Integration of Automated Staking and GIS. Stakeout 2 seats for stakers ArcEditor GIS Coordinator Right-of-Way Agent ArcView Manager of Engineering Dispatch

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Integration of Automated Staking and GIS Slide 2 Stakeout 2 seats for stakers ArcEditor GIS Coordinator Right-of-Way Agent ArcView Manager of Engineering Dispatch Coordinator ArcReader All other BEC employees Locators ArcPad 9 seats for line trucks Powels MxGIS GIS Coordinator Types of Software Slide 3 Old notes on how to bring staking sheets from Stakeout into ArcEditor and how to get shapefiles back to Stakeout Put shapefiles in Stakeout folder on network and the individual machines will get the updates when they sync Slide 4 New notes on how to bring staking sheets from Stakeout into ArcEditor and how to get shapefiles back to Stakeout Slide 5 Slide 6 MxGIS Pros & Cons Pros Saves time both bringing in Staking sheets and exporting out shapefiles Now maps are updated on average once a week instead of once a year Has already paid for itself many times over Easy to operate Happier GIS Coordinator = happier co-workers/boss Reduction in errors Things can be missed when manually recreating staking sheets Cons Retirement comes in as stations Relies heavily on stakers creating perfect sheets Expensive Not 100% set up exactly like I want it Large staking sheets can be cumbersome and hard to work with Slide 7 The two tools used for MxGIS. Slide 8 Select the Post Work Order From StakeOut button. These boxes pop up. Select Search by Work Order ( or the option you want ). Slide 9 Once work order comes up, highlight it and select OK. Slide 10 This box shows you the progression of the how the staking sheet is being brought into the geodatabase. Sometimes you will get an error, but if you run through the steps again, it usually works. I have the settings set to move the work order to our closed status if this process properly posted the job. When it is done, select OK. The map will auto- matically zoom to the extent of the job. Slide 11 The yellow diamond is a point MxGIS brought in as a station. If I wouldnt already have a GPS point for this location, I would use this placement for 63-31-111. See blow-up below Slide 12 MxGIS brings in any new feature (63-31- 344 is a new meter and it comes in as a new meter), along with any new line features (the red solid line is new secondary underground). The staker must not have used the location for the transformer 63-31-110 because it came in at a different location I will move it to the new location as it looks like a better placement. The location for the pedestal 63-31-231 was used, so I can just delete that station (the yellow diamond). Slide 13 To finish posting the job, I had to give the new underground line a phase (the place- ment OH or URD did come through, but because a phase wasnt assigned yet, it was solid red). I also copied the station (the yellow diamond) over to my GPS feature class to show this location position was from StakeOut. After I make sure the flow is correct, I save my edits. The final step is to select the 2 nd MxGIS tool to export shape- files out of the GIS. Slide 14 When you select this button, we have it set up to put all the shapefiles into a folder on the hard drive. Then a script grabs those files and copies them to the Stakeout server. When the StakeOut users sync, they will get the updates. It is set to run once a week. This functionality could have been built in house using model builder. Slide 15 MxGIS Tips You can either have MxGIS configured for your data model or to Powels data model We kept our data model This was more expensive, but worth it See it in action before you decide what you want Have patience If you want something different than what is suggested, be persistent Slide 16 For more information, feel free to contact me: Michelle Anderson GIS Coordinator (218) 444-3685 manderson@beltramielectric.com