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  • DOMESTIC DIFFUSION OF INTERNATIONAL POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES

    submitted to:

    United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV

    submitted by:

    Steve Hillenbrand Tennessee Valley Authority

    and

    Dean M. Menke The University of Tennessee

    Center for Clean Products and Clean Technologies

    March 1997

    printed on recycled paper

  • ... r... ).,

    Y .

  • ABSTRACT

    Pollution prevention has been an effective tool in the U.S. to protect human health and the environment, reduce or eliminate the use of toxic chemicals, and increase industrial efficiency by reducing or eliminating the generation of wastes at the source. Many countries in the European Community have made similar strides in developing initiatives, products, and processes which prevent pollution in various stages of manufacturing/production. The existence of many of these pollution prevention technologies, however, is not known within U.S. businesses, industries, or technical assistance programs, and the information is not readily available. By cataloguing and disseminating information on pollution prevention technologies, cleaner production initiatives, and cleaner products worldwide, this Environmental Technology Initiative project, The Domestic Diffusion of Intemational Pollution Prevention Opportunities, improved the national and international diffusion of technological information.

    Twenty-three organizations from five different countries were contacted within the context of this project. These organizations represent the breadth of possible contacts, from universities and private consulting firms, to local, regional and national environmental protection authorities and research facilities. The countries represented by these organizations included Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden. Intemational and multinational cooperative programs were also included amongst the contacts of this projest, represented by the United Nations Environmental Programme and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

    each established contact. These meetings served to establish an international network of pollution prevention practitioners, and a conduit through which technical information and experiences could be exchanged. This network of pracritioners and exchange of information resulted in 83 separate entries into the pollution prevention and cleaner production technical database maintained for this project. Entries range kom pollution prevention possibilities and best available technologies for specific industries, to manuals which assist small and medium sized companies to establish an effective environmental management system. These 83 database entries have now been included and are available through the Waste Reduction Resource Center and their RLIBY database.

    A U.S. delegation completed two separate trips to Europe, meeting personally with

    I

  • .. . .

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS .................................................. iv

    INTRODUCTION ......................................................... 1

    Project Goals ....................................................... 1

    Project Scope ....................................................... 2 Contacts and Travel ............................................ 2 NeedsSurvey .................................................. 3 Information Exchange and Dissemination ........................... 3

    ESTABLISHEDNETWORK ............................................... 3

    Denmark ........................................... Copenhagen Capacity ............................ Copenhagen County Council ...................... Danish Environmental Protection Agency ............

    SophusBerendsen ............................... Danish Technical Institute International .............

    Storsimms Amt. Department of Environment and Energy

    Germany ..............................................

    Umweltbundesamt .................................. Fraunhofer.Gesellschaft. Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut .......

    The Netherlands ........................................ Delft University of Technology ........................

    NAM Environmental Research .......................

    TNO ............................................. UNEP. Working Group on Sustainable Product Development

    Nonvav ................................................

    Erasmus University .................................

    STIMULAR Consulting ..............................

    . . . . . . . . . . . 4

    ........... 4

    ........... 4

    ........... 4

    ........... 4

    ........... 5

    ........... 5

    ...... 5

    . . . . . . 5

    ...... 6

    ........... 6

    ............ 6

    ........... 6

    ........... 6

    . . . . . . . . . . . 7

    ........... 7

    ........... 7

    .. 8 Institute for Pollution Prevention. Oesvold Research Foundation ........ 8 The National Institute of Technology ................................ 8 Norwegian Pollution Control Authority ............................. 8

    ii

  • Sweden .................................................................. 8 Linkbping University ............................................ 8 LundUniversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Scania Vitalis AB .............................................. 9

    InternationaVMultinational ........................................... 9 ........................... 9

    Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 United Nations Environment Programme

    Others ............................................................ IO Technical University of Graz. Austria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 VIT, Finland ................................................. 10 Innovation Centers ............................................ 10

    SELECTED RESULTS ................................................... 11

    Seleeted Publications ............................................... 11

    Databases ......................................................... 12

    Programs and Initiatives ............................................ 13

    World WideWebSites .............................................. 14

    CONCLUSIONS ......................................................... 16

    APPENDIX A

    APPENDIX B

    ... 111

  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    The researchers of this project would like to extend a special thanks to all the established contacts. Each offered openly their time, information, and hospitality to the traveling delegation. Without their cooperation and interest, this project and its accomplishments could not have been possible. Chris Mitchelle must also be acknowledged for his work assembling the database of technical information gathered during the project.

    iv

  • DOMESTIC DIFFUSION OF INTERNATIONAL POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES

    Pollution prevention has been an effective tool in the U.S. to protect human health and the environment, reduce or eliminate the use of toxic chemicals, and increase industrial efficiency by reducing or eliminating the generation of wastes at the source. Many countries in the European Community have made similar strides in developing initiatives, products, and processes which prevent pollution in various stages of manufacturing/production. The existence of many of these pollution prevention technologies, however, is not known within U.S. businesses, industries, or technical assistance programs, and the information is not readily available. This project, The Domestic Diffusion of International Pollution Prevention Opportunities, was designed to improve technology diffusion nationally and internationally through cataloguing and disseminating information on pollution prevention technologies, cleaner production initiatives, and cleaner products worldwide.

    INTRODUCTION

    The Environmental Technology Initiative @TI) was an integral part of the Clinton Administrations broad new technology policy. It assigned the federal government a catalytic role in promoting the development of new technologies across a range of sectors including cleaner industrial technologies that prevent pollution. Of the six ETI topical areas developed to support the strategies of the initiative, two were addressed by this project: 1) Innovative Capacity - strengthen the capacity of technology developers and users to succeed in environmental innovation; and 2) Domestic Diffusion - accelerate the diffusion of innovative technologies at home.

    University of Tennessee Center for Clean Products (Center), and various European organizations, the goals and objective of this project were achieved. US. delegations met and exchanged pollution prevention experiences with European researchers, government agency representatives, and university s&. Information covering pollution prevention technologies developed and established internationally @ut not yet in the US.) was collected and catalogued. This information is now included in the pollution prevention database maintained by the Waste Reduction Resource Center (WRRC) and is available to all U.S. businesses, industries, and fededstate agencies. The knowledge gained from this information should free U.S. research dollars and allow its reinvestment to accelerate development beyond established technologies. The sharing and dissemination of information serves to guide U S . industries towards the next step