J/I MUSIC Dr. John L. Vitale Session #2B (Or Not 2B ... ... by Ella Fitzgerald Step #1: As we listen

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  • J/I MUSIC

    Dr. John L. Vitale

    Session #2B (Or Not 2B)

    January 16, 2020

  • BRAIN TEASER ACTIVITY:

    Topic: Funny Student Answers

  • Listening Activity

    Fill in the Missing Lyrics!

    I ___________ you!

  • Tttttttt

    Version #1: Popular/Recent Song

    “Need You Now” by Lady Antebellum

    Step #1: Try to fill in the blanks from your

    memory of the song, and/or what makes

    sense from a grammar/syntax perspective.

    Step #2: We will listen to the song together

    with lyrics on screen. Please check to see

    how well you did.

  • “Need You Now” by Lady Antebellum

  • Tttttttt

    Version #2: Jazz Song

    “All the Things You Are”

    by Ella Fitzgerald

    Step #1: As we listen to the song, fill in the

    blanks.

    Step #2: We will listen to the song together

    with lyrics on screen. Please check to see

    how well you did.

  • “All The Things You Are” A jazz classic composed in 1939 as recorded by Ella Fitzgerald in 1961

  • “All The Things You Are” A jazz classic composed in 1939 as recorded by Ella Fitzgerald in 1961

  • Musical Movements

    Musical Element: Duration

    Keeping The Beat!

  • Musical Movements Preparation

    • The Beat (Pulse) is the heart of any song

    • Dancers move to the beat

    • Band leaders count songs in to the beat

    (E.G. 1 -- 2 -- 3 -- 4)

    • Most people naturally feel the beat, and

    naturally move to the beat

  • Father and His

    Daughters

    Dancing to

    the Beat!

    URL:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=

    gzMtaiNR80Y

  • Even Some Animals Can Move

    Perfectly In Sync to the Beat of a Song

    Ronan the Sea Lion

  • The Beat (Pulse) of a Song is measured

    in BPM (Beats Per Minute)

    Examples:

    60 beats per minute would be a very slow beat,

    with exactly one beat per second

    120 beats per minute is very quick, with

    exactly 2 beats per second (most dance songs

    are recorded at 120 BPM)

  • A metronome can be used

    to provide exact Beats Per

    Minute

    If you do not have one,

    you can use a metronome

    online at:

    webmetronome.com Notice the Italian terms of reference to

    speed on this website.

  • Doing the Funky Chicken! Keeping the Quarter Note Pulse

    80 BPM 90 BPM 100 BPM (160 BPM) (180 BPM) (200 BPM)

  • Session #2B Overview (1) Warm Up (Funny Student Answers)

    (2) Listening Activity

    (3) Musical Movements

    (4) The Basics of the Ontario Arts Curriculum

    Document

    •The Music specialist vs. the Generalist Teacher

    (Board Policies)

    •The Three Major Strands Across the Arts

    Curriculum

    •The Six Elements of Music

  • The Music Teacher

    Specialist

    The Generalist

    Teacher VS.

  • Four Pathways For The Music Teacher

    Specialist at the P/J, J/I, and I/S levels

    (1) An undergraduate degree in

    music education followed by a B.Ed.

    with a music teachable

  • Four Pathways For The Music Teacher

    Specialist at the P/J, J/I, and I/S levels

    (2) An undergraduate degree in

    general music (performance,

    composition, etc.) followed by a

    B.Ed. with a music teachable

  • Four Pathways For The Music Teacher

    Specialist at the P/J, J/I, and I/S levels

    (3) An undergraduate degree in

    anything with a minor in music,

    followed by a B.Ed. with a music

    teachable

  • Four Pathways For The Music Teacher

    Specialist at the P/J, J/I, and I/S levels

    (4) An undergraduate degree in

    anything with accredited private

    instruction in music (Royal

    Conservatory) or Music Additional

    Qualifications (ie Orff and/or

    Kodály)

  • The Generalist Teacher:

    Anyone with a P/J designation can

    be assigned to teach music from

    Grades 1-6, while a J/I designation

    can be assigned to teach music from

    Grades 4-8 (and technically up to

    grade 10)

  • Generalist Teacher Music Training:

    • Many teacher education programs have

    minimal instruction in music

    • Any generalist teacher with private

    music training (or studied music in high

    school) has an advantage

    Nipissing:

    • 36 hours music only instruction is on

    the high end

  • School Board Policies on

    Music Specialists Vs. Generalist Teachers

    •Very complicated issue -- varies from Board to Board

    Example:

    York Region Public has music teacher specialists

    starting as early as grade 4 in some of their

    schools (not all)

  • School Board Policies on

    Music Specialists Vs. Generalist Teachers

    Example:

    Up until a few years

    ago, York Region

    Catholic had music

    teacher specialists

    starting in Grade 9

  • School Board Policies on

    Music Specialists Vs. Generalist Teachers

    •Very complicated issue -- varies from Board to Board

    Example:

    Many Boards (such

    as Toronto Catholic

    DSB) hires non-

    certified teachers

    (musicians) and

    calls them itinerant

    teachers

  • According to a Report Released by

    People for Education (May 15, 2017):

    “Only 41% of elementary schools have a

    specialist music teacher, either full- or

    part-time, a decline from 48% in 2006/07,

    and a dramatic drop from an all-time high

    of 58% in 1997/98.”

  • What is the Outcome of so Many

    Music Education Delivery Models?

    •Many generalist teachers do not teach

    music, which means they are breaking

    the law, and no one really seems to care.

    Many parents don’t even know that

    schools must teach music.

  • What is the Outcome of so Many

    Music Education Delivery Models?

    •Even when generalist teachers teach

    music, it is often literacy based (write a

    paper/project on your favourite

    singer/band)

  • Please share your own experiences of music

    education in elementary school. What model

    of music education were you subjected to?

    The Specialist or the Generalist teacher?

    Choose a number between 1-10.

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

    Specialist Generalist

  • What Does This All Mean in Ontario?

    In General . . . .

    (1) If you are hired to teach grade 1, 2, or 3,

    you WILL be expected to teach music

    (2) If you are hired to teach grade 4,5,6,7, &

    8, you MAY (about a 59% chance) be

    expected to teach music

    Because of budget cutbacks, many school boards

    are not hiring music specialist teachers

  • “Clearly, some teachers who consider

    themselves non-musicians are successful as

    teachers of music in elementary schools.

    Ironically, it may be these teachers who provide

    the strongest reinforcement for the notion that

    all generalist teachers can succeed.”

    Bartel, L & Cameron, L (2002). Self-Efficacy in Teachers Teaching Music. Paper

    presented at the conference of the American Education Research Association, Music

    Education SIG, New Orleans, April 2, 2002.

    Teaching music and being a

    musician are two different things!

  • The Bottom Line:

    Generalist Teachers Can Become

    Dynamic and Successful Music Educators

    Regardless of Musical Training!

    “All generalist teachers can

    succeed in the music

    classroom!”

  • Dance

    Drama

    Music

    Visual Arts

  • A Dynamic and Animated Music Curriculum

    Student- Centred

    Imagination

    Compliance

    Preface and Contextualization:

    The Basics of the Ontario Arts Curriculum Document

    We teach

    students,

    not

    curriculum

    The least of

    learning

    happens in

    the

    classroom.

    The

    curriculum

    documents

    are only a

    guideline

    The

    curriculum

    is written

    by teachers

    for teachers.

  • The 3 Major Strands Across the Arts

    Page #13

    (1) Creating and Presenting/Performing

    (2) Reflecting, Responding, and Analyzing

    (3) Exploring Forms and Cultural Contexts

    How do these strands apply to music?

  • The Three Major Strands are the basis for the

    overall (year end) expectations for each grade

    Overall Expectations for Grade 4 Music (pg. 104)

    By the end o