .

CareersEmployers look for enthusiasm and passion as well as good grades . They hire graduates who are able to explain why they chose their particular course of study and why they enjoyed it . The right attitude to life, study and work is what gives graduates the competitive edge when applying for jobs .

Career Development and Employment The Vic Careers team is available to help you explore work, study and lifestyle options . The service includes a comprehensive Careers Resource Library, graduate destination information, internet access to research career opportunities, excellent reference books, free handouts, information on internships, scholarships and summer work, Victoria CareerHub—our 24/7 web-based job vacancy service—and graduate recruitment programmes including employer seminars . Workshops are held throughout the year on job-searching strategies and making career decisions . On CareerHub, you can also register for the Victoria Plus Award, Victoria’s service and leadership award . There is also a Resume Builder to help you get your CV started and an ePortfolio for you to record your skills and experiences .

Useful resources Career View series www.victoria.ac.nz/careers/resources/

career_publications/career_view including recent issues for Architecture and Design

What can I do with my degree/subject? www.victoria.ac.nz/careers/resources/degree_options

Enrolled students and Victoria graduates can access up-to-date careers information and job vacancies 24/7 by registering on Victoria CareerHub http://careerhub.victoria.ac.nz

career development and employment 14 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5393 Fax 04-463 5252 Email [email protected] Website www.victoria.ac.nz/careers

(opposite page) SARC 162 project by Nina Boyd.

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Support, services and resourcesFaculty Student and Academic Services OfficeVisit the office for help with anything from enrolment to graduation . Get help with choosing your degree, planning your courses or changing your degree programme . This office should be your first point of contact for any enquiries you have about your studies .

139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Phone 04-463 6200 Email [email protected] [email protected] Websites www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture www.victoria.ac.nz/design

Accommodation ServiceAdvice on our Halls of Residence, renting and other accommodation options . www.victoria.ac.nz/accommodation

Campus Care24/7 campus security . 04-463 9999 (if calling from outside University) 8888 (if calling from within University)

Career Development and EmploymentAlso known as Vic Careers—find out what you need to know to get a job, what career options are open to you and what your ideal future might look like . www.victoria.ac.nz/careers

Career Hub24/7 access to part-time jobs, graduate jobs, contract work, tutoring positions, internships, work experience opportunities and a CV building tool . Use your student computing account to log in . http://careerhub.victoria.ac.nz

Counselling ServiceProfessional, confidential counselling available at all campuses for any issue that is impacting on your personal or academic success . www.victoria.ac.nz/counselling

CrècheThe University crèches can provide your children with the best possible education and care while you study . www.victoria.ac.nz/creche

Disability ServicesIf you have a temporary or ongoing impairment you can get planning help, liaison with academic staff, adaptive equipment, technology and training, sign language interpreting, note-taking assistance, mobility parking, ergonomic furniture and access to rest and study rooms . www.victoria.ac.nz/disability

Enrolment OfficeIf you are a prospective or a current student, you can get information, advice and support with enrolment . www.victoria.ac.nz/enrol

Fees and PaymentsGet information and advice related to fees, payments, student levies, scholarships and liaising with StudyLink . www.victoria.ac.nz/fees

Financial Support and AdviceGet information on money matters . Financial Support and Advice also manages the Hardship Fund . www.victoria.ac.nz/finadvice

Health ServicesGet access to a full range of general practice medical services . www.victoria.ac.nz/studenthealth

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Information Technology ServicesSupport relating to ITS computers on all campuses, access to myVictoria (the student portal), standard software such as Microsoft Office and other specialised software like SPSS and Endnote . www.victoria.ac.nz/its

Language Learning CentreSelf-study and classroom facilities, resources and people to help you with language learning . www.victoria.ac.nz/llc

LibrariesInformation resources and people to support you in your research and learning; space to think and work . www.victoria.ac.nz/library

MaraeThe marae provides a turangawaewae—a standing place where Māori custom prevails—for students and staff . www.victoria.ac.nz/marae

Overseas Exchange (Vic OE)See page 117 .

Physiotherapy ClinicNo referral necessary, you can come straight to the Clinic . www.victoria.ac.nz/physio

Recreation ServicesGet access to recreation, fitness and sports, to stay healthy and happy during your studies . www.victoria.ac.nz/reccentre

Student Interest and Dispute AdvisorIf you need support or guidance on any matter involving safety, conflict or misconduct, make contact to discuss what assistance is available to deal with the problem . www.victoria.ac.nz/disputes-advice

Student Learning Support ServiceGroup and one-to-one academic support—useful at any stage of your study . www.victoria.ac.nz/slss

Student Recruitment, Admission and OrientationIf you are a prospective or new student, get course advice and your admission questions answered . www.victoria.ac.nz/futurestudents

Te Rōpū ĀwhinaSee page 107 .

Vic Books and Student NotesBuy your textbooks (new or second hand) and your student notes . www.vicbooks.co.nz

Victoria InternationalIf you are an international student you can get access to support services, including insurance and student visa renewal, as well as admission, enrolment and orientation (for new students) . www.victoria.ac.nz/international

Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association (VUWSA)VUWSA is a Victoria student association that provides advocacy, support and advice for all students . www.vuwsa.org.nz

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STUDiOSTUDiO is the student representative group for students in all courses of study at the Faculty of Architecture and Design .

STUDiO officers are elected each year and are responsible for everything from social and sporting events to student representation on faculty boards .

Along with class reps, STUDiO reps are able to assist their fellow students with course-related issues . STUDiO holds regular social events such as STUDiO-invited talks, barbeques, drinks evenings and sports tournaments, the annual STUDiO Ball each August and design competitions throughout the year, arranging student discounts with local shops and suppliers and generally incites fun and excitement to give everyone a break from study now and then .

STUDiO is always looking for people to get involved and help run things—keep an eye out for STUDiO noticeboards near the main staircase of the Te Aro Campus and the STUDiO website for information about events and meetings .

studio Faculty of Architecture and Design Atrium, 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Email [email protected] Website www.studio.org.nz

(right) Emily Steel’s Little Slide Dress was conceived in MDDN 351 Wearable Technology. The dress is made from old 35mm film strips, backlit by LEDs and programmed by sensors with an Arduino Lilypad. As evening arrives and ambient light dims, the dress lights up and can even flicker to evoke the magic of classic movies—a source of inspiration for Emily’s design.

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Architecture and Design LibraryThe Architecture and Design Library supports the research and teaching activities of all subjects within the School of Architecture and the School of Design .

It offers a range of reference, borrowing, short loan and teaching services . The Library provides access to books, journals, plans and resources in other formats including DVDs and an increasing range of online electronic resources .

Users can request books from the other four University campus libraries through Intersite Delivery while the Borrow Direct service connects students and staff to collections at Waikato University, Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and Otago University libraries .

Photocopying and scanning facilities can be found in the Library as well as space for group study .

Computers with internet access and word processing are also available for student use . Reference services and classes to increase research skills are regularly offered to assist the development of all users .

architecture and design library 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Phone 04-463 6241 Email [email protected] Website www.victoria.ac.nz/library/ Catalogue http://victoria.lconz.ac.nz/

(right) Snapture camera by Sarah Kong.

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Technical resourcesThe Faculty has a team of 15 technicians and a Technical Services Manager, supporting the specialist Architecture and Design technical infrastructure and services for students’ and staff teaching and research . These include:

Computing servicesThe Faculty computing environment consists of approximately 500 student computers and 100 staff computers spread around nine studios, numerous staff offices and five computer labs to support the particular needs of Architecture and Design students and staff . This also includes a dedicated Mac computer lab for students studying in the Digital Media Design and Media Design programmes currently offered by the School of Design .

Audio-visual (AV) and photographic facilitiesThese include lecture theatres, seminar rooms, portable AV teaching equipment, mobile LCD displays, SmartBoard equipment and loan AV equipment for students . The Faculty also has an Advanced Learning Communications Facility (ALCF) containing video conferencing equipment and MediaSite recording . The ALCF room also has Access Grid technology connected to KAREN high-speed internet . There is also a photography studio open to all students, located next to the Faculty photography office/studio .

3D modelling workshop facilitiesThis includes not only the traditional carpentry and metal machinery areas, paint booth and modelling equipment, but also three ULS laser cutters, four small 3D Modella routers, a full bed (2 .4m x 1 .2m) Techno CNC router, two Eden 3D Rapid prototype machines and a HAAS CNC lathe .

Technical resource centreThis service for students provides for their specialist architecture and design needs . From here students can order wide-format printing and have prototyping carried out on site . Students can also loan digital AV equipment and building science test equipment, and purchase specialist modelling and art supplies at cost—an essential service considering the difficulty students would otherwise face attempting to source various modelling supplies from around the country .

Specialist Building Science and School of Design labsThese currently include an Architecture School lighting lab, a Design School ergonomics lab and a photographic studio .

mark shaw Manager, Technical Services 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Phone 04-463 6251 Email [email protected]

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DSDN 142 project by Ryan Guy.

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Key dates2013JUNE Accommodation Guide available

13 Jun—Year 12 Day on Campus

JULY Guide to Undergraduate Study first-year prospectus available

AUGUST Liaison Officers visit schools for course planning (through to October)

1 Aug—Halls of Residence applications open for 2014

30 Aug—Study at Vic Open Day

SEPTEMBER 15 Sep—Victoria Excellence and Achiever Scholarship applications due

OCTOBER 1 Oct—Online enrolment opens

1 Oct—Halls of Residence applications due

7 Oct—Application due date for courses in 2013/14 Trimester Three

NOVEMBER 18 Nov—Trimester Three begins

25 Nov—Course Planning Weeks for first-year students, Kelburn Campus and Auckland (through to 6 December)

DECEMBER 1 Dec—International students’ first-year applications due for March 2014 intake

10 Dec—Application due date for limited-entry programmes and courses starting in 2014

2014JANUARY 10 Jan—Application due date for all other programmes

FEBRUARY 24 Feb—New Students’ Orientation Week (through to 28 Feb)

MARCH 3 Mar—Trimester One begins

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Faculty oF architecture and design Student and Academic Services Office Phone 04-463 6200 Fax 04-463 6204 Email [email protected] [email protected] Websites www.victoria.ac.nz/fad www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture www.victoria.ac.nz/design

139 Vivian Street Te Aro Campus Wellington 6011

Victoria University of Wellington PO Box 600 Wellington 6140 New Zealand

student recruitment, admission and orientation Phone 0800 VICTORIA (842 867) 04-463 5374 Fax 04-463 5193 Email [email protected] Website www.victoria.ac.nz/futurestudents

Level 1, Hunter Building Gate 2, Kelburn Parade PO Box 600 Wellington 6140 New Zealand

victoria international Phone +64-4-463 5350 Fax +64-4-463 5056 Email [email protected] Website www.victoria-international.ac.nz

Level 2, Easterfield Building Kelburn Parade PO Box 600 Wellington 6140 New Zealand

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