Instructional Design Models By Tanner Burton EDU 561.

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Instructional Design ModelsBy Tanner BurtonEDU 561

Instructional Design Models CONSSAM4DRapid ISDLacks depth to planningNot suited for all subjectsCould create bad habits long term Can be repetitive Time consuming to make fit for classroom useLacks in-depth planning so can miss small things Can limit students if not planned wellWhile Comparing and contrasting you will see that the three models hold a variety of similarities. All are fairly fast to utilize and quick to implement into a classroom setting. They all are well designed for a class that will utilize eLearning as a main practice in the course. The weaknesses are that these models may not all be perfect for a variety of subjects, but have a strength in marketing to use a hands on work atmosphere class. The models are only as strong as you make them so these especially will require a lot of work to ensure they are fitted for best use of the students. 2Instructional Design Models PROSSAM4DRapid ISDFlexibleSimple model to develop courses quicklyQuick and easy to rolloutNo perfect project, strive for best possible outcome* (Arshavskiy, 2013)4 areas to the model make it quick and easy to follow4 practical phases to the modelMistakes are bound to be made, you adjust and react as you go Adaptive to a variety of learning stylesGood for: tight deadlines, limited budget, and constantly changing content* (Arshavskiy, 2013)*- Arshavskiy, M. (2013). Instructional Design Models. In Instructional design for eLearning: Essential guide to creating successful eLearning courses (pp. 11-20). S.l.: Your eLearning World.Visuals of Instructional Design ModelsSide by Side Comparison

Leaving ADDIE for SAM. (n.d.). Retrieved September 12, 2015, from http://www.slideshare.net/alleninteractions/leaving-addie-for-samDevLearn 2013 Learning Models & Design Patterns. (n.d.). Retrieved September 12, 2015, from http://www.slideshare.net/cammybean/dev-learn-learning-models-and-design-patternsoctober-20138 principles. (n.d.). Retrieved September 11, 2015, from http://www.slideshare.net/CarolineEsterson1/8-principlesViability Rapid ISD4D ModelSAM

In the high school I hope to teach this marketing course at we will have limited time and money to create this course, couple that with limited technology and slow internet access we will have to find ways to maximize technology use with a variety of projects that can be completed with few class periods in the computer lab per week. On the flip side we will have a smart board in the classroom and hopefully a couple of computers so students can take turns utilizing classroom technology throughout the week. It is likely class my size would stay at or below 10-15 students which can allow for multiple teaching techniques and allow us to do some individual and team projects to make the experience very representative of what a marketing employee would see after college.

In the models I have listed I believe that Rapid ISD is what I will plan to utilize when I set up my marketing course. It follows the steps to creating a great real-life scenario for teaching how to do presentations which is a great part of a marketing course. It makes sense to set up the course to be as real as possible to get the most from it, plus it could help students find their passion for after high school.

The 4D model would be another good option, I think the set up would be good to integrate a significant online portion to the learning, though I am not sure I could utilize enough eLearning components to justify this model. Being in a small district it could be a challenge to have computer access to get the students involved enough to make it beneficial long term.

The SAM model is a good choice and very compelling to use as it sets the stage for being life like or a work like setting. You understand there is no such thing as perfection, but what is the best thing you can do in any given situation. It also opens for you to be critiqued as you go just like you would be if you were in a work environment in a marketing firm. It is very much a team atmosphere with ways to intermingle a variety of teaching techniques to help the student see success through revisions and reworking projects as they go to get the best possible outcome for work they put in. 9References:Arshavskiy, M. (2013). Instructional Design Models. In Instructional design for eLearning: Essential guide to creating successful eLearning courses (pp. 11-20). S.l.: Your eLearning World.

Leaving ADDIE for SAM. (n.d.). Retrieved September 12, 2015, from http://www.slideshare.net/alleninteractions/leaving-addie-for-sam

DevLearn 2013 Learning Models & Design Patterns. (n.d.). Retrieved September 12, 2015, from http://www.slideshare.net/cammybean/dev-learn-learning-models-and-design-patternsoctober-2013

8 principles. (n.d.). Retrieved September 11, 2015, from http://www.slideshare.net/CarolineEsterson1/8-principles

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