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Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR Version 1.2 July, 2001 ©1998-2001 Jim Gleason All Rights Reserved www.guitarencyclopedia.com

Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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Page 1: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA

BEGINNINGGUITAR

Version 1.2 July, 2001©1998-2001 Jim Gleason

All Rights Reserved

www.guitarencyclopedia.com

Page 2: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

2

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Page 3: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT!READ THIS INTRODUCTION

Six Subjects

This book follows the traditional convention of step-by-step lessons. It is a carefully arranged series of 219 lessons, in progressive order by subject.

The six subjects covered in this book are indicated in the upper corners of the pages. Here is a list of them in order:

THEORY TECHNIQUE FINGERING RHYTHM CHORD PROGRESSION MELODY

Progressive LevelsAll of the lessons are rated by level. The book progresses from level 1 to level 2. The levels are rated with

decimal points, similar to the Dewey decimal system found in libraries. Level 1.235 comes before level 1.236, for example. Every lesson has a unique level number.

Keep Current In Each SubjectBegin in whichever subject you like. However, you need to keep current in all of the subjects. As you

progress page-by-page through one subject, be aware of the level number shown at the top of the page. Before you get more than .1 ahead in one subject, catch up with the others.

Do I Have To Study Every Page?No. Study most of the book. Where there are multiple examples for the same subject matter, you may

skip some of them. If you are sure that you know something covered in one of the lessons, skip it. Keep in mind that it is very important to cover the fundamentals thoroughly. If you are considering skipping a lesson, you should still look it over to be sure.

READING THE CONTENTS SECTION THAT FOLLOWS THIS INTRODUCTION

The contents pages are set up in columns. The far left column indicates the progressive lesson level, as described above. The “general” column lists which of the six main subjects (shown above) is covered in the lesson. The “specifi c” column gives more information regarding the topic of the lesson. The “content” column gives even more specifi c detail of the nature of the lesson. “CD/track”, identifi es which CD and track for the example pertaining to a particular level. For example, level 1.010 shows “1-1” in the CD track column, with “1” below it. This indicates that there is a recording on track number 1 (as shown in your CD players display panel) of the CD titled “CD 1-1” (shown on the lower portion of the CD label).

Page 4: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

Contentsan explanation of the columns below is given in the Introductiion

Specif icLevel ContentGeneralCD /t rackPage

Pitch Notation1.000 THEORY intro to reading notation: chord diagrams, tablature, chord symbols,slur symbols, full fretboard note names

13

Pitch Notation1.039 THEORY first position natural notes23

Pitch Notation1.041 THEORY note names up and down the sixth string25

Pitch Notation1.042 THEORY note names up and down the fifth string26

Pitch Notation1.043 THEORY note names up and down the fourth string27

Pitch Notation1.044 THEORY octaves of notes in first position and related major chords28

Pitch Notation1.045 THEORY note names on the staff; memorize FACE, EGBDF; GFEDCBA29

Pitch Notation1.0471 THEORY memorize first position note names32

Pitch Notation1.048 THEORY memorize the tertian cycle: FACEGBD37

Pitch Notation1.049 THEORY first position C major & A Aeolian scales38

Pitch Notation1.090 THEORY word games39

Pitch Notation1.091 THEORY word games answers40

Pitch Notation1.102 THEORY word games with ledger lines41

Pitch Notation1.104 THEORY answers for word games with ledger lines43

Scales and Keys1.250 THEORY introduction to tone centers, chord roots, chord progression and key45

Scales and Keys1.252 THEORY1-13

key and chord progression47

Pitch Ear Training1.255 THEORY1-14

intervals: 8va, P5; chords: major, minor49

Pitch Notation1.290 THEORY first position G major and E Aeolian scales53

Pitch Notation1.345 THEORY linear note names on each string54

Pitch Notation1.420 THEORY first position F major and D Aeolian scales57

Pitch Notation1.527 THEORY first position D major and B Aeolian scales58

Pitch Ear Training1.535 THEORY1-15

intervals: M3, m3; chord: dim.59

Pitch Notation1.590 THEORY first position Bb major and G Aeolian scales64

Pitch Notation1.636 THEORY first position A major and F# Aeolian scales65

Pitch Notation1.680 THEORY first position E major and C# Aeolian scales66

Scales and Keys1.710 THEORY major scale intervals67

©1998 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

BEGINNING GUITAR CONTENTS

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CONTENTS

Specif icLevel ContentGeneralCD /

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Pitch Notation1.760 THEORY first position B major and G# Aeolian scales70

Pitch Ear Training1.830 THEORY1-16

intervals: M2, m2; chord: sus. 4.71

Formulas1.846 THEORY preparation for constructing MS fingering: three ways to finger m2& M2; do re me = 1,2,3,etc; half steps are 3 to 4 & 7 to 1

75

Formulas1.850 THEORY constructing major scale fingerings79

Guitar Care1.010 TECHNIQUE1-11

tuning87

Guitar Care1.011 TECHNIQUE1-12

tuning notes on CD88

Guitar Care1.014 TECHNIQUE intonating the bridge; changing strings91

Hand Coordination1.020 TECHNIQUE relaxation, massage and stretching; carpel tunnel and other stresssyndromes; posture; playing and practicing attitude

92

Picking Hand1.050 TECHNIQUE1-17

general picking technique; all down picking, all up picking95

Fretting Hand1.054 TECHNIQUE general fretting technique99

Fretting Hand1.056 TECHNIQUE fretting techniques; first hovering exercise101

Fretting Hand1.057 TECHNIQUE closeness and clearing exercise on two strings.102

Fretting Hand1.120 TECHNIQUE fretting pressure exercise105

Fretting Hand1.125 TECHNIQUE chord cancellation exercise106

Fretting Hand1.126 TECHNIQUE simultaneous touchdown exercise107

Picking Hand1.220 TECHNIQUE strummming technique109

Fretting Hand1.235 TECHNIQUE fretting hand muting; rolling technique111

Fretting Hand1.237 TECHNIQUE1-18

combined fretting and muting113

Fretting Hand1.300 TECHNIQUE1-19

introduction to slide, sliding perfect fifths114

Fretting Hand1.310 TECHNIQUE1-110

“recoil” technique: pivoting on the ball of the fretting hand thumb.Keep the thumb only slightly bent at the tip joint during the pivot.

115

Fretting Hand1.350 TECHNIQUE barreíng technique116

Hand Coordination1.381 TECHNIQUE open position chromatic scale exercises117

Hand Coordination1.390 TECHNIQUE1-111

twelfth fret artificial harmonics120

Picking Hand1.425 TECHNIQUE picking hand heel-of-hand muting122

Picking Hand1.426 TECHNIQUE1-112

picking hand heel-of-hand muting exercise: In The Hall Of theMountain King

123

Picking Hand1.470 TECHNIQUE alternate picking; intro to rhythmic picking; economy picking; tiltingthe pick

124

Picking Hand1.475 TECHNIQUE1-113

tilting the pick129

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CONTENTS

Specif icLevel ContentGeneralCD /

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Picking Hand1.480 TECHNIQUE1-114

alternate picking exercise: Cantata #147130

Picking Hand1.485 TECHNIQUE economy picking exercise: Cantata #147134

Picking Hand1.550 TECHNIQUE picking hand side-of-hand muting138

Picking Hand1.551 TECHNIQUE1-115

Reggae side-of-hand muting139

Fretting Hand1.610 TECHNIQUE1-116

introduction to blue note140

Fretting Hand1.640 TECHNIQUE1-117

diagonal thirds stretching exercise141

Hand Coordination1.690 TECHNIQUE principles142

Hand Coordination1.691 TECHNIQUE1-118

Moto Perpetuo On the First and Second Strings143

Hand Coordination1.694 TECHNIQUE1-119

speed exercises on one string: the 123 pattern146

Fretting Hand1.730 TECHNIQUE posture exercise for the index and little fingers147

Fretting Hand1.732 TECHNIQUE closeness and clearing on six strings149

Fretting Hand1.810 TECHNIQUE introduction to hammer and pull off151

Fretting Hand1.811 TECHNIQUE1-120

open position pentatonic slur exercise152

Fretting Hand1.812 TECHNIQUE1-121

open string slur exercise153

Fretting Hand1.813 TECHNIQUE1-122

pentatonic scale slur exercise154

Hand Coordination1.841 TECHNIQUE sixth position chromatic scale exercises156

Fretting Hand1.844 TECHNIQUE more rolling technique exercises159

Fretting Hand1.869 TECHNIQUE1-123

Pentatonic Slur Blues161

Picking Hand1.880 TECHNIQUE fingerpicking quarter notes in 4/4 with eighth notes per bar162

Picking Hand1.881 TECHNIQUE1-124

preparation for Travis Fingerpicking Exercise 1163

Picking Hand1.882 TECHNIQUE1-125

preparation for Travis Fingerpicking Exercise 2164

Picking Hand1.885 TECHNIQUE1-126

Travis Fingerpicking Exercise 1 167

Picking Hand1.887 TECHNIQUE1-127

Travis Fingerpicking Exercise 2169

Fretting Hand1.930 TECHNIQUE general characteristics171

Picking Hand1.935 TECHNIQUE general characteristics173

Picking Hand1.940 TECHNIQUE right hand technique of popular guitarists175

Picking Hand1.955 TECHNIQUE1-128

“thumb pluck, index strum”180

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CONTENTS

Specif icLevel ContentGeneralCD /

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Picking Hand1.956 TECHNIQUE1-129

“thumb pluck, index strum”181

Picking Hand1.960 TECHNIQUE1-130

“pick bass, finger pluck” technique182

Picking Hand1.961 TECHNIQUE1-131

“pick bass, finger pluck” Blues #1183

Picking Hand1.962 TECHNIQUE1-132

“pick bass, finger pluck” Blues #2184

Picking Hand1.965 TECHNIQUE1-133

“thumb strum, finger(s) pluck” technique185

Picking Hand1.970 TECHNIQUE1-134

“thumb strum, index strum” technique186

Picking Hand1.975 TECHNIQUE1-135

Travis fingerpick minor progression with descending bass, version 1187

Picking Hand1.976 TECHNIQUE1-136

Travis fingerpick minor progression with descending bass, version 2188

Concept1.030 FINGERING intro. to notes & fingering; note names at frets 0, 5, 10 & 12189

Chords1.061 FINGERING1-21

one finger chords192

Chords1.062 FINGERING1-22

one finger blues193

Pentatonic Scales1.064 FINGERING1-23

open position E minor 7/11 and G major 6/9194

Chords1.110 FINGERING1-24

Two Finger Blues. Two finger chords for two to four beats each:picked version

195

Chords1.111 FINGERING1-25

Two Finger Blues. Two finger chords for two to four beats each:plucked version

196

Concept1.260 FINGERING octave shapes; open position CGDAE, first eight three-finger chords197

Arpeggios1.320 FINGERING1-26

defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs202

Arpeggios1.322 FINGERING1-2204

Chords1.351 FINGERING1-27

Three String Barre Blues with Bass207

Intervals1.380 FINGERING half steps, open-position chromatic scale208

Intervals1.385 FINGERING whole steps, open-position whole-tone scales209

Pentatonic Scales1.430 FINGERING1-28

open position A minor 7/11 and C major 6/9210

Intervals1.445 FINGERING all-fretted chromatic scale211

Arpeggios1.521 FINGERING1-29

open-position major and minor arpeggios213

Arpeggios1.522 FINGERING1-210

open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs with patterns andbass: minor blues (track 11)

214

Arpeggios1.523 FINGERING1-211

open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs with patterns andbass: Sixties Folk Song (track 12)

215

Arpeggios1.525 FINGERING1-212

open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs with patterns andbass: Major Classic Rock (track 13), Minor Classic Rock (track 14)-13

217

Chords1.603 FINGERING first nineteen chord fingerings219

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CONTENTS

Specif icLevel ContentGeneralCD /

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Chords1.630 FINGERING1-214

quick-changing two finger chords for one or two beats each,including two string barré chords

220

Chords1.635 FINGERING first 35 chord fingerings224

Pentatonic Scales1.700 FINGERING1-215

twelfth position E minor 7/11 and G major 6/9225

Chords1.716 FINGERING1-216

major scale-tone thirds with pedal tones226

Chords1.723 FINGERING1-217

three string barré examples227

Intervals1.725 FINGERING augmented fourth = diminished fifth, all intervals up to a perfect fifth228

Intervals1.735 FINGERING1-218

perfect fourth song examples231

Intervals1.736 FINGERING1-219

Parallel Fourths Blues232

Intervals1.740 FINGERING1-220

perfect fifth song examples233

Concept1.835 FINGERING fundamentals, strict vertical position234

Heptatonic Scales1.890 FINGERING major scale fingering 3; major scale and arpeggio exercise 5-4240

Pentatonic Scales1.925 FINGERING twelfth position A minor 7/11 and C major 6/9241

Pentatonic Scales1.9461 FINGERING linear Gm7/11 pentatonic scale exercises242

Pentatonic Scales1.9462 FINGERING243

Reference1.993 FINGERING pentatonic scale fingering, pentatonic lines; intro to relative majorand minor pentatonic

244

Reference1.9971 FINGERING common scales, chords and arpeggios249

Rhythm Notation1.070 RHYTHM1-221

intro to reading rhythm: beats, meter, top number in timesignatures, metric accent, tempo in BPM

252

Concepts1.080 RHYTHM1-222

subdivision of the beat: duple and triple subdivision255

Rhythm Notation1.100 RHYTHM left and right repeat signs, repeated beats, repeated bars , numberedendings, double barline ending

256

Rhythm Notation1.200 RHYTHM intro to time signatures, halving values, whole, half and quarter notes258

Rhythm Notation1.205 RHYTHM1-223

intro to rhythmic words; first four four-pulse words in whole beats;first three three-pulse rhythmic words in whole beats

261

Concepts1.319 RHYTHM1-224

intro to Swing Eighths263

Rhythm Notation1.325 RHYTHM dotted notes; dotted half notes264

Rhythm Notation1.326 RHYTHM1-225

dotted notes exercise265

Rhythm Notation1.400 RHYTHM time signatures266

Rhythm Notation1.410 RHYTHM whole, half, dotted half and quarter rests; "performing" a rest toaccurately end the previous note

268

Rhythm Notation1.411 RHYTHM1-226

whole beat rests269

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CONTENTS

Specif icLevel ContentGeneralCD /

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Rhythm Notation1.500 RHYTHM ties; intro to sustain and rest syncopation270

Rhythm Notation1.501 RHYTHM1-227

quarter and half notes with sustain syncopation and rest syncopation271

Rhythm Notation1.510 RHYTHM1-228

first seven four-pulse rhythmic words in full beats; first ninethree-pulse rhythmic words in full beats

272

Rhythm Notation1.520 RHYTHM1-229

sustain-syncopated quarter, half, dotted half and whole notes273

Rhythm Notation1.530 RHYTHM1-230

rest -syncopated quarter, half, dotted half and whole notes274

Rhythm Notation1.600 RHYTHM1-231

eighth notes in pairs; "all four", "gallop" and "Jingle Bells" rhythmicwords in eighth notes

275

Rhythm Notation1.750 RHYTHM complete eighth note triplets276

Rhythm Notation1.751 RHYTHM1-232

eighth note triplet exercises277

Rhythm Notation1.755 RHYTHM compound time signatures: 6/8, 9/8, 12/8278

Rhythm Notation1.800 RHYTHM1-233

Rhythmic Word Exercises279

Rhythm Notation1.801 RHYTHM three eighth notes compared to an eighth triplet280

Rhythm Notation1.802 RHYTHM1-234

eighth note groups of three compared to eighth note triplets281

Rhythm Notation1.805 RHYTHM1-235

first four three pulse words in eighth note groups of three282

Rhythm Notation1.900 RHYTHM Rhythmic Word Exercises283

Rhythm Notation1.905 RHYTHM1-236

dotted quarter notes.284

Concepts1.910 RHYTHM1-237

introduction to four pulse rhythmic words in eighth notes (the firsteight four pulse words)

285

Rhythm Notation1.911 RHYTHM1-238

all combinations of all eight four pulse rhythmic words in eighthnotes with no rests

286

Principles1.225 CHORD Prog1-31

Reading Strummed Rhythms; Counting Rhythm293

Song1.230 CHORD Prog1-32

Rock Song #1, Rock Song #2, Rock Song #3-4

295

Song1.231 CHORD Prog1-35

Folkrock #1a 296

Song1.232 CHORD Prog1-36

Folk Song #1297

Song1.240 CHORD Prog1-37

Folkrock #1b 298

Song1.241 CHORD Prog1-38

Folkrock #2299

Song1.270 CHORD Prog1-39

Old English Folk Song301

Song1.327 CHORD Prog1-310

Rock Song with mutes303

Song1.328 CHORD Prog1-311

R&B Song #1304

Song1.336 CHORD Prog1-312

Folkrock #3305

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CONTENTS

Specif icLevel ContentGeneralCD /

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Song1.338 CHORD Prog1-313

Chicago Blues #1 in A306

Song1.352 CHORD Prog1-314

Mojo / Voodoo Blues #2 in A 307

Song1.455 CHORD Prog1-315

House of the Rising Sun308

Song1.456 CHORD Prog1-316

Modern Rock Song #1 309

Song1.460 CHORD Prog1-317

Modern Rock Song #2 312

Song1.545 CHORD Prog1-318

Chuck Berry Style rhythm313

Song1.575 CHORD Prog1-319

Bo Diddley style rhythm314

Song1.580 CHORD Prog1-320

Ornament Open chords 1316

Song1.581 CHORD Prog1-321

Ornament Open chords 2317

Song1.6041 CHORD Prog1-322

barre chord songs-36

318

Song1.622 CHORD Prog1-337

Mississippi Blues #1 in E326

Song1.741 CHORD Prog1-338

Albert King Style #1327

Song1.770 CHORD Prog1-339

Chicago Blues #1 in E328

Song1.820 CHORD Prog1-340

Mississippi Blues #2 in A330

Song1.823 CHORD Prog1-341

Albert King Style #2 333

Song1.865 CHORD Prog1-342

Swing Blues #1 In C334

Song1.867 CHORD Prog1-343

Swing Blues #2335

Song1.870 CHORD Prog1-344

B.B. King Style336

Song1.897 CHORD Prog1-345

Page, Who, AC/DC Style rhythm337

Song1.060 MELODY1-41

Ode To Joy In C339

Melodic Examples1.065 MELODY1-42

open position 641 Em minor 7/11 licks without slurs340

Song1.130 MELODY1-43

Happy Birthday344

Song1.131 MELODY1-44

Minuet in G, no bass345

Song1.280 MELODY1-45

Romanza347

Melodic Examples1.311 MELODY1-46

open position 641 Em minor 7/11 licks with slides; on CD: examplesof licks over Albert King Style #1 & Mississippi Blues #1

348

Song1.315 MELODY1-47

Mojo / Voodoo Blues 1 in E349

Song1.329 MELODY Greensleeves, bass only: try to figure out melody351

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CONTENTS

Specif icLevel ContentGeneralCD /

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Song1.330 MELODY1-48

Greensleeves, easy version in Am with bass352

Melodic Examples1.331 MELODY1-49

open position G major 6/9 licks with slides353

Song1.335 MELODY1-410

Amazing Grace, easy version in G with bass355

Melodic Examples1.435 MELODY1-411

open position 53 A minor 7/11 licks with slides356

Melodic Examples1.440 MELODY1-412

open position C major 6/9 licks with slides359

Song1.546 MELODY1-413

Chuck Berry Style #1360

Melodic Examples1.615 MELODY1-414

E minor 7/11 licks with b3 and b7 blue notes361

Song1.620 MELODY1-415

Surf's Up362

Melodic Examples1.650 MELODY1-416

A minor 7/11 licks with b3 and b7 blue notes364

Melodic Examples1.705 MELODY1-417

twelfth position 641 E minor 7/11 licks with slides365

Song1.717 MELODY1-418

Ode To Joy melody367

Song1.718 MELODY1-419

Ode To Joy arrangement with thirds368

Song1.728 MELODY1-420

Estudio V by Fernando Sor371

Song1.742 MELODY1-421

Albert King Style #1373

Melodic Examples1.745 MELODY1-422

twelfth position G major 6/9 licks with slides374

Melodic Examples1.780 MELODY1-423

minor 7/11 solo in C #1375

Melodic Examples1.781 MELODY1-424

minor 7/11 solo in C #2376

Melodic Examples1.815 MELODY1-425

open and twelfth position E minor 7/11 licks with slides, hammersand pull-offs

377

Song1.824 MELODY1-426

Albert King Style #2 381

Song1.825 MELODY1-427

Acoustic Shuffle in E, no bass382

Melodic Examples1.860 MELODY1-428

open and twelfth position G major 6/9 licks with slides, hammers andpull-offs

385

Song1.866 MELODY1-429

Swing Blues #1 In C387

Song1.868 MELODY1-430

Swing Blues #2388

Song1.871 MELODY1-431

B.B. King Style389

Song1.895 MELODY1-432

Chuck Berry Style #2390

Melodic Examples1.926 MELODY1-433

open and twelfth position A minor 7/11 licks with slides, hammersand pull-offs

391

Melodic Examples1.929 MELODY1-434

Jeff Beck and Albert King solo study394

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CONTENTS

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Melodic Examples1.945 MELODY1-435

open and twelfth position C major 6/9 licks with slides, hammers andpull-offs

395

Song1.947 MELODY1-436

Hendrix Style Double Stops 397

Song1.950 MELODY1-437

Mojo / Voodoo Blues 3 in E400

Song1.980 MELODY1-438

Minor Blues #1405

Song1.983 MELODY1-439

Flight of the Bumblebee408

Song1.985 MELODY1-440

Acoustic Shuffle in E410

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

AN INTRODUCTION TOREADING MUSIC NOTATION

Does music exist in nature or does it imitate nature? It could be said that music exists in nature becauseit is in the songs of birds, the splashing of waves, the dripping of rain, the stepping of feet, the pecking of awoodpecker and so on. Or, does it imitate nature. Being a romantic, I prefer to think that it exists in nature.

What came first in music, rhythm or pitch? One can‘t exist without the other, but systems of rhythmdeveloped in cultures faster than systems of pitch. Music has a pulse or rhythm, which is usually regular. Innature, there is a regularity to the splashing of waves, dripping of rain and stepping of feet. We imitate wavesbeating on the shore, dripping rain and walking feet beat ing on the ground with beats in our music. Beats arecommonly played in reguar groups.

For guitarists, there are three common types of music notation: standard music notation, tablature andchord grid diagrams. Chord grid diagrams are usually the easiest to read.

Theory 1.000

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© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

TABLATUREThis system of notation is a graph of the guitar strings from the perspective of looking down on the guitar

as you’re playing it. The tablature indicates where each note is fretted. Numbers on the strings indicate frets andare written from left to right in the sequence they are to be played. In this book, tablature is written below allmusic notation.

The numbers that indicate the fingers of each hand are shown below. They are typically placed belowthe standard music notation, between the music notation and the tablature.

fretting hand plucking hand

Symbols above each tablature number indicate the suggested fretting finger. Right hand symbols areshown above or below notes in the standard music notation. The right hand finger symbols are “p” (pulgar =thumb in Spanish), “i” (indice = index finger in Spanish), “m” (medio = middle finger in Spanish) and “a” (anular= ring finger in Spanish).

In reading the tablature, remember that the top string on the tablature is the smallest, first string.

Theory 1.001

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THEORY THEORY 15 15

Theory 1.002 Theory 1.002 ©1998 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

this row of numbers represents the fretting fingers

this top line represents the first string (smallest)

this bottom line represents the sixth string (largest)

fret numbersthis row of arrows

shows the downwardand upward picking strokes

these are the symbols used torepresent the fretting fingers

57

1↓

3↑

8

4↑

7

3↓

5

1↓

5

1↓

5

1↓

7

3↑

5

1↓

7

3↑

9

4↓

1↓

5

57

1

3

8

4

7

3

5

1

5

1

5

1

7

3

5

1

7

3

9

4

1

5

The grid diagrams shown above the music notation in the diagram below are aids in reading the tablature.Instruction on reading these grid diagrams is on the following pages. The gird diagrams are used in this coursewhere the fretting hand mainly retains a particular chord fingering. You still should read the guitar part in thetablature, since it shows the exact sequence of notes.

plucking hand1

Am I

32

this top line represents the first string

this bottom line represents the sixth stringthis row of arrows

shows plucking fingers,(the symbols "p, i, m and a"

were defined earlier)

these chord diagramsare defined in the

material that follows

fret numbers

plucking:pa

3

3

p

2

i

0

p

3

m

1

p

2

i

0

pa

0

0

p

2

i

2

p

0

m

1

p

2

i

2

plucking:pa

3

3

p

2

i

0

p

3

m

1

p

2

i

0

pa

0

0

p

2

i

2

p

0

m

1

p

2

i

2

4

2

1

C I

3first string(smallest)

4

2

1

C I

3

sixth string(largest)

theo 1.002 theo 1.002

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THEORY

FRETBOARD DIAGRAMS

this diagram......

represents this viewof the fretboard

The vertical lines represent strings. The horizontal spaces are frets (numbered alongside the diagram).The actual metal fret is indicated by the horizontal line at the bottom of each space on the diagram.

vertical lines are strings(numbered above diagram)

horizontal spaces are frets(numbered alongside the diagram)

6 5 4 3 2 1

1

2

3

4

Theory 1.003

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THEORY

Theory 1.004

Dots in these diagrams indicate fingered notes. Chord tones are fingered simultaneously. Scale orarpeggio tones (chords played one note at a time) are fingered individually.

unmarked stringsare not sounded

“T ” indicates anote fretted withthe left thumb.

a circle above a stringindicates it is playedopen (not fretted)

The barré is a group of notes all on the same fret of two or more strings fingered with a straight portionof one finger. It uses the classical wrist position. Finger (fret) the barré with the harder edge of your finger whenyou can. Avoid the creases opposite your knuckles, since they can mute notes.

In the “F” chord shown below with finger numbers, you need to interpret that the first finger is placedacross all six strings (as shown in the diagram to its right).

2

1

F I

4

11

3

barreF I

barre

3

Bb I

3

1

3barre

Bb I

barre

Left-handed guitarists. Interpret references to the right hand as left hand and vice versa. All diagramsmust be imagined in “mirror image”:

as shown mirror image

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THEORY

Roman Numerals and Chord NamesA roman numeral above the top right of the diagram indicates the number of the top fret on the diagram.

A plain letter name, such as “D” indicates a major chord. A small “m” after a letter name indicates aminor chord. “D” means “D major”, while “Dm” means “D minor”. A few more common chord symbolabbreviations are shown a couple of pages later.

A II

Roots and Tone CentersA chord root is the note after which a chord is named (“D” is the root of a D major chord). A tone center

is the note after which a scale is named (“C” is the tone center of a C Lydian scale).

D maj. chord II C Lydian scale VII

Theory 1.005

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THEORY

Theory 1.006

Movable DiagramsMovable diagrams have no roman numeral on their upper right and therefore have no specified top fret

number. They may be placed anywhere on the fretboard according to their chord root(s) or tone center(s). Ifnotes on a diagram are indicated by dots, a circled or enlarged dot indicates the chord root or tone center.

movablemovable

named after named after

The numbers 1, 2, 3 and 4 within diagrams indicate left hand fingers. The finger number on the chordroot or tone center may be circled.

When numbers higher than 4 are used in a diagram, all of the numbers indicate scale, chord or arpeggiotones.

Proceedure Of Reading Chord DiagramsYou read the previous pages and are anxious to play songs. How complicated can it be? True, chord

diagrams are a simple graphic representation of fingers on the fretboard, but be careful not to make an error inreading them. It is quite common that someone new to reading chord diagrams “thinks” they have read a diagramcorrectly, and doesn't find out until much later (if at all) that they have made an error.

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THEORY

Theory 1.007

Take Your Time And Read Chord Diagrams Right The First Time.(1) Read the header (Gm III) with the chord name and roman numeral for position.

(2) Read across the frets one string at a time from the sixth (largest) string to the first string. Allow threeto five seconds for each string. The strings are numbered from sixth to first as you scan across thediagram from left to right.

A few things to be careful to recognize:

• whether notes are on the same fret or different frets

• when there is an “empty” fret.

• when notes are on adjacent strings

• when a string is skipped.

CHORD ABBREVIATIONS & SYMBOLS7 = seventh chord (dominant) 9 = ninth chord7#5 = seventh sharp five chord (dominant) 9#5 = ninth sharp five chord (dominant)7b5 = flat five chord (dominant) 9b5 = ninth flat five chord (dominant)7#9 = seventh sharp nine chord (dominant) °7 = diminished seventh chordC = C major chord Cm = C minor chord6 = sixth chord (major sixth chord) m6 = minor sixth chord6/9 = sixth add nine chord m6/9 = minor sixth add nine chord∆7 = major seventh chord m7 = minor seventh chord∆9 = major ninth chord m9 = minor ninth chord/9 = major add nine chord m/9 = minor add nine chordm7b5 = minor seventh flat five chord sus. 4 = suspended fourth chord

m( 7) = minor, natural 7 chord (minor, major 7) sus. 2 = suspended second chord

n3 = no thirdn5 = no fifth

SLUR SYMBOLS(shown above or below notes in music notation)

H = hammer on.

P = pull off.

S = slide.

B1 = bend an interval of one fret (a half step or one semitone).

B2 = bend an interval of two frets (a whole step or two semitones. B3 for three frets, B4 for four frets, etc.

R = release bent note (all bends have a silent release unless “R” is indicated).

(B1) = silently bend one fret before picking.

(B2) = silently bend two frets before picking. (B3) for three frets, (B4) for four frets, etc.

+ or = blue note. A slight bend (less than one fret) for expression.

GR = gradual release. Gradually release a previously bent note.

TD1 = tremolo drop one fret. Press the tremolo bar toward the guitar to lower the pitch an interval of one fret.

TD2 = tremolo drop two frets. Press the tremolo bar toward the guitar to lower the pitch an interval of two frets.

TB1 = tremolo bend one fret. Pull the tremolo bar away from the guitar to raise the pitch an interval of one fret.

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THEORY

Theory 1.008

TR = tremolo release. Release pressure on the tremolo bar and allow it to return to its resting point.

(TD1) = silent one-fret tremolo drop. Before playing the current note, press the tremolo bar toward the guitar to drop the pitchan interval of one fret.

(TD2) = silent two-fret tremolo bend. Before playing the current note, press the tremolo bar toward the guitar to drop the pitchan interval of two frets. (TD3) for three frets, (TD4) for four frets.

(TB1) = silent one-fret tremolo bend. Before playing the current note, pull the tremolo bar away from the guitar to raise the pitchan interval of 1 fret.

(TB2) = tremolo bent 2 frets before picking. Before playing the current note, pull the tremolo bar away from the guitar to raisethe pitch an interval of 2 frets. (TB3) for 3 frets, (TB4) for 4 frets.

rake = play all the notes within the bracket labeled “rake” in one stroke, muting each note with the left hand as soon as it isplayed. The last note may sustain.

= harmonics are indicated by open diamond note heads in place of the usual oval notehead.

X = percussive muted notes are indicated by an “X” notehead in place of the usual oval notehead.

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THEORY

FULL FRETBOARD NOTE NAMES AND STAFF LOCATIONS

* Guitar sounds one octave lower than written.

A D G B EE

FA# D# G#

C F

B E AC# F#F#

C FA#

D GG

C# F#B

D# G#G#

D G C E AA

Eb Ab DbF

BbBb

E A DF#

BB

FA# D#

G CC

B E

G C F A DD

G# C# F# A# D#D#

A D G B EE

Ab Db Gb Bb EbEb

F# G# C#C#

Gb Ab DbDb

Bb Eb

Gb

D# G# C# A#A#

Db Gb Eb AbAb

Db GbGb

Bb Eb Ab

6

FA# D# G#

C

B E AC#F#

C F Bb DG

C# F#B

D#G#

D G C EA

Db Gb EbAb

DbGb

Bb Eb Ab

5 4 3 2 1

Bb

F

F#

G

G#

A

Ab

Gb

Theory 1.009

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THEORY

Theory 1.039

Ä 44â 44 E

0

tF

1

tG

3

tA

0

tB

2

tC

3

tD

0

tE

2

tF

3

tG

0

tA

2

tB

0

tC

1

tD

3

tE0

tF1

t

Äâ G

3

tA

5

tG

3

tF

1

tE

0

tD

t3

C

t1

B

t0

A

t2

G

t0

F

t3

E

t2

D

t0

C

t3

B

t2

Äâ

æææ

A

t0

G

t3

F

t1

E

t0

First Position Natural Notestheo 1.039 theo 1.039

Play the notes below and speak the letter names. Notice that "E" to "F" and "B" to "C" are one fret apart, as circled below. All of the other alphabetical pairs of notes (AB, CD, DE, FG and GA) are two frets apart.

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THEORY 25

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

A

5

A

0

D

5

D

0

G

5

G

0

B

4

B

0

E

5

E

0

0

E

1

F

3

G

5

A

0

A

2

B

3

C

5

D

0

D

2

E

3

F

5

G

0

G

2

A

4

B

B

0

C

1

D

3

E

5

0

E

1

F

3

G

5

A

5

A

3

G

1

F

0

E

5

E

3

D

1

C

0

B

4

B

2

A

0

G

5

G

3

F

2

E

0

D

5

D

3

C

2

B

0

A

5

A

3

G

1

F

0

E

© 1998 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

The example below shows the locations of fretted notes which are the same pitch and note name as the next smaller string open. Except for the third string, this occurs at the fifth fret.

theo 1.040 theo 1.040

Play the notes below and speak the letter names. On each string, you will play a note which is the same as the next smaller string open. This is indended to show you where the notes duplicate.

Notice that "E" to "F" and "B" to "C" are one fret apart, as circled below. All of the other alphabetical pairs of notes (AB, CD, DE, FG and GA) are two frets apart.

First Position Natural Notesincluding duplications at the fourth and fifth frets

Theory 1.040

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THEORY 25

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.041

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26

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THEORY 27

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.042

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27

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THEORY

Theory 1.043

Ä 44â 44 do

0

tre

2

tme

4

!tfa

5

t7

tsol

9

tla

11

!tti

12

tdo

12

tdo

11

!tla

9

tti

7

tsol

æææ

fa

5

tme

4

!tre

2

tdo

0

t

Ä 44â 44 1

0

t2

2

t3

4

!t4

5

t5

7

t6

9

t7

11

!t1

12

t1

12

t7

11

!t6

9

t5

7

t æææ5

t4

4

!t3

2

t2

0

t1

Ä 44â 44 D

0

tE

2

tF

3

tG

5

t7

tA

9

tB

10

tC

12

tD

12

tD

10

tC

9

tB

7

tA

æææ5

tG

3

tF

2

tE

0

tD

Ä 44â 44 10

tC

12

tD

12

tE

15

tF

17

tG

19

tA

21

tB

22

tC

22

tC

21

tB

19

tA

17

tG

æææ15

tF

14

tE

12

tD

10

tC

This is a D major scale, named after "D", the note on which it begins and ends. One traditional set of names for the notes of a major scale is "do, re, me, fa, sol, la, ti, do." The eighth note has the same name as the first one and is called an octave Speak these names as you play the notes.

Another set of names for the notes of a major scale is numbering them "1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1." Again, the eighth note has the same name as the first one and is called an octave. When a note in the music notation has the symbol "#" before it, its name has the word "sharp" after it, such as "F sharp" for the second note below. Speak the numbers as you play the notes. Notice that major scale tones "3" to "4" and "7" to "1" are 1 fret apart and all the other pairs are 2 frets apart.

This is not a major scale. It is the set of all natural notes. Natural notes have no sharps or flats after their name. A version of a note with a sharp in its name (such as "C sharp") is played one fret higher (toward the bridge). A version of a note with a flat in its name (such as "B flat") is played one fret lower in pitch (toward the head of the guitar).

The example above is not a major scale, as you may have heard when you played it. To play a major scale with these notes, they must be played from "C" to "C", as shown below. This is the "C" major scale. All other major scales require one or more sharps or flats. Your guitar may not have enough frets to play this example.

Note Names Up And Down Each String (continued)theo 1.043 theo 1.043

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28

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THEORY

Theory 1.044

Ä 44â 44

E

0

tE

2

tE

0

t

022100

ttt!ttt

1

tF

3

tF

1

|F G

3

tG

0

tG

3

t

320033

tttttt

0

tA

2

tA

02220

|||!||

Äâ

B

2

|B

0

|3

tC

1

tC

32010

||||| æææ0

tD

3

tD

0232

|||!|

1

E I

32

2

1

G I

3 4

4

A I

32

3

2

1

C I

2

D I

3

1

Octaves Of First Position Natural Notes(and related major chords)

theo 1.044theo 1.044

When you fret single notes within the first four frets, you are playing in first position. In first position, the index finger frets the first fret, the middle finger frets the second fret, the ring finger frets the third fret, and the little finger frets the fourth fret.

In first position, there are three"E's", three "F''s" and three "G's". "A", "B", "C" and "D" occur in two placeseach. For each of the letter-named notes, the lowest note is written below the staff. The highest of each letter-named note occurs near the middle or top of the staff. For the notes that occur in three places ("E", "F'" and "G"), the middle note is written near the bottom of the staff.

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29

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THEORY

Theory 1.045

NOTE NAMES ON THE STAFF

The staff is a group of 5 horizontal lines on which music is written. The plural is usually “staves”, butmay be “staffs”.

Bar lines (above) are vertical lines written across the staff to divide it into groups of beats. Each groupof beats is called a bar. Time signatures (see Chapter 22, section B) indicate the number of beats in the bars thatfollow it.

Ledger lines are short lines placed above or below the staff to add to its range.

The parts of notes are the head, stem, flag, beam and dot.

The head of a note is an oval. It is centered vertically on or between the lines of the staff. Thewhole note’s only part is its head.

The stem of a note is a vertical line connected to the head. It connects to the left if it goes downfrom the head and to the right if it goes up. Stems on note heads above the middle of the staffare usually written down. Stems on heads below the middle of the staff are usually written up.Stems on the center line of the staff can be written up or down.

When two voices (two instrument or voice parts) are written on the same staff, the upper part isusually written with all stems up and the lower part with all stems down:

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THEORY

A clef is a sign placed on the staff at the beginning of a piece of music to indicate the placement of the letters.The letters used in music include “A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.”

The treble clef or “G” clef assigns the letter “G” to the second line from the bottom of the staff.Guitar music is written on the treble clef. Notes on the treble clef are completely above those onthe bass clef in pitch.

The bass clef or “F” clef assigns the letter “F” to the second line from the top of the staff. Noteson the bass clef are completely below those on the treble clef in pitch.

Middle C is the C nearest the middle of the piano keyboard. It is the “dividing line” between the trebleand bass clefs. It is on the first ledger line below a staff using the treble clef and the first ledger line above a staffusing the bass clef.

The treble and bass clefs were originally part of the great staff, which had eleven lines. The top five lineswere extracted to make the treble clef, and the bottom five lines were extracted to make the bass clef. The centerline of the great staff was middle C.

The notes on the staves are in alphabetical order:

Theory 1.046

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THEORY

Theory 1.047

Guitar is usually written on the treble clef, transposed down one octave.

The letter names on the treble clef are easy to memorize with the use of a few associations. From bottomto top, the notes on the lines of the staff are the first letters of the words in this sentence: Every Good Boy DoesFine. From bottom to top, the notes on the spaces of the staff spell the word “FACE.”

The notes on the lines (including ledger lines) are in an alternate alphabetical pattern: A, C, E, G, B,D, F, A, C, etc. Likewise, the notes on the spaces are in the same alternate alphabetical pattern: A, C, E, G, B,D, F, A, C, etc. Memorize the alternate alphabetical cycle shown at the right below:

Note Names In Reverse Order (GFEDCBA or “gee-fed-cee-bah”)Most of us were not taught to think the alphabet backward, as well as forward. In music, whenever notes

descend (go down) a seven tone scale such as the major scale, you will need to think the letters backward. Asa memory device, think of the reverse series of letters as a middle eastern-sounding word, pronounced: “gee-fed-cee-bah”. Of course, the notes continue down the scale after “A”, forming the cycle “GFEDCBAGFED,etc.”

================Ä tmmmmG

tmmmmF

tmmmmE

tmmmmD

tmmmmC

tmmmmB

tmmmmA G

tmmmmF

tmmmmE

tmmmmD

tmmmmC

tmmmmB

tmmmmAtmmmmm

AB

CDE

F

GG

F

EDC

B

A

Clockwise, thisshows note namesascending a scale

Clockwise, thisshows note namesdescending a scale

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32

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.0471

• the open strings, from sixth to fi rst string are Eat A Darn Good Breakfast Early (E A D G B E).

• E to F is one fret. B to C is one fret.• AB, CD, DE, FG and GA are each two frets apart.• There are three each of the notes E, F and G.• The note name at any fret on the sixth string is the same at that fret on the

fi rst string.• Octaves “skip” one or two strings, depending on their angle. Octaves are

notes which have the same name, but are eight letter names apart (counting the starting and ending notes). See the diagrams at the left below.

• Octaves of A, B, D, E and G each include an open string.• The fi ngering pattern on strings 1, 2 and 6 is open, 1, 3.• The fi ngering pattern on strings 5 and 4 is open, 2, 3.• The fi ngering pattern on string 3 is open, 2.• Memorize the locations of the notes after which each chord is named below

Memorizing First Position Note Names

Note Names On The Guitar

The top fret on all of the diagrams below is the fi rst fret. The tiny circles above the chord diagrams indicate open strings (not fretted). Notes enclosed in the large circles below have letter names after which the chord is named. In each diagram, the notes enclosed in the large circles are octaves (eight letter names apart)`. Letter names for notes above the diagrams indicate open strings.

skip 2 strings

skip 1 string

E A

1

E I

32 2

1

3 43

2

1

2

3

12

1

4

11

3 2

1

3 4432

32

1

32

1

2

3

E

E

EF

F

F

G

G G

A

A B

BC

C D

D

F I G I A I B7 I C I D I

Dm IAm IEm I

D G B EF C F

B E A

G C F D G

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33

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THEORY

Theory 1.0472

• The notes go up from line to space in alphabetical order.• “E”, “F” and “G” each occur in three places in the range of notes shown below.• “A”, “B”, “C” and “D” each occur in two places in the range of notes shown below.• The lowest of each of the natural notes in fi rst positon is below the staff.• The middle of each of the sets three notes with the same name (E, F and G) is near the bottom of the staff.

Note Names On The Staff

lowest middle highest

• Spaces (notes between lines) are FACE, from bottom to top. Going up on lines beginning with the third ledger line below the staff is also FACE.

• Lines from bottom to top are represented by the fi rst letter of each word in the sentence: Every Good Boy Does Fine. Going up on spaces beginning with the note below the third ledger line below the staff is also EGBDF.

• “B” is on the center line of the staff. Think of it as the “bulls-eye” (see the arrow at the right above).• FACE and EGBDF overlap in the every-other-letter cycle FACEGBD shown at the right below.

the center line is “B” for “bulls-

eye”

The every-other note letter cycle includes “FACE”

and EGBDF (Every Good Boy Does Fine).

FA

C

EG

B

D

ÄE

tF

tG

tA

tB

tC

tD

tE

tF

tG

tA

tB

tC

tD

tE

tF

tG

t

ÄF

tA

tC

tE

tE

tG

tB

tD

tF

ttF

tA

tC

tE E

tG

tB

tD

tF

t

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34

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THEORY

Theory 1.0473

The Staff Game

This game will help you to memorize the names of the notes on the staff, using the word “F-A-C-E” for the spaces and the sentence “Every Good Boy Does Fine” for the lines. You need to recall the names of the notes on the staff directly, without having to think through the word “face” or through the sentence “every good boy does fi ne”. In this game, you’ll make the transistions to think directly to each letter name.

This is a question and answer game. The questions and answers for the spaces regard the word “face”. They are:

question answerwhat is the fi rst letter? ..............................................Fwhat is the second word? ...........................................Awhat is the next-to-last letter? ....................................Cwhat is the last letter?.................................................E

The questions and answers for the lines of the staff regard the sentence “every good boy does fi ne”. The answers are intentionally abbreviated to the fi rst letter of each word. They are:

question answerwhat is the fi rst word? ................................................Ewhat is the second word? .........................................Gwhat is the middle word? .........................................Bwhat is the next-to-last word? ..................................Dwhat is the last word? ...............................................F

Part of this game is knowing how to ask the questions. Here are the eight questions (in order) for the eight-note example below:

Ä 44 t t t t æt t t tWhat is the next-to last letter?

What is the next-to last word?

What is the second letter?

What is the second word?What is the fi rst word?

What is the last letter?

What is the last word?

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35

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THEORY

Theory 1.0474

Beginning To Read:Putting the Fretboard and Staff Together

ÄE

tF

tG

tA

tB

tC

tD

tE

tF

tG

tA

tB

tC

tD

tE

tF

tG

tRead the diagram at the left and play the notes from “G” on the third string

to “G” on the fi rst string. Then, play the notes from “G” to “G” again as you read the last eight notes on the staff below. Think the letter names as you focus on the notes on the staff.

Ä 44 t t t t t t t t t t t t «t tY |Ä t t t t t t t t t t t t «t tY |Ä t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t |Ä t t t t t t t t t t t t æ«t tY |

Ode To Joyfrom Beethoven's Ninth Symphony

Now, using those eight notes (seven of them, actually), play the melody to Ode To Joy shown below.

E A D G B EF C F

B E A

G C F D G

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36

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THEORY

Theory 1.0475

Ä t t t t t t t t t t t tt t t t t

SELF TEST

1. Look at any note above.2. Speak its name and play it.3. Confi rm you have played it correctly with the chart below.

Äâ

æææ

E

0

tF

1

tG

3

tA

0

tB

2

tC

3

tD

0

tE

2

tF

3

tG

0

tA

2

tB

0

tC

1

tD

3

tE0

tF1

tG3

t

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37

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THEORY

Theory 1.048

Tertian is Greek for “made of threes”. From each number in the cycle, counting the number on whichyou begin, it is three numbers to the next. Think of it as an every-other-number pattern, where after “7” you skip“1” and continue from “2”. After “6” you skip “7” and begin again at “1“.

13

5

72

4

6C

E

G

BD

F

Atertiancycle of

numbers

tertiancycle ofletters

In letters, this cycle represents the pattern of note names on “all lines” or “all spaces” in music notation:

Ä 44 tD

tF

tA

tC

tE

tG

tB

tD

tF

tA

tC

tE

æt

G

t

B

t

D

t

F

======================Ä 44 tmmmmmmm

D

tmmmmmmF

tmmmmmA

tmmmmC

tmmmmE

tmmmmG

tmmmmB

tmmmmD

tmmmmF

tmmmmA

tmmmmmC

tmmmmmmE

ætmmmmmmmG

tmmmmmmmmB

tmmmmmmmmmD

tmmmmmmmmmmF

Ä 44 tE

tG

tB

tD

tF

tA

tC

tE

tG

tB

tD

t

F

æt

A

t

C

t

E

t

G

======================Ä 44 tmmmmmmE

tmmmmmG

tmmmmB

tmmmmD

tmmmmF

tmmmmA

tmmmmC

tmmmmE

tmmmmG

tmmmmB

tmmmmmD

tmmmmmmF

ætmmmmmmmA

tmmmmmmmmmC

tmmmmmmmmmmE

tmmmmmmmmmmmG

In letters and numbers both, the tertian cycle is the pattern of letters with which harmony and chords aremade. A “C major chord“ consists of the notes “C, E, G”, which are three consecutive letters in the tertian cycle,beginning with “C”. The combination of the notes “F, A, C” also constitutes a major chord, as does “G, B, D”.Some combinations constitute a minor chord, such as “D, F, A” and “A, C, E”. Some chords use all seven letters.A complete “G13” chord consists of “G, B, D, F, A, C, E”. More details are given in the materials that follow.

Thinking in numbers, a major chord can consist of “135“, “4, 6, 1” or “5, 7, 2”, while a minor chord canconsist of “2, 4, 6”, “3, 5, 7” or “6, 1, 3”. All of these examples involve consecutive groups of numbers fromthe tertian cycle. Not all chords follow this convention, but it is the basis of chord construction and is best tolearn first. All the details of chord construction will be taught in the materials that follow.

THE TERTIAN CYCLE

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THEORY

Theory 1.049

Ä 44â 44 C

3

tD

0

tE

2

tF

3

tG

0

tA

2

tB

0

tC

1

t1

tC

0

tB

2

tA

0

tG

æææ

F

3

tE

2

tD

0

tC

3

t

Äâ

0

tA

2

tB

3

tC

0

tD

2

tE

3

tF

0

tG

2

tA

0

tB

1

tC

3

tD

0

tE

1

tF

3

tG

5

|A

Äâ 5

tA

3

tG

1

tF

0

tE

3

tD

1

tC

0

tB

2

tA

0

tG

3

tF

2

tE

0

tD

æææ3

tC

2

tB

0

|A

Speak the note names as you play.

Speak the note names as you play.

C major scalein first position

A natural minor (A Aeolian)in first position

theo 1.049 theo 1.049

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THEORY

Theory 1.090

Ä 44 | | t | t t t t t t t t t t | t t t t

Ä t t t t t | t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t

Ä t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t | t t t t

Ä t t t t t t t t t t t t | t tÄ t t t t t | t t | t t | t

Ä t t t t | t t t t t t | t t t t t t t t t t t

Ä t t t t t t | | t t t t t t t t t t tÄ t t t t t t t | t t t t t t t t t | t

Ä t t t t t t | t t t t t t t t t t æt t |

Word GamesWrite the letter name under each note.

Each bar should spell a word.

theo 1.090 theo 1.090

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THEORY

Theory 1.091

Ä 44B

|E

| tA

|B

tE

tC

tA

tG

tE

tD

tA

|B

tE

tG

|G E

tG

tA

tD

t

Ä tB

tA

tD

tE

tA

|C

tE

tE

tF

tA

tC

tE

tE

tD

tG

tE

tD

tF

tA

tC

tE

Ä tE

tD

tG

tE

tD

tE

tF

tA

tC

tE

tB

tE

tA

tD

tE

tD

tC

tA

|D

tB

tE

tA

tD

Ä tB

tA

tD

tE

tB

tA

|D

tA

tD

tD

tE

tD

|A

tG

tE

Ä tF

tE

tE

tD

tB

|A

tG

tF

|E

tD

tB

|A

tD

Ä tA

tG

tE

tD

|B

tA

tG

tF

tA

tD

tE

|F

tE

tD

tF

tA

tD

tE

tD

tD

tE

tA

tD

Ä tC

tA

tF

tE

tD

tA

|D

|C

tA

tB

tC

tA

tG

tE

tD

tD

tE

tE

tD

Ä tD

tA

tB

tB

tE

tD

tD

|A

tD

tC

tA

tB

tB

tA

tG

tE

tB

|E

tE

Ä tA

tG

tE

tD

tA

tC

|E

tB

tA

tG

tE

tD

tF

tA

tD

tE

tD

ætG

tA

|G

Word Games Answers

theo 1.091 theo 1.091

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41

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THEORY

Theory 1.102

Ä 44 | | t | t t t t t t t | t t | t t t t

Ä t t t t t | t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t

Ä t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t | t t t t

Ä t t t t t t | t t t t t | t t

Ä t t t t t | t t | t t | t

Ä t t t t | t t t t t t | t t t t t t t t t t t

Ä t t t t t t | | t t t t t t t t t t t

theo 1.102 theo 1.102Word Games On Ledger LinesWrite the letter name below each note. Each bar spells a word.

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42

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THEORY

Theory 1.103

Ä t t t t t t t | t t t t t t t t t | t

Ä t t t t t t | t t t t t t t t t t æt t |

theo 1.103 theo 1.103Word Games On Ledger Lines (continued)

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43

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THEORY

Theory 1.104

Ä 44B

|E

| tA

|B

tE

tC

tA

tG

tEtD

tA

|B

tE

tG

|G E

tG

tA

tDt

ÄB

tA

tD

tE

t tA

|C

tE

tE

tF

tA

tC

tE

tE

tD

tG

tE

tD

tF

tA

tC

tE

ÄE

tD

tG

tE

t tD

tE

tF

tA

tC

tE

tB

tE

tA

tD

tE

tD

tC

tA

|D

tB

tE

tA

tD

ÄB

tA

tD

tE

t tB

tA

|D

tA

tD

tD

tE

tD

|A

tG

tE

Ä tF

tE

tEtD

tB

|A

tG

tF

|E

tD

tB

|A

tD

ÄA

tG

tE

tD

t |B

tA

tG

tF

tA

tD

tE

|F

tE

tD

tF

tA

tD

tE

tD

tD

tE

tA

tD

ÄC

tA

tF

tE

t tD

tA|D

|C

tA

tB

tC

tA

tG

tEtDtD

tE

tEtD

Word Games On Ledger Lines - Answerstheo 1.104 theo 1.104

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44

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THEORY

Theory 1.105

ÄD

tA

tB

tB

tE

tD

t tD

|A

tD C

tA

tB

tB

tA

tG

tE

tB

tE

|E

t

ÄA

tG

tE

tD

t tA

tC

|E

tB

tA

tG

tE

tD

tF

tA

tD

tE

tD

ætG

tA

|G

Word Games On Ledger Lines - Answers (continued)theo 1.105 theo 1.105

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45

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THEORY

Theory 1.250

CHORD ROOT

A chord root is the note after which a chord is named. “A” is the root of an A7 chord. “D” is the rootof a Dm7 chord. “Eb” is the root of an Eb7 chord. The root is the main note of a chord. Enlarged or circled noteson diagrams indicate chord roots.

A chord root is the lowest bass note you can imagine in a chord. In the chord below, the lowest pitchthat sounds is not the root of the chord. The bass note (on the fourth string) is “E”, but the root is “C”.

2

1

C I

The version of the chord below includes the root in the bass. The root is a “C” note, after which the chordis named.

3

2

1

C I

TONIC CHORD

The tonic chord (or “main chord”) is the chord you would expect the piece of music to end on. It is thechord which sounds most resolved in a piece of music. A tonic chord is used to give the most final sound atthe end of a piece.

I said “you would expect” the piece of music to end on the tonic chord in the previous paragraph, becausealthough the listener expects a song to end on the tonic chord, it doesn't have to. A song can end with a deceptivecadence (chord sequence) where the final chord is not the tonic chord. This type a ending is intended to “trick”the listener. Although a deceptive cadence does not produce as strong a feeling of resolution, it still can bestimulating. Likewise, songs often begin on the tonic chord, but they don’t have to.

Many recorded pieces of music have a “fade- out” ending. No distinct ending chord is played with a fade-out. I have always hated fade-out endings. I much prefer hearing the ending the band or artist would play ina live performance. The only exception would be where there is some point to fading out, such as the maincharacter in the lyric is walking off into the woods or something of that nature.

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46

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THEORY

Theory 1.251

Here are some compositional techniques of establishing the tonic chord:

1. Use long duration or frequent occurrence of the main chord.

2. Use the root of the main chord as the continual bass note for a series of chords.

3. Progressions are typically built with groups of two or four bars. Ending with the desired tonic chordestablishes stronger tonality than beginning with it, especially where the tonic chord begins the thirdor fifth bar.

4. Use a main chord which has a strong consonance. Example “a” below is the strongest consonanceand example “c” has the weakest consonance.

a. The main chord usually has a strong tonality (is easy to establish as the main chord) in major,Dorian, Mixolydian or Aeolian mode (when major, Dorian, Mixolydian or Aeolian scales areused).

b. The main chord has a passive tonality (somewhat difficult to establish as a main chord) inPhrygian or Lydian mode (when Phrygian or Lydian scales are used).

c. The main chord has a weak tonality (quite difficult to establish as the main chord) in Locrianmode (when Locrian scale is used).

5. Use the root of the main chord in a low range of pitch.

TONE CENTER

The tone center of a piece of music is the root of the tonic chord (the chord you expect the piece to endon). If the tonic chord is Cm7, the tone center is “C.” If the tonic chord is Ebm, the tone center is “Eb.”

Cm7 III Eb IIIC

G

Bb

Eb

G

G

Bb

Eb

Eb

Whenever scales are shown on diagrams in this book, the tone centers are indicated by enlarged, circled,or “squared” notes:

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47

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THEORY

Theory 1.252

KEY

A song is said to be in a key named after the tone center. If the tone center is “A”, the song is said to bein the key of “A”. The key may be further qualified by the scale or mode type, such as “A” major, “A” minoror “A” Mixolydian.

The term “minor” is often used loosely in key names where the song may be in any mode which has aminor chord built on the tone center (e.g., Aeolian or harmonic minor). Likewise, the term major is sometimesused in reference to any mode which has a major chord built on the tone center (e.g., Mixolydian or Phrygianmajor).

In the example below, the Am chord sounds resolved at the end. The piece is in the key of A minor.

Äâ 2

t0

t1

t3

t0

t1

t0

t4

!t4

t4

t3

# t3

" t3

t2

t0

t1

t3

t0

t1

t0

t5

t æææ0

t1

t0

t5

t012

|||Am========================Ännnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâmmmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm

2

t0

t1

t3

t mmmm mmm0

t1

t0

tmmmm mmmm mmmm4

!t4

t4

tmmmm mmmm mmmm3

# t3

" t3

tmmmm mmmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm2

t0

t1

t3

t mmmm mmm mmmm mmmmm0

t1

t0

t5

t æææ

mmmm mmm mmmm mmmmm0

t1

t0

t5

t012

|mmmmmm||Am

Elsewhere, in the same piece of music, the section below appears. It has a sense of temporarily beingin the key of E major (the specific scale it uses is E Mixolydian flat six, but the tonic chord is E, and the primarysound of the scale is E major). The E major chord sounds somewhat resolved at the end of the example. but youmight get the sense that the melody is going back to the key of A minor afterward (play the example below, thenthe example above).

ÄâΩ øΩΩ ø 2t

4

!t1

!t2

t0

t1

t0

t1

t1

!t1

t0

t1

t0

t2

t4

!t1

!t2

t0

t1

t0

t æøææø1

t1

!t1

t210

|||E

========================ÄnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâΩ øΩΩ ømmmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm

2

t4

!t1

!t2

t mmmm mmmm0

t1

t0

tmmmmmmmm mmmmm

1

t1

!t1

tmmmm mmmm mmmm0

t1

t0

tmmmm mmmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm2

t4

!t1

!t2

t mmmm mmmm0

t1

t0

tmmmm æøææø

mmmm mmmmm1

t1

!t1

tmmmm210

|mmmmmm||E

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48

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

CHORD PROGRESSION

A chord progression is any sequence of chords. Typically, a chord progression is repeated during a pieceof music. Each section of the piece of music (verse, chorus, etc.) may use a different chord progression. Theremay be different versions of each chord progression. Here is a simple chord progression:

1

Am I

2

Ä 44â 44 0

12

|||000

||| æææ3

200

||||2100

|!|||================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 0

12

|mmmmmm||000

|mmmmmmm|| æææ3

200

|mmmmmmm|||

2100

|mmmmmmmm!|||

G6 I Fma7b5 I

1

2

E I

1

2

Theory 1.253

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49

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.255

Become familiar with the sound of the intervals below. Changing the position in which an interval isplayed changes the names of the notes, but the interval remains the same.

OCTAVES

All 21 of the intervals below are octaves. It doesn't matter which position they are played in, sinceintervals are measurements, not specific notes.

these are octaves in the fifth position

V1

3

V1

3

V1

4

V1

4

V1

4

V1

3

V1

3

these are octaves in the sixth position

VI1

3

VI1

3

VI1

4

VI1

4

VI1

4

VI1

3

VI1

3

octaves are octaves, no matter which position you play them in

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

4

at any fret

1

4

at any fret

1

4

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

PERFECT FIFTHS

All 24 of the intervals below are octaves. Like octaves, it doesn't matter which position they are playedin. Intervals are measurements, not specific notes.

these are perfect fifths in the fifth position

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

EAR TRAINING

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50

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

these are perfect fifths in the sixth position

VI1

3

VI1

3

VI1

3

VI1

3

VI1

3

VI1

3

VI1

3

VI1

3

VI1

3

perfect fifths are perfect fifths, no matter which position you play them in

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

1

3

at any fret

EAR TRAINING TEST 1.256On the CD, each interval example below will be played, then identified as a perfect fifth or octave. Listen

to each example and attempt to identify the intervals before the anwer is given. If you find this too difficult, listento the CD while reading the answers below. In the answer rows below, “fifth” means perfect fifth.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10octave octave fifth fifth octave octave fifth octave fifth fifth

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

4

V1

4

V1

3

V1

4

V1

3

V1

3

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20fifth octave fifth octave octave fifth fifth octave octave octave

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

4

V1

4

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30fifth octave fifth fifth octave octave octave fifth octave fifth

V1

3

V1

4

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

4

V1

3

V1

3

V1

4

V1

3

Theory 1.256

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51

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

MAJOR AND MINOR CHORDS

A chord is the simultaneous sounding of two or more different notes. Most often, a chord has three ormore different notes. Chords with three different notes are called triads. The most common triads are majorand minor.

The major chord below combines “C”, “E”, and “G” notes. Although there are five notes in the chord,there are only three different notes. The names of the notes are shown below the strings (C, E, G, C, E).

3

2

1

C I

C E G C E

Each chord has a root name. The root of a “C” major chord is “C”, and the root of a “D” major chordis “D”. The quality of both of them is major. Major chords express happiness, while minor chords expresssadness. To experience this, play the A major and A minor chords and the D major and D minor chords below.The chord name “D” abbreviates the full chord name “D major chord”, and the chord name “Dm” abbreviatesthe full chord name “D minor chord”.

1

Am I

324

A I

32 2

D I

3

1

Dm I

1

2

3

these are major chords

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

2

D I

3

1 4

A I

32

1

E I

32

these are minor chords

Cm I

1

3

Gm I

4

1

3

Dm I

1

2

3

1

Am I

32

Em I

32

Theory 1.257

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52

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

EAR TRAINING TEST 1.258On the CD, each chord example below will be played, then identified as a major or minor chord. Listen

to each example and attempt to identify the chords before the anwer is given. If you find this too difficult, listento the CD while reading the answers below.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10minor major major minor minor major major minor minor minor

Em I

32 2

D I

3

1

3

2

1

C I

1

Am I

32

Gm I

4

1

3

1

E I

32

2

1

G I

3 4

Gm I

4

1

Cm I

1

3

Em I

32

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20major major minor minor major minor minor minor major major

2

D I

3

1 4

A I

32

Dm I

1

2

3

1

Am I

32

2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32

Cm I

1

3

Gm I

4

1

3 3

2

1

C I

1

E I

32

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30major major minor minor major minor minor minor major major

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

Dm I

1

2

3

1

Am I

32

1

E I

32

Em I

32

Gm I

4

1

3

Dm I

1

2

3

4

A I

32 4

A I

32

Theory 1.258

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53

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.290

Ä ! 44â 44

3

tG

0

tA

2

tB

3

tC

0

tD

2

tE

4

tF#

0

tG

2

tA

0

tB

1

tC

3

tD E

0

tF#

2

tG3

|

Ä !â 3

tG

2

tF#

0

tE

3

tD

1

tC

0

tB

2

tA

0

tG

4

tF#

2

tE

0

tD

3

tC

æææ2

tB

0

tA

3

|G

Ä !

â0

tE

2

tF#

3

tG

0

tA

2

tB

3

tC

0

tD

2

tE

4

tF#

0

tG

2

tA

0

tB

1

tC

3

tD

0

|E

Ä !â 0

tE

3

tD

1

tC

0

tB

2

tA

0

tG

4

tF#

2

tE

0

tD

3

tC

2

tB

0

tA

æææ3

tG

2

tF#

0

|E

Speak the note names as you play.

Speak the note names as you play.

G major scalein first position

E natural minor (E Aeolian)in first position

theo 1.290 theo 1.290

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54

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.420

Ä " 44â 44

F1

1

tG2

3

tA3

0

tBb

4

1

t3

tC5

0

tD6

2

tE7

3

tF1

0

tG2

2

tA3

3

tBb

4

1

tC5

D6

3

tE70

tF11

|

Ä "â

F71

tE60

tD5

3

tC4

1

tBb

3

t3

A

2

t2

G

0

t1

F

3

t1

2

tE7

0

tD6

3

tC5

1

tBb

4

æææ0

tA3

3

tG2

1

|F1

Ä " 44â 44

D61

0

tE72

2

tF1

b3

3

tG24

0

tA3

2

t5

Bb4

3

tb6

C5

1

tb7

D6

3

t1

Ä "

âD61

3

tC5

b7

1

tBb

4b6

3

tA35

2

t æææ

G2

0

t4

F1

3

tb3

E7

2

t2

D6

0

t1

Speak the note names as you play.

letter names:

numbered tones:

Speak the note names as you play.

letter names:

numbers in F:numbers in D:

F major scalein first position

D natural minor (D Aeolian)in first position

theo 1.420 theo 1.420

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55

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.450

Ä 34

â 34names:fingers:

E0

0

tF1

1

tG2

3

t1

A4

5

tB1

7

tC2

8

tD4

10

tE1

12

tF2

13

t æ

ææG4

15

«|

Ä

â A0

0

tB1

2

tC2

3

t5

D4

5

tE1

7

tF2

8

tG4

10

tA1

12

tB3

14

t æ

ææ15

«|C4

Ä

â D0

0

tE1

2

tF2

3

t9

G4

5

tA1

7

tB3

9

tC4

10

tD1

12

tE3

14

t æ

ææ15

«|F4

Ä

â G0

0

tA1

2

tB3

4

t13

C4

5

tD1

7

tE3

9

tF4

10

tG1

12

tA3

14

t æ

ææ16

«|B4

II position VII position XII position

II position VII position XII position

II position VII position XII position

II position VII position XII position

Linear Notes On Each String cp 1.450cp 1.450

Page 56: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

56

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.451

Ä 34

â 34fingers:names: B

0

0

tC1

1

tD2

3

t17

E4

5

tF1

6

tG2

8

tA4

10

tB1

12

tC2

13

ææD4

15

«|

Ä

â E0

0

tF1

1

tG2

3

t21

A4

5

tB1

7

tC2

8

tD4

10

tE1

12

tF2

13

ææ15

«|

G4

Ä 44

â 448

tC1

10

tD1

12

tE3

13

tF4

25

10

tG1

12

tA1

14

tB3

15

tC4

14

tB3

12

tA1

10

tG1

13

tF4

æ

ææ12

tE3

10

tD1

8

|C1

Ä 44

â 443

tG1

5

tA1

7

tB3

8

tC4

29

5

tE1

7

tD1

8

tF2

10

tG4

8

tF2

7

tE1

5

tD1

8

tC4

æ

ææ7

tB3

5

tA1

3

|G1

II position VII position XII position

II position VII position XII position

C major scale

G Mixolydian Scale

Linear Notes On Each String (continued) cp 1.451cp 1.451

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57

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.452

Ä 34

â 34 E0

0

tF1

1

tG3

3

t33

0

tA0

2

tB2

3

tC3

0

tD0

2

tE2

3

tF3

0

tG0

2

tA2

0

tB0

1

tC1

3

tD3

0

tE0

æ

ææF1

1

tG3

3

|

Ä 34â 34 E

1

12

tF2

13

tG4

15

t39

A1

12

tB3

14

tC4

15

t

12

tD1

14

tE3

15

tF4

12

tG1

14

tA3

12

tB1

13

tC2

15

tD4

12

tE1

æ

ææF2

13

t

G4

15

|

Ä 34

â 34 B1

7

tC2

8

tD4

10

t45

E1

7

tF2

8

tG4

10

tA1

7

tB3

9

tC4

10

tD1

7

tE3

9

tF4

6

tG2

8

tA4

10

tB1

7

tC2

t

8

D4

|

10

Ä 34â 34

1

t3

t5

t51

2

t3

t5

t2

t3

t5

t2

t4

t1

t3

t5

t1

t æææ1

t3

t5

t

C

G I

CE

EE

F

GG

F

A D B

DFB A

open position notes

C

G

XII

CE

EE

F

GG

F

A D B

DFB A

At first, play the notes below with the index finger barring the twelfth fret, so you can associate them with the notes in open position. Once you have begun to memorize the note names, finger the notes with the index finger moving to each string as needed. Since the lowest reachable note in this fingering is the rhird step of the C major scale, this is called "fingering 3."

G

D

VII

GB

BB

C

DD

C

E A

AC

F

EF

Play these natural notes at the seventh fret (seventh position). Notice that there is no notefreted with the first finger on the second string. Since the lowest reachable note in this fingering is the seventh step of the C major scale, this is called "fingering 7."

D

A

I

D

F

F

G

AA

G

B E

EG

C

B

C

FPlay these natural notes at the first fret (second position, since the hand mainly plays with the first finger at the second fret). Since the lowest reachable note in this fingering is the fourth step of the C major scale, this is called "fingering 4."

Linear Notes On Each String (continued) cp 1.452cp 1.452

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58

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Ä !! 44â 44

D

0

t1

E

2

t2

F#

4

t3

G

0

t4

A5

2

tB6

0

tC#

7

2

tD1

3

t

Ä !!â

D

3

t1

C#

2

t7

B

0

t6

A

2

t5

æææ0

tG4

4

tF#3

2

tE2

0

tD1

Ä !! 44â 44

B6

2

t1

C#7

4

t2

D1

0

tb3

E2

2

t4

æææ4

tF#35

0

tG4

6b6

2

tA5

b7

0

tB61

Ä !!â

B6

0

t1

A5

2

tb7

G4

0

tb6

F#3

4

t5

æææ2

tE24

0

tD1

b3

4

tC#

72

2

tB61

Speak the note names as you play.

Speak the note names as you play.

D major scalein first position

B natural minor (B Aeolian)in first position

theo 1.527 theo 1.527

Theory 1.527

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59

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.535

EAR TRAINING

Become familiar with the sound of the intervals below. Changing the position in which an interval isplayed changes the names of the notes, but the interval remains the same.

MAJOR THIRDS

All 22 of the intervals below are major thirds (the four rows of diagrams below). It doesn't matter whichposition they are played in, since intervals are measurements, not specific notes. They can occur on two adjacentstrings, or on a single string.

these are major thirds in the fifth position

V1

2

V1

2

V11

V

2

1

1

4

V1

4

V1

4

V1

4

V1

4

V1

4

V

major thirds are major thirds, no matter which position you play them in

1

2

at any fret1

2

at any fret1

2

at any fret11

at any fret

2

1

at any fret

1

4

at any fret at any fret1

4

at any fret1

4

at any fret1

4

at any fret1

4

at any fret1

4

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60

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.536

MINOR THIRDS

All 22 of the intervals below are minor thirds (the four rows of diagrams below). It doesn't matter whichposition they are played in. Intervals are measurements, not specific notes. They can occur on two adjacentstrings, or on a single string.

these are minor thirds in the fifth position

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

2

V1

3

V1

4

V1

4

V1

4

V1

4

V1

4

V1

4

minor thirds are minor thirds, no matter which position you play them in

1

3

at any fret1

3

at any fret1

3

at any fret1

2

at any fret1

3

at any fret

1

4

at any fret1

4

at any fret1

4

at any fret1

4

at any fret1

4

at any fret1

4

at any fret

EAR TRAINING TEST 1.536On the CD, each interval example below will be played, then identified as a major third or minor third.

Listen to each example and attempt to identify the intervals before the anwer is given. If you find this too difficult,listen to the CD while reading the answers below. In the answer rows below, “maj 3” means major third and“min 3” means minor third.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10maj 3 min 3 maj 3 min 3 maj 3 min 3 maj 3 maj 3 min 3 min 3

1

4

V V1

4

1

4

V V

1

4

1

4

V V

1

3

V1

2

1

4

V V

1

3

V1

4

Page 61: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

61

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.537

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20min 3 min 3 maj 3 min 3 min 3 maj 3 min 3 maj 3 maj 3 maj 3

V1

2

V1

4

1

4

V V

1

3

V1

3

1

4

V V

1

3

V1

2

1

4

V V

1

2

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30min 3 maj 3 min 3 maj 3 min 3 maj 3 min 3 min 3 min 3 min 3

V1

4

1

4

V V

1

4

V1

2

V1

4

V1

2

V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

2

EAR TRAINING TEST 1.537review octave, perfect fifth, major third and minor third

On the CD, each interval example below will be played, then identified. Listen to each example andattempt to identify the intervals before the anwer is given. If you find this too difficult, listen to the CD whilereading the answers below. You may want to review the previous ear training on octaves and perfect fifths.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10octave maj 3 min 3 maj 3 octave fifth min 3 octave maj 3 maj 3

V1

3

V1

2

V1

4

1

4

V V1

3

V1

3

V1

3

V1

4

1

4

V V

1

2

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20fifth octave maj 3 min 3 octave maj 3 min 3 maj 3 maj 3 fifth

V1

3

V1

3

1

4

V V

1

3

V1

4

1

4

V V

1

3

V1

2

1

4

V V1

3

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30octave maj 3 octave min 3 min 3 maj 3 fifth octave min 3 min 3

V1

4

1

4

V V1

3

V1

3

V1

4

V1

2

V1

3

V1

4

V1

3

V1

2

Page 62: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

62

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.538

MAJOR, MINOR AND DIMINISHED CHORDS AND ARPEGGIOS

A major chord consists of the first, third and fifth tone of a major scale. A minor chord consists of athefirst, a flatted third (lowered in pitch by one fret) and fifth tone of a major scale. A diminished chord consistsof the first, a flatted third and a flatted fifth tone of a major scale. When a chord is played one note at a time itis an arpeggio. When the tones of an arpeggio are played simultaneously, they make a chord.

G major scale and G major chord

2

1

G III

3

G major scale II

4

2

1

2

4

1

4

3

Ä 44â 44

fingers: 4scale tones:

5

t1

1

2

t2

3

4

t3

4

5

t4

3

t25

5

t46

2

!t17

3

t21

æææ5

t31

4

t23

3

t15

345

ttt========================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

fingers: 4scale tones:

5

tmmmm1

1

2

tmmmm2

3

4

tmmmm3

4

5

tmmmm4

3

tmmmm25

5

tmmmm46

2

!tmmmm17

3

tmmmm21

æææ5

tmmmm31

4

tmmmm23

3

tmmmm15

345

tmmmmmmtt

G major scale and G minor chord

1 1

Gm III

3

G major scale II

4

2

1

2

4

1

4

3

Ä 44â 44

fingers: 4scale tones:

5

t1

1

2

t2

3

4

t3

4

5

t4

3

t25

5

t46

2

!t17

3

t21

æææ

31

5

t1

b3

3

" t15

3

t335

ttt========================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

fingers: 4scale tones:

5

tmmmm1

1

2

tmmmm2

3

4

tmmmm3

4

5

tmmmm4

3

tmmmm25

5

tmmmm46

2

!tmmmm17

3

tmmmm21

æææ

31

5

tmmmm1

b3

3

" tmmmm15

3

tmmmm335

tmmmmmmtt

G major scale and G diminished chord

2

1

G dim. II

4

G major scale II

4

2

1

2

4

1

4

3

Ä 44â 44

fingers:

scale tones:

5

t41

2

t12

4

t33

5

t44

3

t25

5

t46

2

!t17

3

t21

æææ

41

5

t2

b3

3

" t1

b5

2

" t235

ttt========================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

fingers:

scale tones:

5

tmmmm41

2

tmmmm12

4

tmmmm33

5

tmmmm44

3

tmmmm25

5

tmmmm46

2

!tmmmm17

3

tmmmm21

æææ

41

5

tmmmm2

b3

3

" tmmmm1

b5

2

" tmmmm235

tmmmmmmtt

Page 63: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

63

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.539

these are major chords

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

2

D I

3

1 4

A I

32

1

E I

32

these are minor chords

Cm I

1

3

Gm I

4

1

3

Dm I

1

2

3

1

Am I

32

Em I

32

these are diminished chords

C dim. III

1

4

32

G dim. I

12 3

D dim. I

3

1 1

A dim. I

13

2

E dim. I

12

EAR TRAINING TEST 1.539major, minor and diminished chords

On the CD, each chord example below will be played, then identified. Listen to each example and attemptto identify the major, mnor or diiminshed chord quality before the anwer is given. If you find this too difficult,listen to the CD while reading the answers below. You may want to review the previous ear training on majorand minor chords.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10major minor diminished minor major minor major diminished minor major

3

2

1

C I Gm I

4

1

3

C dim. III

1

4

32

Dm I

1

2

3

1

E I

32

Cm I

1

3

4

A I

32

A dim. I

13

2 1

Am I

32 2

D I

3

1

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20diminished major diminished diminished diminished major min 3 major diminished diminished

C dim. III

1

4

32

1

E I

32

G dim. I

12 3

D dim. I

3

1 1

A dim. I

13

2

3

2

1

C I E dim. I

12

2

1

G I

3 4

G dim. I

12 3

D dim. I

3

1 1

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30major diminished minor major minor minor minor minor minor major

4

A I

32

D dim. I

3

1 1

Gm I

4

1

3 2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32

Em I

32

Gm I

4

1

3

Dm I

1

2

3

1

Am I

32 2

D I

3

1

Page 64: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

64

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.590

Ä "" 44â 44

Bb

1

t1

C

3

t2

D

0

t3

Eb

1

t4

F5

3

tG6

0

tA7

2

tBb

1

3

t

Ä ""â Bb

3

t1

A

2

t7

G

0

t6

F

3

t5

æææ1

tEb

4

0

tD3

3

tC2

1

tBb

1

Ä "" 44â 44

G61

3

tA72

0

tBb

1b3

1

tC24

3

t0

tD35

1

tEb

4b6

3

tF5

b7

0

tG61

A

2

t72

Bb

3

t1

b3

C

1

t24

D

3

t35

4

tEb

4b6

1

tF5

b73

|G61

Ä ""

âG613

tF5

b71

tEb

4b6

4

tD35

3

t

1

tC24

3

tBb

1b3

2

tA72

0

tG61

3

tF5

b7

1

tEb

4b6

0

tD35

3

tC24

æææ1

tBb

1b3

0

tA72

3

|G61

Speak the note names as you play.

Speak the note names as you play.

Bb major scalein first position

G natural minor (G Aeolian)in first position

theo 1.590 theo 1.590

Page 65: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

65

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.636

Ä !!! 44â 44 1

0

tA

2

2

tB

3

4

tC#

4

0

tD

2

t5E

4

t6

F#

1

t7

G#

2

t1A

0

t2B

2

t3

C#

3

t4D

0

t5E

6F#

2

t7

G#

4

t1A

5

|

Ä !!!

â 5

t1A

4

t7

G#

2

t6

F#

0

t5E

3

t4D

2

t3

C#

0

t2B

2

t1A

1

t7

G#

4

t6

F#

2

t5E

0

t4D

æææ4

t3

C#

2

t2B

0

|1A

Ä !!! 44

â 44 16

F#

2

t27

G#

4

tb31A

0

t42B

2

t5

4

t3

C#

b6

0

t4D

b7

2

t5E

1

4

t6

F#

1

t27

G#

2

tb31A

0

t42B

2

t53

C#

3

tb64D

0

tb75E

2

|16

F#

Ä !!!

â 12

t6

F#

b70

t5E

b6

3

t4D

5

2

t3

C#

0

t42B

2

tb31A

1

t27

G#

4

t16

F#

2

tb75E

0

tb64D

4

t53

C#

2

t42B

æ

ææ0

tb31A

4

t27

G#

2

|16

F#

Speak the note names as you play.

letter names:

numbers in A:

Speak the note names as you play.

numbers in F#:

numbers in A:

letter names:

A major scalein first position

F# natural minor (F# Aeolian)in first position

theo 1.636 theo 1.636

Page 66: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

66

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Ä !!!! 44â 44

E1

0

tF#2

2

tG#

3

4

tA4

0

tB5

2

tC#

6

4

tD#

7

1

tE1

2

tF#2

4

tG#

3

1

tA4

2

tB5

0

tC#

6

2

tD#

7

4

tE10

|

Ä !!!!

â E10

tD#

7

4

tC#

6

2

tB5

0

tA4

2

tG#

3

1

tF#2

4

tE1

2

tD#

7

1

tC#

6

4

tB5

2

tA4

0

t æææ

G#3

4

tF#2

2

tE1

0

|

Ä !!!! 44

â 44C#

61

4

tD#

72

1

tE1

b3

2

tF#24

4

tG#

35

1

tA4

b6

2

tB5

b7

0

tC#

61

2

t

Ä !!!!

âC#

61

2

tB52

0

tA4

b3

2

tG#

34

1

t æ

ææF#25

4

tE1

b6

2

tD#

7b7

1

tC#

61

4

t

Speak the note names as you play.

letter names:

Speak the note names as you play.

letter names:

numbers in E:

numbers in C#:

E major scalein first position

C# natural minor (C# Aeolian)in first position

theo 1.680 theo 1.680

Theory 1.710

Page 67: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

67

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.710

MAJOR SCALE INTERVALSThe major scale is familiar to most of us. At sometime in our childhood most of us had some exposure to

it as the “do, re, me” scale. In the solfeggio system (solfeggio in Italian, solfége in French), the intervals of the major scale are labeled with the syllables “do, re, me, fa, sol, la, ti”. Here is a C major scale, played entirely on the fi fth string and labeled both with the solfeggio syllables and the numbers 1 through 7:

Ä 44â 44

3

t1do

5

t2re

7

t3

me

8

t4fa

10

t5

sol

12

t6la

14

t7ti

15

t1

do

15

t1

do

14

t7ti

12

t6la

10

t5

sol

æææ

4fa

8

t3

me

7

t2re

5

t1

do

3

t========================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

3

tmmmm1do

5

tmmmm2re

7

tmmmm3

me

8

tmmmm4fa

10

tmmmm5

sol

12

tmmmm6la

14

tmmmm7ti

15

tmmmm1do

15

tmmmm1do

14

tmmmm7ti

12

tmmmm6la

10

tmmmm5

sol

æææ

4fa

8

tmmmm3

me

7

tmmmm2re

5

tmmmm1do

3

tmmmmnumbered

tones:solfeggio:

The example above was given on a single string to illustrate the intervals that make up the major scale. A whole step is an interval of two frets (not counting the one on which you begin). A half step is an inteval of two frets (not counting the one on which you begin).

As you can see in the example above, major scale tones three up to four and seven up to one are a half step apart. All other consecutive major scale tones (1 to 2, 2 to 3, 4 to 5, 5 to 6 and 6 to 7) are a whole step apart.

The intervals between natural notes in alphabetical order also have two half steps: B to C and E to F. In the example below, the natural notes from “A” to A” are played on the sixth string. Notice that the musical alphabet begins again with “A” after “G”. All of the alphabetically consecutive notes (A to B, C to D, D to E, F to G and G to A) are a whole step apart, except B to C and E to F.

Ä 44â 44 A

5

tB

7

tC

8

tD

10

t12

tE

13

tF

15

tG

17

tA

17

tA

15

tG

13

tF

12

tE

æææ10

tD

8

tC

7

tB

5

tA

========================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 A

5

tmmmmmB

7

tmmmmC

8

tmmmmD

10

tmmmm12

tmmmmE

13

tmmmmF

15

tmmmmG

17

tmmmmA

17

tmmmmA

15

tmmmmG

13

tmmmmF

12

tmmmmE

æææ10

tmmmmD

8

tmmmmC

7

tmmmmB

5

tmmmmmA

letternames:

The C major scale is the only one which aligns the half steps at 3 to 4 and 7 to 1 with the half steps between B and C and between E and F. C major scale tones three and four are “E” and “F”, which are a half step apart both in regard to the intervals between the letters and in regard to the intervals of the major scale. Likewise, C major scale tones seven and one (ascending) are “B” and “C”, which are a half step apart both in regard to the intervals between the letters and in regard to the intervals of the major scale.

Every major scale except C major requires alteration of one or more notes to align the letter names with the major scale pattern. These alterations are called accidentals. The three common accidentals are (1) sharp, which raises a note one half step; (2) fl at, which lowers a note one half step; and (3) natural, which cancels previous sharps and fl ats.

Page 68: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

68

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.711

The symbols for accidentals are: “” for sharp, “” for fl at and “” for natural. In typesetting, the number symbol () is often substituted for the sharp, and the lowercase “” substituted for the fl at.

String diagrams will be used to illustrate the intervals between tones of the major scale and between the letter-named notes of the musical alphabet. The vertical lines each represent a string, positioned with the head of the guitar above the top end of the string image. The horizontal lines represent frets.

string diagram

string

frets

The string diagrams below illustrate the intervals of the major scale and the necessary alterations to adjust the intervals implied by the letter names of notes. Thick horizontal lines illustrate the frets at which you would play notes.

Ä 44â 44

3

t1do

5

t2re

7

t3

me

8

t4fa

10

t5

sol

12

t6la

14

t7ti

15

t1

do

15

t1

do

14

t7ti

12

t6la

10

t5

sol

æææ

4fa

8

t3

me

7

t2re

5

t1

do

3

t========================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

3

tmmmm1do

5

tmmmm2re

7

tmmmm3

me

8

tmmmm4fa

10

tmmmm5

sol

12

tmmmm6la

14

tmmmm7ti

15

tmmmm1do

15

tmmmm1do

14

tmmmm7ti

12

tmmmm6la

10

tmmmm5

sol

æææ

4fa

8

tmmmm3

me

7

tmmmm2re

5

tmmmm1do

3

tmmmmnumbered

tones:solfeggio:

The C major scale on the string diagram below illustrates this C major scale shown in music notation and tablature above. The major scale intervals line up perfectly with the letters “C” through “C” to make the C major scale. Notice that the half step between major scale tones three and four aligns with the half step between E and F. Likewise, the half step between major scale tones seven and eight aligns with the half step between B and C.

The letters “G” through “G”, however do not align to make a major scale. The “F” note of the “G through G alphabetically” diagram is one fret higher on the diagram (which would be one half step lower in pitch) than the major scale tone “7” on the “major scale intervals” diagram next to it. To correct this, F can be raised in pitch,

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69

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.712

or sharped. Raising the pitch would place an “F#” one fret lower on the diagram (which is one fret higher in pitch).

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

C

D

E

A

B

C

F

G

G

A

B

C

D

E

G

F

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

G

A

B

C

D

E

F#

G

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

majorscale intervals

C majorscale

majorscale intervals

G through G,alphabetically

majorscale intervals

G majorscale

In the diagrams below, the “B” note of the “F through F alphabetically” diagram is one fret lower on the diagram (which would be one half step higher in pitch) than the major scale tone “4” on the “major scale intervals” diagram next to it. To correct this, B can be lowered in pitch, or fl atted. Lowering the pitch would place a “Bb” one fret higher on the diagram (which is one fret lower in pitch).

F

G

A

B

C

D

F

E

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

majorscale intervals

F through F,alphabetically

majorscale intervals

F majorscale

F

G

A

Bb

C

D

F

E

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

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70

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THEORY

Theory 1.760

Ä !!!!! 44

â 44B1

2

2

tC#

2

4

4

tD#

3

1

1

tE4

2

2

t

4

tF#5

4

1

tG#

6

1

3

tA#

7

3

4

tB1

4

2

tC#

2

1

4

tD#

3

3

5

tE4

4

2

tF#5

1

G#6

1

4

tA#

7

3

6

tB1

4

7

|

Ä !!!!!

âB1

4

7

tA#

7

3

6

tG#

6

1

4

tF#5

1

2

t

5

tE4

4

4

tD#

3

3

2

tC#

2

1

4

tB1

4

A#7

3

3

tG#

6

1

1

tF#5

4

4

tE4

2

2

t æ

ææ1

tD#

3

1

4

tC#

2

4

2

|B1

2

Ä !!!!! 44

â 44G#

6

1

4

4

tA#

7

2

1

1

tB1

b3

2

2

tC#

2

4

4

4

t

1

tD#

3

5

1

2

tE4

b6

2

4

tF#5

b7

4

1

tG#

6

1

1

3

tA#

7

2

3

4

tB1

b3

4

2

tC#

2

4

1

4

tD#

3

5

3

E4

b6

4

5

tF#5

b7

1

2

tG#

6

1

3

4

|

Ä !!!!!

âG#

6

1

3

4

tF#8

b7

1

2

tE4

b6

4

5

tD#

3

5

3

4

t

2

tC#

2

4

1

4

tB1

b3

4

3

tA#

7

2

3

1

tG#

6

1

1

4

tF#8

b7

4

2

tE4

b6

2

1

tD#

3

5

1

4

tC#

2

4

4

æ

ææ2

tB1

b3

2

1

tA#

7

2

1

4

|G#

6

1

4

Speak the note names as you play.

numbers in B:

letter names::

fingers:

Speak the note names as you play.

letter names::

numbers in B:

numbers in G#:fingers:

letter names::

numbers in B:

numbers in G#:

fingers:

B major scalein first position

G# natural minor (G# Aeolian)in first position

theo 1.760 theo 1.760

Page 71: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

71

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THEORY

Theory 1.830

EAR TRAININGBecome familiar with the sound of the intervals below. Changing the position in which an interval is

played changes the names of the notes, but the interval remains the same.

MINOR SECOND (ALSO CALLED HALF STEP)AND MAJOR SECOND (ALSO CALLED WHOLE STEP)

Here are the fingerings for half and whole steps. Play them and become familiar with their sound. Thewhole step is a dissonant or disturbing interval. The half step is a very dissonant or disturbing interval.

2

4

4

1 1 1

minor second on 1 stringmay be on any string,

at any position,with any fingers

3

1

major second on 1 stringmay be on any string,

at any position,with any fingers

minor second on 2 stringsmay be on adjacent pair of strings

except NOT the second and third strings,at any position, with any fingers

4

1

major second on 2 stringsmay be on adjacent pair of strings

except NOT the second and third strings,at any position, with any fingers

minor second on 2 stringsthe unique fingering

on the second and third strings,at any position, with any fingers

3

1

major second on 2 stringsthe unique fingering

on the second and third strings,at any position, with any fingers

EAR TRAINING TEST 1.830

On the CD, each interval example below will be played, then identified as a minor second or majorsecond. Listen to each example and attempt to identify the intervals before the anwer is given. If you find thistoo difficult, listen to the CD while reading the answers below.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10min 2 min 2 maj 2 min 2 maj 2 min 2 maj 2 min 2 min 2 min 2

1

V

2

1

V

4

1

V

3

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

2

1

V

4

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72

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20maj 2 min 2 maj 2 min 2 maj 2 min 2 maj 2 min 2 maj 2 maj 2

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

3

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

3

EAR TRAINING TEST 1.831

review octave, perfect fifth, major third, minor third, minor second, major second

On the CD, each interval example below will be played, then identified. Listen to each example andattempt to identify the intervals before the anwer is given. If you find this too difficult, listen to the CD whilereading the answers below. You may want to review the previous ear training lessons.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10octave min 2 min 3 min 2 min 2 maj 2 fifth octave maj 2 maj 3

V1

3

1

V

4

V1

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

1

V

4

V1

3

V1

4

1

V

3

V1

2

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20maj 3 octave fifth octave maj 2 maj 3 min 3 maj 2 maj 3 fifth

V1

2

V1

3

V1

4

V1

3

1

V

4

1

4

V V

1

3

1

V

3

1

4

V V1

3

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30fifth min 2 octave min 3 min 3 min 2 fifth maj 2 min 3 min 3

V1

4

1

V

4

V1

3

V1

2

V1

4

1

V

2

V1

3

1

V

4

V1

3

V1

2

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40maj 3 maj 2 octave min 3 min 3 min 2 fifth maj 2 maj 3 min 3

V1

2

1

V

4

V1

3

V1

3

V1

4

1

V

2

V1

3

1

V

4

V1 1

V1

2

Theory 1.831

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73

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THEORY

SUSPENDED FOURTH CHORDS AND ARPEGGIOS

A suspended fourth chord consists of the first, fourth and fifth tone of a major scale. Think of it as a majoror minor chord with a fourth replacing the third. When a chord is played one note at a time it is an arpeggio.When the tones of an arpeggio are played simultaneously, they make a chord.

G major scale and G suspended fourth chord

4

1

G sus.4 III

3

G major scale II

4

2

1

2

4

1

4

3

Ä ! 44â 44 5

t4

1

2

t1

2

4

t3

3

1

t4

4

3

t2

5

5

t4

6

2

t1

7

3

t2

1

æææ5

t3

1

5

t4

4

3

t1

5

355

ttt========================Ä ! 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 5

tmmmm4

1

2

tmmmm1

2

4

tmmmm3

3

1

tmmmm4

4

3

tmmmm2

5

5

tmmmm4

6

2

tmmmm1

7

3

tmmmm2

1

æææ5

tmmmm3

1

5

tmmmm4

4

3

tmmmm1

5

355

tmmmmmmttfingers:

scale tones:

these are suspended fourth chords

C sus. 4 I

3

1

4 2

1

G sus. 4 I

4

1

3

D sus. 4 I

4

3

4

A sus. 4 I

2 3 4

E sus. 4 I

2

these are major chords

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

2

D I

3

1 4

A I

32

1

E I

32

these are minor chords

Cm I

1

3

Gm I

4

1

3

Dm I

1

2

3

1

Am I

32

Em I

32

these are diminished chords

C dim. III

1

4

32

G dim. I

12 3

D dim. I

3

1 1

A dim. I

13

2

E dim. I

12

Theory 1.832

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74

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

EAR TRAINING TEST 1.833major, minor and diminished chords

On the CD, each chord example below will be played, then identified. Listen to each example and attemptto identify the major, mnor, diiminshed and suspended fourth chord quality before the anwer is given. If youfind this too difficult, listen to the CD while reading the answers below. You may want to review the previousear training.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10sus. 4 minor sus. 4 major diminished major sus. 4 sus. 4 sus. 4 diminished

3 4

E sus. 4 I

2

1

Am I

32

C sus. 4 I

3

1

4

2

D I

3

1

C dim. III

1

4

323

2

1

C I C sus. 4 I

3

1

4

1

3

D sus. 4 I

4

3 4

E sus. 4 I

2

G dim. I

12 3

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20major sus. 4 minor sus. 4 minor sus. 4 diminished diminished sus.4 major

2

D I

3

1 1

3

D sus. 4 I

4

Dm I

1

2

3 2

1

G sus. 4 I

4

Gm I

4

1

3 2

1

G sus. 4 I

4

C dim. III

1

4

32

E dim. I

12

2

1

G sus. 4 I

4

4

A I

32

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30diminished sus. 4 major minor sus. 4 minor minor minor major sus.4

D dim. I

3

1 13

4

A sus. 4 I

2

3

2

1

C I Em I

32 1

3

D sus. 4 I

4

Gm I

4

1

3

Dm I

1

2

3

1

Am I

32 2

D I

3

1 3 4

E sus. 4 I

2

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40major minor minor sus. 4 sus. 4 diminished sus.4 major minor sus.4

2

D I

3

1

Dm I

1

2

3

Em I

32 1

3

D sus. 4 I

4

1

3

D sus. 4 I

4

C dim. III

1

4

322

1

G sus. 4 I

4 3

2

1

C I Gm I

4

1

3

C sus. 4 I

3

1

4

Theory 1.833

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75

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THEORY

Theory 1.846

PREPARATION FOR MAJOR SCALE CONSTRUCTION

You will need to know (1) how to fi nger half steps and whole steps; (2) how to assign numbers to the major scale; and (3) where half steps occur in the major scale.

FINGERING HALF STEPS AND WHOLE STEPS: THERE ARE THREE WAYS TO FINGER EACH.

Fingering Half Steps And Whole Steps On A Single String.

On a single string, half steps are one fret apart (not counting the fret on which you begin). The half step may be fi ngered with any combination of fi ngers, but usually with two consecutive fi ngers.

Regardless of which single string the half step is fi ngered on, and regardless of which position it is fi ngered in (regardless of which fret at which it is played), the interval is the same.

2

half step I1

2

half step II1

2

half step III1

2

half step IV1

2

half step V1

2

half step at any fret1

3

half step I2

3

half step II2

3

half step III2

3

half step IV2

3

half step V2

3

half step at any fret2

4

half step I3

4

half step II3

4

half step III3

4

half step IV3

4

half step V3

4

half step at any fret3

half step I1

2

half step I1

2

half step II1

2

half step III1

2

half step IV1

2

half step V1

2

half step at any fret1

3

half step I2

3

half step II2

3

half step III2

3

half step IV2

3

half step V2

3

half step at any fret2

4

half step I3

4

half step II3

4

half step III3

4

half step IV3

4

half step V3

4

half step at any fret3

half step I1

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76

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.847

Regardless of which single string the whole step is fi ngered on, and regardless of which position it is fi ngered in (regardless of which fret at which it is played), the interval is the same.

3

whole step I1

3

whole step II1

3

whole step III1

3

whole step IV1

3

whole step V1

3

whole step at any fret1

4

whole step I2

4

whole step II2

4

whole step III2

4

whole step IV2

4

whole step V2

4

whole step at any fret2

whole step I

2

3

whole step I1

3

whole step II1

3

whole step III1

3

whole step IV1

3

whole step V1

3

whole step at any fret1

4

whole step I2

4

whole step II2

4

whole step III2

4

whole step IV2

4

whole step V2

4

whole step at any fret2

whole step I

2

Fingering Half Steps And Whole Steps On Two Adjacent Strings.

To understand half and whole steps fi ngered on two adjacent strings, let’s look at the fi ngering of unisons (pairs of the same note) commonly used for tuning:

I

4

I

4

I

4

I

4

I

4

on each diagram, the two notes are the same pitch

By raising the pitch of the note on the smaller string on each diagram by one fret (a half step), the interval is changed from a unision (the same notes) to a half step. Notice that these fi ngerings are relatively the same, except the one involving the third and second strings is unique.

I

4

I

4

I

4

I

4

I

4

1 1 1 1 1

on each diagram, the two notes are an interval of a half step apart

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77

© 2000-2001 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

THEORY

Theory 1.848

By raising the pitch of the note on the smaller string on each diagram by an additional half step (raised two frets or one whole step from the open string), the interval is changed to a whole step. Again, these fi ngerings are relatively the same, except the one involving the third and second strings is unique.

I

4

I

4

I

4

I

4

I

4

1 1 1 1 1

on each diagram, the two notes are an interval of a whole step apart

THE THREE FINGERINGS FOR EACH INTERVAL

I

2

I

4

I

4

1 1 1

half step on one stringmay be on any string,

at any position,with any fingers

I

3

1

whole stepmay be on any string,

at any position,with any fingers

half step on two stringsmay be on adjacent pair of strings

except NOT the second and third strings,at any position,

with any fingers (as long as you can reach!)

I

4

1

whole step on two stringsmay be on adjacent pair of strings

except NOT the second and third strings,at any position,

with any fingers (as long as you can reach!)

half step on two stringsthe unique fingering

on the second and third strings,at any position,with any fingers

I

3

1

whole step on two stringsthe unique fingering

on the second and third strings,at any position,with any fingers

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78

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THEORY

Theory 1.849

NUMBERING THE MAJOR SCALE TONES

In the solfeggio system, the intervals of the major scale are labeled with the syllables “do, re, me, fa, sol, la, ti”. Here is a C major scale, played in the fi rst position (with the fi rst fi nger at the fi rst fret) and labeled both with the solfeggio syllables and the numbers 1 through 7:

Ä 44â 44

3

t1do

0

t2re

2

t3

me

3

t4fa

0

t5

sol

2

t6la

0

t7ti

1

t1do

1

t1do

0

t7ti

2

t6la

0

t5

sol

æææ

4fa

3

t3

me

2

t2re

0

t1do

3

t========================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

3

tmmmm1do

0

tmmmm2re

2

tmmmm3

me

3

tmmmm4fa

0

tmmmm5

sol

2

tmmmm6la

0

tmmmm7ti

1

tmmmm1do

1

tmmmm1do

0

tmmmm7ti

2

tmmmm6la

0

tmmmm5

sol

æææ

4fa

3

tmmmm3

me

2

tmmmm2re

0

tmmmm1do

3

tmmmmletter

names:solfeggio:

RECOGNIZING THE LOCATION OF THE HALF STEPS IN THE MAJOR SCALE

In making up major scale fi ngerings, you should think of the notes by number, one through seven. Be aware that the half steps (one fret intervals) occur between numbered major scale tones 3 and 4 and between 7 and 1 (ascending in pitch). These scale steps are circled in the example above. The remaining steps of the major scale are whole steps apart, which include the intervals between the following pairs of numbered scale tones: “1 to 2”, “2 to 3”, “4 to 5”, “5 to 6” and “6 to 7”.

The intervals between the numbered tones of the major scale were illustrated earlier in the section on Major Scale Intervals, using the “string diagrams” shown below.

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

C

D

E

A

B

C

F

G

G

A

B

C

D

E

F#

G

1 do

2 re

3 me

4 fa

5 sol

6 la

7 ti

1 do

majorscale intervals

C majorscale

majorscale intervals

G majorscale

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THEORY

CONSTRUCTINGMAJOR SCALE FINGERINGS

You must know the information in the previous section: Preparation For Major Scale Construction toeffectively study this section.

After studying this section, you should be able to begin a major scale at scale tone “1” with the index,middle or little finger of your fretting hand on strings six and five and with the index finger on string four.

Review “Strict Vertical Position” (primarily for single note playing)Position is numbered after the fret at which your index finger is placed. In that position, the other three

fingers are assigned one of the next three frets in-a-row toward the body of the guitar. In other words, eachof the four fingers are assigned to one of four consecutive frets.

The examples below show the first string. The position numbers would be the same, regardles ofwhich string the fingers were placed upon.

1

2

3

4

V1

2

3

4

VI1

2

3

4

VII

fifthposition

sixfhposition

seventhposition

fifthfret

sixthfret

seventhfret

You can also reach one fret out-of-position with the index and little fingers:

1

2

3

4

IV V VI

fifthposition

sixfhposition

seventhposition

fourthfret

fifthfret

sixthfret

1

4

1

2

3

4

1

4

1

2

3

4

1

4

Theory 1.850

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THEORY

So......what position are each of these examples (example 3 has two answers)?

2

X

whichposition?

tenthfret

3

II

whichposition?

secondfret

Example 2Example 1

II

whichposition?

secondfret

Example 3

1

answers: Example 1: eleventh position. Example 2: third position. Example 3: second OR third position.

BEGINNING A MAJOR SCALE FINGERING

FROM THE LITTLE FINGER ON THE SIX STRING

Be careful not to change position. Position was defined earlier in this lesson.

Let's start in fifth position. Play the note at the sixth string, eighth fret and think of it as scale tone one:

Vfifthfret

4

scale tone 1

The interval from scale tone one to scale tone two should be a whole step. According to the fingeringfor a whole step shown in the previous section, a whole step above step one would be here:

Vfifthfret1

scale tone 2

The interval from scale tone two to scale tone three should be a whole step. According to the fingeringfor a whole step shown in the previous section, a whole step above step two would be here:

Vfifthfret

3scale tone 3

Theory 1.851

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81

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THEORY

Theory 1.852

So far, you should have played this:

Äâ

æææ

4

8

t1

1

5

t2

3

7

t3

=========Ännnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ

æææ

4

8

tmmmm1

1

5

tmmmm2

3

7

tmmmm3

fingers:

scale tones:

The interval from scale tone three to scale tone four should be a half step. According to the fingeringfor a half step shown in the previous section, a half step above step three would be here:

Vfifthfret

4scale tone 4

The interval from scale tone four to scale tone five should be a whole step. That would be here:

Vfifthfret1

scale tone 5

The interval from scale tone five to scale tone six should be a whole step. That would be here:

fifthfret

3scale tone 6

V

The interval from scale tone six to scale tone seven should be a whole step. According to the fingeringfor a half step shown in the previous section, that presents two options:

fifthfret

4scale tone 7

Vfourthfret1scale tone 7

IV

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THEORY

Theory 1.853

The interval from scale tone seven up to scale tone one should be a half step. If you chose the firstfinger option in fingering scale tone seven, be careful not to change position.

fifthfret1scale tone 1

V

You should have come up with one of these fingerings. The first version uses the little finger for scaletone seven, while the second version uses the little finger for both scale tones seven and one.

Ä 44â 44

41

8

t12

5

t33

7

t44

8

t æææ

15

5

t36

7

t47

9

t11

5

t================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

41

8

tmmmm12

5

tmmmm33

7

tmmmm44

8

tmmmm æææ

15

5

tmmmm36

7

tmmmm47

9

tmmmm11

5

tmmmmfingers:

scale tones:

Ä 44â 44 1

8

t4

2

5

t1

3

7

t3

4

8

t4

æææ

5

5

t1

6

7

t3

7

4

t1

1

5

t1

================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 1

8

tmmmm4

2

5

tmmmm1

3

7

tmmmm3

4

8

tmmmm4

æææ

5

5

tmmmm1

6

7

tmmmm3

7

4

tmmmm1

1

5

tmmmm1fingers:

scale tones:

If you continue the fingering through the next octave higher, you should get the following:

fifthfret1

scale tone 1

V

3

scale tone 2

V1

scale tone 3

V

2

scale tone 4

V

4

scale tone 5

V1

scale tone 6

V

3

scale tone 7

V

4

scale tone 1

V

Ä 44â 44 1

5

t1

2

7

t3

3

5

t1

4

6

t2

æææ

5

8

t4

65

t1

77

t3

18

t4

================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 1

5

tmmmm1

2

7

tmmmm3

3

5

tmmmm1

4

6

tmmmm2

æææ

5

8

tmmmm4

65

tmmmm1

77

tmmmm3

18

tmmmmm4fingers:

scale tones:

Here is the entire two-octave fingering you have made:

Ä 44â 44

8

t41

5

t12

7

t33

8

t44

5

t15

7

t36

9

t47

5

t11

5

t32

7

t13

5

t24

6

t45

æææ8

t16

5

t37

7

t41

8

c========================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

8

tmmmm41

5

tmmmm12

7

tmmmm33

8

tmmmm44

5

tmmmm15

7

tmmmm36

9

tmmmm47

5

tmmmm11

5

tmmmm32

7

tmmmm13

5

tmmmm24

6

tmmmm45

æææ8

tmmmm16

5

tmmmm37

7

tmmmmm41

8

cfingers:

scale tones:

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83

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THEORY

Theory 1.854

Now begin the fingering again at the sixth string, eighth fret, scale tone “1” and descend as far as theposition permits:

fifthfret

1

scale tone 1

Vfifthfret

3

scale tone 7

V

down a half step tobegin at

fifthfret1

scale tone 6

V

down a half step to

I number major scale fingerings according to the number of lowest note fingered with the index fingeron the sixth string. The fingering you have just made, is called major scale in-position fingering 6. Otherfingerings called three-note-per-string major scale fingerings use slightly different rules regarding playingin position. The seven in-position fingerings are shown below. Scale tones are numbered. The scale tonenumbers shown in parenthesis are options, where the same note can be fingered on the second string.major scale in-position fingerings

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 1reach with

index finger

fingering 2reach with

index finger

fingering 3no

reaches!

fingering 4reach with

index finger

fingering 5reach with

index finger

fingering 6reach withlittle finger

fingering 7no

reaches!

4

2 3

2

3 2

2

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

6 7

7

1

1

52

5

2

3

6

23 3

4

4 4

(6 )

7

1

7

1

6

6 6

2

2 5

5

3

5

3

4 4

4

( 1 )

1

7

1

7

2

6

6 6

5 5

5

4

4

2

( 2 )

7

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23 3

3

4

4 4

( 7 ) 3

7

3

The in-position fingerings lend themselves to playing chord and arpeggio structures within the scale.Melody is largely an ornamentation of chord tones, so these fingerings work well to improvise. Three-note-per-string fingerings are better suited to playing scale runs, since picking can be the same for every stringand the finger patterns are more repetitious and easier to recall. Here are the three-note-per-string majorscale fingerings:

4

6

7

2

3

41

7 3

1

5

4

1

2 5

63

4

7 3

1

2 5

2 15

6 2 53

4

67 3

44

6 2

1

53

67

2 5

3

15 4

6

7

3

4

67

2 5

3

6

7

315

4

7

5

6

4

6

7

3

4

1

72

15

15

6 2 5

67 3

4

7

1

2

6 2 15

67 2

5

3

1 4

6

7 3

6 2

15

3

6

7

2

3

2 15 4

7 3

2

4

1 4

2

41

7

fingering 1/2 fingering 2/3 fingering 3/4 fingering 4/5 fingering 5/6 fingering 6/7 fingering 7/1

Three-note-per-string major scale fingerings shown above combine in-position fingerings, and arenumbered accordingly. Fingering 1/2 combines in-position fingerings 1 and 2; fingering 2/3 combines in-position fingerings 2 and 3; and so on.

Let's get back to constructing in-position fingerings.

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THEORY

Theory 1.855

BEGINNING A MAJOR SCALE FINGERING

FROM THE INDEX FINGER ON THE SIX STRING

Be careful not to change position. Position was defined at the beginning of this article.

Let's start in fifth position. Play the note at the sixth string, fifth fret and think of it as scale tone one:

Vfifthfret1

scale tone 1

The interval from scale tone one to scale tone two should be a whole step. You may use the second orthird fingers. If you use the second finger, you are in sixth position. If you use the third finger you are infifth position.

Vfifthfret

2scale tone 2

Vfifthfret

3scale tone 2

Using either the second or third fingers for scale tone “2”, you could use the fourth finger for scale tone“3”. This is shown in options 1 and 2, below

:fingering scale tones “1”, “2“ and “3” with OPTION 1

V

4scale tone 3

Vfifthfret1

scale tone 1

V

2scale tone 2

fingering scale tones “1”, “2“ and “3” with OPTION 2 V

4scale tone 3

Vfifthfret1

scale tone 1

V

3scale tone 2

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THEORY

Theory 1.856

If you used the third finger for scale tone “2”, there is another option for scale tone three:

fingering scale tones “1”, “2“ and “3” with OPTION 3

IV1

scale tone 3

Vfifthfret1

scale tone 1

V

3scale tone 2

fourthfret

The interval from scale tone three to scale tone four should be a half step. Regardless of which optionyou used in fingering scale tones “1”, “2” and “3” (see above), scale tone four would be fingered the same:

Vfifthfret1

scale tone 4

Using option 3 for scale tones “1”, “2” and “3” presents a problem in fingering two consecutive noteswith the same finger, which can make it difficult to play through the scale quickly:

fifthfret1

scale tone 1

V

3

scale tone 2

V1

scale tone 3

IV1

scale tone 4

V

fifthfret

fifthfret

fifthfret

Using option 2 for scale tones “1”, “2” and “3” presents another problem in reaching scale tone “3”with the little finger, which can also make it difficult to play through the scale quickly:

fifthfret1

scale tone 1

V

3

scale tone 2

V

4

scale tone 3

V1

scale tone 4

Vfifthfret

fifthfret

fifthfret

Using option 1 for scale tones “1”, “2” and “3” is best to play through the scale quickly. Remember,this choice has established your fingering as being in sixth position, with the index finger reaching out-of-position to the fifth fret and with the little finger reaching out-of-position to the ninth fret.

fifthfret1

scale tone 1

V

2

scale tone 2

V

4

scale tone 3

V1

scale tone 4

Vfifthfret

fifthfret

fifthfret

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86

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THEORY

Theory 1.857

Continuing to construct the scale in sixth position would produce the fingering shown below.

1

scale tone 1

V

2

scale tone 2

V

4

scale tone 3

V1

scale tone 4

V

2

scale tone 5

Vscale tone 6

V

1

scale tone 7

V

2

scale tone 1

V

4

4

scale tone 2

V

1

scale tone 3

V

2

scale tone 4

V

4

scale tone 5

Vscale tone 6

V

4

scale tone 7

V

2

1

scale tone 1

V1

useeitherone 2

scale tone 2

V

4

scale tone 3

V

Since the lowest pitch fingered on the sixth string with the index finger is scale tone “1”, this is calledmajor scale in-position fingering 1. You should now try to construct all seven of the major scale in-positionfingerings, which were shown earlier in this article.

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TECHNIQUE

Technique

GUITAR CARE

TUNINGPrecise tuning is essential to good music and for your development. Tuning is accomplished by

comparing a note suspected to be out of tune to a “reliable” tuning source such as a tuning fork, an electronicguitar tuner, or a musical instrument which is in tune and can produce a steady, sustained pitch.

Tuning with a tuning fork. Hold the handle without touching the “u-shaped” portion and tap the fork witha snap of the wrist on something hard (careful not to bend the fork). Without touching the fork to the guitar,position the “u-shaped” portion parallel to, and close to, the guitar pickup to amplify it. If you are using anacoustic guitar or can’t amplify the tuning fork with the guitar pickup, touch the base of the handle to a resonatingobject such as a wooden guitar top, a table, or to the bone where your cheek meets your ear. It is preferable tohear the tuning fork and the string being tuned at the same time.

Tuning with electronic tuner. If you have a choice, use a tuner with a stable sweep meter. Tune eachstring exactly to the “0” mark. An electronic tuner is the most accurate method available to you, so take advantageof it. Remember to double check all of the strings once you have tuned them.

Tuning to another musical instrument. It is preferable to tune to a musical instrument which has a puretone (without complex harmonics), such as a flute, or to a harmonic on a string instrument. If you are tuningto a synthesizer, select a “voice” or “patch” on the synthesizer that is similar to a flute in sound. Carefully balancethe volume between your guitar and the other instrument.

Tune to the fifth string (“A”) first. Larger strings are less likely to go out of tune. The sixth string tendsto be less stable than the fifth because (1) being lower in pitch, it doesn’t produce as steady a tone and (2) beingon the edge of the fretboard, it is more subject to change caused by twisting of the neck.

Tune up to the note. This prevents the string from slipping on the tuning machine post.

Listen to the “beating.”. Bring the string’s pitch up gradually, but continuously. When it gets close tothe correct pitch, you should be able to hear a rapid pulsing or beating sound (if not, perhaps you’ve heard toomuch loud music!). This sound is the difference in speed of vibrations between the string and the tuning source.

Once you are in close proximity to the correct pitch, the beating sound will slow down as you approachthe pitch of the tuning source and speed up as you move away from it. Turn the key on the tuning machine sloweras you approach the desired pitch. You may pass the pitch if you don’t pay close and continuous attention tothe decreasing speed of the beating, in which case the beating will gradually start to speed up again. Once yougrow accustomed to this tuning method, you will be able to bring the pitch up more rapidly. Try to tune closeenough so that the beating is slowed to less than one beat per second.

Tune all of the strings, then check all of them again. On most guitars, the neck actually bends as you tunethe strings which tends to put other strings out of tune as you tune a single string. You will often need to “triplecheck” your tuning.

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.010

Tuning With Fretted Notes and Open Strings.This traditional tuning method is easiest to memorize. It is fairly accurate, but error can accumulate by

the time you tune all six strings.

Pressing too hard can sharpen the note out of tune. Press the string down just to your left of the fret, justhard enough that the string doesn’t buzz on the fret you are fingering. Part of the fingertip may lay over the fret,but not so much as to mute the string. Turn the tuning machine keys with the right hand, so the left hand cansustain the note (or notes) it is fretting.

Tuning with fretted notes and open strings. The top fret on each diagram is the first fret.

The top horizontal line in first position fretboard diagrams represents the nut. The top horizontal spaceis the first fret. In fretboard diagrams, the fret is the line at the bottom of each horizontal space, as noted earlierin Fretboard Diagrams.

Stretch out new strings well during the first time you tune them, to lessen the number of times you’ll haveto tune all of the strings

Tuning All Strings Relative To the Fifth String (illustrated on the next page)

The fifth string is usually least prone to going out of tune. It is a large string, less likely to stretch. Thefifth string is less likely to be affected by twisting of the neck, as are the first and sixth strings. This tuning methodis quite accurate, since it continually references the fifth string.

Before proceeding, tune your fifth string to a reliable source, as described earlier.

• Step 1 tunes the sixth string open “E” to a fretted “E” on the fifth string.

• Step 2 tunes the first string open “E” to a fretted “E” on the fifth string.

• Step 3 tunes a fretted “E” on the second string to a fretted “E” on the fifth string.

• Step 4 tunes a fretted “A” on the fourth string to the fifth string open, “A”.

• Step 5 tunes a fretted “D” on the third string to a fretted “D” on the fifth string.

Steps 3 and 5 require fretting notes with the left hand while reaching across to the tuning pegs with theright hand. This can be a little awkward, but is well worth the effort.

As you proceed from Step 1 through Step 5, it is likely that the strings will loosen and drop in pitch. Tuneyour fifth string to the source again and retune all of the strings. If your guitar has a floating tremolo system,you may have to tune a few times.

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89

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.011

Tuning All Strings Relative To the Fifth String

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90

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.012

TUNING THE GUITAR TO THE PIANO

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91

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.013

INTONATING THE BRIDGE

(adjusting your guitar’s bridge to correct the string lengths in relation to the fretboard)

Use a guitar tuner equipped with a meter. Tune the guitar fairly well. Play the twelfth fret harmonic onone string and note the exact reading on the meter (the needle doesn’t have to be exactly on the “0” mark). Nextplay the fretted note on the twelfth fret on the same string. If the fretted note was flat, adjust the individual bridgepiece to make the string shorter. If the fretted note was sharp, adjust the individual bridge piece to make the stringlonger. Repeat the process until the fretted note and harmonic at the twelfth fret are exactly the same. This maytake a few minutes for each string, but it is well worth the time. Before adjusting another string, always checkthe tuning of all the strings. Adjust your bridge every month if you can. Re-check the bridge if you change stringgauge or if the trussrod or tilt of the neck is readjusted.

CHANGING STRINGS

Change your strings at least once every six weeks or as often as once a week if the strings get very oxidized(watch for “crud” and discoloration of the strings). Never remove more than three strings at a time and neverremove more than two of the larger strings (fourth, fifth and sixth) at a time. The change in tension may affectthe neck adversely.

Slip the end of each new string through the slots or holes in the bridge and/or tailpiece, except with a FloydRose™ Tremolo system, where you would cut off the end of the string and insert in the vice slot (some stringsnow come with pre-cut soldered ends, making this step unnecessary). Slip the end of the string through the holeor slot on the tuning machine post.

Measure about five to five and one half inches slack (one hand width) in the string at the twelfth fret. Onceyou have measured the slack, bend the end of the string ninety degrees (an “L” shape) at the point where it passedthrough the tuning machine post, bending it opposite the way the string will wind around the post as it is tuned.Keeping the slack pulled up so that the bent part of the string is taut against the post, grab the loose end of thestring and pull it tightly around the post opposite the direction the string winds around it. Keep each windingunderneath the portion of string running from the neck to the tuning machine.

It is preferable to have two or three windings around the string post of the sixth string, progressing to fiveor six windings around the first string’s post. Windings should not overlap. Once the post is full of windings,more turns will tend to strip the gear inside the tuning machine. Get accustomed to the proper length of slackfor each string on a particular guitar.

Pulling the string tightly against the post, bend it over the portion of the same string running from theneck to the tuning machine. Taking up the slack so the string winds below itself on the post, tighten the string.Once the string is not flopping around, start tuning it. Stretch the string with both hands every six inches toremove excess elasticity. Pull only an inch or two away from the fretboard on the first two strings to avoidbreaking them.

Once you’ve installed all six strings, stretch them all again, tune, stretch again, until the strings stay intune. The new strings should sound great and stay in tune now!

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.020

RELAXATION, POSTURE AND ATTITUDE

RELAXATION

The shoulder, forearm, wrist and hand should be loose throughout. For maximum efficiency, use onlyas much muscular tension as is necessary for a technique. All the parts of your arms and hand that need not beinvolved in the performance of a technique should be relaxed and flexible, moving only sympathetically. Excesstension will decrease your speed and accuracy. Analyze your technique to make sure the habits you developcontribute to your control. Develop your personal technique as you discover the unique way your physiologyworks.

MASSAGE AND STRETCHING

Massage and stretching should be applied particularly to the fretting hand, since more dexterity is usuallyrequired in that hand.

• Allow both hands to dangle at your side. Shake them briskly to loosen up the hands and arms ANDlubricate the joints.

• Relax the hand to be massaged. Stretch each adjacent pair of fingers apart to loosen the webbingbetween them.

• Sit down and lay your massaged hand palm-up on your thigh. Make a fist with your free hand andmassage the palm with the knuckles of the free hand in circles about one inch in diameter. Usingthe thumb and fingers of your free hand, gently squeeze all the muscles and bones in the palm ofthe massaged hand to relieve tension.

• Wrap the thumb and fingers of the free hand around a finger of the massaged hand. Massage in atubular fashion, squeezing the finger while moving up and down it and twisting around it. Includethe thumb of the massaged hand.

• Bend the left arm at the elbow and touch the elbow to your ribs. Rotate the left hand clockwise andtouch its knuckles to your left collarbone. Cover the back of your left hand with your right palmand use the right hand to gently turn the left hand even further clockwise. Use enough pressure tocause a slight discomfort in the left wrist. Repeat with the opposite arm. When done daily, thisincreases the flexibility of the fretting-hand wrist and greatly aids in quick chord changes and inchanging from the “bending” position to the “classical” position. Descriptions of these twopositions follow in the sections on fretting technique.

AVOID INJURY FROM REPETITIVE STRESS DISORDER

Carpal Tunnel SyndromeThe carpel tunnel is the area of your wrist beneath the muscles at the heel of your hand. It contains nerves

and tendons which control the movement of your hand. Repetitive movements (such as playing guitar) canirritate the tendons and cause them to swell, which in turn irritates the nerves. Movements made with the wristbent are particularly irritating and should be avoided. Like the strings on a marionette, the tendons manipulatethe fingers. Once the tendons swell, they have a problem fitting through the carpal tunnel and are irritated evenmore, hence the term carpal tunnel syndrome.

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.021

Tendonitis is a general term referring to a chronic irritation of the tendons (another repetitive stressdisorder). It is a symptom of carpal tunnel syndrome and of other irritations. When you experience anydiscomfort or pain in your hands during guitar practice use the following remedies:

• concentrate on relaxing any muscles that are not involved in the technique

• think about your posture (see below)

• take a short break to relax your mind and body

• massage and stretch the hands and arms

• breathe deeply throughout your practice: oxygen is great for the brain and body

• change to a different exercise

Some physicians might prescribe corticosteroid injection or surgery for repetitive stress disorders, butthese treatments should only be used in extreme situations when all other alternatives have failed. Most problemscan be solved with the checklist above. If they do not suffice, try professional massage, osteopathic treatmentor take a Yoga or other stretching class.

Be aware of physical or mental fatigue. Mental fatigue can cause physical fatigue and vice-versa. Hereis a fatigue checklist:

“I may be fatigued because”.............

• I'm not using good posture (see section below).

• I've been playing long enough for now and I need a break.

• I'm upset about something, and I need to do something first before practicing (sit and relax for a fewminutes, take a walk, make a phone call, etc.).

• My body hurts and I need stretching, massage and a break.

• I'm holding my breath while I play, instead of breathing deeply.

• This exercise is irritating me and I need to do another one, play something fun for a few minutes, or takea break.

POSTURE AND HOLDING THE GUITAR

Always sit or stand with posture that provides free movement of your forearms, hands and fingers.Holding the head of the guitar above shoulder height allows the tendons in your fretting arm to loosen. Holdingthe head of the guitar too high can require too much bending in the picking wrist and tightens the tendons in thepicking arm. Feel your body. Concentrate on relaxing the areas where you feel tension.

A Posture Checklist• avoiding bending the wrists by keeping the head of the guitar away from the left shoulder.

• avoiding bending the wrists by keeping the head of the guitar elevated to about 45º from the floor.

• keep the elbow on the fretting hand arm near the side, except when fretting extremely wide spans or whenbarréing with the ring or little fingers .

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.022

• when you sit and play guitar, it is preferable to use a chair height which allows the thigh on the frettinghand side to be parallel to the floor.

• when you sit and play guitar, it is preferable to elevate the foot on the fretting hand side so that the kneeis three to eight inches above the hip (more for a taller person) and place the guitar on the left thigh. Ifthis causes discomfort in the lower back, avoid it (or do stretching for your lower back).

• if you find yourself bending over while playing in a seated position (which may be because you havea long torso), try using a lower chair to position the leg on your fretting hand side so the knee is higherthan the hip by an inch or two.

• if you find it difficult to reach over the guitar with your fretting hand while playing in a seated position(which may be because you have a short torso), try using a higher chair to position the leg on your frettinghand side so the knee is lower than the hip by an inch or two.

• keep the fretting hand positioned with the base of the little finger very close to or touching the bottomedge of the fretboard except when fretting extremely wide spans (especially those on the first string,lesser on the second string, etc.).

ATTITUDE

The fastest way to advance as a guitarist is to get into the habit of playing daily.

One of my students told me about this great idea he was taught by Howard Roberts (the jazz guitarist whowas one of the founders of the Guitar Institute of Technology in L.A..

Howard said, “ get an egg timer and set it for five minutes the next time you practice. Then stoppracticing.” Jeff said, “what??, I don't get it!” Howard continued, “then, if you feel you're up to it set it for sixminutes the next day. Increase it by one minute every day, only if you feel you're psychologically up to it. Youshould be anxious to practice.” I thought this was a great idea.

Combine play and practice. You should practice a combination of fun stuff and hard work. If you don'tenjoy it, you won't find it easy to do regularly. In the early months of your practicing, play something you knowwell for five or ten minutes, so you feel good about your playing. Then focus for two or three minutes and workup a sweat. Alternate back an forth. By focus, I mean complete attention to what you are studying: no distractionsno indecision about whether you want to do this or not. You should choose the things you practice so they areapplicable to what you want to play, so they are psychologically rewarding.

Develop your ability to focus for longer periods and more often during your play/practice sessions. Aftera few months you may be able to focus for ten or fifteen minutes at a time and enjoy it. A seasoned professionalmusician can play for a half hour to an hour at a time with complete concentration. It is incredible what you canaccomplish in one hour with complete focus.

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.050

GENERAL PICKING TECHNIQUE

Wrist And hand Position For The Picking Arm The upper forearm should serve as an “anchor” point against the upper edge of the guitar. The wrist

should be slightly bent unless you are using part of the hand to mute. The fingertips, side of hand (from the baseof the little finger to the wrist), heel of hand, and thumb should brush against the strings, bridge or body of theguitar to judge distance.

Many players rest the “pinky” side of their hand (between the little finger and the wrist) on the bridgewhile picking. While this provides stability for the picking hand, it sacrifices the tone variation usually availableby picking closer to the neck for bass tones or closer to the bridge for treble tones.

Wrist Sweep, Forearm Rotation And Elbow SweepWrist Sweep. A sweeping, continuous down-up motion of the wrist is used for strumming chords and

picking single notes. Here is an exercise to familiarize you with this motion:

• Move your hand side to side with the same movement as if your hand were palm-down on a table.

• Mute the strings with your fretting hand and strum down-up alternately on two or three strings asa group; as you would a three note chord.

• Gradually widen the stroke until you are strumming on all six strings.

Note that when strumming alternately down-up on four to six strings, the wrist movement is so wide thatit involves a distinct forearm rotation (view the protruding wrist bone nearest the thumb). The weight of the handwill aid the motion of the hand in strumming.

Most players involve a slight forearm rotation in playing single notes. At the fastest rates of pickingsingle notes, most players use a controlled muscle quiver in the forearm rotation.

Holding The PickThere are many ways to hold a guitar pick. In the most traditional method, hold the pick between the side

of the tip segment of the index finger and the flat surface of the thumb (opposite the thumbnail). Try to extendthe tip of the pick less than a quarter of an inch from the thumb for fine control (many players prefer less thanan eighth of an inch). Bend the first finger so its tip points toward the base of the thumb. Holding the pick inthis manner should allow light pressure between the thumb and first finger.

Experiment and see what is comfortable and effective. For single-note playing, I usually hold the pickbetween the tips of the thumb, index and middle fingers. This gives me fine control over the pick and allowsremoval of the index finger for picking hand tapping. For strumming, I usually hold the pick between the sideof the tip segment of the index finger and the thumb.

The Position Of The PickUsually, you should position the pick in a plane perpendicular (90°) to the surface of the strings (or to

the guitar top), so it will glide equally well over the strings during downstrokes and upstrokes. This makes it

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.051

easier to move the pick from one string to another. It also causes the strings to vibrate parallel to the frets,providing maximum clearance and minimum buzzing. There are special situations, however, where you shouldtilt the pick toward or away from the floor:

(1) when picking the first note down on each of four or more strings, tilt the base of the pick towardthe floor and;

(2) when picking the first note up on each of four or more strings, tilt the base of the pick away fromthe floor and;

(3) when picking all downstrokes or all upstrokes to intentionally cause the strings to vibrate againstthe frets and buzz (typically in an accented phrase).

Pluck the strings with the tip of the pick produces a purer tone than either of the long edges of the pick,which produce more “scratchy” or “breathy” tones.

Rotating The Pick On Its AxisTo produce the purest string tone, rotate the pick on its axis so the flat surface of the pick is parallel to

the length of the string. Ideally, the tip of the pick should not move past the underside of the string (nearest theguitar body), moving just close enough to the guitar body to get alongside the string.

By rotating the pick on its axis to make it less parallel to the length of the string, you produce a morepercussive, “breathy” or “scratchy” tone. When the pick is rotated slightly out-of-parallel position with thestring, the tone becomes breathy. As the pick is rotated more out-of-parallel position with the string, the tonebecomes more scratchy.

axis

Rotating the pick on its axis to make it less parallel to the length of the string by about ten to fifteendegrees makes it easier to judge the distance between your pick and the guitar body, and therefore allows youto “glide” over the surface of the strings while picking.

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.052

string

an aerial viewof the pickparallel to a string

to the guitar's bridge

to the tuning headof the guitar

an aerial view of the pickrotated 30° on itsaxis in relation to the stringfor standard picking

string

to the guitar's bridge

to the tuning headof the guitar

Circle picking is a refined alternative to picking from the wrist. It involves very small, controlledmovements in the fingers. To get the basic feeling of this technique, draw a straight line on a piece of paper, holda pen or pencil between your thumb and index finger as you would hold a pick, and draw little clockwise ovalsaround the line at this angle:

Then try picking down-up on one string with the same movement. Bend the wrist to move the oval pathfrom one string to another (to change the string you are picking on). Circle picking is only practical at slowerrates of picking notes.

STYLES OF PICKINGThe seven styles of picking are downstroke, upstroke, alternate, rhythmic, sweep, economy and inside.

1. Downstroke PickingThis provides melodic emphasis and is often used in simpler guitar froms such as traditional blues and

fifties rock. You will find it to be the easiest sytle of picking, unless you began playing with a predominantupstroke (see upstroke picking, below).

Upstroke PickingMost players have a predominant downstroke and tend to start phrases (continuous rhythmic group of

notes) with a downstroke. Some players developed a predominant upstroke, often because they liked the tone.

The common position of the pick in regard to the position on its axis is such that the end of the pick nearestthe bridge is up and the end nearest the neck is down. Many of the predominant upstrokers that I have seen havethe type of thumb that curves back at the tip toward the thumbnail. Let's call this a hyper-extended thumb. Thishyper-extended thumb shape makes it easier to position the pick on its axis as shown below.

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.053

an aerial view of the pickrotated 30° on itsaxis in relation to the stringfor picking with a hyper-extended thumb

string

to the guitar's bridge

to the tuning headof the guitar

Either position of the pick can work, but be aware that the more the pick is rotated on its axis away frombeing parallel to the string, the more it scrapes the string, changing the tone.

Open-String Picking ExercisePlay this exercise with all strokes in the same direction, preferrably downstrokes. If you have a

predominant upstroke, it may be better to try to make a change to predominant downstroke, since most guitarstyles are played with predonimant downstrokes.

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.054

GENERAL FRETTING TECHNIQUE

FRETTING-HAND POSITIONS

The fretting hand can go through infinite forms. Any particular chord is ideally fretted with a slightlydifferent hand form to accommodate what is played immediately before and after it. Every phrase of notes orchords requires that the hand move a little differently. For any particular phrase, each guitar player has theirown unique and ideal way to perform the fretting. I'll discuss a few basic forms below.

Classical Wrist PositionFor wide spans in scales, arpeggios and chords, use the classical guitar wrist form. With the ball of the

thumb on the center of the back of the neck (opposite the third and fourth strings), bend the wrist to turn thefretting-hand palm towards the forearm and spread the fingers.

To protect the fretting wrist is essential that the head of the guitar be kept high with this wrist position.Keep the head of the guitar raised enough that the neck is at 45° or more to the floor.

Bending PositionAlthough you may not be bending notes (stretching one or more strings up and down a fret) for a while,

you should start getting used to the form. It will also be useful in understanding the compromised position, whichshould be your most common fretting-hand position for now.

Keep the elbow against or close to the body. Bend the fretting-hand wrist to move the back of the handtowards the forearm slightly (30° to 45°). If you have trouble imagining this bending of the wrist, put yourfretting hand palm right in front of your face and bend the hand away from you at the wrist, without moving theforearm.

Keep the base of your first finger touching the bottom of the fretboard and your thumb high enough thatit is easily visible from the front of the guitar (see photos or videos of Hendrix, Clapton, Van Halen or Vai, etc.in performance). The fingers should be angled in such a way that the base of the index finger is one or two fretstoward the head of the guitar from the tip of the finger. The bottom of the fretboard should be in line with (closeto) the base of the index finger at one end of your hand, and at a point halfway between the base of the little fingerand the heel of the hand.

The Circular Or “V” ShapeThe two extremes of the shapes the fretting hand thumb and index finger form are a circle or “v”. When

fretting notes on the smaller strings, the thumb and index finger form a circular shape. When fretting the largerstrings and especially when barréing, the thumb and index finger are in a “v” shape.

“Choreographing” Your Fretting Hand MovementThink of your fingers as dancers. Think of the places they fret notes as resting points in a dance. The

fingers should work together gracefully. When they fret a chord where all of the notes are to be strummed atonce, they need to move from their previous position in such a manner that they all arrive at their fretting pointsat precisely the same time.

When the fretting fingers play a sequence of single notes, the sequence forms a path. Each group of a

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TECHNIQUE

few consecutive notes (three to six, typically) moves through some sort of a path. Whatever the path is, movegracefully through it.

Consider a short phrase of three notes ascending the same string, using your index, ring, then littlefingers. Think of fretting the three notes similarly as you would a chord, but don't fret them all at once. Instead,make a “wave” motion through the fretted with your fingers. “Hover” your fingers over the frets as you playthe group of notes. As you are fretting the first note, begin moving the finger into place for the next note andrelax the previous finger precisely when the next finger has attained full pressure against the string. Apply onlyas much pressure as is needed to sound the note clearly without buzzing or muting.

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Technique 1.055

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TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.056

FRETTING TECHNIQUES

Contacting The StringFret notes with the fingertip pressing the string up against the edge of the metal fret (the edge nearest the

headstock of the guitar). Exert just enough pressure. Contact the string to the fret at precisely the same time thepick touches the string, so that by the time the pick follows through, the note is clearly fretted. Fretting beforepicking is inefficient and impedes your ability.

Spreading The FingersIn playing single notes, keep the fretting-hand fingers both relaxed and spread out. Keep the fingertips

hovering close (within a quarter inch) to four consecutive frets on the same string in line with points at whichyou would fret notes. Lay the first (index) finger’s middle knuckle away from the rest of the hand, giving easieraccess to the notes one fret toward the headstock of the guitar. Although you won’t be able to stretch as far, laythe little finger in a similar way to the right (left for left-handers). This is a “ready” position enabling you to reachany note you may need to on any string within a six fret range.

FIRST HOVERING EXERCISE

This exercise develops the posture of your fretting hand, training the fretting fingers to stay in readyposition. First, place all four fingers on four consecutive frets and pick the second string, sounding the notefretted with the little finger (finger "4"):

3

2

1

V

4

Next, lift the little finger off the fretboard 1/4" or less, "hovering" the little finger over the fretting pointit used earlier, keeping the finger very relaxed. Pick the ring finger note (finger “3”).

3

2

1

V

Now, lift the ring finger. Hover both of the free fingers over the fretting points they used earlier, withboth of them relaxed. Pick the middle finger note (finger “2”).

2

1

V

Page 102: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.-057

Finally, lift the middle finger. Hover all of the free fingers over the fretting points they used earlier, withthem relaxed. Pick the index finger note (finger “1”).

1

V

Repeat the sequence, trying each time to relax the fingers more and hover them closer to the fretboard.You'll probably have the most trouble with the little finger.

CLOSENESS AND CLEARING EXERCISE ON TWO STRINGS

Versions of this exercise will be presented later on all six strings, with slurs, and in combination with thehover exercise. Like the hovering exercise, this one trains your fingers to stay close to the strings.

As you are playing this exercise, you may need to adjust the position of fingers with which you previouslyfretted in order to reach the next note you are fretting. If so, the next time you play the exercise, try to positionthe fingers when you put each down initially, so no readjustment will be necessary.

Step 1.Fret the note on the second string, fifth fret with the index finger (“1”). Strum it along with the first string

open, as a chord. Make sure both notes are sounding clearly. Keep the free fingers relaxed and hovering overthe fretboard. The middle finger (“2”) should hover over the point at which it would fret the sixth fret, the ringfinger over its fretting point at the seventh fret and the little finger over its fretting point at the eighth fret. Makesure both notes sound clearly and are not muted.

1

V

Step 2.Leave your index finger pressing the string to the fifth fret and fret the next note with your middle finger

(finger “2”). Strum it along with the first string open, as a chord. Keep the free fingers relaxed and hoveringover their assigned points on the fretboard. Make sure both notes sound clearly and are not muted.

1

V

2

Page 103: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.058

Step 3.Leave your index and middle fingers fretting their assigned frets and fret the next note with your ring

finger (finger, “3”). Strum it along with the first string open, as a chord. Keep the little finger relaxed andhovering over the eighth fret. Make sure both notes sound clearly and are not muted.

1

V

2

3

Step 4.Leave your first three fingers fretting their assigned frets and fret the next note with your little finger

(finger, “4”). Strum it along with the first string open, as a chord. Make sure both notes sound clearly and arenot muted.

1

V

2

3

4

Step 5.Leave the middle, ring and little fingers fretting their assigned frets on the second string (sixth, seventh

and eighth frets) while fretting the first string, fifth fret with the index finger (“1”). Strum the first two stringsas a chord and make sure both notes sound clearly.

1

V

2

3

4

Step 6.Leave the ring and little fingers fretting their assigned frets on the second string (seventh and eighth frets)

and the index finger fretting the first string, fifth fret. At the same time, fret the first string, sixth fret with themiddle finger (“2”). Strum the first two strings as a chord and make sure both notes sound clearly.

1

V

2

3

4

Page 104: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.059

Step 7.Leave the index and middle fingers fretting their assigned frets on the first string (fifth and sixth frets)

and the little finger fretting the second string, eighth fret. At the same time, fret the first string, seventh fret withthe ring finger (“3”). Strum the first two strings as a chord and make sure both notes sound clearly.

1

V

2

3

4

Step 8.Leave the index, middle and ring fingers fretting their assigned frets on the first string (fifth, sixth and

seventh frets) and fret the first string eighth fret with the little finger. Pick the first string.

1

V

2

3

4

Page 105: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.120

FRETTING PRESSURE EXERCISEThis is a good warm-up exercise. Fret the note shown below. In five steps, increase fretting pressure

from totally muting the note to applying just barely enough pressure to clearly fret the note. Here is a descriptionof the five steps:

Step 1. The note is clearly muted. Picking it produces a thumping sound, with no buzzing.

Step 2. The note is muted, but just barely buzzes. Picking it produces a thumping sound, with buzzing

Step 3. The note is clearly buzzing. Picking it produces buzzing, not a muted sound, not a clear note.

Step 4. The note is almost clear. Picking it still produces slight buzzing, but you can hear the frettednote.

Step 5. You are applying just barely enough pressure to sound the note clearly.

1

VIII

Make sure you are not increasing pressure abruptly on one of the steps. Typical mistakes are to increasepressure too abruptly between steps four and five. For example don't apply half the pressure during steps onethrough four, then the rest on step five.

Now apply the five steps listed above to each of the other three fingers as shown below. Of course, applyall five steps to the second finger; then apply all five steps to the third finger; then apply all five steps to thelittle finger.

2

VIII

3

VIII

4

VIII

Okay, now for the hard part! Apply the five steps to each of the pairs of notes below, making sure thatthe sound attributes described in each of the five steps above occur on both notes simultaneously. In order tobe able to hear the notes clearly on these two note chords, pluck them with your thumb and index finger, ratherthan picking them.

1

V

21

V

3

1

V

4

1

V

21

V

2

1

V1

2

V1

2

V

3

2

V

43

V

3 3

V1

2

V

2

3

V

4 4

V

4

1

V

4 4

V

2

4

V

33

V

2

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.125

Get a head start on fretting your chords with the exercises below. The eight chords used in these exercisesare usually the best ones to learn first.

CHORD CANCELATION EXERCISES

3

2

1

C I

1

Am I

32

Em I

32

4

A I

322

D I

3

1

1

E I

32

2

1

G I

3 4

Dm I

1

2

3

Practice each of the chords above in the following manner:

• Finger a chord using minimal pressure (just enough to prevent the notes from muting or buzzing).

• Release the pressure on the notes you are fretting, but retain contact with the strings.

• Reapply minimal pressure and strum the chord, making sure all notes are clear.

• Release the pressure on the notes you are fretting, and move your fingertips one eighth inch fromthe strings.

• Reapply minimal pressure and strum the chord, making sure all notes are clear.

Choreograph the movement of your fingers so that all of the fingertips touch their stringssimultaneously.

• Repeat the previous two steps four times, increasing the distance to one quarter inch, then one halfinch, then one inch and finally two inches.

Now the chord shape should be cancelled, since your fingertips are two inches from the strings. Duringthe exercise you trained your fingers to the choreographed movement they should make for a simultaneoustouchdown.

CHORD FRETTING EXERCISES

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.126

SIMULTANEOUS TOUCHDOWN EXERCISES

Chord Changes With Fretted Notes in CommonTake advantage of a finger that doesn't need to move during a chord change. Some of the easiest chord

changes involve notes in common. Practice the changes below without moving fingers on the notes in common.Be careful that the fingertips that do move fret their respective notes simultaneously.

Strum each chord once in the example below Don't remove the tip of the ring finger (“3”) on this example.However, the rest of the ring finger should tilt down slightly.

2

1

Cadd9 I

2

1

G I

3 43 4

1

D I

3

2

Strum each chord once in the example below. Don't remove the tip of the middle finger (“2“) on this example.However, the rest of the ring finger should tilt up slightly.

Dm I

1

2

3

3

A I

21

Strum each chord once in the example below. Don't remove the tip of the index (“1”) nor middle finger s (“2“)on this example.

1

Am I

32

3

2

1

C I

Chord Changes With Shapes In CommonTake advantage of fingering shapes that move. When part or all of a chord fingering shape is transferred

to other strings, take advantage by retaining the shape. Cancelling the fingering shape would cause unnecessarymovement. Be careful that the fingertips that do move fret their respective notes simultaneously.

Strum each pair of chords below, retaining the identical shape of the chord fingering.

1

Am I

32

1

E I

32 4

A I

32 4

E sus. 4 I

32

Page 108: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

108

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.127

Strum each pair of chords below, retaining the identical shape of the fingering made by the middle (“2”) andring (“3”) fingers.

3

2

1

C I

3

2

G I

44

Em I

32 4

A I

32

3

2

1

C I

1

F I

2

3

Strum each of the four chords below, retaining the identical shape of the fingering made by the index (“1”)and middle (“2”) fingers.

3

2

1

C I Dm I

1

2

3

1

32

E I

1

Am I

32

Page 109: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

109

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.220

TECHNIQUES OF STRUMMINGHolding the pick. There are many ways to hold a guitar pick. In the most traditional method, hold the

pick between the side of the tip segment of the index finger and the flat surface of the thumb (opposite thethumbnail). Try to extend the tip of the pick 1/4" or less from the thumb for fine control (many players preferless than 1/8"). Bend the first finger so its tip points toward the base of the thumb. Holding the pick in this mannershould allow light pressure between the thumb and first finger.

The position of the pick in relation to the strings. To produce the purest string tone, cause the stringsto vibrate parallel to the frets, providing maximum clearance and minimum buzzing. Make sure that the pickis held in a plane perpendicular (90°) to the surface of the strings (or to the guitar top), to avoid “catching” thestring on upstrokes. Pluck the strings with the tip of the pick. Keep the flat surface of the pick almost, but notquite parallel with the length of the string. Allow the tip of the pick to protrude just barely past the undersideof the string (nearest the guitar body).

Right wrist and hand position. The shoulder, forearm, wrist and hand should be loose throughout. Applylight, evenly-distributed muscular tension throughout these parts of the hand and arm to support the pick“effortlessly”.

The wrist should be slightly bent unless you are using part of the hand to mute. The upper forearm shouldserve as an “anchor” point against the upper edge of the guitar. The fingertips, side of hand (from the base ofthe little finger to the wrist), heel of hand, and side of the thumb can touch to judge distance, but don’t anchorthem. As you develop your personal technique, you may find yourself touching with various parts of the hand.Analyze your technique to make sure the habits you develop contribute to your control of the pick.

Many players rest the “pinky” side of their hand (between the little finger and the wrist) on the bridgewhile picking. While this provides stability for the right hand, it sacrifices the tone variation usually availableby picking closer to the neck for bass tones or closer to the bridge for treble tones.

Right wrist sweep. A sweeping, continuous down-up motion of the wrist is used for strumming chords.Here is an exercise to familiarize you with this motion:

• Move your hand side to side with the same movement as if your hand were palm-down on a table.

• Mute the strings with your left hand and strum down-up alternately on two or three strings as a group;as you would a three note chord.

• Gradually widen the stroke until you are strumming on all six strings.

Note that when strumming alternately down-up on four to six strings, the wrist movement is so wide thatit involves a distinct forearm rotation (view the protruding wrist bone nearest the thumb). The weight of the handwill aid the motion of the hand in strumming.

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.221

Strict Down-Up StrummingIn strict down-up strumming, each series of continuous notes is strummed strictly (1) down-up-down-

up, etc. or (2) up-down-up-down, etc. If you start with a downstroke, the picking order is down-up-down-up,etc. Starting with an upstroke would use the picking order up-down-up-down, etc.

You often pass the strings before strumming them to strictly continue the down-up motion. In theory,the wasted motion is acceptable in order to allow an uninterrupted continuous rhythmic motion.

Down-up strumming exercise. Count evenly: “one - and - two - and - three - and - four - and,” as you strumdown on the downward arrows and up on the upward arrows.

Rhythmic Selection.Many accompaniment and melodic rhythms can be played easily when your right hand assumes a

continuous motion but you select when the pick contacts the strings. This may be applied to playing single notesor strumming chords.

Rhythmic selection. Miss the strings where no arrow is shown.

Exceptions to Strict Down-Up StrummingConsecutive downstrokes or consecutive upstrokes provide emphasis and a consistent tone.

Consecutive downstroke exercise. Consecutive upstroke exercise.

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.235

MUTING WITH THE FRETTING HAND

“Safety” MutesAs a safeguard against strings picked or plucked by mistake, you can gently touch strings adjacent to

those you are fretting. The surface of each finger between the tip of the finger and the palm may be used to muteby gently touching the smaller strings adjacent to those you are fretting.

In the example below, every fretting finger should gently touch and mute the next smaller adjacent string.

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If your fingertips are large enough in relation to the string spacing, you can use them to mute the nextlarger string. While fretting on one string, the fingertip of the fretting finger can gently touch the next larger stringand mute it.

As each finger frets in the example below, it should gently touch and mute the next larger adjacent string sothat no two notes sound at the same time.

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Safety mutes can be used with chord fingerings to mute smaller and larger strings. If the chord involvesstrings two through five, for example, safety mutes could be applied to the first and sixth strings.

While fretting the chord progression below, try to mute the first and sixth strings with the fretting hand. Ifyou are unable to mute the sixth string, at least mute the first string.

21

A9 IV

43 32

D9 V

3

1

2

1

4

A dim. 7 V

3

1

A6 VI

2 3 4 2

1

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Bb9 V

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A9 IV

43

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112

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.236

Muting Notes After Fretting ThemAfter fretting a note, it can be muted by aburptly decreasing the pressure to the point that you are lightly

touching the string. This will mute the string. Let the string lift off of the fret quickly. If it lifts off slowly, itmay buzz.

Muting Single Notes When Moving To A Larger StringRolling technique. If two consecutive notes are fretted on the same fret with the second note on a larger

string, the rolling technique can be used to mute the first note.

The rolling technique exercises below should involve a slight “cradle-like” rocking motion of the palmto help move each finger from one string to another. The base of the first finger should be closer to the fretboardthan the base of the little finger.

The rocking motion should involve more movement on the side of the palm near the little finger. Thiscauses a slight rotation of the finger. From the player's view of the fingertip, the finger rotates clockwise whenmoving to a smaller string and rotates counter-clockwise when moving to a larger string.

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fingers::

When two consecutive notes are fretted on different strings with the second note on a larger string anda higher-numbered fret (closer to the guitar body), the finger fretting the second note can mute the first note. Thisis easier on adjacent strings, but can be done two or more strings apart by using the fretting fingers flattenedagainst the strings.

================Ä 44

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7

tmmmmI1

mmmm mmmm

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9

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10

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9

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cfingers::

Page 113: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

113

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.237

Ä 44â 44

Swing Eighths

fingers: 0

0

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E7

A7 E7

B7 C B7 E7 B7

E7 A7 B7 Fma13#11 E7

Combined Fretting and Muting Mute each open string chord with the finger that frets the note that follows.Pluck the bass notes with the thumb and the remaining notes with the fingers.

tec 1.237 tec 1.237

Page 114: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

114

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

INTRODUCTION TO SLIDEThis technique should not be confused with bottleneck slide technique, which will be covered separately.

The slide is a slurring technique where two or more notes are sounded when picking or plucking the string once,continuing the pressure against the fret with the fretting hand and slidding to another fret. Two or moreconsecutive notes can be performed with the slide, by moving up or down a string to different frets.

If the slide is a distance of two or three frets, you should be able to retain the contact on the back of theneck with the ball of your thumb, pivoting on it. This makes it much easier to retain your orientation on thefretboard. You may be able to retain contact while sliding over three frets, especially if the span of your handis large and/or if playing on the higher-numbered frets (which are closer together).

Single Note Slide Exercise

=============================Ä 44

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=============================Ä

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The slide may be performed on two or more strings simultaneously. Here is an example where the notesare consistently an interval of a fifth apart (equal to five scale tone apart).

Perfect Fifth Slide Exercise

===============Ä 44

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Technique 1.300

Page 115: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

115

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.310

“RECOIL” TECHNIQUEI named this technique after a rattlesnake, because of its habit of returning to its ready position after

striking and biting.

In more fundamental styles such as blues, rock and folk, an improviser often uses a single scale fingeringpattern as a source for melodic tones. This makes it easier to develop an improvisation by having to recall onlyone pattern. In these styles, an improviser can slide up to a note, then return to the original scale fingering area.

To make this quick and efficient, keep the ball of the thumb in contact with the back of the neck. Slideup the neck, then quickly return. Try this in the exercise below.

recoil technique example 1

===============Ä 44

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c

2 4

S

mmmm mmmm2

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3

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mmmm mmmm0

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2

t

recoil technique example 2

===============Ä 44

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d

2 4

2 2

S

tmmmmoY tmmmmY0

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0

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3

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0

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t æ

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tmmmmoY

2 4

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t mmmm mmmm0

0

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3 3

tmmmmmoI

3 5

t |mmmm

Page 116: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

116

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.350

BARRE TECHNIQUEFingers Typically Used

Barreing is most commonly performed with the index and ring fi ngers, less often with the middle fi nger and the little fi ngers. Here a few of the most common barré chords:

2

1

F I

4

11

3

3

Bb I

3

1

3

2

1

3

C9 II

3 3

2

C13 no root II

4

1

2

1 1

Fm I

4

11

3

2

Bb I

4

1

3

1barre

barre

barre barre

barre

barre

Am II

4

1

44 barrebarre

G13 sus. 4 III

4

2

44

1

The Portion Of The Barreing FingerGenerally, it is most effi cient to barre with edge of a fi nger (the area between the surface of the fi nger

facing the palm and the side of the fi nger). With the index fi nger, the preferred edge is on the side of the fi nger nearest the thumb. On the other fi ngers, the edge opposite the thumb usually works best.

Applying And Sustaining PressureUsually the thumb should be placed near the middle of the neck, opposite the barréing fi nger. Pressure

should be applied between the thumb and the barréing fi nger. The shape of your hand will be a little different for each barre chord. Listen carefully to all the notes that should be sounding in a barre chord you are playing.

The “F chord shown above usually works better when the thumb is placed near the middle of the neck, while the “C9” chord works better with the thumb below the middle and toward the head of the guitar. The “Am” chord shown above works best if the thumb is placed well below the center of the neck and toward the head of the guitar.

Avoiding StressBarreing can be quite stressful on the tendons in your wrist, so take a break whenever you experience the

slightest pain. Do your best to develop barré forms that avoid bending your wrist. Keep your elbow at your side. It is often better to keep the base of the little fi nger in front of the neck and sometimes above the level of the fi rst string. Keeping the palm close to or touching the bottom of the fretboard will avoid bending your wrist.

Page 117: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

117

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.381

Ä 44

â 44

Û0fretting:

picking:

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Open-Position Chromatic Scale ExercisePick alternately down-up when you stay on a string. Pick in the direction of a new string you are moving to.

tec 1.381 tec 1.381

Page 118: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

118

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.382

Ä 44

â 44Û

1picking:

1

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!t↓

fingers:

Open Position Chromatic Scale Exercise (continued)tec 1.382 tec 1.382

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119

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.383

Ä 44

â 440

picking:

0

t↑

1

1

t↓

2

2

!t↑

3

3

t↓

1

1

#t↑

2

2

!t↓

3

3

t↑

4

4

!t↓

1

2

t↑

2

3

#t↓

3

4

!t↑

4

5

t↓

1

3

# t↑

2

4

!t↓

3

5

t↑

4

6

! t↓

21

4

7

t↑

3

6

" t↓

2

5

t↑

1

4

" t↓

4

6

t↑

3

5

# t↓

2

4

" t↑

1

3

t↓

4

5

# t↑

3

4

" t↓

2

3

t↑

1

2

"t↓

4

4

t↑

3

3

#t↓

2

2

"t↑

1

1

t↓

Ä

â3

3

t↑

2

2

"t↓

1

1

t↑

0

0

t↓

2

2

t↑

1

1

t↓

0

0

t↑

4

4

"t↑

1

1

t↓

0

0

#t↑

4

4

"t↑

3

3

t↓

0

0

#t↓

4

4

"t↑

3

3

t↓

2

2

"t↑

23

4

4

"t↓

3

3

t↑

2

2

"t↓

1

1

t↑

3

3

#t↓

2

2

"t↑

1

1

t↓

0

0

t↑

2

2

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1

1

t↑

0

0

t↓

3

3

"t↑

1

1

t↓

0

0

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3

3

"t↑

2

2

t↓

Ä

â0

0

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3

3

"t↑

2

2

t↓

1

1

"t↑

3

3

t↓

2

2

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1

1

!t↓

0

0

#t↑

2

2

t↓

1

1

"t↑

0

0

t↓

4

4

"t↑

1

1

t↓

0

0

# t↑

4

4

"t↑

3

3

t↓

25

0

0

t↓

4

4

"t↑

3

3

t↓

2

2

t↑

4

4

t↓

3

3

t↑

2

2

t↓

1

1

"t↑

3

3

t↓

2

2

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1

1

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0

0

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2

2

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1

1

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0

0

t↓

4

4

"t↑

Ä

â1

1

"t↓

0

0

t↑

4

4

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3

3

t↓

0

0

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4

4

"t↑

3

3

t↓

2

2

t↑

4

4

t↓

3

3

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2

2

t↓

1

1

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3

3

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2

2

# t↑

1

1

" t↓

0

0

t↑

27

2

2

t↓

1

1

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0

0

t↓

4

4

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1

1

t↓

0

0

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4

4

" t↑

3

3

t↓

0

0

# t↓

4

4

" t↑

3

3

t↓

2

2

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4

4

t↓

3

3

# t↑

2

2

" t↓

1

1

t↑

æ

ææ3

3

t↓

2

2

" t↑

1

1

t↓

0

0

t↑

«|

fingers:

Open Position Chromatic Scale Exercise (continued)tec 1.383 tec 1.383

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120

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.390

HARMONICSEach note played on the guitar produces complex sounds comprised of many pitches. The loudest of

those pitches, the one we’re most aware of, is called the fundamental. Other pitches that sound with thefundamental are called harmonics. Harmonics sound clearer and louder using the bridge pickup with areasonable amount of treble.

“Touch” (or “Artificial”) harmonics.“Touch” harmonics can be produced by forcing the string to vibrate in fractional arcs called “partials.”

By touching the string very lightly with the fingertip at 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, etc., the vibrating string length fromeither end, the string can be forced to vibrate in sections. As the sections or arcs vibrate, they produce the soundwe call a harmonic.

If a touch harmonic is played at 1/2 the string length, the string will vibrate in two sections:

touching here

produces these arcs

end of vibratingstring length

end of vibratingstring length

A touch harmonic played at 1/3 the string length, causes the string to vibrate in three sections:

touching here

produces these arcs

end of vibratingstring length

end of vibratingstring lengthor touching here

Once the strings are vibrating in sections produced by touch harmonics, touching the string exactly atthe end of an arc will not stop its vibration. Touching the string anywhere other than an the end of an arc willmute the string. The point at which the ends of two arcs meet is called a node.

All of these fractional arcs or partials sound with every open string and fretted note you play, but withmuch less volume than the fundamental (above). The shorter the string length, the lesser the volume. Amultiband equalization unit can aid in bringing out particular harmonics by increasing the volume through thehigher range of pitch where they occur.

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121

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.391

Open string touch harmonics.Before or after picking a note, touching the string very lightly at the particular places along the string will

produce a harmonic:

• Touching at the 12th fret (1/2 the vibrating string length) will produce a harmonic an octave above theopen string. Touch exactly over the metal fret.

• Touching at the 7th or 19th frets (1/3 the vibrating length) produces a harmonic an octave and a fifth abovethe open string. Touch exactly over the metal fret.

• Touching at the 5th or 24th frets (1/4 the string length) produces a harmonic two octaves above the openstring. Touch exactly over the metal fret.

TWELFTH FRET HARMONICS EXERCISE

Play harmonics where the diamond-headed notes are shown at the twelfth fret.

Touch exactly over the twelfth fret, not where you usually fret it, but exactly over the metal fret.

====================================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

c0

tmmmm2

tmmmm0

tmmmm121212

zmmmmmmmzz0

tmmmm2

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tmmmm121212

zmmmmmmmzz0

tmmmm2

tmmmm0

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tmmmm

====================================Ännnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 2

tmmmm0

tmmmmmm3

tmmmmm2

tmmmm tmmmm12

rmmmm121212

zmmmmmmmzz

3

tmmmmm0

tmmmm2

tmmmm0

tmmmm tmmmm0

tmmmm2

tmmmm0

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====================================Ännnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 12

1212

zmmmmmmmzz0

tmmmm2

tmmmm0

|mmmm2

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tmmmm2

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tmmmm0

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====================================Ännnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 2

tmmmm0

tmmmmmm3

tmmmmm2

tmmmm tmmmm12

rmmmm121212

zmmmmmmmzz

3

tmmmmm0

tmmmm2

tmmmm0

tmmmm æææ

tmmmm12

rmmmm121212

zmmmmmmmzz

Page 122: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

122

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.425

PICKING HEEL-OF-HAND MUTEThe “heel” of your hand is the ridge of muscle and flesh between your wrist and palm. By touching a

string immediately next to the bridge, the sound can be softened, or muted. This technique is easier to performwith the elbow of the picking hand a inch or two lower, so the picking hand arm is closer to being parallel tothe strings. The same positionion of the hand can temporarily be gotten by bending the wrist of the fretting hand.The wrist should not remain bent in this manner for an extended length of time, as it would put unnecessary stresson the wrist.

Pressing the heel of the hand anywhere on a string whiile picking or plucking it will raise the pitch ofnotes played on that string. To keep this change in pitch to a minimum, mute by touching the string as close tothe bridge as you can. More pressure should be applied to the bridge than to the string.

As with standard picking, heel-of-hand muted picking should be accompolished by a side-to-sidesweeping motion of the wrist. To move from one string to another, keep the wrist in contact with the vibratingend of each string nearest the bridge. You should find it fairly easy to pick muted notes on either or both of twoadjacent strings without changing the location of the wrist. With practice, you can even play on three adjacentstrings without changing the placement of the wrist, but it is usually better to move the placement of the wristrather than risk losing a mute.

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123

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.426

Ä 44â 44 At0

B

t2

C

t3

D

t0

E

t2

C

t3

E

t2 1

!tD#

2

tB

1

tD#

0

# tD

1

" tBb

0

tD

0

tA

2

tB

3

tC

0

tD

2

tE

3

tC

2

tE

2

tA

0

tG

2

tE

3

tC

2

tE

0

|G

Äâ A

2

tB

0

tC

1

tD

3

tE

t1

C

tE

t4

! tD#

0

tB

4

tD#

3

# tD

3

" tBb

3

tD

2

tA

0

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1

tC

3

tD

t1

E

tC

tE

tA

t1

G

tE

tC

tE

|G

ÄâΩ øΩΩ ø

E

2

tF#

4

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1

!tA

2

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0

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1

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0

t1

tC

1

! tG#

1

tC

0

tB

1

tG#

0

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2

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4

! tG

1

!tE

2

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0

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1

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0

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tC

1

!tG#

1

tC

0

|B

Äâ

0

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2

tB

3

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0

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2

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3

tC

2

tE

1

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2

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1

tD#

0

# tD

1

" tBb

0

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0

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2

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3

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0

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2

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3

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2

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2

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0

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2

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3

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2

tE

0

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Äâ A

2

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0

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1

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3

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1

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4

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4

tD#

3

# tD

3

" tBb

3

tD

2

tA

0

tB

1

tC

3

tD

0

tE

1

tC

0

tE

5

tA

æææ0

tE

1

tC

0

tE

5

tA

2

|A

In the Hall of the Mountain KingUse heel-of-hand mutes for every note.

tec 1.426 tec 1.426

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124

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.470

PRIMARY STYLES OF PICKING

ALTERNATE PICKING

In alternate picking, each series of continuous notes is picked strictly (1) down-up-down-up, etc. or (2)strictly up-down-up-down, etc. If you start with a downstroke, the picking order is down-up-down-up, etc.Starting with an upstroke would use the picking order up-down-up-down, etc. On a single string, this is simpleenough:

Ä 44â 44

1picking:

fingers:

↓4

!t0

↑0

t2

↓5

t0

↑0

t3

↓6

" t0

↑0

t4

↓7

# t0

↑0

t æææ6

" t3

↓0

t0

↑5

t2

↓0

t0

↑4

!t1

↓0

t0

=================Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

mmmm mmm1

picking:

fingers:

4

!t0

0

t mmmm mmm2

5

t0

0

t mmmmm mmm3

6

" t0

0

t mmmmm mmm4

7

# t0

0

t æææ

mmmmm mmm6

" t3

0

t0

mmmm mmm5

t2

0

t0

4

!tmmmm1

0

tmmmm0

You often pass a string before picking it to strictly continue the down-up motion. If you were to pickdown on the fifth string immediately before picking a note on the fourth string, you would move the pick slightlypast the fourth string before picking it, so it can be picked in an upstroke. In theory, the wasted motion isacceptable in order to allow an uninterrupted continuous rhythmic motion.

Ä 44â 44

æææ

picking: ↓

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t============Ä 44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

æææ

picking:

0

tmmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmmm0

tmmmm

Alternate Picking Exercise. The most significant disadvantage of down-up picking is having to passa string before picking it. On the exercise below, every string has to be passed before picking. Using all openstrings, pick in this exact order of down ( ↓ ) and up ( ↑ ) strokes.

Ä 44â 44picking:

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

3434

æøææø0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

0

t↓

0

t↑

==========================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44picking:

mmmmmm mmmmmm0

t0

t mmmmmm mmmmm

0

t0

t mmmmm mmmm

0

t0

t mmmm mmmm

0

t0

t mmmm mmmm

0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t 34=34nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

æøææø

mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmmm mmmmm0

t0

t

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125

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.471

Imagine alternate picking a series of notes with an even rhythm:

Ä 44â 44fingers:

picking: ↓

5

t1

7

t3

7

t3

7

t3

7

t3

7

t3

7

t3

7

t3

æææ8

"t↓

4

7

t↑

3

7

t↓

3

7

t↑

3

7

t↓

3

7

t↑

3

5

t↓

1

Now, imagine some of the notes missing from the even rhythm:

Ä 44â 44fingers:

picking:

0

t1

2

t3

d

2

tI3

2

t3

2

t3

d

2

tI3

æææ3

"t4

2

t3

d

2

tI3

2

t3

2

t3

0

t1

Carefully compare the two examples above.

Strumming By Rhythmic Selection. Many accompaniment and melodic rhythms can be played easilyby assuming a continuous down-up motion with your picking hand and selecting when the pick contacts thestrings. So, this may be called “rhythmic selection from a continuous pulse.” It may be applied to playing singlenotes or strumming chords.

Ä 44â 44strum:

02210

ttttt↓

02210

ttttt↑

d

02210

tItttt

02210

d

02210

tItttt

02210

ttttt↓

ttttt↑

æøææø3

0033

ttttt↓

30033

ttttt↑

d

30033

tItttt↑

d

30033

tItttt↑

30033

ttttt↓

30033

ttttt↑

æææ

02210

AAAAA1

Am I

322

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32

“RHYTHMIC” PICKING

Page 126: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

126

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.472

Creating Rhythmic Picking By Rhythmic Selection. For single notes, as with strumming, you canassume a continuous down-up motion with your picking hand and select when the pick contacts the string.

Ä 44â 44 ↓picking:

0

tI↑

0

tI↑

0

tI↑

0

tI↓

0

tI↑

0

tI æøææø

3

tI↑

3

tI↑

3

tI↑

3

tI↓

3

tI↑

3

tI æææ

0

A

ECONOMY PICKING

Basic ConceptStaying On The Same String. Whenever you remain on the same string and pick continuous rhythms,

pick alternately down-up.

Ä !!!! 44â 44picking:

fingers:

12

t4↓

11

t3↑

9

t1↓

12

t4↑

11

t3↓

9

t1↑

7

t1↓

11

t4↑

æøææø9

t2↓

7

t1↑

5

t1↓

9

t4↑

7

t2↓

5

t1↓

4

t1↓

0

t0↑

======================Ä !!!! 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44picking:

mmmmmm mmmmmfingers:

12

t4

11

t3

mmmmm mmmmmm9

t1

12

t4

mmmmm mmmmm11

t3

9

t1

mmmm mmmmm7

t1

11

t4

æøææø

mmmmm mmmm9

t2

7

t1

mmmm mmmmm5

t1

9

t4

mmmm mmmm7

t2

5

t1

mmmm mmm4

t1

0

t0

Picking Discontinuous Rhythms. When the regular pulse of a rhythm you are playing in single notesis interrupted (by a sustain or by a rest), the next picking stroke can be in either direction. If the next picking strokeis on the beat (at the beginning of a beat), it is preferable to pick down. By picking up on the first note in thecircled pair below, the downstroke falls on the beat. The single circled note after the next pause is picked down,again to conform to the preferred downstroke on the beat.

Ä !!!! 44â 44picking:

fingers:

12

t4↓

11

t3↑

9

t1↓

12

t4↑

11

tY3↓

c11

tY3↑

æææ

1↓

9

|

7 5 4

4↓

t0

2↑

t1↓

t0↑

t======================Ä !!!! 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44picking:

mmmmmm mmmmmfingers:

12

t4

11

t3

mmmmm mmmmmm9

t1

12

t4

11

tmmmmmY3

c11

tmmmmmY3

æææ

1

9

|mmmmm7 5 4

mmmm mmmm4

t0

2

t mmmm mmm1

t0

t

If all notes on the beat are picked down and all notes on the last half of the beat picked up, this constitutesrhythmic picking, discussed earlier.

Page 127: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

127

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.473

Pick In The Direction Of The New String. In economy picking, every time you move to a new string,you pick in the direction you were moving to get to the new string. This method of changing strings is moreefficient, since it makes use of every stroke.

Ä 44â 44picking:

fingers:

Û0

0

t2

2

t3

3

t Û0

0

t2

2

t3

3

t Û0

0

t2

2

t0

0

t Û1

1

t3

3

t0

0

t æææ

Û3

3

t0

0

t1

1

t Û0

0

t2

2

t3

3

t3

3

|===================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44picking:

fingers:

Ûmmmmm mmmm mmmm0

0

t2

2

t3

3

t Ûmmmm mmmm mmmm0

0

t2

2

t3

3

t Ûmmmm mmmm mmmm0

0

t2

2

t0

0

t Ûmmm mmm mmmm1

1

t3

3

t0

0

t æææ

Ûmmmmm mmmm mmm3

3

t0

0

t1

1

t Ûmmmm mmmm mmmmm0

0

t2

2

t3

3

t3

3

|mmmmm

ChallengesPreserving The Rhythm. Alternate picking involves a rhythmically regular wrist movement, making

it easy to pick regular rhythms. Picking two or more consecutive notes in the same direction requires timingthe movement to preserve the rhythm of the notes.

Try playing the example above again (“pick in the direction of the new string”), paying particularattention to continuing the triplet rhythm through the first two beats of the second bar. It would be easy to “rush”the rhythm where the first two beats of the second bar are played with all upstrokes.

Efficiency In Passing A String Without Picking It. In economy picking, you will often need to passover a string without picking it. This occurs when you have just picked a string, then need to move in the oppositedirection of the last stroke to pick to the next note on another string. This would require passing the string youhave just picked, on the way to picking the next string. Whenever this occurs, minimize the length of your stroke,staying close to the string before changing direction in moving toward the next string.

In the exercise below, after picking every note except the circled one, you will need to change directionto move to the next string. In doing so, try to minimize the length of your stroke, staying close to the string beforechanging direction in moving toward the next string.

Ä 44â 44

æøææø

picking:

fingers: 0

0

t0

0

t1

1

t0

0

t2

2

t3

3

t0

0

t0

0

t=============Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44æøææø

picking:

fingers:

mmmm mmmm0

0

t0

0

t mmmm mmmmm1

1

t0

0

t mmmm mmmm2

2

t3

3

t mmmm mmmm0

0

t0

0

t

Page 128: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

128

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.474

Inside PickingInside picking is a concept to improve efficiency with economy picking, where a repeated note group

involves picking downward on the smallest string and upward on the largest string. Following the rule of pickingin the direction of the new string, immediately after picking the largest or smallest string in a repeated group ofnotes, you would have to pass the string without picking it on the way to the next string.

inside picking example 1

Ä 44â 44picking:

fingers:

0

t0

0

t0

1

t1

0

t0

3

t1

0

t0

5

t3

0

t0

æøææø

4

6

t0

0

t3

5

t0

0

t1

3

t0

0

t1

1

t0

0

t====================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44picking:

fingers:

mmmm mmmm0

t0

0

t0

mmmm mmmmm1

t1

0

t0

mmmmm mmmm3

t1

0

t0

mmmmmm mmmm5

t3

0

t0

æøææø

mmmmmm mmmm4

6

t0

0

t mmmmmm mmmm3

5

t0

0

t mmmmm mmmm1

3

t0

0

t mmmm mmmmm1

1

t0

0

t

inside picking example 2

Ä 44â 44picking:

fingers:

0

t0

1

t1

0

t0

2

t2

1

t1

0

t0

3

"t3

1

t1

æøææø0

t0

2

t2

1

t1

0

t0

3

"t3

1

t1

2

t2

1

t1

====================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44picking:

fingers:

mmmmm mmmm

0

t0

1

t1

mmmmm mmm0

t0

2

t2

mmm mmmm1

t1

0

t0

mmmm mmmm3

"t3

1

t1

æøææø

mmmmm mmm0

t0

2

t2

mmm mmmm1

t1

0

t0

mmmm mmmm3

"t3

1

t1

mmm mmmm2

t2

1

t1

Tilting The Pick For Four Or More Consecutive Strings. Economy picking scales, arpeggios ormelodies which consistently progress upwardly in pitch involve more downstrokes, since the first and last noteon each string would be picked down. Play the example below.

===================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44mmmm mmmm

fingers:

picking:

2

2

t1

1

!t mmmm mmmm0

0

t0

0

t mmmm mmmm3

6

t1

4

t mmm mmmm2

5

t1

4

!t æææ

mmmm mmmm3

9

t3

9

t mmm mmmm3

9

!t1

7

t4

12

|mmmmmm

Page 129: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

129

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.475

Economy picking scales, arpeggios or melodies which consistently progress downwardly in pitchinvolves more upstrokes, since the first and last note on each string would be picked up. Play the example below.

Ä 44â 44

fingers:

picking:

1

10

t1

10

t2

11

!t3

12

t1

5

t3

7

t3

7

t3

7

t æææ

1

2

!t2

3

t1

2

t3

4

!t0

0

|===================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

mmmmm mmmmfingers:

picking:

1

10

t1

10

t mmmm mmmm2

11

!t3

12

t mmmm mmmm1

5

t3

7

t mmmm mmm3

7

t3

7

t æææ

mmmm mmmm1

2

!t2

3

t mmmm mmmm1

2

t3

4

!t0

0

|mmmm

When four or more consecutive strings are picked in the same direction, tilt the plane of the pick fromits base (opposite the tip) five to ten degrees so it can glide over the surface of the strings.

Ä 34â 34

↓strum:

fretting:

0

t↓

2

t↓

2

t↓

1

!t↓

0

t↑

3

t↓

0

t↑

1

t↑

2

t↑

2

t↑

0

t↑

3

t↓

2

! t↓

0

t↓

0

t↓

2

t↓

3

t↓

2

!t↑

3

t↑

3

t↑

0

t↑

0

t↑

3

t↓1

2

! t

Äâ ↑

0

t↓

3

t↓

2

t↓

0

t↓

1

t↓0

t1

t↑

1

t↑

2

t↑

3

t↑

3

t↑

1

t↑ ↓

0

t↓

2

t↓

2

t↓

1

!t↓

0

t↓0

t æøææø

↑2

!t↑

0

t↑

2

t↑

1

!t↑

2

t æææ

0

t↓

2

t↓

2

t↓

1

!t ≥↓00

tt

1

E I

32

4

1

Am I

32

1

Am7 I

32

43

4

2

D I

1

2

1

G I

3 4

3

2

1

C I

2

1

F I

4

11

3

1

E I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 41

E I

32

1

E I

32

4

1

Am I

32

1

Am7 I

32

43

4

2

D I

1

2

1

G I

3 4

3

2

1

C I

2

1

F I

4

11

3

1

E I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 41

E I

32

SWEEP PICKING

Sweep picking will be discussed soon in Level 2.

Page 130: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

130

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.480

Ä !!! 98â 98

d12

t9

t11

t9

t12

t12

t11

t9

t↑

1

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

12

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

12

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

12

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

Ä !!!â 11

t↑

12

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

5

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

12

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↓

12

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

Ä !!!

â 52

0

«t «t «t

4

t3

d

2

23

«t «t«t9

4

40

«t «t «t

2

2

«t «t «t0665

«t «t «t «t2

23

«t «t «t42

«t «t

022

«t «t «t

Ä !!!

â0

119

ttt↓

12

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

12

12

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

12

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

9

t↑

10

t↓

9

t↑

10

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

12

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

12

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

For each of the chords in this line, pick the bass note and pluck the other notes with the remaining fingers of your plucking hand.

A II

4

1

2

D/F# I

43

2

E I

3

2

F#m7 I

3 4

2

C#m V

3 2

D/F# I

43

E I

3

1 1 1

A I

1

1

E IX

3

Alternate Picking Study #1

Cantata 147 (Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring) by J.S. Bach

tec 1.480 tec 1.480

Page 131: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

131

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.481

Ä !!! 98â 98

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

17

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

12

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

12

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

12

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

9

t↓

Ä !!!â 11

t↑

12

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

21

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

10

t↑

9

t↓

11

t↑

12

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↓

12

t↑

12

t↓

11

t↑

Ä !!!

â022

«t «t «t

4

«t «t «t

2

23

«t «t«t4

4

40

«t «t «t

2

2

«t «t «t

0665

«t «t «t «t æ

ææ2

23

«t «t «t

42

«t «t

022

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27

12

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1 1

A I

1

For each of the chords in this line, pick the bass note and pluck the other notes with the remaining fingers of your plucking hand.

1

A/G# I

11

3

2

D/F# I

43

2

E I

3

2

F#m7 I

3 4

2

C#m V

3 2

D/F# I

43

E I

3

1 1 1

A I

1

1

E IX

3

Alternate Picking Study #1, Cantata 147 (continued)

tec 1.481 tec 1.481

Page 132: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

132

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.482

Ä !!! 98â 98

9

t↓

9

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12

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11

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12

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Alternate Picking Study #1, Cantata 147 (continued)

tec 1.482 tec 1.482

Page 133: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

133

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.483

Ä !!! 98â 98 12

t↓

10

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12

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9

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â11

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æææ12

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c« c«

Alternate Picking Study #1, Cantata 147 (continued)

tec 1.483 tec 1.483

Page 134: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

134

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.485

Ä !!! 98â 98

d12

t9

t11

t9

t12

t12

t11

t9

t↑

1

9

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For each of the chords in this line, pick the bass note and pluck the other notes with the remaining fingers of your plucking hand.

A II

4

1

2

D/F# I

43

2

E I

3

2

F#m7 I

3 4

2

C#m V

3 2

D/F# I

43

E I

3

1 1 1

A I

1

1

E IX

3

Economy Picking Study #1Cantata 147 (Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring) by J.S. Bach.

This exerciseis the same as the previous one, Alternate Picking Exercise 1, except it uses economy picking.

tec 1.485 tec 1.485

Page 135: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

135

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.486

Ä !!! 98â 98

12

t↓

11

t↓

9

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↓

12

t↑

12

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11

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17

9

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4

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1 1

A I

1

For each of the chords in this line, pick the bass note and pluck the other notes with the remaining fingers of your plucking hand.

1

A/G# I

11

3

2

D/F# I

43

E I

3

2

F#m7 I

3 4

2

C#m V

3 2

D/F# I

43

E I

3

1 1 1

A I

1

1

E IX

3

Economy Picking Study #1, Cantata #147 (continued)

tec 1.486 tec 1.486

Page 136: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

136

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Ä !!! 98â 98

9

t↑

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

9

t↑

12

t↑

12

t↑

12

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11

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31

12

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Economy Picking Study #1, Cantata #147 (continued)

tec 1.487 tec 1.487

Technique 1.487

Page 137: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

137

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.488

Ä !!! 98â 98 12

t↓

10

t↑

12

t↓

9

t↓

12

t↑

11

t↓

12

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51

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Economy Picking Study #1, Cantata #147 (continued)

tec 1.488 tec 1.488

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138

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.550

SIDE OF HAND MUTING(WITH THE PICKING HAND)

This technique is used to mute entire chords with the picking hand. The mute is performed with the sideor edge of the hand from the base of the little finger to the heel of the palm. The side of the hand must contactthe vibrating part of the strings, but it must do so as close to the bridge as possible. The more the side of the handis moved away from the bridge, the more the notes are sharpened (which is not desirable).

Muting causes the notes to sharpen very slightly, even if performed by muting as close to the bridge aspossible, since, to some degree, the string vibrates from the side of the hand to the headnut. Technically, to playa side-of-hand muted guitar part more perfectly in tune, you would need to tune the strings slightly flat incomparison to their unmuted pitch. This would compensate for the sharpening effect of the muting. AlthoughI have never heard of anyone doing so, I'm sure someone has been diligent enough to make this tuningcompensation in preparation for a recording.

It is difficult to manipulate the pick while performing this muting technique. Since the side of the pickinghand must remain in contact with the strings, you must develop the ability to move the pick with the thumb andindex finger, without moving the side of the hand which is muting. To do this, the pick must be held betweenthe thumb and the index finger. It should contact them on the “fingerprint” and “thumbprint” areas.

The picking motion is made by bending the thumb and index finger side of the hand without moving theside of the hand which is contacting the strings. While perfecting this technique, be very conscious of the baseof the little finger where it contacts the first string at the bridge. You should be able to feel the 90° angle wherethe first string meets the bridge piece, on the side of the first string opposite the second string. Be certain thatthe base of the little finger stays in consistent contact with the first string at the bridge.

Electric guitar tone for this technique usually contains more treble. Your tone control on the guitar wouldusually turned up higher (75% to full on). The electric guitar pickup selection for muting would more often bethe bridge and/or middle pickups, also to produce more treble. Muting reduces treble, so these settings areappropriate compensations.

Reverb and wah wah are often used along with this muting technique in Reggae. The wah wah is moveddown on the beat, which increases treble on the beat. Reverb helps to compensate for the shortness of the chordscaused by the muting. I still prefer the old fashioned spring reverb, maybe because that's what I've heard on theclassic recordings from the fifties through the seventies.

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139

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.551

Ä !! 44â 44

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Reggae Side-Of-Hand Muting

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140

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.610

INTRODUCTION TOBLUE NOTES AND BENDING

Melody is usually based on chord tones. It is commonly a decoration of chord tones, using other scaletones and chromatic tones as decoration.

Major chords sound happy. Minor chords sound sad. Certain notes of a chord can be lowered (by pitch)in the melody to suggest a feeling of sadness or other form of discontent. These lowerd notes are called bluenotes. When the accompaniment part (such as rhythm guitar) plays a major chord and the melody (vocal, leadguitar, etc.) plays a minor chord note against it, a “blue” feeling is expressed.

Blue notes may be slurred by hammering or bending up (in pitch) to the chord tone. This accounts formuch of the expression used in blues-related styles. Blue notes may be bent partially or completely to the chordtone.

To bend a note, keep the base of the first finger in contact with the lower edge of the fretboard. Bendthe string toward the middle of the neck. Notes on the first and second string should be bent up. Notes on thefifth and sixth string should be bent down. Notes on the two middle strings can be bent either way.

Bend the string by raising the side of the hand between the little finger and the wrist for the most part,not by straightening the finger. More detail to the bending technique, which differs when bending down andwhen bending up follows below.

During a downward bend (toward the first string side of the fretboard), move the side of the hand(between the little finger and the wrist) toward the front of the neck. Looking into your palm, you should seethe palm move toward in front of the neck as the hand rotates counter-clockwise.

During an upward bend (toward the sixth string side of the fretboard), move the side of the hand (betweenthe little finger and the wrist) toward the back of the neck. Looking into your palm, you should see the handrotating clockwise, as the palm moves behind the neck.

Blue Note Example. In the example below, the first note is a lowered version of a chord tone, whichis hammered into the chord tone that follows it. The notes with a sharp symbol below them (#) are slurred bybending slightly. They should be bent a half step or less.

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140

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE 141

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.640

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© 1998 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

Diagonal Thirds Stretching Exercisetec 1.640 tec 1.640

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142

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.690

COORDINATED ATTACKOne of the most important technical requirements for speed on the guitar is a coordinated attack. The

two hands must work together so that the precise events that must occur to sound a note happen at the same time.

With the fretting hand the event is the completion of adequate pressure with the fretting finger(s). Asa finger is in the process of fretting a note, pressure is applied to the string as the finger gets closer to the fretboard.When the pressure is great enough to assure that the note will not buzz or be muted, the note is ready to be pickedor plucked. The action of picking or plucking should have already begun, so it is coordinated with the fretting.It is ideal to be sensitive to the point of when adequate pressure has been applied, so time and energy can beconserved.

The picking hand event is the precise moment that the pick or finger lets go of the string it has pickedor plucked. At that moment, the note(s) must be fretted with adequate pressure because the string is now goingto sound.

Your brain sends electric impulses to your nerves and muscles to control these events. Imagine a surgeof electrical energy moving down each arm to the fingers involved in the technique. Imagine the culminationof the electrical impulses as the point of adequate pressure with the fretting hand and the letting go of the stringwith the picking hand. By trial and error, align the impulses to in turn align the fretting and picking in time.

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143

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.691

Ä !!!! 44â 44

fretting:

picking:

12

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fretting hand

to Coda

Coordinated Attack Study #1Moto Perpetuo On The "B" and "E" Strings

This style of picking will be described soon. Pick alternately down-up when you stay on a string. Pick in the direction of a new string you are moving to.

tec 1.691 tec 1.691

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144

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.692

Ä !!!! 44â 44picking:

fretting:

5

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0

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1

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7

t2↑

0

t0↓

7

t2↑

Ä !!!!

â11

t4↓

7

t1↑

0

t0↑

7

t1↓

12

t4↑

9

t1↓

0

t0↑

9

t1↓

40

14

t4↑

11

t1↓

0

t0↑

11

t1↓

12

t4↑

9

t1↓

0

t0↑

9

t1↓

11

t4↑

7

t1↓

0

t0↑

7

t1↓

9

t4↑

6

t1↓

0

t0↑

6

t1↓

7

t2↑

2

t2↓

0

t0↑

4

t1↓

0

|0↑

Coordinated Attack Study #1 (continued)

tec 1.692 tec 1.692

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145

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.693

Ä !!!!â

Ω øΩΩ ø

fretting:

picking:

12

t4↓

0

t0↑

12

t4↑

0

t0↓

9

t1↑

0

t0↓

9

t1↑

0

t0↓

44

12

t4↓

0

t0↑

12

t4↓

0

t0↑

9

t1↓

0

t0↑

9

t1↑

0

t0↓

12

t1↓

0

t0↑

14

t3↑

0

t0↓

10

t2↑

0

t0↓

9

t1↑

0

t0↓

12

t1↓

0

t0↑

14

t3↑

0

t0↓

10

t2↑

0

t0↓

9

t1↑

0

t0↓

Ä !!!!â

1↓11

t0↑0

t2↑

12

t0↓0

t4↑

14

t0↑

0

t1↓

10

t0↑

0

t48

12

t4↓

0

t0↑

9

t1↓

0

t0↑

10

t4↓

0

t0↑

7

t1↓

0

t0↑

4

t1↓

0

t0↑

5

t2↑

0

t0↓

5

t1↑

0

t0↓

7

t3↑

0

t0↓

æøææø5

t1↑

0

t0↓

9

t1↑

0

t0↓

10

t2↑

0

t0↓

12

t4↑

Ä !!!!

â

5

t4↑

0

t0↓

1

t1↑

0

t0↓

2

t2↑

0

t0↓

2

t2↑

52

æææ0

Ab

1212

0↑

zzharm.

33

# # # #

Ä 44

â 44

d|

8

ip

tI

10

m

t

9

a

t

8

« « « d|3

ip

tI

5

m

t

4

a

t

3

« « « d|

5

ip

tI

7

m

t

5

a

t

5

« « « d|0

p i

tI

7

m

t

5

a

t

4

« « «p

d|1

i

tI

3

m

t

2

a

t1

« «« « d|

8

ip

tI

10

m

t

9

a

t

8

« « « æ

ææp

d|1

i

tI

3

m

t

2

a

t1

« « « d|3

ip

tI

5

m

t

4

a

t

3

« « «

(Go back to the beginning. At the Coda symbol: ,go to the ending section shown below).

To Coda

Coda

plucking hand

1

C VIII

43

2 1

G III

43

21

Am V

4

2 2

Em IV

21

4

1

F I

43

2 1

C VIII

43

2 1

C VIII

43

2 1

G III

43

2

Coordinated Attack Study #1 (continued)

Coordinated Attack Study #2excerpt from Pachelbel's Canon

tec 1.693 tec 1.693

Page 146: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

146

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.694

Ä 44â 44

Û3

17

t1

15

t1

13

3

15

t1

13

t1

12

2

13

t1

12

t1

10

3

12

t1

10

t1

8

t Û3

10

t1

8

t1

7

t Û2

8

t1

7

t1

5

t Û3

7

t1

5

t1

3

t Û3

5

t1

3

t1

1

t Û3

3

t1

1

t1

0

t Û2

1

t1

0

t1

3

t Û3

0

t1

3

t1

1

t Û3

3

t1

1

t0

0

t

ÄâÛ

1

1

t0

0

t2

2

t Û0

0

t2

2

t0

0

t Û2

2

t0

0

t3

3

t Û0

0

t3

3

t2

2

t æææ

Û

3

t3

2

t2

0

t0

Û

2

t2

0

t0

3

t3

Û

0

t0

3

t3

2

t2

0

t0

Äâ 2

Û17

t1

16

! t3

18

t1

Û16

t3

18

t2

17

t3

Û18

t2

17

t1

15

t3

Û17

t1

15

t1

13

t3

Û15

t1

13

t1

12

t2

Û13

t1

12

t1

10

t3

Û12

t1

10

t1

9

! t2

Û10

t1

9

t2

10

t1

Û9

! t2

10

t1

9

t2

Û10

t1

9

t1

7

t3

Û9

t1

7

t1

5

t3

Û7

t1

5

t1

4

t

Äâ 2

Û1

t1

0

t1

2

t3

Û0

t1

2

t1

1

! t2

Û

2

t1

1

t3

3

t1

Û1

t3

3

t2

2

t æææ

3

Û

3

t2

2

t0

0

t2

Û2

t0

0

t3

3

t0

Û0

t3

3

t2

2

t0

0

t

Speed Exercise:the 123 scale pattern beginning on one string

tec 1.694 tec 1.694

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147

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.730

tec 1.730 tec 1.730

POSTURE EXERCISES FOR THEINDEX AND LITTLE FINGERS

These exercises train the the index and little fingers to stay separated from fingers next to them. Bytraining your “outside” fingers (index and little fingers) to stay separated at the middle knuckle, the tips of theoutside fingers can more easily reach to adjacent strings and frets.

Reaching To The Two Adjacent Frets With The Index FingerPlay the sequence indicated by each row of diagrams below in order, reading from left to right. Keep

the middle, ring and little fingers fretted, as shown. Play this sequence keeping the first finger very close to thestrings. When your hand or fingers tire, rest and massage them.

fretting the adjacent fret with the index finger

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

reaching two frets with the index finger

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

Page 148: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

148

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.731

Reaching To The Two Adjacent Frets With The Little FingerPlay the sequence indicated by each row of diagrams below in order, reading from left to right. Keep

the index, middle, and ring fingers fretted, as shown. Play this sequence keeping the little finger very close tothe strings. When your hand or fingers tire, rest and massage them.

reaching one fret with the little finger

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

4 4 4 4 4

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

4 4 4 4 4

reaching two frets with the little finger

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

4 4 4 4 4

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

VIII

3

1

2

4 4 4 4 4

Page 149: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

149

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.732

CLOSENESS AND CLEARING EXERCISEON ALL SIX STRINGS

This exercise was presented earlier, on strings 1 and 2 only. It trains your fretting hand to hover closeto the strings and to clear notes on adjacent smaller strings. Play the exercise exactly as written below, readingthe diagrams in sequence from left to right in each row, then down to the next row.

VIII1

VIII

1

VIII

2

1

VIII

2

3

1

VIII

4

2

3

1

As you begin to the next row, do not lift the middle, ring nor little fingers. From each diagram to the next,only move one finger.

VIII1

VIII

1

VIII

2

1

VIII

2

3

1

VIII

4

2

3

1

4

2

3

4

3

44

2

3

As you begin to the next row, do not lift the middle, ring nor little fingers. From each diagram to the next,only move one finger.

4

2

3

VIII1

VIII

1

VIII

2

1

VIII

2

3

1

VIII

4

2

3

1

4

2

3

4

3

44

2

3

As you begin to the next row, do not lift the middle, ring nor little fingers. From each diagram to the next,only move one finger.

4

2

3

VIII1

VIII

1

VIII

2

1

VIII

2

3

1

VIII

4

2

3

1

4

2

3

4

3

44

2

3

Page 150: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

150

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.733

As you begin to the next row, do not lift the middle, ring nor little fingers. From each diagram to the next,only move one finger. One note is omitted on this string, so the exercise plays the chromatic scale, which isequivalent to an every-fret scale.

4

2

3

VIII

1

VIII

2

1

VIII

2

3

1

VIII

4

2

3

1

4

3

44

2

3

As you begin to the next row, do not lift the middle, ring nor little fingers. From each diagram to the next,only move one finger.

4

3

4

2

3

VIII1

VIII

1

VIII

2

1

VIII

2

3

1

VIII

4

2

3

1

4

2

3

4

3

4

2

Page 151: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

151

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.810

SLURSSlurs are groups of two or more notes sounded in one picking of the string. In order from loudest, most

percussive attack to softest, they are: hammer-on, pull-off, slide, bend and tremolo bar bend. The slide techniquewas covered earlier. Slight bending was introduced earlier with blue notes. Much more detailed instruction onbending will be given in Level 2 of this course.

Hammer-on (abbreviated “hammer”)

A hammer-on is a slur executed by smashing a string onto the fretboard with a fingertip against the fretas with a normally fretted note. This is done where a lower-pitched, fretted note or open note on the same stringis already sounding. To minimize the distance from which your finger must start to hammer, place the fingertipaccurately and move it quickly.

Pull-OffA pull off is a slur performed by fretting and picking a note and then applying a downward tension,

scraping and plucking the string as you leave it with the fretting-hand finger. Curve the path in which the fingerleaves the fretboard to avoid sounding an adjacent string as you pass by it.

In my music notation upper case (capital) versions of “H” and “P” are used to represent hammer and pull-off.

OPEN STRING HAMMER, PULL OFF EXERCISE.

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152

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.811

Ä 44

â 44

0231

«t «t «t «t

02220

«t «t «t «!t «t

022100

ttt!ttt tttttt

3

P

t

0

3

t

3

0P

t

0

3

t

2

0

t

0

2P

#t

2

0

t2

022100

«t «t «t «!t «t«t

355433

«t «t «#t «t«t «t

02220

ttt!tt ttttt

0

H

t

2

0

t

0

2

H

t

2

0

t

0

2

H

t

2

0

t

0

2

t0

Ä

â 0231

«t «t «t «t

02220

«t «t «t «!t «t

022100

ttt!ttt tttttt

3

P

t

0

3

t

3

0

P

"t

2

3

t

0

2

#t

2

0

t

0

2

P

t0

022100

«t «t «t «!t«t «t

355433

«t «t «#t «t «t«t

02220

ttt!tt æ

ææAAAAA

a

2

D I

3

1 4

A I

321

E I

32

1

E I

322

1

G I

3 44

A I

32

2

D I

3

1 4

A I

321

E I

32

1

E I

322

1

G I

3 44

A I

32

Open Pentatonic Slur Exercisetec 1.811 tec 1.811

Page 153: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

153

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.812

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 4

!t

1

P

0

t

5

t

2

0

tP

6

! t

3

0

tP

7

t

4

0

tP

1

æø

ææø10

t

4

P

0

t

9

! t

3

P

0

t

8

# t

2

P

0

t

7

t

1

P

0

t Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 4

! t1

P

0

t5

t2

0

tP

6

" t3

0

tP

7

# t4

0

tP

æø

ææø10

t4

0

tP

9

! t3

0

tP

8

# t2

0

tP

7

t1

0

tP

Äâb

0

c d tY5

Ω øΩΩ ø

H

1

4

!t0

tH

2

5

t0

tH

3

6

! t0

t7

tH

4

0

t æøææø

H

10

t4

0

tH

3

9

! t

0

t8

# tH

2

0

tH

1

7

t0

t æææ

H

1

4

!t b c

Ä 44â 44Ω øΩΩ øÛ

4

!t1

0

tP H

4

t Û5

t2H

0

tHP

5

tH

Û6

! t3

0

tP H

6

7

tH

4

0

tHP

7

t9

æøææø

Û10

t4

P

0

tH

10

9

! tH

3P

0

tH

9

H

8

# t2

P

0

tH

8

tHÛ

7

t1

P

0

tH

7

t

Ä

â

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø

Û

4

! t1

0

tHP

4

t Û

5

tH

2

P

0

tH

5

t Û

6

" tH

30

tHP

6

t Û

7

# tH4

0

tHP

7

t11

æø

ææø

ÛH

10

t4

0

tP

10

tH

Û

9

! tH P3

0

tH

9

t ÛH

8

# tP

20

tH

8

t Û

7

tH1

0

tP

7

tH

Open-String Slur Exercisestec 1.812 tec 1.812

Page 154: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

154

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.813

Ä 34

â 3411

577555

tIttttt c

577555

3

tIttttt d tI

1

1

5

t4H

3

t1

5

t3

7

t3

S

5

t1

5777

tItt!t c

5777

5

tIttt d tI1 4

8

tH

1

5

t3

7

tH

1

5

t3

7

tH

Ä

â577555

tIttttt c

577555

5

tIttttt d tI

1

5

H

7

t3

5

t1

H

7

t3

5

t1

7

t3

H

5777

tItt!t c

5777

5

tIttt d tI1

7

t3

H

5

t1

7

t3

H

5

t1

H

8

t4

Ä

â577555

tIttttt c

577555 8

tIttttt d

tY4

9

1 4 1 3

PPP

5

t

8

t

5

t

7

t

5

t1

5777

tItt!t c7755777 8

tIttt d tY4 1 3 1 3 1

PPP

5

t

7

t

5

t

7

t

5

t

Ä

â577555

tIttttt c

577555

7

tIttttt d tY

3

1 3

1

5

t3

P

7

t1

5

t3

P

7

t1

5

tP

5777

tItt!t c

5777

7

tIttt d tI3

æ

ææP

5

t1

7

t3

5

t3

S

3

t1

5

t3

1 1

Am V

4

11

3 3

D V

33

1

Am D

Am D

Am D

Pentatonic Scale Slur Exercisestec 1.813 tec 1.813

Page 155: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

155

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.814

Ä 128

â 128Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1

5

t1

5

t1

5

t

577555

«t «t «t «t «t«t

1

5

t4

8

tH

1

5

tP

1

5

t3

7

tH

1

5

tP

1 7

3

7

t3

7

t3

7

t

7675

«t «!t «t «t1

5

t3

7

tH

1

5

t1

P

5

#tH

3

7

t1

P

5

t

Ä

â 3

7

t3

7

t3

7

t

7555

«t «t «t «t1

5

tH

3

7

t1

P

5

t1

5

tH

4

8

t1

P

5

t1 9

3

7

t3

7

t3

7

t8767

«$t «t «!t «t4

8

t1

5

tP H

4

8

t4

8

t1

P

5

tH

4

8

t

Ä

â 1

5

t1

5

t1

5

t56575

«t «t «t «t «t3

7

t1

P

5

tH

3

7

t3

7

t1

5

tP

3

7

tH

2 1

æø

ææø5

t1

5

t1

5

t1

577555

«t «t «t «t «t«t

7

t3

P

5

t1

7

t3

6

"t2

P

5

t1P

8

t4

1 1

Am V

4

11

3 3

2

1

E7 V

4

1 1

Am V

32

1

4

E7#9 VI

3

1

2

Dm7 V

3

111 1

Am V

4

11

3

Pentatonic Scale Slur Exercises (continued)tec 1.814 tec 1.814

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156

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Ä 44â 44

Ûfingers: 1

5

t2

6

! t3

7

t Û2

6

t3

7

t4

8

t Û2

7

t3

8

t4

9

! t Û3

8

# t4

9

! t1

5

t Û4

9

! t1

5

t2

6

!t Û1

5

#t2

6

!t2

7

t Û1

6

t2

7

t3

8

t Û2

7

t3

8

t4

9

!t

Äâ

Û

8

t3

9

!t4

5

t1

Û

9

t4

5

t1

6

!t2

Û

5

#t1

6

!t2

7

t2

Û

6

t1

7

t2

8

!t3

Û

7

t2

8

!t3

9

t4

Û

8

t3

9

t4

5

t1

Û9

t4

5

t1

6

!t2

Û5

#t1

6

!t2

7

t2

Äâ

Û6

!t1

7

t2

8

!t3

Û7

#t2

8

!t3

9

t4

Û8

t3

9

t4

6

t1

Û9

t4

6

t1

7

!t2

Û6

t1

7

!t2

8

t3

Û7

t2

8

t3

9

!t4

Û8

#t3

9

!t4

5

t1

Û9

t4

5

t1

6

! t2

Ä 44â 44

Û5

t1

6

! t2

7

t2

Û6

t1

7

t2

8

t3

Û7

t2

8

t3

9

! t4

Û10

t4

9

" t3

8

# t2

Û39

" t28

t17

" t Û28

# t17

" t16

" t Û27

# t16

" t4

10

t Û16

t4

10

t3

9

" t

Äâ

Û4

10

t3

9

" t2

8

t Û3

9

t2

8

t1

7

"t Û2

8

#t1

7

"t1

6

t Û2

7

t1

6

t4

9

t Û6

t1

9

t4

8

"t3

Û9

#t4

8

"t3

7

t2

Û8

t3

7

t2

6

"t1

Û7

#t2

6

"t1

10

t4

tec 1.841 tec 1.841Chromatic Scale Exercises

Technique 1.841

Page 157: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

157

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Ä 44â 44

Û6

"t1

10

t4

9

t3

Û10

t4

9

t3

8

"t2

Û9

#t3

8

"t2

7

t1

Û8

t2

7

t1

6

"t1

Û2

7

t1

6

"t4

10

t Û1

6

t4

10

t3

9

"t Û4

10

#t3

9

"t2

8

t Û3

9

t2

8

t1

7

t

Äâ

Û

8

t2

7

t1

6

"t1

Û

7

#t2

6

"t1

10

t4

Û

6

t1

10

t4

9

"t3

Û

10

#t4

9

"t3

8

t2

æææ

Û

9

"t3

8

t2

7

t1

Û

8

t2

7

t1

6

" t1

Û

7

# t2

6

" t1

5

t1

6

t2

Ä 44â 44

5

t1

6

! t1

7

t2

8

t3

6

t1

7

t2

8

t3

9

! t4

7

t2

8

# t3

9

! t4

5

t1

8

# t3

9

! t4

5

t1

6

!t2

9

! t4

5

t1

6

!t2

7

t3

5

#t1

6

!t1

7

t2

8

t3

6

t1

7

t2

8

t3

9

!t4

7

t2

8

#t3

9

!t4

5

t1

Ä 44â 44

8

t3

9

!t4

5

t1

6

!t2

9

t4

5

#t1

6

!t2

7

t3

5

#t1

6

!t1

7

t2

8

!t3

6

t1

7

#t2

8

"t3

9

#t4

7

t2

9

t3

5

t4

6

!t1

8

!t3

9

t4

5

#t1

6

!t2

9

t4

5

#t1

6

!t2

7

t3

5

#t1

6

!t1

7

t2

8

!t3

Äâ 6

!t1

7

t2

8

!t3

9

t4

7

#t2

8

!t3

9

t4

6

t1

8

t3

9

t4

6

t1

7

!t2

9

t4

6

#t1

7

!t2

8

t3

6

t1

7

!t2

8

t3

9

!t4

7

t2

8

#t3

9

!t4

5

t1

8

#t3

9

!t4

5

t1

6

! t2

9

t4

5

# t1

6

! t2

7

t3

Chromatic Scale Exercises (continued)tec 1.842 tec 1.842

Technique 1.842

Page 158: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

158

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.843

Ä 44â 44 5

t1

6

! t1

7

t2

8

t3

6

t1

7

t2

8

t3

9

! t4

7

t2

8

# t3

9

! t4

10

t4

9

" t3

8

# t2

7

t1

6

" t1 3

8

t2

7

t1

6

" t4

10

t2

7

# t1

6

" t4

10

t3

9

" t1

6

t4

10

# t3

9

" t2

8

t4

10

# t3

9

" t2

8

t1

7

"t

Äâ 9

" t3

8

t2

7

"t1

6

t1

8

#t3

7

"t2

6

t1

9

t4

7

t2

6

t1

9

t4

8

"t3

6

t1

9

#t4

8

"t3

7

t2

9

t4

8

"t3

7

t2

6

"t1

8

t3

7

#t2

6

!t1

10

#t4

7

t2

6

"t1

10

t4

9

t3

6

t1

10

t4

9

t3

8

"t2

Äâ 10

t4

9

t3

8

"t2

7

t1

9

#t3

8

"t2

7

t1

6

"t1

8

t3

7

#t2

6

!t1

10

#t4

7

t2

6

"t1

10

t4

9

"t3

6

"t1

10

t4

9

"t3

8

t2

10

#t4

9

"t3

8

t2

7

t1

9

t3

8

t2

7

t1

6

"t1

8

t3

7

#t2

6

"t1

10

t4

Äâ

7

t2

6

"t1

10

t4

9

"t3

6

t1

5

#t4

9

"t3

8

t2

10

#t4

9

"t3

8

t2

7

t1

9

t3

8

t2

7

t1

6

" t1

æææ8

t3

7

t2

6

" t1

5

t1

6

t2

b

Chromatic Scale Exercises (continued)tec 1.843 tec 1.843

Page 159: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

159

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.844

Ä 44â 44fingers:picking:

8

t↓1

8

t↓1

9

! t↑2

9

!t↓2

10

t↑3

10

t↓3

11

!t↑4

11

!t↓4

7

t↑1

7

t↓1

8

t↑1

8

!t↓1

9

!t↑2

9

t↓2

10

t↑3

10

t↓3

11

!t↑4

11

!t↓4

7

t↑1

7

t↓1

8

!t↑1

8

!t↓1

9

t↑2

9

t↓2

↑3

10

t↓3

10

t↑4

11

!t↓4

11

!t↑1

7

t↓2

8

t↑1

8

!t↓2

9

!t

Äâ 9

t↑2

10

t↓3

10

t↑3

11

! t↓4

7

!t↑1

7

t↓1

8

t↑1

8

t↓1

9

!t↑2

9

! t↓2

10

t↑3

10

t↓3

11

! t↑4

11

! t↓4

t

11

" t↑4

11

" t↑4

10

t↓3

10

t↑3

9

" t↓2

9

" t↑2

8

t↓1

8

t↑1

7

t↓1

7

!t↑1

11

" t↓4

10

#t↑3

10

t↓3

9

t↑2

9

" t↓2

8

"t↑1

Äâ 8

t↓2

7

t↑1

11

"t↓4

11

"t↑4

10

t↓3

10

t↑3

9

t↓2

9

t↑2

8

"t↓1

8

"t↑1

7

t↓1

7

t↑1

11

"t↓4

11

"t↑4

10

t↓3

10

t↑3

9

t↓2

9

!t↑2

8

"t↓1

8

#t↑1

7

t↓1

7

t↑1

11

"t↓4

11

"t↑4

æææ10

t↓3

10

t↑3

9

"t↓2

9

"t↑2

8

t↓1

8

t↑1

7

t↓1

Ä 44â 44fingers:

picking:

8

t↓1

8

t↑1

9

!t↓2

9

! t↑2

10

t↓3

10

t↑3

11

!t↓4

11

!t↑4

7

t↓1

7

t↓1

8

"t↑1

8

t↑1

9

!t↓2

9

#t↓2

10

t↑3

10

t↑3

↓4

11

!t↓4

11

!t↓1

7

t↑1

7

t↓1

8

"t↓1

8

"t↑2

9

#t↑2

9

#t

10

t↓3

10

t↓3

11

!t↑4

11

!t↑4

7

t↓1

8

t↓2

9

!t↑2

8

!t↑1

Chromatic Perfect Fourths

Chromatic Perfect Fourths, Alternating Up And Down

More Rolling Technique Exercisestec 1.844 tec 1.844

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160

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.845

Ä 44â 44fingers:

picking: ↓2

9

t↓3

10

t↑4

11

" t↑3

10

t↓1

7

!t↓1

7

# t↑1

8

t↑1

8

t↓2

9

!t↓2

9

! t↑3

10

t↑3

10

t↓4

11

" t↓4

11

" t t

11

" t↑4

11

" t↑4

10

t↓3

10

t↓3

9

! t↑2

9

!t↑2

8

#t↓1

8

# t↓1

↑1

7

t↑1

7

!t↑3

10

#t↓4

11

" t↑3

10

t↑2

9

t↓1

8

"t↓2

9

" t

Äâ 8

t↑2

7

t↑1

11

"t↑4

11

"t↓4

10

t↑3

10

t↑3

9

t↓2

9

t↓2

8

"t↑1

8

"t↑1

7

t↓1

7

t↓1

11

"t↑4

11

"t↑4

10

t↓3

10

t↓3

9

t↑2

9

!t↑2

8

#t↓1

8

"t↓1

7

t↑1

7

t↑1

11

"t↑4

11

"t↓4

æææ10

t↑3

10

t↑3

9

! t↓2

9

!t↓2

8

#t↑1

8

# t↑1

7

t↓1

Ä 44â 44fingers:picking:

8

t↓1

8

t↑1

11

"t↑4

10

t↓3

8

t↑1

8

"t↓1

10

t↑3

10

t↓3

8

"t↑1

8

"t↓1

10

t↑3

10

t↓3

8

t↑1

8

t↓1

10

t↑3

11

" t↓4

8

t↑1

8

t↓1

11

" t↑4

11

" t↓4

8

t↑1

8

t↑1

11

t↓4

10

t↑3

8

t↓1

8

"t↑1

10

t↓3

10

t↑3

8

t↓1

8

"t↑1

10

t↓3

10

t↑3

Äâ 8

"t↓1

8

t↑1

10

t↓3

11

"t↑4

8

t↓1

8

t↑1

6

t↓4

6

" t↑1

æææ8

A↓3

Pentatonic Scale In Perfect Fourths

More Rolling Technique Exercises: Chromatic Perfect Fourths (continued)

tec 1.845 tec 1.845

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161

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.869

fingers:

6

4

P

3

1

3

1

6

4

P

3

1

3

1

6

4

P

3

1

5

3

6

4

P

5

3

3

1

1

4

2

H

5

3

3

1

4

2

5

3

H

3

1

5

2

S

7

2

6

1

8

3

P

6

1

7

2

6

1

8

3

P

6

1

8

3

P

6

1

7

3

6

2P

5

1

3

1

5

3P

3

1

5

3

4

2H

5

3

3

1

5

3P

3

1

5

3

4

2P

3

1

6

4

3

1

83

P

61

8

383

5

1

H

7

3

5

1

H

8

361

8

3

5

83

P

61

8

383

5

1

6

2

H

7

3

6

2

7

3

6

2

P

5

1

P

0

0

3

1

P

0

0

0

0

3

1

P

0

0

0

0

3

1

0

0

P

3

1

4

2

P

3

1

6

4

4

2

H

5

3

3

1

4

2

H

5

3

3

1

5

3

S

7

3

6

2

8

4

6

2

7

3

P

5

1

H

7

3

8

4

7

3

6

2

7

3

P

5

1

3

1

5

3

5

3

9

5

3

P

3

1

5

3

5

3

3

1

H

5

3

2

1

5

3

H

3

1

5

3

3

1P

0

0

0

0

3

1P

0

0

0

0

3

1P

0

0

3

1

4

2P

3

1

6

4

5

3

G7

C7 G7

D7 C7G7

tec 1.869 tec 1.869Pentatonic Slur Blues

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162

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.880

TRAVIS FINGERPICKINGThis fingerpicking style was named after Merle Travis, who was most renowned for developing and

popularizing it. It involves a steady bassline on the beat, plucked with the thumb. Other notes are played on thelast half of various beats, or occassionaly along with a bass note. Most commonly, if a note is played with a bassnote, it is on the first beat.

fretting hand plucking hand

Symbols to represent the fingers of the plucking hand are typically shown below or around the notes theypertain to in music notation. Each symbol is the first letter of a Spanish word which represents the finger, sinceclassical guitar developed in Spain. The symbols are shown below. The Spanish word “anular” is relation tothe word “annual” and relates to the word ring in regard to the earths “annual ring” around the sun.

symbol Spanish word English word

p pulgar thumb

i indice index finger

m medio middle finger

a anular ring finger

The wrist should be about two fingers width from the body of the guitar. The thumb and fingers of theplucking hand should move independently of the hand, as much as possible. The thumb should bend at its base,and should be extended toward the guitar neck to avoid interference with the index finger. Each plucking fingershould bend mostly at the tip joint, less at the middle joint and very little at the joint where it joins the hand.

With the rest stroke, a plucking finger comes to rest against the next larger string after plucking. Thethumb would come to rest against the next smaller string. After plucking a string with the free stroke, pluckingfingers curve away from the next larger string. Travis fingerpicking uses the free stroke.

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163

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.881

Ä ! 44â 44

320033

AAAAAA

32010

AAAAA

320033

AAAAAA

20023

AAAAA

Ä !â

022000||||||

020000||||||

32010

|||||2003

||||02210

|||||

32210

||||| æø

ææø20023

AAAAA æ

ææ320033

AAAAAA

Ä !â

Ω øΩΩ ø 3

t0

t3

t0

t3

t2

t3

t2

t3

t0

t3

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t

Ä !â

0

t2

t0

t0

t3

t2

t2

t0

t0

t2

t3

t2

t æøææø2

t0

t2

t0

t

2

1

G I

3 4

First, just strum the chords:

tec 1.881

4

2

1

C I

32

1

G I

3 4

2

D/F# I

4

3

tec 1.881

Em I

32

Now, finger the chords and pluck the bass notes with your thumb. Bend the thumb at its base, not at the tip segment.

Em7 I

2

3

2

1

C I

1

G/B I

3 4

1

Am I

32

1

Am7 I

32

4

2

D/F# I

4

3

2

1

G I

3 4

2

1

G I

3 4 4

2

1

C I

3 2

1

G I

3 42

D/F# I

4

3

Em I

32

Em7 I

2

3

2

1

C I

1

G/B I

3 4

1

Am I

32

1

Am7 I

32

42

D/F# I

4

3

Preparation For Travis Fingerpicking Exercise 1

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164

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.882

Ä ! 44â 44

02210

AAAAA

332010

AAAAAA

20210

AAAAA

12210

#AAAAA

2322

AAAA3232

AAAA

Ä !â

20033

AAAAA

10033

"AAAAA

2100

A!AAA0100

A!AAA33210

A#AAAA22100

AA!AAA

Ä !â

02210

AAAAA20033

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AAAAA42000

!AAAAA0232

AAAA2010

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Ä !â 1

123

#AAA#A0124

AAAA320033

AAAAAA

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!AAAAA

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AAA!AAA

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7410

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First, just strum the chords:

1

Am I

32

tec 1.882

4

2

1

C I

32

D9/F# I

1

3

1

Fma7 I

2

43

Dm I

1

2

4

Dm7/C I

1

2

43

tec 1.882

1

G/B I

3 4

Gm/Bb I

3

1

4

1

E I

32

1

E7 I

2 2

1

Fma7 I

43

1

E I

32

1

Am I

32 1

G/B I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

4

2

C#m7b5 IDm I

1

2

4

2

1

C/E I

2

1

F I

3

1

4

2

F#m7b5 I

1

2

1

G I

3

3

1

E7/G# I

2

1

Am I

32

1

E I

32

1

Am I

321

Am/9 V

3

Preparation For Travis Fingerpicking Exercise 2

Page 165: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

165

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.883

Ä ! 44â 44

0

t2

t0

t2

t3

t2

t3

t2

t2

t0

t2

t0

t1

# t2

t1

t1

t

Ä !â 0

t2

t0

t2

t3

t2

t3

t2

t2

t0

t2

t0

t1

" t0

t1

t0

t

Ä !â 2

t1

!t2

t0

t0

t1

!t0

t0

t3

t3

#t3

t3

t2

t2

t2

t2

t

Ä !â

0

t2

t0

t2

t2

t0

t2

t0

t3

t2

t3

0

t t4

! t2

t4

0

t t

1

Am I

32

Now, finger the chords and pluck the bass notes with your thumb. Bend the thumb at its base, not at the tip segment.

2

D9/F# I

1

3

1

Fma7 I

2

43

Dm I

1

2

4

Dm7/C I

1

2

43

1

G/B I

3 4

Gm/Bb I

3

1

4

1

E I

32

1

E7 I

2 2

1

Fma7 I

43

1

E I

32

1

Am I

32 1

G/B I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

4

2

C#m7b5 I

Preparation For Travis Fingerpicking Exercise 2 (continued)tec 1.883 tec 1.883

Page 166: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

166

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.884

Ä !â 0

t2

t0

t2

t2

t0

t2

t1

t3

#t2

t3

t2

t4

t2

t4

t2

t

Ä !

â3

t0

t3

t0

t4

! t0

t4

t0

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t

Ä !â

0

t2

t0

t2

t æææ0

A

Dm I

1

2

4

2

1

C/E I

2

1

F I

3

1

4

2

F#m7b5 I

1

2

1

G I

3

3

1

E7/G# I

2

1

Am I

32

1

E I

32

1

Am I

321

Am/9 V

3

Preparation For Travis Fingerpicking Exercise 2 (continued)tec 1.884 tec 1.884

Page 167: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

167

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.885

Ä ! 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ ø3tp

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

0

tp

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

2

tp

3

tp

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

0

tp p

2

tp

0

ti

2

tp

2

tp

0

t

Ä !

â0

tp

2

tp

0

ti

0

tp

0

tp

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti

2

tp

0

tp

0

tp

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

2

tp

æøææø2

tp

0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

0

tp

æææ3

20033

AAAAAA

Ä !

âΩ øΩΩ ø 3tp

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

0

tp

0

ti

2

tp

0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

0

tp

2

ti

Ä !

â0

tp

2

tp

0

ti

0

tp

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti

2

tp

0

tp

0

ti

0

tp

2

tp

2

ti

3

tp

2

tp

2

ti

æøææø2

tp

0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

0

tp

2

ti

æææ3

20033

AAAAAA

2

1

G I

3 4

Adding one note to the end of the second beat.

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 42

D/F# I

4

3

Em I

32

Adding notes to the end of the second and fourth beats.

Em7 I

2

3

2

1

C I

1

G/B I

3 4

1

Am I

32

1

Am7 I

32

4

2

D/F# I

4

3

2

1

G I

3 4

2

1

G I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

2

D/F# I

4

3

Em I

32

Em7 I

2

3

2

1

C I

1

G/B I

3 4

1

Am I

32

1

Am7 I

32

4

2

D/F# I

4

3

2

1

G I

3 4

Travis Fingerpicking Exercise #1tec 1.885 tec 1.885

Page 168: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

168

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.886

Ä ! 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ ø p3t

p

0

ti

0

tp

3

tm

3

tp

0

ti

0

t

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

1

tm

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

3

tm

0

tp

0

ti p

2

tp

0

ti

2

tp

2

tm

3

tp

0

ti

2

t

Ä !

â0

tp

2

tp

0

ti

0

tp

0

tm

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti

2

tp

3

tm

0

tp

0

ti

0

tp

2

tp

2

ti

3

tp

1

tm

2

tp

2

ti

æøææø2

tp

0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

3

tm

0

tp

2

ti

æææ

AAAAAA

320033

Ä ! 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ øa

3

3

ttp

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

3

tm

0

tp

0

ti

a

3

0

ttp

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

1

tm

2

tp

0

ti

3

3

ttpa

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

3

tm

0

tp

0

ti

2

3

ttpa

0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

3

tm

0

tp

2

ti

Ä !

â0

0

ttpa

2

tp

0

ti

0

tp

0

tm

0

tp

0

ti

a

3

0

ttp

2

tp

0

ti

2

tp

3

tm

0

tp

0

ti

a

0

0

ttp

2

tp

2

ti

3

tp

1

tm

2

tp

2

ti

æø

ææø2

3

ttpa

0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

3

tm

0

tp

2

ti

æ

ææ320033

AAAAAA

2

1

G I

3 4

Adding notes to the end of the second through fourth beats.

tec 1.886

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

2

D/F# I

4

3

tec 1.886

Em I

32

Adding notes to the end of the second through fourth beats and playing two notes on the first beat.

Em7 I

23

2

1

C I

1

G/B I

3 4

1

Am I

32

1

Am7 I

32

4

2

D/F# I

4

3

2

1

G I

3 4

2

1

G I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 42

D/F# I

4

3

Em I

32

Em7 I

23

2

1

C I

1

G/B I

3 4

1

Am I

321

Am7 I

32

4

2

D/F# I

4

32

1

G I

3 4

Travis Fingerpick Exercise #1 (continued)

Page 169: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

169

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.887

Ä ! 44â 44

0

tp

0

ta

2

tp

2

ti

0

tp

1

tm

2

tp

3

tp

0

ta

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

1

tm

2

tp

2

tp

0

ta

0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

1

tm

0

tp p

1

# ta0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

1

tm

1

tp

2

t

Ä !

â 0

tp

1

# ta

2

tp

3

ti

0

tp

1

tm

2

tp

3

tp

1

#ta

2

tp

3

ti

3

tp

1

tm

2

tp p

2

ta3

tp

0

ti

0

tp

2

tm

3

tp

0

tp

1

" ta3

tp

0

ti

0

tp

1

tm

3

tp

0

t

Ä !

â p

2

ta0

tp

1

!ti

0

tp

2

tm0

tp

1

tp

0

ta0

tp

1

!ti

0

tp

0

tm0

tp

1

t3

tp

0

ta

3

#tp

2

ti

3

tp

1

tm

3

tp

2

tp

0

ta

2

tp

1

!ti

2

tp

0

tm

2

tp

Ä !

ât0

p

t0a

t2

p

t2

i

t0

p

t1

m

t2

p

2

tp

3

ta

0

tp

0

ti

2

tp

3

tm

0

tp p

3

ta0

tp

2

ti

0

tp

3

tm

1

tp

2

tp

4

! ta0

tp

2

ti

0

tp

4

tm

0

tp

2

t

1

Am I

32

1

C/G I

3

2 2

D9/F# I

1

3

1

Fma7 I

2

43

Dm I

1

2

4

Dm7/C I

1

2

43

1

G/B I

3 4

Gm/Bb I

3

1

4

1

E I

32

1

E7 I

2 2

1

Fma7 I

43

1

E I

32

1

Am I

32 1

G/B I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

4

2

C#m7b5 I

Travis Fingerpicking Exercise #2tec 1.887 tec 1.887

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170

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.888

Ä ! 44â 44 0

tp

2

ta

2

tp

3

ti

0

tp

3

tm

2

tp p

2

ta

0

tp

0

ti

1

tp

2

tm

0

tp

0

t3

#tp

1

#ta

2

tp

1

ti

3

tp

1

tm

2

tp p

4

ta

0

tp

2

ti

1

tp

4

tm

0

tp

2

t

Ä !

â3

tp

3

ta

0

tp

0

ti

3

tp

3

tm

0

tp

4

! tp

0

ta

0

tp

0

ti

4

tp

3

tm

0

tp

0

tp

0

ta

2

tp

2

ti

0

tp

1

tm

2

tp

0

tp

0

ta

2

tp

1

!ti

0

tp

0

tm

2

tp

Ä !

â0

tp

0

ta

2

tp

2

ti

0

tp

1

tm

2

tp

æ

ææp

0

tp

7

ti

5

tm

0

ta

0

|

Dm I

1

2

4

2

1

C/E I

2

1

F I

3

1

4

2

F#m7b5 I

1

2

1

G I

3

3

1

E7/G# I

2

1

Am I

32

1

E I

32

1

Am I

32

let ring___________

1

Am/9 V

3

Travis Fingerpicking Exercise #2 (continued)tec 1.888 tec 1.888

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171

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.930

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THEFRETTING HAND

Index Finger (symbol: “1”).Advantages. The index is the finger used most often (1) as an “anchor” in hammers and pull-offs, (2)

as the barré, (3) for playing two notes in sequence on the same string to change position.

Disadvantages. It is usually used with its middle knuckle positioned out toward the head of the guitarand lying down toward the fretboard. Therefore, it has to move a great distance to form certain chords wherethe finger tips are bunched up in a small area.

Since it is the finger farthest toward the head of the guitar, bends with the index finger can not be aidedwith other fingers.

The Span Between The Index and Middle Fingers.Advantages. This is the widest span of the fretting hand fingers, allowing the index finger to reach far

out of position toward the head of the guitar. The span is especially wide if the middle knuckle of the index fingeris spread toward the head of the guitar.

Disadvantages. See disadvantages for the index finger above.

Middle Finger (symbol: “2”).Advantages. Bending may be aided with the index finger. The middle finger occasionally fingers two

consecutive notes on the same string to change position.

Disadvantages. Barréing is somewhat awkward with the middle finger. Even so, it is easier for thebeginning guitarist to bend the tip segment of the middle finger backwards than the tip segment of the ring finger.This flexibility allows the novice to do some barréing with the middle finger.

The Span Between the Middle and Ring Fingers.Advantages. This span is wider than that between the ring and little fingers. However, conventional

fingering avoids the use of the middle and ring fingers with an “empty” fret between them (spanning three frets).

Disadvantages. This span is smaller than that between the middle and index fingers.

Ring Finger (symbol: “3”).Advantages. This is the finger used most often for bends. It can be aided with the index and middle fingers

in bending.

The ring finger often fingers two consecutive notes on the same string to change position. It is the secondmost common finger used for barring (the index is most common).

Disadvantages. It is difficult for the beginning guitarist to bend the tip segment of the ring fingerbackwards. This inflexibility can make some third finger barréing difficult. Regular, gradual stretching will helpgreatly, but can take years.

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172

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Example: C major chord in third position, including the first string:

The Span Between the Ring and Little Fingers.Advantages. This span is second most useful for reaching out of position notes (the index finger is the

most useful).

Disadvantages. This narrow span often causes fingering of an out-of-position note with the little fingerto be slow.

The Little Finger (Symbol: “4”).Advantages. The little finger is useful in reaching out-of-position notes. It is often useful in changing

position by using it to fret two notes in succession on the same string.

Disadvantages. The little finger is the smallest and weakest of the four fingers. The ring finger is oftensubstituted for the little finger for (1) bending notes, (2) sliding, and (3) changing position by fretting two notesin succession on the same string.

Technique 1.931

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173

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.935

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THEPICKING HAND

The Thumb (symbol: “p” for pulgar in Spanish).Advantages. The picking-hand thumb can be versatile. Some players, such as Wes Montgomery have

used the picking-hand thumb almost exclusively to pluck notes. In conjunction with the pick, it can be used toplay harmonics. In Folk or Classical playing it plucks most of the bass notes. “Thumb” harmonics (taught later)can be performed by glancing the string with the side of the thumb (opposite the index finger) as you pick. “Slap”harmonics can be played with the thumb using a quick twist of the forearm (a technique common used on Funkelectric bass).

Disadvantages. Fingerpickers can accidentally hit and interrupt the movement of the index finger if theydon’t keep the thumb and index finger separated far enough.

Holding the Pick Between the Thumb and Index Finger.Advantages. This is the most common manner of holding the pick. For most techniques, holding the pick

between the ball of the thumb and the side of the index finger provides maximum stability, flexibility and control.It allows the other three fingers to be used for fingerpicking.

Disadvantages. Unless you use a thumb pick, the index finger and thumb cannot work independently.It is difficult to switch rapidly from picking notes to picking-hand fretting, unless the pick is held between thethumb and middle finger.

The Index Finger (symbol: “i” for indice in Spanish).Advantages. The index finger is usually the most agile of the four fingers. The pick is usually held

between the thumb and index finger.

Many harmonics techniques are performed with the index finger. The nail of the index finger can be usedto produce harmonics by glancing the string with it as you pick This must be done at fractions of the vibratingstring length: 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 2/3, etc.

You can strum without using a pick by using the index finger relaxed, bending the joints of the indexfinger and not moving the back of the hand. Strum down with the fingernail and up with the fingertip.

The index finger usually works best for picking-hand fretting. By holding the pick solely with the middlefinger, you can hold onto the neck with the thumb on one side and the ring finger on the other. This providesmaximum stability for picking-hand fretting with the index finger.

Disadvantages. Holding the pick between the thumb and index finger will slow you down when tryingto switch from picking notes to picking-hand fretting. Fretting with the picking hand works better with pickednotes when the pick is held between the thumb and middle finger.

Holding the Pick Between the Thumb and Middle finger.Advantages. This aids greatly in switching quickly from picked notes to picking-hand fretting.

Disadvantages. General use of this pick grip prevents use of the first finger in fingerpicking whileholding the pick.

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174

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.936

The Middle Finger (symbol: “m” for medio in Spanish).Advantages. Usually the longest finger, the middle finger has the greatest reach in fingerpicking. See

advantages above for holding the pick between the middle finger and thumb.

Disadvantages. See disadvantages above for holding the pick between the middle finger and thumb.

The Ring Finger (symbol: “a” for annular in Spanish).Advantages. Provides stability in picking-hand fretting with the index finger (see 5a above). The ring

finger is almost always free to fingerpick. The fingernail of the ring finger can be used to produce harmonicsby glancing the string with it as you pick.

Disadvantages. The ring finger is usually shorter and has less independent movement than the index andmiddle finger.

The Little Finger (“menique” in Spanish)The little finger is rarely used for fingerpicking. It is used in Flamenco techniques such as the Rasgueado

It is occasionally used to pluck strings, when all four fingers need to pluck notes simultaneously.

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175

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.940

a pencil between your thumb and index fingers as you would apick, and draw tiny clockwise ovals around the string (shownabove).

Most guitarists used wrist picking. When playing at veryhigh speeds, they slightly rotated the forearm with a quivering(trembling) muscle action, which in turn moved the wrist andthe pick. A few used a quivering action where the forearm bendsat the elbow and the wrist generally didn't bend. These quiver-ing movements were best performed without tightness.

Alternate picking predominated and is the most widelyaccepted style of picking. Any continuous series of notes shouldbe picked alternately down-up-down-up, etc., or up-down-up-down, etc. These are illustrated in the example below withpicking directions (1) and (2).

Frank Gambale was the only one to use a refined sweeppicking style. With sweep picking, direction of the stroke andfingering is prepared. You alternate pick on each string. Whenyou move to another string, the note is picked in the samedirection used to approach it. This is shown above with pickingdirection (3).

Rockers sometimes picked consecutive strokes in the samedirection for arpeggios or in the context of a "flash" lick:

Right hand technique has been a mystery for many Rock guitar-ists. In the fifties and sixties, creativity came before technique.Speed was not so important as was expression of the sexual andpolitical revolutions occurring in American youth. When JohnMcLaughlin hit the scene in the early seventies, the demand forfaster, refined right hand technique rapidly increased.

Rock guitarists who began playing in the fifties were usuallytaught a Jazz or Bluegrass picking style. Although a goodfoundation, those picking styles eventually needed modificationfor modern Rock. The right wrist began to flatten down againstthe guitar and demands for speed pressed the anatomy to itslimits.

Since 1965, I've transcribed thousands of Rock guitar solos.While teaching and performing these solos, it became evidentthat right hand technique was usually the last thing in the wayof attaining the velocities emerging in Rock guitar solos in theseventies and eighties.

In 1986, I completely re-evaluated my right hand techniqueby pursuing my natural muscle movements, economy of motionand relaxation. In a few months, my speed and accuracy greatlyincreased!

In my continuing aspiration for better right hand tech-nique, I recently studied video footage of thirty top Rockguitarists. The aspects I looked for were:

manner of holding the pickwrist positionanchoringright hand tensiondependence on the left hand for speedcircle picking versus wrist pickingwrist quiver vs. elbow quiveralternate picking vs. sweep picking

Players respected for having the most control seemed tohave the least tension in the hand and arm. Those with lesscontrol appeared to depend on the left hand for speed withhammer-ons, pull-offs bends and slides.

Most held the pick between the thumb and first fingers.Some held it with the thumb, index and middle so they couldperform right hand tapping with the index finger in a phrase ofmostly picked notes. Others spread the index and middle fingersor pressed the middle finger against the index at the nail forsupport.

Metal players tended to use their wrist bent backwardsabout 15° and rested the heel or pinky side (between the pinkyand the wrist) of their hand on the bridge. Jazz or acoustic-influenced players tended to bend their wrist inward 5° to 15°and touch the pickguard with one or two free fingers.

Only one out of thirty used circle picking, which involvessmall movements in the fingers. To grasp this technique, drawa straight line on a piece of paper (representing the string), hold

RIGHT HAND TECHNIQUE OF POPULAR GUITARISTS

Take advantage of right hand characteristicsof great guitarists and be aware of how your naturaltendencies can bring your individual style and tech-niques to new heights.

The results of my study of the right handtechniques of popular guitarists is shown on thefollowing pages:

circlepicking

Page 176: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

176

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.941

BELEW, ADRIANstrat

BERRY, CHUCKGibson 335

CAMPBELL, VIVIANstrat

CLAPTON, ERICLes Paul, strat

DiMEOLA, ALLes Paul type

EMMETT, RIKGibson type

FLACKE, RAYtele

GAMBALE, FRANKstrat type

GARCIA, JerryGibson type

GILBERT, PAULstrat type

GILLIS, BRADstrat

HENDRIX, JIMIstrat

LEE, ALBERTGibson, tele, acoustic

LEE, ALVINGibson 335

LEE, JAKE E.strat

LIFESON, ALEXstrat/Paul

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Thumb & 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.Keeps fingers 1, 2 and 3together in a half fist.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Thumb and 1st.

Backbent 15°

Fairly straight.

Generally backbent 15-20°

Backbent 15°.

Backbent 15°.

Bent inward 15°.

Backbent 15°.

Backbent 15°.

Backbent 5-10°.

Backbent 15°.

Backbent 15°.

Bent 20°. Forearmrotated 45° so palm is inplayer’s view.

Backbent 15°.

Backbent 5-10°.

Backbent 15°.

Straight or slightly bentinward (5°).

Heel of hand on bridge.Touches pickguard withpinky and third.Sometimes no anchor.

Pinky on pickguard.Pinky side of handsometimes on bridge.

Base of thumb on guitarbody. Heel and pinky sideof hand on bridge. Pinky onpickguard during skips.

Pinky side of hand onbridge. Pinky onpickguard.

Heel of hand on bridge.

Pinky side of hand onbridge for faster passages.Often touches pickguardwith pinky and third.

Heel and pinky side ofhand on bridge.

Heel of hand on bridge

Pinky (sometimes with third) onpickguard. Side of hand (baseof pinky) sometimes on bridge.

Palm sometimes touchesbridge, particulary formuting or certain tones.

Pinky side of hand onbridge. Brushes againstpick- guard with pinkyand third.

Pinky side of hand onbridge. Pinky brushedagainst pickguard.

Pinky side of hand onbridge.

Heel of hand on bridge.2nd, 3rd and pink oftenrest on pickguard.

Side of hand (base ofthumb) on bridge.

Ring and pinky onpickguard.

Light.

Light.

Fairly tight.

Fairly light.

Light.

Light.

Fairly light.

Fairly light.

Light.

VERY light.

Light.

Light.

Fairly light.

Light.

Light.

Light, except when at topspeed.

None.

Speed is unimportant inhis style.

Heavy for variety (notfor speed).

Fairly heavy.

None.

None.

Heavy dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Great, since fingeringsare prepared forsweeping.

Some dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Some dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Heavy dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Fairly heavy.

Heavy dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Some dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Heavy dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Little.

Artist/Guitar holds pick between wrist position anchoring right hand tension depends on left hand for speed.

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177

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.942

BELEW, ADRIANstrat

BERRY, CHUCKGibson 335

CAMPBELL,VIVIAN strat

CLAPTON, ERICLes Paul, strat

DiMEOLA, ALLes Paul type

EMMETT, RIKGibson type

FLACKE, RAYtele

GAMBALE,FRANKstrat type

GARCIA, JerryGibson type

GILBERT, PAULstrat type

GILLIS, BRADstrat

HENDRIX, JIMIstrat

LEE, ALBERTGibson, tele, acoustic

LEE, ALVINGibson 335

LEE, JAKE E.strat

LIFESON, ALEXstrat/Paul

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

On slow andmoderate passages.

Only.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow and moderate

passages.

Plucks arpeggios with pick,

2nd finger and 3rd finger.

On slow andmoderate passages.

Only.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow and

moderate passages. Plucks

arpeggios with pick, 2nd

finger and 3rd finger.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

Unknown.

Generally doesn’tplay fast enough torequire it.

Performed byrotating the forearm& bending at theelbow.

Performed byrotation of theforearm.

Performed byrotation of theforearm.

Performed byrotation of theforearm.

Generally doesn’tplay fast enough torequire it.

Not needed with hissweeping style.

Generally doesn’tplay fast enough torequire it.

Performed by VERYslight rotation of theforearm.

see elbow quiver.

Performed byrotation of theforearm.

Generally doesn’tplay fast enough torequire it.

Performed byrotation of theforearm.

see elbow quiver.

see elbow quiver

Unknown.

NONE.

see wrist quiver

NONE.

NONE.

NONE.

NONE.

NONE

NONE.

NONE.

Performed bybending at the elbow.

NONE.

NONE.

NONE.

Performed bybending at the elbow

Performed bybending at the elbow

Generally, but playsphrases of predomi-nant downstrokes foremphasis.

Rare. Generallypicks alldownstrokes.

Generally

Generally, but playsphrases of predomi-nant downstrokes foremphasis.

Almost always.

Almost always.

Generally, but playsphrases of predomi-nant downstrokes foremphasis.

On each string, butalways picks in thedirection of approachto a new string.

Generally, but playsphrases of predominantdownstrokes and slursfor slower melodies.

Almost always.

Generally, exceptskims arpeggios.

Generally, but playedphrases of predomi-nant downstrokes foremphasis.

Generally, but playedphrases of predomi-nant downstrokes foremphasis.

Almost always.

Generally, exceptskims arpeggios.

Generally.

Probably.

NONE.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks,but not developedinto a refined style.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks,but not developedinto a refined style.

Probably not.

Probably not.

NONE

Definitely!! He worksout ONE fingering foreach scale to be used inALL positions.

Probably not.

Generally reservedfor apreggios.

On arpeggios.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks,but not developedinto a refined style.

NONE

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks,but not developedinto a refined style.

On arpeggios.

Probably not.

Artist/Guitar circle picking wrist picking wrist quiver elbow quiver alternate picking sweep picking

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178

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.943

LUKATHER, STEVEstrat

MALMSTEEN,YNGWIE - strat type

McLAUGHLIN, JOHNGibson type

METHENY, PATGibson type

MOORE, VINNIEstrat

MORSE, STEVEtele

PAGE, JIMMYLes Paul, tele, strat

RICE, TONYMartin dreadnought

SANTANA, CarlosLes Paul type

SATRIANI, JOEstrat type

SCHON, NEALPaul, strat type

SCOFIELD, JOHNGibson 335 type

VAN HALEN, EDDIEstrat type

WATSON, DOCMartin dreadnaught

WATSON, JEFFLes Paul

Thumb and 1st.

Thumb and 1st.

Thumb & 1st, withpressure from the 2ndagainst 1st at the nail.

1st & 2nd fingers spread.

Thumb and 2nd, pickingwith the round edge.Picks very lightly withVERY light pick.

Thumb and 1st.

Thumb and 1st,sometimes incl. 2nd.Sometimes 2nd pressesnail against nail of 1st.

Thumb and 1st.

Thumb and 1st. Thumb,index and middle beforearound 1986, thumb &index after.

Thumb and 1st.

Thumb and 1st.

Thumb and 1st.

Usually thumb & 1st.Thumb, 1st & 2nd whenmixing with right handhammers & pull offs.

Between thumb and 1st.

Between thumb and 1st.

Bent inward 15-20°,except straight to 5° onelbow quiver.

10-15° backbent.

Picking 1st to 6th: forearm rotated 15-

20° backward, little finger in player’s

view. Picking 6th to 1st: forearm rotated

inward15-20° so palm is in player’s view.

Picking 1st to 6th: forearm rotated 15-

20° backward, little finger in player’s

view. Picking 6th to 1st: forearm rotated

inward15-20° so palm is in player’s view.

Backbent 15°.

Fairly straight.

Backbent 15-20°. Guitarbody low and neck high, sohand & forearm are nearlyperpendicular to strings.

Backbent 5-10°.

Forearm rotated 45° sopalm is in player’s view.Predominant upstroke.

Straight to 10° backbent.

Backbent 15°.

Backbent 15°.

Generally backbent 15°.Palm turned up approx.45° when using wristquiver.

Backbent 5° so heel ofhand is parallel withinside of forearm.

Backbent 15°.

Palm sometimes touchesbridge, particulary formuting or certain tones.Pinky on pickguard.

Palm sometimes touchesbridge, particulary formuting or certain tones.

Sometimes at bridge,particularly for quiver.

Forearm only.

Heel of hand on bridge.

Pinky side of hand onbridge. Pinky laying onpickguard.

Pinky side of hand onbridge.

Pinky (sometimes with3rd) on pickguard.

Pinky side of hand onbridge before around1986, heel & side ofhand after.

Forearm nearly to wrist onguitar body. Often pinkyside of hand on bridge,pinky & 3rd on pickguard.

Pinky side of hand onbridge. Touchespickguard with pinky.

Touches pickguard andpickup cover with 2ndand 3rd fingers.

Side of hand on bridge.

Forearm only.

Heel of hand on bridge.

Light, except tight onelbow quiver

VERY light.

Slight.

VERY light.

Light.

Moderately light.

Moderately light.

Fairly light.

A little tight before 1986,light after.

Very light.

Light.

VERY light.

VERY light.

Moderate.

Light.

Heavy dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Some dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

NONE.

Heavy dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

NONE.

None.

Some.

NONE

Moderate for variety (notfor speed).

Heavy dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Heavy dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Uses slurs to makepicking of arpeggiossmoother.

Generally high.

NONE

Some dependence foreffect, but not for speed.

Artist/Guitar holds pick between wrist position anchoring right hand tension depends on left hand for speed.

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179

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.944

LUKATHER,STEVEstrat

MALMSTEEN,YNGWIE - strat type

McLAUGHLIN,JOHN Gibson type

METHENY, PATGibson type

MOORE, VINNIEstrat

MORSE, STEVEtele

PAGE, JIMMYLes Paul, tele, strat

RICE, TONYMartin dreadnought

SANTANA, CarlosLes Paul type

SATRIANI, JOEstrat type

SCHON, NEALPaul, strat type

SCOFIELD, JOHNGibson 335 type

VAN HALEN,EDDIE strat type

WATSON, DOCMartin dreadnaught

WATSON, JEFFLes Paul

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

Mainly.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

Somewhat involvedin wrist picking.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

NONE NOTED.

On slow passages

On slow andmoderate passages.VERY smallmovements.

On slow andmoderate passages.VERY smallmovements.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

Slight involvementof wrist in circlepicking.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

On slow andmoderate passages.

Most of the time.

Picks from theelbow!

On slow andmoderate passages.

Rarelly performed byrotating the forearm,usually by elbowquiver.

Performed by VERYslight rotation of theforearm.

Performed bybending wrist flatwithout muchforearm rotation.

Performed byrotating the forearm.

see elbow quiver.

see elbow quiver

see elbow quiver.

Generally doesn’tplay fast enough torequire it.

Performed byrotating the forearm.

Performed by slightrotation of theforearm.

Performed byrotation of theforearm.

Generally doesn’tplay fast enough torequire it.

Performed byrotating the forearm.

NONE

see elbow quiver

Performed bybending at the elbow

NONE.

see wrist quiver

see wrist quiver

Performed bybending at the elbow

Performed bybending at the elbow

Performed bybending at the elbow

NONE.

see wrist quiver

NONE.

NONE.

NONE

see wrist quiver

NONE

Performed bybending at the elbow

Almost always.

Almost always.

Almost always.

Generally, but playsphrases of predominantdownstrokes and slursfor slower melodies.

Generally, exceptskims arpeggios.

Almost always.

Generally.

Generally, but occasionallypicks twice in the samedirection in an approach toa new string.

Generally. Pickspassages of allupstrokes formelodic emphasis.

Almost always. Pickspassages of mostlydownstrokes formelodic emphasis.

Generally, but playsphrases of predomi-nant downstrokes foremphasis.

Generally, but playsphrases of predominantdownstrokes and slursfor slower melodies.

Generally

Religiously.

Generally, exceptskims arpeggios.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks andarpeggios, but not devel-oped into a refined style.

Generally reserved forapreggios. However,usually picksarpeggios alternate.

Unknown.

Probably not.

On arpeggios.

Probably not.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks,but not developedinto a refined style.

None, except asnoted under alternatepicking.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks,but not developedinto a refined style.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks &arpeggios, but not ina refined style.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks,but not developedinto a refined style.

Probably not.

Yes, in the context of“flash” rock licks,but not developedinto a refined style.

NONE

On arpeggios.

Artist/Guitar circle picking wrist picking wrist quiver elbow quiver alternate picking sweep picking

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180

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.955

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Thumb Pluck and Index Strumtec 1.955 tec 1.955

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181

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.956

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Thumb Pluck and Index Strum Techniquetec 1.956 tec 1.956

Pluck the bass notes with the thumb, bending it only at its base. Strum the chords with the index finger, using a flicking motion. Bend the index finger at the joint where it connects to the hand and at the middle joint. Leave the tip joint of the index finger very relaxed, so the tip segments acts like the bristle-end of a paint brush. Try to keep the main body of the plucking hand (other than the fingers) calm and un-involved.

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182

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

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32 2

1

B7 I

3 4

Em I

32

Minor Progression With Descending Bass

Pick Bass and Finger Pluck

ec 1.960 tec 1.960

Pick the bass notes with a guitar pick, holding it between the thumb and index finger. Pluck the chords with the three remaining fingers. The middle and ring fingers must bend more than the little finger, so the tips of all three of them are aligned. Mute after each pair of chords with the fretting hand, so it sounds like a reggae part.

Technique 1.960

Page 183: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

183

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.961

Ä ! 44

â 44

Swing Eighths

2

3

t3

33

tt4

1

1

" t1

2

# t0

0

t34

33

tt1

2

t34

33

tt2

3

#t34

33

tt1

2

t3

33

tt4

0

0

t34

33

tt1

1

" t1

2

# t2

3

t3

33

tt4

1

1

" t1

2

# t0

0

t34

33

tt1

2

t34

33

tt2

3

# t3

33

tt1

2

t34

33

tt0

0

t34

33

tt1

1

" t1

2

# t

Ä !

â 2

3

t1

10

tt0

0

t2

2

tH

0

0

t101

tt2

2

t101

tt

3

"t3

01

tt1

2

t2

01

tt1

0

t0

10

tt1

0

t0

2

t2

H

3

t3

33

tt0

1

" t1

2

# t1

0

t0

33

tt3

2

t1

33

tt3 2

3

#t333

tt1

2

t333

tt0

0

t3

33

tt1

1

" t1

2

# t

Ä !

â 0

0

t123

tt3

4

t123

tt0

0

t132

tt3

4

"t3

3

t110

tt0

2

t210

t3

3

t110

tt1

1

" t2

2

# t3

tI3

d333

tt#t333

ttt322

t"tt322

ttt311

tt"t311

ttt æøææø3

00

ttt Û1

3

t2

4

! tS3

0

t t1 2

1

" t1

# t1.

Ä !

âæææ3

00

ttt232

!t! tt343

tt#t |||2.

G I

43

1

C I G I

4

G I

43

D I

2

1

1

C I G7 I

432

G dim7 I

32

Am7b5 I

4

11

G I

4

D7

G I

4

F#7 II

21

3

G7 III

21

3

Option 1: pluck the bass notes with the thumb and the two note chords with the index and middle.Option 2: pluck the bass notes with the pick and the two note chords with the middle and ring fingers.

Pick Bass, Finger Pluck Blues #1 tec 1.961 tec 1.961

Page 184: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

184

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.962

Ä !!!! 44â 44

0

t0

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

2

t2

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

0

#t0

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

2

t3

100

tttH

0

toI

2

t0 2

toI

0 2

t0 2

H

0

t0

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

2

t2

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt0

0

#t100

ttt4

4

t100

ttt3

2

t100

tttH

0 2

0

toI

2

tH

0 2

0

toI

2

t

Ä !!!!

â0

t0

020

#ttt

4

t4

020

ttt

2

t1

020

ttt

4

t4

020

ttt

0

# t0

020

ttt

4

t4

020

ttt

2

t1

020

ttt

4

t4

2

t1

0

t0

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

2

t2

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

0

# t0

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

2

t3

100

tttH

0

toI

2

t0 2

0

t0

Ä !!!!

â2

t2

202

ttt

0

t0

202

ttt

2

t2

202

ttt

2

t2

1

" t1

0

t0

020

#ttt

3

# t3

020

ttt

2

t1

020

ttt

1

# t1

0

t0

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

0

t0

020

#ttt

1

! t1

020

ttt1.

æøææø2

t2

202

ttt

2

t2

202

ttt

0

t0

020

# ttt

3

# t3

020

ttt

Ä !!!!

â0

t0

100

ttt

4

t4

100

ttt

0

t0

020

#ttt

1

! t1

020

ttt2.

æææ2

202

tIttt d3123

#t# tt#t2012

tttt tIttt d c

1

E I

2

A7 I1

E I

2

1

B7 I

3 4 2

A7 I1

E I

2

A7 I

2

1

B7 I

3 4 2

A7 I

1

E I

2

A7 I

2

1

B7 I

3 41

F9 II

2

4

3

1

E9 I

2

4

3

Option 1: pluck the bass notes with the thumb and the two note chords with the index and middle.Option 2: pluck the bass notes with the pick and the two note chords with the middle and ring fingers.

Pick Bass, Finger Pluck Blues #2tec 1.962 tec 1.962

Page 185: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

185

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.963

Ä ! 44â 44

022

ttt022

ttt00

tt

022

ttt022

ttt022

ttt022

ttt00

tt

022

ttt00

tt

022

ttt21

t!t12

tt20

tt21

tt21

tt21

t!t12

tt20

tt12

tt20

tt21

tt

Ä !â

00

tt00

tt232

ttt

00

tt00

tt00

tt00

tt232

ttt

00

tt232

ttt

00

tt542

t! tt542

ttt000

ttt

542

ttt542

ttt542

t! tt542

ttt000

ttt

542

ttt000

ttt

542

ttt

Ä !â

320

ttt320

ttt010

ttt320

ttt320

ttt320

ttt320

ttt010

ttt320

ttt010

ttt320

ttt200

ttt200

ttt33

tt200

ttt200

ttt200

ttt200

ttt33

tt200

ttt33

tt200

ttt

Ä !â

022

ttt022

ttt10

tt022

ttt022

ttt022

ttt022

ttt10

tt022

ttt10

tt022

ttt21

t!t12

tt20

tt21

tt21

tt æøææø2

1

t!t12

tt20

tt12

tt20

tt21

tt æææ2

2000

AAAAA

Em I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 4

2

D I

3

1

A9 II

3

1

4

4

2

1

C I

3 2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 4

Em I

32

Minor Progression With Descending Bass

Thumb Strum, Fingers Plucktec 1.965 tec 1.965

Keep the wrist two or three fingers width from the guitar body. Strum the bass notes with the side of your thumb (the side opposite the index finger). Pluck the high notes (generally on strings 1 and 2) with the index and middle fingers.

Page 186: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

186

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.970

Ä ! 44

â 44P

022

tttP

022

ttt↓

000

ttt↑

000

tttP

022

ttt↑

000

ttt↓

000

ttt↑

000

tttP

022

ttt↓

000

ttt

022

tttP

022

tttP

000

ttt↓

000

ttt↑

022

tttP

000

ttt↑

000

ttt↓

000

ttt↑

022

tttP

000

ttt↓ P

21

t!tP

21

tt↓

202

ttt↑

202

tttP

21

tt↑

202

ttt↓

202

ttt↑

202

tttP

21

tt↓

202

tttP

21

t!tP

21

tt↓

202

ttt↑

202

tttP

21

tt↑

202

ttt↓

202

ttt↑

202

tttP

21

tt↓

202

ttt

Ä !

â P

00

ttP

00

tt↓

232

ttt↑

232

tttP

00

tt↑

232

ttt↓

232

ttt↑

232

tttP

00

tt↓

232

tttP

00

ttP

00

tt↓

232

ttt↑

232

tttP

00

tt↑

232

ttt↓

232

ttt↑

232

tttP

00

tt↓

232

ttt

542

t! ttP

542

tttP

000

ttt↓

000

ttt↑

542

tttP

000

ttt↑

000

ttt↓

000

ttt↑

542

tttP

000

ttt↓

542

t! ttP

542

tttP

000

ttt↓

000

ttt↑

542

tttP

000

ttt↑

000

ttt↓

000

ttt↑

542

tttP

000

ttt↓

Ä !

â P

332

tttP

332

ttt↓

010

ttt↑

010

tttP

332

ttt↑

010

ttt↓

010

ttt↑

010

tttP

332

ttt↓

010

tttP

332

tttP

332

ttt↓

010

ttt↑

010

tttP

332

ttt↑

010

ttt↓

010

ttt↑

010

tttP

332

ttt↓

010

ttt

320

tttP

320

tttP

033

ttt↓

033

ttt↑

320

tttP

033

ttt↑

033

ttt↓

033

ttt↑

320

tttP

033

ttt↓

320

tttP

320

tttP

033

ttt↓

033

ttt↑

320

tttP

033

ttt↑

033

ttt↓

033

ttt↑

320

tttP

033

ttt↓

Ä !

â P

02

ttP

02

tt↓

210

ttt↑

210

tttP

02

tt↑

210

ttt↓

210

ttt↑

210

tttP

02

tt↓

210

ttt

02

ttP

02

ttP

210

ttt↓

210

ttt↑

02

ttP

210

ttt↑

210

ttt↓

210

ttt↑

02

ttP

210

ttt↓ P

21

t!tP

21

tt↓

202

ttt↑

202

tttP

21

tt↑

202

ttt↓

202

ttt↑

202

tttP

21

tt↓

202

ttt æø

ææø21

t!tP

21

ttP

202

ttt↓

202

ttt↑

21

ttP

202

ttt↑

202

ttt↓

202

ttt↑

21

ttP

202

ttt↓

æ

ææP

022000

AAAAAA

Em I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 4

2

D I

3

1

A9 II

3

1

4

4

2

1

C I

3 2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 4

Em I

32

Minor Progression With Descending Bass

Thumb Strum and Index Strumtec 1.970 tec 1.970

Page 187: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

187

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.975

Ä ! 44â 44 p

0

tp

2

ti

0

tp

2

tp

2

ti

0

tp

0

tp

2

ti

0

tp

2

tp

2

ti

0

tp

2

tp

1

!ti

2

tp

2

tp

1

ti

2

tp

2

tp

1

!ti

2

tp

2

tp

1

ti

2

t

Ä !

â p

0

tp

2

ti

3

tp

0

tp

2

ti

3

t

0

tp

2

tp

3

ti

0

tp

2

tp

3

ti p

0

tp

2

ti

0

tp

0

tp

2

ti

0

t

0

tp

2

tp

0

ti

0

tp

2

tp

0

ti

Ä !

â p

3

tp

2

ti

0

tp

3

tp

2

ti

0

t

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

2

tp

0

ti p

3

tp

0

ti

0

tp

2

tp

0

ti

0

t

3

tp

0

tp

0

ti

2

tp

0

tp

0

ti

Ä !

â p

0

tp

2

ti

2

tp

0

tp

2

ti

2

t

0

tp

2

tp

2

ti

0

tp

2

tp

2

ti p

2

tp

1

!ti

2

tp

2

tp

1

ti

2

t æøææø

p

2

tp

1

!ti

2

tp

2

tp

1

ti

2

t æææ0

000

AAAA

Em I

321 + 2 + 3 + 4 +6 4 34 3 5

picking patterncount:

strings:2

1

B7 I

3 421 + 2 + 3 + 4 +5 4 34 3 6

picking patterncount:

strings:

2

D I

3

11 + 2 + 3 + 4 +4 3 2 5 3 2

picking patterncount:

strings:3

A7 I

21 + 2 + 3 + 4 +5 4 34 3 6

picking patterncount:

strings:

4

2

1

C I

3

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +5 4 34 3 6

picking patterncount:

strings:2

1

G I

3 4

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +6 4 34 3 5

picking patterncount:

strings:

1

Am I

321 + 2 + 3 + 4 +5 4 34 3 6

picking patterncount:

strings: 2

1

B7 I

3 421 + 2 + 3 + 4 +5 4 34 3 6

picking patterncount:

strings:

Em I

32

Minor Progression With Descending Bass

Travis Fingerpicktec 1.975 tec 1.975

Page 188: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

188

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

TECHNIQUE

Technique 1.976

Ä ! 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ øpa

0

0

tt

p

2

ti

0

tp

2

tm

0

tp

2

ti

0

tpa

0

0

tt

p

2

ti

0

tp

2

tm

0

tp

2

ti

0

tpa

2

2

ttp

1

!ti

2

tp

2

tm

0

tp

1

ti

2

tpa

2

2

ttp

1

!ti

2

tp

2

tm

0

tp

1

ti

2

t

Ä !

â pm

0

2

ttp

2

ti

3

tp

0

tm

2

tp

2

ti

3

t

0

2

ttpm

2

tp

3

ti

0

tp

2

tm

2

tp

3

ti p

a

0

0

ttp

2

ti

0

tp

0

tm

0

tp

2

ti

0

tpa

0

0

ttp

2

ti

0

tp

0

tm

0

tp

2

ti

0

t

0

Ä !

â pa

3

0

ttp

2

ti

0

tp

3

tm

1

tp

2

ti

0

t

3

0

ttpa

2

tp

0

ti

3

tp

1

tm

2

tp

0

ti p

a

3

3

tt

p

0

ti

0

tp

2

tm

3

tp

0

ti

0

t

3

3

ttpa

0

tp

0

ti

2

tp

3

tm

0

tp

0

ti

Ä !

â pa

0

0

ttp

2

ti

2

tp

0

tm

1

tp

2

ti

2

tpa

0

0

ttp

2

ti

2

tp

0

tm

0

tp

2

ti

2

tpa

2

2

ttp

1

!ti

2

tp

2

tm

0

tp

1

ti

2

t æøææø2

2

ttpa

1

!tp

2

ti

2

tp

0

tm

1

tp

2

ti

æææ0

000

AAAA

Em I

321 + 2 + 3 + 4 +

6 4 3 5 4 3

picking patterncount:

strings: 12

2

1

B7 I

3 421 + 2 + 3 + 4 +

5 4 3 6 4 3

picking patterncount:

strings: 12

2

D I

3

11 + 2 + 3 + 4 +

4 3 2 5 3 2

picking patterncount:

strings: 11

A9 n3 I

21 + 2 + 3 + 4 +

5 4 3 6 4 3

picking patterncount:

strings: 12

4

2

1

C I

3

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +

5 4 3 6 4 3

picking patterncount:

strings: 12 2

1

G I

3 4

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +

6 4 3 5 4 3

picking patterncount:

strings: 12

1

Am I

321 + 2 + 3 + 4 +

5 4 3 6 4 3

picking patterncount:

strings: 12

2

1

B7 I

3 421 + 2 + 3 + 4 +

5 4 3 6 4 3

picking patterncount:

strings: 12

Em I

32

Minor Progression With Descending BassTravis Fingerpicking (continued)

tec 1.976 tec 1.976

Page 189: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

189

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.030

Fretboard Note NamesIf you know the names of the notes on the piano, the chart below should help you to learn the guitar note

names. You may already know that the two pairs of keys on the piano without a black key between them are“B, C” and “E, F”, the notes which are one fret apart on the guitar.

6 5 4 3 2 1

E A D G B E

middle Cin the center of the piano keyboard

Open (not fretted) Strings

E

AD

G B E

6 5 4 3 2 1

string numbers

Memorizing the Fretboard Note Names.Memorize the open-string note names with this sentence: Eat A Darn Good Breakfast Early. The first

letter of each word makes a list of the open-string names for the sixth through first strings.

Note names progress up each string in alphabetical order: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, etc. The distancebetween “B” and “C” and between “E” and “F” is one fret (not counting the fret on which you begin). All otheralphabetical pairs (A to B, C to D, F to G or G to A) are two frets apart.

After memorizing the open string note names, memorize fifth, tenth and twelfth fret note names.

Distances in pitch between notes are called intervals. A whole step is a two-fret interval (not countingthe fret on which you begin). A half step is a one-fret interval. One and one half steps is a three fret interval,

Page 190: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

190

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.031

two steps is a four fret interval, and so on.

Use the sentences below to memorize the fifth and tenth fret note names (the first letter of each wordlists the names on the sixth through first strings. The twelfth fret note names are identical to the open-stringnames.

fifth fret: All Dogs Go Crazy Eating Ants

tenth fret: Don't Go Crazy For A Dog

D G BE EA

open strings

5th fret

12th fret

C

C

D

DD

D

F

G

G

G B

E

E E

AA

A

A

nut

frets withall natural names

10th fret

Next, memorize fretted notes on the sixth and fifth strings. If you have already memorized the note nameson the fifth, tenth and twelfth frets, you can locate all others by moving alphabetically up or down any string fromthese reference points.

D G BE EA

open strings

5th fret

12th fret

17th fret

C

C

C

C

D

DD

D

F

F

F

G

G

G

G

B

B

B

E

E

E E

AA

A

A

nut

C

CD

F

G

G

B

E AA

Page 191: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

191

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.032

Chords are commonly named after notes on the fifth and sixth strings. By using the octave shapes youwill learn later in this section, you can identify note names on the fourth through first strings in reference to thoseyou have memorized on the sixth and fifth strings.

Natural notes have no sharp (#) nor flat (b). They are indicated with a plain letter “A” through “G”, orthe letter followed by the “ ” (natural) symbol. Notes with a sharp in their name are played one fret higher thanthe natural versions of the same letter-named note. Notes with a flat in their name are played one fret lowerthan the natural versions of the same letter-named note. Enharmonic notes are those which have two or morenames for the same note, such as A# and Bb, Cb and B or C# and Db.

Fretboard Note Names With Naturals and Flats

D G

10th fret 10th fret

BE EA

open strings

5th fret

12th fret

17th fret

Db

Db

Db

Db Db

Db

Db

Db

Db

Db Db

Db

Eb

Eb

Eb

Eb

Eb Eb

Eb

Eb

Eb

Eb

Eb Eb

Gb Gb

Gb

Gb

Gb

Gb

Gb Gb

Gb

Gb

Gb

Gb

Bb

Bb Bb

Bb

Bb

Bb

Bb

Bb

Bb Bb

Bb

Bb

C

C

C

C C

C

C

C

C

C C

C

D

D

D

DD

D

D

D

D

DD

D

F

F F

F

F

F

F

F F

F

F

F

G G

G

G

G

G

G G

G

G

G

G

B

B

B B

B

B

B

B

B B

B

B

E

E

E

E

E E

E

E

E

E

E E

Ab

Ab Ab

Ab

Ab

Ab

Ab

Ab Ab

Ab

Ab

Ab

AA

A

A

A

A

AA

A

A

A

A

nut

letter names are shown above the fret they name

D G BE EA

open strings

5th fret

12th fret

17th fret

C#

C#

C#

C# C#

C#

D#

D#

D#

D#

D# D#

F# F#

F#

F#

F#

F#

Bb

A# A#

A#

A#

A# C

C

C

C C

C

D

D

D

DD

D

D

F

F F

F

F

F

G G

G

G

G

G

G

B

B

B B

B

B

B

E

E

E

E

E E

E E

G#

G# G#

G#

G

G#

AA

A

A

A

A

A

nutD G BE EA

open strings

5th fret

12th fret

17th fret

C

C

C

C C

C

C

C

C

C C

C

D

D

D

DD

D

D

D

D

DD

D

F

F F

F

F

F

F

F F

F

F

F

G G

G

G

G

G

G G

G

G

G

G

B

B

B B

B

B

B

B

B B

B

B

E

E

E

E

E E

E

E

E

E

E E

AA

A

A

A

A

AA

A

A

A

A

nutD G BE EA

open strings

5th fret

12th fret

17th fret

C

C

C

C

D

DD

D

D

DD

D

F

F

G

G

G

G

G

G

B

B

E

E E

E

E E

AA

A

A

AA

A

A

nut

C#

C#

C#

C# C#

C#

D#

D#

D#

D#

D# D#

F# F#

F#

F#

F#

F#

Bb

A# A#

A#

A#

A# C

C

C

C C

C

D

D

D

DD

F

F F

F

F

F

G G

G

G

G

B

B

B B

B

E

E

E

E

G#

G# G#

G#

G

G#

AA

A

A

A

frets withall natural names

natural notes natural notesand flats

natural notesand sharps

10th fret 10th fret

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192

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.061

Ä ! 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ ø 0

00

|||010

||| æøææø0

20

|!||010

|# || æææ2

000

AAAA

Ä !â

Ω øΩΩ ø 2

t000

ttt1

!t000

ttt0

t000

ttt4

! t000

ttt3

t000

ttt2

t0

t

Ä !â

æøææø4

t20

tt20

tt20

tt æææ2

000

AAAA

Em I C I

1

French Girl

Em6 I

2

SpiesC I

1

Em I

2

Em I

2

1

Em(ma7) I

Em I

2

Em7 I Em6 I

4

Cma7 I

3

1

B7 I

3

fin 1.061 fin 1.061

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193

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.062

Ä !!!! 44â 44

Swing Eighths

10

02

tt10

02

tt30

04

tt30

04

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt30

04

tt30

04

tt

02

tt10

02

tt10

04

tt30

04

tt30

05

t#t40

05

tt40

04

tt30

04

tt30

02

tt10

02

tt10

04

tt30

04

tt30

02

tt10

02

tt10

04

tt30

04

tt30

02

tt10

02

tt10

04

tt30

04

tt30

05

t#t40

05

tt40

04

tt30

04

tt30

Ä !!!!

â10

02

#tt10

02

tt30

04

tt30

04

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt30

04

tt30

04

tt

02

#tt10

02

tt10

04

tt30

04

tt30

05

t#t40

05

tt40

04

tt30

04

tt30

02

tt10

02

tt10

04

tt30

04

tt30

02

tt10

02

tt10

04

tt30

04

tt30

02

tt10

02

tt10

04

tt30

04

tt30

05

t#t40

05

tt40

04

tt30

04

tt30

Ä !!!!

â 10

02

tt10

02

tt30

04

tt30

04

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt30

04

tt30

04

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt30

04

tt30

04

tt40

05

t#t40

05

tt30

04

tt30

04

tt02

tt10

05

t#t40

04

tt30

03

t#t20

æøææø0

2

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt10

02

tt10

1.

Ä !!!!

âæ

ææ10

02

tt21

045

tt!t0

21

056

t#tt0

|||2.

A7

pick this with all downstrokes

D7 A7

E A A7 Adim7 Bm7b5 A7 E7

A Adim7 A7

One Finger Blues in Afin 1.062 fin 1.062

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194

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.064

Ä 44â 44

022000

AAAAAA

0

t3

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t3

t0

t3

t0

t3

t0

t2

t æææ0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t3

t0

t

Äâ

30003

AAAAA

3

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t3

t0

t3

t0

t3

t0

t2

t0

t æææ2

t0

t2

t0

t3

|

Open Position G Major 6/9 Pentatonic Scale

Open Position E Minor 7/11 Pentatonic Scale

3

2 2 2

3 3

fingeringnumbered tones

of an "E" major scale1 4 b7 b3 5 1

b3

5 1 4

b7 b3

3

2 2 2

3 3

fingering

numbered tonesof a "G" major scale

6 2 5 1 3 6

1

3 6 2

5 1

"E minor seven eleven" (E minor 7/11, or Em7/11) is a chord name. I use chord names for pentatonic scales, to standardize their names. Otherwise, various authors, music critics and interviewed musicians will collectively use a huge collection of confusing names for the scales. I realize "Em7/11" is a long name, but when you learn chord construction, this (or any of my other pentatonic scale names) will make perfect sense.

"G major six nine" (G 6/9) is a chord name. I use chord names for pentatonic scales, to standardize their names. See the note above regarding E minor 7/11 pentatonic scale.

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195

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.110

Ä 44â 44Ω øΩΩ ø000ttt

000

ttt201

ttt201

ttt303

ttt303

ttt201

ttt201

ttt000

ttt000

ttt201

ttt201

ttt303

ttt303

ttt201

ttt201

ttt

Äâ 0

10

ttt010

ttt012

ttt012

ttt013

tt"t013

ttt012

ttt012

ttt000

ttt000

ttt201

ttt201

ttt303

ttt303

ttt201

ttt201

ttt

Äâ 0

21

ttt021

ttt043

ttt043

ttt550

ttt550

ttt043

ttt043

ttt000

ttt000

ttt303

ttt303

ttt æøææø2

02

"ttt202

ttt101

tt"t101

ttt

Äâ 0

00

|||202

!ttt303

ttt æææ

AAAa

G I

21

C I G7 I

2 32

1

C I G I

21

C I G7 I

2 32

1

C I

1

C I

1

C6 I

21

C7 I

3

1

C6 I

2

G I

21

C I G7 I

2 32

1

C I

D7n3 I

21

G III

21 1

D9 no3 III

23 4

G III

21

G I G7 I

2 3

G dim. 7 I

2 3

Am7b5 I

2 3

G I G dim. 7 I

2 3

G7 I

2 3

Two Finger Bluesstrum this with the pick or pluck with the thumb, index and middle fingers

fin 1.110 fin 1.110

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196

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Ä 44

â 44 00

ttmp

0

ti

21

ttmp

0

ti

33

ttmp

0

ti

21

ttmp

0

ti

00

ttmp

0

ti m

p

21

tt0

ti m

p

33

tti

0

tmp

21

tti

0

t

Äâ 0

0

ttmp

1

ti

02

ttmp

1

ti

03

t"tmp

1

ti m

p02

tt1

ti

00

ttmp

0

ti

21

ttmp

0

ti

33

ttmp

0

ti

21

ttmp

0

ti

Ä

â 01

ttmp

2

ti

03

ttmp

4

ti

50

ttmp

5

ti

03

ttmp

4

ti

00

ttmp

0

ti

33

ttmp

0

ti

æø

ææø22

"ttmp

0

ti

11

t"tmp

0

ti

Ä

âmi

000

|||mi

p

202

!tttmi

p

303

tttp

æ

ææAAA

a

G I

2

1

C I G7 I

2 3

2

1

C I G I

2

1

C I G7 I

2 3

2

1

C I

1

C I

1

C6 I

21

C7 I

3

1

C6 I

2

G I

2

1

C I G7 I

2 32

1

C I

D7n3 I

21

G III

21 1

D9 no3 III

23 4

G III

21

G I G7 I

2 3

G dim. 7 I

2 3

Am7b5 I

2 3

G I G dim. 7 I

2 3

G7 I

2 3

Two Finger BluesPluck the pairs of notes with the thumb and middle fingers. Pluck the single notes with the index

finger. Pluck the three note chords at the end with the thumb, middle and index fingers.

fin 1.111 fin 1.111

Fingering 1.111

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197

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.260

THE FIVE CHORD ROOT SHAPES

Each of these shapes represent the shape of the notes after which the chord is named.

C I G ID I A IE IE E

E

G#

B

D

D

A F#

C

C

E

EG

E A C#

A E G

GG

D B

B

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

4

2

D I

3

1 4

A I

32

1

E I

32

E E

E

D

D C

C

A

A G

GG

THE SEVEN OCTAVE FINGERINGSThe diagrams below can be played in any position (at any fret).

Numbers within the diagrams indicate fretting fingers.

3

1 4

1

1

4

1

3

Primary Octave FingeringsThese are "two string, two fret" octaves.

3

1

1

3

Secondary Octave FingeringThe only un-compensated "three string,-three fret" octave (compensated versionsare shown at the right).

These are "three string, three fret" octaves withcompensation for tuning on the smallest two strings.

1

4

These are "two string, two fret" octaves withcompensation for tuning on the smallest two strings.

Notes on the smallest two strings mustrelatively be moved up one fret (higher in pitch),when combined with the larger four strings..

Notes on the smallest two strings must relativelybe moved up one fret (higher in pitch), whencombined with the larger four strings.

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198

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.261

THE FIVE OCTAVE SHAPES

By combining two pairs of the seven octaves and using the other three octaves unchanged, five octaveshapes are produced.

1

3

1

3

1

4

1

4

1

3

1

4

1

3

1

3 4

1

3

1

Notice how each of the five octave shapes occurs in one of the five chord root shapes shown below.

1

3

1 1

4

1

3

1

3

1

34

C I G ID I A IE IE E

E

G#B

D

D

A F#

C

C

E

EG

E A C#

A E G

GG

D B

B

The five octave shapes are named after either the strings on which they occur (641 shape) or the chordroot shape they represent (E form).

1

3

1 1

4

1

3

1

3

1

34

641 shapeE form

42 shapeD form

52 shapeC form

53 shapeA form

631 shapeG form

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199

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.262

Here are is a full-fretboard diagram of “F” notes. Notice that they occur in octave shapes, in the cyclicorder “EDCAGE”.

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

E form, 641 shape

D form, 42 shape

C form, 52 shape

A form, 53 shape

G form, 631 shape

E form, 641 shape

F

F

D form, 42 shape

C form, 52 shape

first fret

fifth fret

ninth fret

twelfth fret

fifteenth fret

F

F

F

641, E form"F" notes I

F

F

F

641, E form"F" notes XIII

F

F

42, D form"F" notes III

F

F

52, C form"F" notes VI

F

F

53, A form"F" notes VIII

F

F F

631, G form"F" notes X

F

F

42, D form"F" notes XV

F

F

52, C form"F" notes VI

notice the order of shapes:"EDCAGE"

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200

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.263

“G” notes occur in the same respective order of octave shapes, a whole step higher (two frets closer tothe guitar body).

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

E form, 641 shape

D form, 42 shape

C form, 52 shape

A form, 53 shape

G form, 631 shape

E form, 641 shape

G

D form, 42 shape

first fret

fifth fret

ninth fret

twelfth fret

fifteenth fret

G

G

G

641, E form"G" notes III

G

G

G

641, E form"G" notes XV

G

G

42, D form"G" notes V

G

G

52, C form"G" notes VIII

G

G

53, A form"G" notes X

G

G G

631, G form"G" notes XII

G

G

42, D form"G" notes XVII

G

G form, 631 shape

G

G G

631, G form"G" notes I

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201

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.264

Every note occurs in the same series of octave shapes. Compare the diagrams below. “G” is a wholestep (two frets) above “F”, “A” is a whole step above “G” and “B” is a whole step above “A”.

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

first fret

fifth fret

twelfth fret

seventeenth fret

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

B

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202

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.320

Ä 44â 44Ω øΩΩ ø 3t

2

t01

tt2

t3

tI21

tt tIt00

æøææø

tt

3

t2

t0

t3

t3

t2

t0

t æææ3

A

Ä 44â 44Ω øΩΩ ø 0t

2

t2

t1

t

3

t0

t0

t0

t æøææø3

t3

t2

t1

t2

t2

t1

!t0

t æææ0

221

AAAA

32

1

C I

C

Spanish Surf Ballad In Duple Time

42

1

F I

3

F

Sixties Rock Style

G

21

G I

4

C

1

Am I

32

Am

21

G I

4

G

42

1

F I

3

F

1

E I

2 3

E Am

Performance Notes Most of the chords involved in these examples should be held until another chord name appears.

Chord Diagram Reminders Roman numerals on the upper right of chord diagrams indicate the number of the top fret on the diagram. Circles shown above a string indicate the string is played open. Strings not marked are not played.

Performance Notes Most of the chords involved in these examples should be held until another chord name appears.

Chord Diagram Reminders Roman numerals on the upper right of chord diagrams indicate the number of the top fret on the diagram. Circles shown above a string indicate the string is played open. Strings not marked are not played.

Open-Position One Note-Per-String ArpeggiosOpen-Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios

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203

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.321

Ä 44â 44

3

t2

t0

t1

t2

t2

t1

!t0

t0

t2

t2

t1

t

3

t2

t0

t1

t3

t3

t2

t1

t

3

t0

t0

t0

t3

t3

t21

tt000

ttt |||

Äâ

3

t2

t0

t1

t2

t2

t1

!t0

t0

t2

t2

t1

t

3

t2

t0

t1

t3

t3

t2

t1

t

3

t0

t0

t0

t !!!

Ä !!!

âΩ øΩΩ ø 0t

2

t22

tt2

t0

t2

t12

tt2

t0

t2

t02

#tt2

t0

t2

t02

tt2

t æøææø0

t2

t3

t2

t

0

t1

t0

t0

t

3

# t3

#t21

t#t000

t#tt ||| # # #

ÄâΩ øΩΩ ø 3t

2

t0

t1

t

2

t2

t1

!t0

t

0

t2

t2

t1

t

3

t2

t0

t1

t

3

t3

t2

t1

t

3

t0

t0

t0

t æøææø3

t3

t21

tt000

ttt ||| æææ3

201

AAAA

32

1

C I

C

1

E I

2 3

E

Sixties Rock Style Ballad In Duple Time

1

Am I

32

Am

32

1

C/G I

C/G

42

1

F I

3

F

21

G I

4

G F G

C E Am C/G F G

4

A I

32

A

4

Ama7 I

12

Ama7

4

A7 I

2

A7

2

D I

31

D

1

E I

32

E F G

C E Am C/G F G F GC

Open Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios (continued)fin 1.321 fin 1.321

Page 204: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

204

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.322

Ä 128â 128

3

t2

t0

t1

t0

t2

t0

t2

t2

t1

t2

t2

t æøææø3

t3

t2

t1

t2

t3

t

3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t æææ3

t2

tt0

ttt1

«t «t «t «t «| «| «| «|

Ä 128â 128

0

t2

t2

t1

t2

t2

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t æøææø3

t3

t2

t1

t2

t3

t2

t2

t1

!t0

t1

t2

t æææ0

t2

tt2

ttt1

«t «t «t «t «| «| «| «|

Ä 128â 128

3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t1

!t2

t0

t2

t1

t2

t1

t2

t0

t2

t1

t3

t2

t0

t1

t0

t2

t3

t2

t0

t1

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

!t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t

32

1

C I

C

Spanish Surf Style Ballad In Triple Time

Am

1

Am I

32

Fifties Style Ballad In Triple Time

F

21

F I

3 4 21

G I

4

G C

1

Am I

32

Am

21

G I

4

Sixties Style Ballad in Triple Time

G

21

F I

3 4

F

1

E I

32

E Am

21

G I

4

G

21

B7 I

3 4

B7

32

1

C I

C

3

A7 I

2

A7

Open Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios (continued)fin 1.322 fin 1.322

Page 205: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

205

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.323

Ä 128â 128

3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t0

t2

!t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t3

t2

t0

t1

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Äâ 0

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t0

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t1

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t1

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t1

t0

t1

t0

t

Äâ

2

t1

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t1

t2

t1

t2

t0

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t3

t2

!t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t2

t1

t2

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t1

!t2

t0

t2

t1

t2

t1

t2

t0

t2

t1

t

Äâ

3

t2

t0

t1

t0

t2

t3

t2

t0

t1

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

!t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t3

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t0

t0

t0

t0

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t0

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t0

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t2

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t0

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t

21

G I

4

G A7

3

A7 I

22

1

G I

4

G

32

1

C I

C

21

G I

4

G

2

D I

31

D

32

1

C I

C

2

D I

31

D

32

1

C I

C

B7 D

3

D7 I

12

D7 G B7

C A7 G A7

Open Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios (continued)fin 1.323 fin 1.323

Page 206: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

206

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.324

Ä 128â 128

3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t3

t2

t0

t1

t0

t2

t3

t0

t0

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t0

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t0

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t0

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Äâ

3

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t æææ3

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«|

G C G A7

G C G

Open Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios (continued)fin 1.324 fin 1.324

Page 207: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

207

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.351

Ä !!! 44â 44

Swing Eighths

0

t222

tYtt d222

ttt222

ttt000

d tYt#t ttt

0 0

t3

t3

# t4

t! t0

t222

tYtt d222

ttt222

ttt000

d tYt#t ttt0 0

t3

t3

# t4

t! t

Ä !!!

â 0

t777

tYtt d777

ttt777

ttt555

d tYt#t ttt

0

t0

t3

# t3

t4

! t0

t222

tYtt d222

ttt222

ttt d000

tYt#t ttt0

t0

t1

! t1

t2

t

Ä !!!

â0

t999

tYtt d999

ttt999

ttt777

d tYtt ttt

0 0

t3

t3

# t4

t! t0

t222

tYtt d222

ttt222

ttt d000

tYt#t æøææø

AAAa

1

A6 I

11

A9 I

1

A6 I

11

A9 I

3

D6 VII33 1

D9 V11

1

A6 I

11

A9 I

3

E6 IX33 1

E9 VII11

1

A6 I

11

A9 I

fin 1.351 fin 1.351Three String Barre Blues With Bass

Page 208: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

208

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.380

Ä 44â 44

0

t1

t2

! t3

t4

! t0

t1

! t2

t3

t4

! t0

t1

!t2

t3

t4

!t0

t1

!t2

t3

"t0

#t1

t2

!t3

t4

"t0

t1

t2

!t3

t4

" t3

t2

t1

#t

Äâ 0

t4

"t3

t2

"t1

t0

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t1

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t4

"t æøææø3

t2

t1

" t0

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" t1

t æææ0

A

Ä 34â 34Ω øΩΩ ø

Û

1

t2

! t3

t Û

4

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t1

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2

t3

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! t Û0

t1

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t Û

3

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1

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Äâ

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t1

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t Û1

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t Û4

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t0

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t

Äâ

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t Û

1

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3

t2

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t Û

2

t1

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t Û

4

" t3

t2

" t æææ1

A

Open-Position Chromatic Scalefin 1.380 fin 1.380

Page 209: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

209

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.385

Ä 44â 44

Ûfretting:

0

t0

2

! t2

4

! t4

Û

1

" t1

3

t3

0

t0

Û

2

t2

4

!t4

1

!t1

Û3

"t3

1

t1

3

t3

Û0

t0

2

!t1

4

!t2

Û6

" t4

4

t2

2

t1

Û0

t0

3

t3

1

t1

Û3

"t3

1

!t1

4

!t4

2424

æøææø

Û

2

t2

0

t0

3

t3

Û

1

" t1

4

! t4

2

! t2

Ä 44â 44

0

t0

2

! t2

4

! t4

1

" t1

3

t3

0

t0

2

t2

4

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1

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3

"t3

1

t1

3

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0

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3434

æøææø0

t0

3

t3

1

t1

3

"t3

1

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4

!t4

2

t2

0

t0

3

t3

1

" t1

4

! t4

2

! t2

0

t0

fin 1.385 fin 1.385Open Position Whole Tone ScalesYou can use these later for weird jazz, film score or progressive stuff.

Page 210: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

210

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.430

Ä 44â 44

02210

AAAAA0

t3

t0

t2

t0

t2

t1

t3

t0

t3

t5

t3

t0

t3

t1

t2

t0

t2

t0

t3

t0

t3

t0

t3

t æææ0

A

Äâ

32010

AAAAA3

t0

t2

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t2

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t0

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t0

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t0

t2

t0

t æææ3

t0

t3

t0

t3

|

Open Position A Minor 7/11 Pentatonic Scale

3 32 2

3 3

fingering

1

numbered tones in relation toan "A" major scale

1 4 b7

b3

5 5

b3b7

5 1

4 b7

Open Position C Major 6/9 Pentatonic Scale

3 32 2

3 3

fingering

1

numbered tones in relation toa "C" major scale

6 2 5

1

3 3

15

3 6

2 5

Page 211: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

211

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.445

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø!

Û

8

t™

9

! t#

10

Û

11

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t!

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â 44Ω ø

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one-position chromatic scale fingering

one-position chromatic scale fingering

fin 1.445 fin 1.445All-Fretted Chromatic Scale Fingering

Page 212: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

212

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.446

Ä 44â 44Ω øΩΩ øÛ

8

t!

9

! t™

10

t#

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11

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8

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four note-per-string chromatic scale fingering

four note-per-string chromatic scale fingering

Chromatic Scale Fingering (continued)fin 1.446 fin 1.446

Page 213: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

213

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.521

Ä 44â 44

Û0

t4

! t2

2

t1

!t0

t Û0

t4

! t0

t Û0

t1

t2

t Û0

t4

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2

t11

Û

2

t2

!t1 4

5

t Û5

t44

5

t2

t Û2

t2

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t Û2

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Äâ

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t æøææø

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4

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æææ0

A

ÄâΩ øΩΩ øÛ

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t Û5

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t Û3

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4

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4

t Û4

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1

t2

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æææ0

A

E

First and Second Position Major Arpeggios

A D

G

First and Second Position Minor Arpeggios

C B E

Em Am Dm

Gm Cm B Em

fin 1.521 fin 1.521

Page 214: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

214

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.522

Ä ! 128â 128 2

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t0

t2

t2

t0

t2

t1

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t1

t2

t2

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t2

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t2

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t0

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t

Ä !â

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t2

t0

t2

t1

!t2

t1

t2

t2

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t1

!t2

t1

t2

t

Ä !â 2

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t0

t2

t2

t2

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t0

t2

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t1

t2

t1

t2

t2

t2

t2

t0

t3

t3

"t1

t0

t1

t3

t1

t3

t2

t3

t2

t3

t

Em I

321

Am I

32

Minor BluesEm I

32

1

Am I

32 21

B7 I

3 4

Em I

321

Am I

323

21

C7 I

4

Open-Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggioswith patterned arpeggios and bass lines

Performance Notes Most of the chords involved in these examples should be held until another chord name appears.

Chord Diagram Reminders Roman numerals on the upper right of chord diagrams indicate the number of the top fret on the diagram. Circles shown above a string indicate the string is played open. Strings not marked are not played.

fin 1.522 fin 1.522

Page 215: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

215

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.523

Ä !â 2

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t0

t2

t2

t2

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t2

t1

!t2

t1

t2

t2

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t1

t0

t1

t2

t æøææø2

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t2

t0

t2

«t æææ0

22000

«A «A «A «A«A «A #

Ä 34â 34 0

t2

t3

t2

t2

!t3

t3

t3

t0

t3

t3

t2

!t0

t2

!t2

t2

t0

t2

t4

!t3

!t2

!t3

t0

t2

t4

!t4

t3

t4

t3

t4

t

Äâ 5

t4

t3

t4

t3

t4

t2

t0

t1

t0

t1

t0

t3

t3

t2

t3

t1

t2

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t3

t2

t0

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t

Äâ 0

t2

t3

t2

t1

t3

t

3

t0

t3

t0

t3

t3

t3

t3

t2

t3

t1

t2

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t0

t2

t0

t2

t0

t0

t

Em I

32 21

B7 I

3 4

Em I

321

Am I

32

Em I

32 21

B7 I

3 4

Em I

32

2

D I

31

21

G I

3 4

Sixties Style Folk Song

4

A I

323

21

F#7 II

32

Bm III

1

3

G III

12

32

1

C I

42

1

F I

3 32

1

C I

32

1

C I

1

Dm I

32

21

G I

3 4 42

1

F I

3 32

1

C I Em I

32

Open Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios (continued)fin 1.523 fin 1.523

Page 216: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

216

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.524

Äâ

0

t2

t2

t2

t1

t2

t0

t2

t3

t2

t2

!t3

t

3

t0

t3

t0

t3

t3

t

3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t3

t3

t2

t3

t1

t2

t

Äâ

3

t3

t2

t3

t1

t2

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t0

t2

t2

t2

t1

t2

t0

t2

t3

t2

t2

!t3

t

3

t0

t3

t0

t3

t3

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t

Äâ

3

t3

t2

t3

t1

t2

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t3

t3

t2

t3

t1

t2

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t2

t1

!t2

t0

t1

t

Äâ

0

t2

t2

t2

t1

t2

t3

t0

t0

t0

t0

t0

t3

t2

t0

t2

t1

t0

t æææ3

«|

1

Am I

32 2

D I

31

21

G I

3 4 21

G I

4 32

1

C I

42

1

F I

3

32

1

C I

1

Am I

32 2

D I

31

21

G I

3 4 32

1

C I

42

1

F I

3 21

G I

43

21

C I

42

1

F I

3 21

G I

4

1

E I

2 3

1

Am I

322

1

G I

4 32

1

C I

Open Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios (continued)fin 1.524 fin 1.524

Page 217: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

217

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.525

Ä 44â 44Ω øΩΩ ø 3t

0

t1

t0

t2

t0

t1

t0

t0

t0

t1

t0

t3

t0

t1

t0

t3

t2

t1

t2

t2

t2

t1

t2

t0

t2

t1

t2

t3

t2

t1

t2

t

Äâ 0

t0

t3

t0

t3

t0

t3

t3

t2

t0

t3

t2

t0

t0

t3

t0

t3

t0

t1

t0

t3

t2

t1

t2

t æøææø0

t3

t

3

t0

t0

t0

t2

t0

t æææ3

A

Ä 44â 44Ω øΩΩ ø 0t

2

t10

tt

0

t3

t2

t10

tt

3

t2

! t2

t10

tt

2

t1

# t2

t01

tt2

t0

t2

t31

tt

0

t3

t2

t31

tt

3

t2

t0

t33

tt

2

t1

" t0

t33

tt

1

t

32

1

C I

21

C/B I

21

Am7 I

Major Classic Rock

32

1

C/G I

21

F I

3

1

Am I

32

Dm7n3 I

12 2

1

F I

3 4

G I

4

G7 I

43

G6 I

42

Minor Classic Rock

G I

4 32

1

C I

21

F I

3

G I

4 32

1

C I

1

Am I

321

Am I

32

4

1

F#m7b5 I

2 32

Fma7 I

13

Dm I

12

4

Dm7 I

12

431

G/B I

3 4

1

Gm I

3 4

Open Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios (continued)fin 1.525 fin 1.525

Page 218: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

218

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.526

Ä 44â 44 2

t1

!t00

tt2

t0

t1

t00

tt0

t3

t3

t21

tt3

t2

t2

t10

!tt2

t0

t2

t12

tt0

t2

t0

t30

tt2

t3

t2

t01

tt3

t4

! t2

t00

tt4

t

Äâ 0

t2

t13

tt

0

t2

t0

t01

tt2

t3

t2

t11

tt3

t4

!t2

t01

tt2

t0

t0

t3

t0

t1

!t0

t0

t0

t æøææø2

t1

t0

t1

t2

t1

!t0

t1

t1.

Äâ 2

t1

t0

t1

t

0

t4

t0

t3

t2.

æææ0

t5

t3

t0

t

0555

||||

1

E I

21

E7 I

21

F I

3 4

1

E I

321

Am I

32

G/B I

42

32

1

C I

2

C#m7b5 I

4

Dm I

12

32

1

C/E I

21

F I

32

F#m7b5 I

4

1

G I

3

1

E/G# I

1

Am I

321

E I

2

1

Am I

321

E7n3 III

21

Am add4 III

3

Am III

3 3 3

Open Position One Note-Per-String Arpeggios (continued)fin 1.526 fin 1.526

Page 219: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

219

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

1 2 3

A I

2 3

1

Am I

2 3 4

B7 I

2

3

1

C I

1

1

4

2

Bm II

3

21

D I

32

1

D7 I

1

2

3

Dm I

2

3

1

C7 I

4

2 3

E I

3

4

2

1

F I

1

1

4

G I

1

3

1

3

2

1

F I

1

4

1 1

Fm I

1

3

1

2

1

3 4

G I

2

2

E7 I

1

2 3

Em I

First Nineteen Chord Fingerings

1

fin 1.603 fin 1.603

2 3

A7 I

1

3 3

B II

3

1

4

2

Cm III

34

2

1

G III

1

3

1

4

1 1

Gm III

1

3

1 1 1

3 3

C III

3

1

4

2

Dm V

34

2

1

A V

1

3

1

4

1 1

Am V

1

3

1 1 1

3 3

D V

3

The chords below are movable.Each chord is named after its circled note.

Fingering 1.603

Page 220: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

220

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.630

Ä !! 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 77tt

99

tt c

77

tt

99

tt c1 d

77

tYt

99

tt

7

t

77

tt

99

tt

77

tt

99

tt c

77

tt

99

tt c æø

ææød

77

tYt

99

tt

0

t77

tt

99

tt

Ä !!

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø99tIt d

99

tt

99

tt

99

tt

77

tt tt5

æø

ææøtt

99

tt

99

tt

77

tt

99

tt

99

tt

77

tt tt # # ""

Ä ""

â13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

0

t7

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

13

tt

13

tt

0

t

0

t

3

t

3

t

1

t

0

t

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

0

t

Ä ""

â13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt

13

tt12

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

35

tt

02

tt

02

tt

02

tt

02

tt

02

tt

02

tt

02

tt

02

tt

13

tt

13

tt

0

t

0

t

3

t

3

t

1

t

0

t æ

ææ13

tt

13

ttcc

bb # #

Bb F Gm Eb Bb

F Gm D Eb Bb

Quick-Changing Two Finger Chordsfin 1.630 fin 1.630

Page 221: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

221

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.631

Ä 44â 44

0

t7

t9

t10

t10

tS

9

t7

t t17

0

t6

!t9

t0

t0

t7

t6

t t0

t5

t7

t0

t0

t7

t5

t t æææ0

t4

!t7

t0

t0

t5

t4

t t

Äâ

0

t3

t5

t0

t0

t5

t3

t t21

0

t3

t4

t0

t0

t0

t3

t t0

t2

t2

t0

t t0

t0

t2

t æææ0

t2

t2

t0

t |

Ä 44â 44

079

ttt

0

t0

t07

10

ttt

0

t0

t079

ttt

0

t25

069

t!tt

0

t0

t069

ttt

0

t0

t067

ttt

0

t057

ttt

0

t0

t079

ttt

0

t0

t057

ttt

0

t æææ0

47

t!tt

0

t0

t047

ttt

0

t0

t045

ttt0

t

Äâ

035

ttt0

t0

t057

ttt

0

t0

t035

ttt0

t29

034

ttt0

t0

t034

ttt0

t0

t030

ttt0

t022

ttt0

t0

t022

ttt0

t0

t000

ttt æææ0

2200

AAAAA!!!

A5 VII

3

1

F VII

4

1

A5 VII

3

1

E/A VI

4

1

E7/A VI

21

Em7/A V

3

1

D/A IV

4

1

D9/A IV

21

Fma7/A III

2

1

Fma7b5/A III

21

Fma7 sus.2A III

1

A sus.2 III

2 3

A5 VII

3

1

F VII

4

1

A5 VII

3

1

E/A VI

4

1

E7/A VI

21

Em7/A V

3

1 1

A no5 VII

3

Em/A V

3

1

D/A IV

4

1

D/A IV

21

F III

3

1

G/A V

3

1

F III

3

1

Fb5 III

3

1

Fsus.2 III1

A5 I

32

G/A I Asus.2 I

32

Quick-Changing Two Finger Chords (continued)fin 1.631 fin 1.631

Page 222: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

222

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.632

Ä !!! 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 22tt

22

tt

42

tt

0

t54

tt

0

t

0

t22

tt33

æø

ææøtt

22

tt

42

tt

0

t54

tt

76

SS

tt

0

t

0

t Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 79tt

79

tt

57

tt

0

t47

tt

0

t

0

t57

tt æø

ææøtt

57

tt

47

tt

0

t57

SS

tt

79

tt

0

t

0

t# # # !

Ä ! 44

â 4402

ttd

13

" tI#t

02

«t «t

02

tI# t37 d

02

tIt

13

d

02

" tI#t ||

02

ttd

13

" tI#t

02

«t «t

35

tIt tt

0

t

23

tt

0

t

23

tt

35

tt

23

tt

02

tt

Ä !

âtt

13

02

d " tI#t «t «t

02

tI# t41 d

02

tIt

13

d

02

" tI#t ||

02

ttd

13

" tI#t

02

«t «t

35

tIt tt

0

t

23

tt

0

t

23

tt

30

tt

23

tt

02

tt æ

ææAAa

#

Ä 44

â 44 12

tt34

tt

55

tt tYt

34

tt46

12

tYt

00

tt

22

tIt ||

32

tt

00

tt

21

tt tt

00

00

tt tt æ

æætIt

32

«t «t || !!!

Quick-Changing Two Finger Chords (continued)fin 1.632 fin 1.632

Page 223: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

223

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.633

Ä !!! 44

â 44 22

tt

0

t

0

t43

tt

0

t

0

t56

tt50

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 77tt

0

t

0

t77

tt

0

t

0

t77

tt

0

t1011

tt

0

t

0

t99

tt

0

t

0

t77

tt

77

tt

0

t

0

t56

tt

0

t

0

t56

tt d

22

tt

0

t

0

t43

tt

0

t

0

t22

tt

Ä !!!

â 10

tt

0

t

0

t10

tt

0

t

0

t10

tt

0

t55

10

tt

0

t

0

t22

tt

0

t

0

t43

tt1.

56

tt

0

t

0

t56

tt

0

t

0

t56

tt

0

t æø

ææø22

tt

0

t

0

t43

tt

0

t

0

t56

tt

10

tt

0

t

0

t22

tt

0

t

0

t10

tt2.

Ä !!!

â 22

tt

0

t

0

t

22

tt

0

t

0

t

22

tt

0

t60

22

AA

990

ttt99

tt

99

tt d

77

tYt

56

tYt d

440

ttt

2

t

2

t t

2

t

2

t

0

t

2

t

2

t

44

tt d

56

tYt c

Ä !!!

â 990

ttt

0

t

9

t t

9

t

9

t d65

990

ttt99

tt

1011

tt tt

99

tYt d

0

99

ttt

7

t

7

t t

7

t

7

t

065

ttt

56

tt

56

tt

56

tt

45

"t#t

34

tt d æ

ææ022

AAA

Quick-Changing Two Finger Chords (continued)fin 1.633 fin 1.633

Page 224: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

224

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.635

G9nr II

1

3 4

2

2 3 4

A I

2 3

A7 I

1 1 1

A7 I

2 3

1

Am I

2

1

Am7 I

1

3 3

B II

1

3

1

B7 II

2 3 4

B7 I

3

2

3

1

C I

3 4

1 1

4

2

Bm II

3

1 1

2

Bm7 II

3

2 3 3

B9 I

1

3

21

D I

3

1

2

D II

32

1

D7 I

2 3

4

D/F# I

1

2

3

Dm I

2

3

1

C7 I

4

2 3

E I

3

1

4

2

Dm7 I

11

4

2

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1

3

1

3

2

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1

4

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1

3

11

2

1

F7 I

1

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1

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2

1

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G/B I

2

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3

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1

4

2

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1

2 3

Em7 I

4

2

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2 3

Em I

First Thirty-Five Chord Fingerings

1

1 1

Fm7 I

3

111

1

fin 1.635 fin 1.635

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.700

Ä 44â 44 12

1212141412

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Em XII

Twelfth Position G Major 6/9 Pentatonic Scale

Twelfth Position E Minor 7/11 Pentatonic Scale

1

4

1

3

1 1 1 1

3 34 4

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3

1

2

1 1 1 1

2 23 3

fingering XIIalternate

numbered tonesof an "E" major scale

1 11

4

G XII

1

4

1

3

1 1 1 1

3 34 4

fingering XII1

3

1

2

1 1 1 1

2 23 3

fingering XIIalternate

numbered tonesof a "G" major scale

Compare the fingerings below to the open position E minor 7/11 and open position G maor 6/9 fingerings you learned earlier. They have the same pattern, but the open strings are replaced with "first finger notes" and the notes fretted with second and third fingers may be changed to third and fourth fingers.

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.716

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"A" major scale-tone thirds with "A" pedal tone (repeating bass)

Major Scale-Tone Thirds

"D" major scale-tone thirds with "D" pedal tone (repeating bass)

"E" major scale-tone thirds with "E" pedal tone (repeating bass)

Pluck the open-string bass notes with the the thumband the remaining notes with the index and middle fingers.

fin 1.716 fin 1.716

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.723

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Three String Barré Examplesfin 1.723 fin 1.723

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.725

MAJOR AND PERFECT INTERVALSUP TO A FIFTH

Play the “A” major scale on the fifth string, as shown below.

=============================Ä 44

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BA C# D E F# G# A A G# F# E C#D B A

In each of the four bars of examples below, “A” is followed another of the major scale tones. Then “A”is played on the sixth string, fifth fret at the same time as the other scale tone. When two notes are played at thesame time, they are called an interval.

=============================Ä 44

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|mmmmmm|A B major

second A C#

third major A D perfect

fourth A E

fifth perfect

Intervals are relative. A perfect fourth represents the interval from scale tone one to scale tone four inany major scale. In the example below, a perfect fourth is constructed from the “A” and “D” major scales.Likewise, any interval conceived in one major scale can be conceived in another.

=============================Ä 44

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|mmmmmm|"A" major scale tones one through four

A B C# D A D perfectfourth

"D" major scale tones one through four

D F#E G D G

fourth perfect

During a piece of music you should get a sense of which chord the music is moving toward, the chordyou would expect it to end on. The key is the name of the note you would expect as the bass note at the end ofthe musical example and is the note after which the last chord is named.

Transposing is the changing of a musical example from one key to another. In the interval diagramsbelow, intervals are shown on various different combinations of strings. In comparing interval fingeringsgraphically, they don't always look the same. Wherever a note on one of the the first two strings is combinedwith a note on strings three through six, the note on the first or second string must be moved up one fret to

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.726

compensate for the fact that the first two strings are tuned down a half step (one fret) compared to the other strings.Remember, for example that you can tune each string fretted at the fifth fret to the next smaller string open exceptthe third string must be fretted at the fourth fret to tune it to the second string, open. This illustrates that the firsttwo strings are tuned down one half step.

DIAGRAMS OF INTERVALS THAT

REPRESENT THE FIRST FIVE TONES OF A MAJOR SCALE

INTERVALS MEASURED IN FRETS DO NOT COUNT THE FRET ON WHICH YOU BEGIN

Major second (M2) = 1 step = 2 fretsEqual to the interval from major scale tone one to major scale tone two in any key.

major third (M3) = 2 steps = four fretsEqual to the interval from major scale tone one to major scale tone three in any key.

perfect fourth (P4) = 2 1/2 steps = five fretsEqual to the interval from major scale tone one to major scale tone four in any key.

perfect fifth (P5) = 3 1/2 stepsEqual to the interval from major scale tone one to major scale tone five in any key.

A minor second interval is an alteration of the major second, where the higher pitch is lowered by a halfstep (one fret).

Minor second (m2) = 1/2 step

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.727

Major second (M2) = 1 step = 2 frets

A minor third interval is an alteration of the major third, where the higher pitch is lowered by a half step(one fret).

minor third (m3) = 1 1/2 steps = 3 frets

major third (M3) = 2 steps = 4 fretsEqual to the interval from major scale tone one to major scale tone three in any key.

An augmented fourth interval is equal to a diminished fifth interval. The augmented fourth interval isan alteration of the perfect fourth, where the higher pitch is raised by a half step (one fret). The diminished fifthinterval is an alteration of the perfect fifth, where the higher pitch is lowered by a half step (one fret).

perfect fourth (P4) = 2 1/2 steps = five fretsEqual to the interval from major scale tone one to major scale tone four in any key.

augmented fourth (aug4) = diminished fifth (dim5) = 3 steps = 6 frets

perfect fifth (P5) = 3 1/2 steps = 7 fretsEqual to the interval from major scale tone one to major scale tone five in any key.

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.735

POSTURE EXERCISES FOR THEINDEX AND LITTLE FINGERS

These exercises train the the index and little fingers to stay separated from fingers next to them. Bytraining your “outside” fingers (index and little fingers) to stay separated at the middle knuckle, the tips of theoutside fingers can more easily reach to adjacent strings and frets.

Reaching To The Two Adjacent Frets With The Index FingerPlay the sequence indicated by each row of diagrams below in order, reading from left to right. Keep

the middle, ring and little fingers fretted, as shown. Play this sequence keeping the first finger very close to thestrings. When your hand or fingers tire, rest and massage them.

fretting the adjacent fret with the index finger

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

reaching two frets with the index finger

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

VIII1

4

2

3

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.736

Parallel Fourths Blues Example 1. Repeat between the repeat signs and end on the last chord.

441

G7

44

4

C7

8

G7

D7

C7

12

G7

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.740

PARALLEL FIFTHSRHYTHM GUITAR EXAMPLES

Parallel Fifths Metal Example 1. Repeat and end on the last chord.

911

911

911

911

911

911

911

911

911

79

57

57

57

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57

57

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24

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24

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Parallel Fifths Metal Example 2. Repeat and end on the third chord.

At the beginning of the second bar, the low “E” to “F#” is a combination hammer and slide.

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.835

FUNDAMENTALS OF FINGERING

STRICT VERTICAL POSITION

Review the five octave shapes. "6-4-1" indicates that the notes are on the sixth, fourth and first strings."4-2" indicates notes on the fourth and second strings.

“Position” is the numbered fret at which the first (index) finger is placed:

Strict vertical position is used for single note patterns such as scales and arpeggios, not for chords orintervals. It is a concept of fingering, used to define which position you are in during any part of a phrase. Itshould not be restrictive. The position is numbereed after the fret at which the first finger is placed.

In strict vertical position, the fretting hand fingers are assigned to four consecutive frets, with twoexceptions:

1. The first finger can reach out of position one fret toward the head of the guitar.

2. The fourth finger can reach out of position one fret toward the bridge.

The diagram below illustrates the two exceptions mentioned above. The arrow to the left of the diagramindicates the strict vertical position:

The Roman numeral on the upper right of a fretboard diagram does not necessarily indicate the strictvertical position. When the first finger reaches one fret out of position to the left, the diagram must include the

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.836

next fret below the strict vertical position:

this strict verticalposition is fourth position,not third as you might thinkby the Roman numeral above.

SURVEYING THE FRETBOARD

Learn to finger all scales, arpeggios (chords played one note at a time) and chords with at least one versionin each octave area.

Find the fingerings that you will use most often. Regardless of how many fingerings you memorize,you’ll be able to play certain ones faster and smoother. After studying principles of fingering, choose fingeringsaccording to the (1) shape and flexibility of your hand, and (2) the contours of patterns on the fretboardcharacteristic of the styles you play.

PRINCIPLES OF FINGERING

General rules. When one rule conflicts with another, weigh the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Practice difficult fingerings such as:

• reaching out of position with the fourth finger

• rapid use of the fourth finger

• bends with the first (index) or fourth finger

• spans leaving a fret between the second (middle) and third (ring) fingers

• consecutive use of the same finger on different strings

• wide skips in position

Avoid difficult fingerings when speed or clarity is needed. Use smooth, easy fingerings for speed andclarity. This often involves avoiding use of the little finger.

In playing the example below, most guitarists would find it easier to avoid the use of the little finger,since playing the upper positions tends to involve a rotation of the palm where the index finger reaches closerto the bridge and the little finger is pulled down. This is especially true in playing uppper positions on acousticguitars where the hand has to reach over the guitar body at the twelfth or fourteenth fret when the guitar has nocutaway.

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.837

===============Ä 44

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Avoid using the second and third fingers spanned apart to leave an empty fret between them Exception:Allan Holdsworth’s style incorporates this commonly avoided span.

Avoid using the same finger for two different notes on the same string, unless to slide, change position,or reach out of position.

Avoid using the same finger on different frets of two adjacent strings:

Changing Position.Avoid changing position until you have to when improvising diagonally across the fretboard. Continue

using a convenient fingering area until it presents a difficulty. This simplifies your position changes.

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.838

Shifting: changing position by playing two consecutive notes on the same string with the same finger.This is usually done with the first or fourth fingers. The following example is an exercise and would usually betoo long of a scale run to be used in its entirety within a solo.

Sliding. Changing position by sliding from one note to another is usually done with the first or fourthfingers.

Skipping from one position to another wastes time in movement, but can save time by using familiarfingering patterns which require little thought.

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.839

Compressing: changing position where notes are played in a lesser span than the fingers usually occupy,such as two consecutive frets fingered by the first and third fingers. In the example below, the first and fourthfingers span three frets instead of four frets (the second and third to last notes in the example).

Out-Of-Position Notes.Reach out of position with the outside fingers. Out-of-position notes can usually be reached to the left

with the first finger or to the right with the little finger:

Use the following guidelines for fingering out-of-position notes:

(1) First finger out-of-position reaches are better than those with the fourth, because of the wider spanbetween the first and second fingers.

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.840

(2) When playing intervals involving five fret spans on two or more strings, choose a fingering optionwith a whole step between the first and second finger. Otherwise, the whole step will probably occurbetween the third and fourth fingers

(3) Identical fingering patterns on adjacent strings are desirable for ease of memorization and to conservemotion in the left wrist.

(4) Hammers and pull-offs sometimes determine which out of position version of a note will be used.

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.890

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11

!t↓4

12

t↓1

9

t↑3

11

!t↓4

12

t↓1

9

t↑3

11

!t æø

ææø↓1

9

!t↑2

10

t↓4

12

t↓1

9

! t

↑4

12

t

↓1

9

t

↑2

10

t↑1

9

t↑3

11

!t↑4

12

t↑4

12

t↓1

9

! t æ

ææ↓4

12

«|

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø↓4

Ût↑1

! t↓2

t↓4

Ût↑1

!t↓3

!t↓4

Ût↑1

t↓3

!t↓4

Ût↑1

t↓3

!t

aæø

ææø↑1

Û!t↓2

t↓4

t↑1

Û! t

↓4

t

↑1

t

↑2

Ût

↑1

t↑3

!t↑4

Ût↑4

t↓1

! ta

æ

ææ↓4

Aa

Ä 34

â 34Ω ø

ΩΩ ø↓4

12

t↑1

9

! t↓4

12

t↓4

12

t↓3

11

!t↓1

9

t↓2

10

t↓1

9

! t

↑4

12

t

↓2

10

t

↑1

9

t

↑4

12

t æø

ææø↓2

10

t↑1

9

!t↑3

11

!t↓1

9

t↑4

12

t↓3

11

!t↑1

9

t↑4

12

t↓3

11

!t↑1

9

!t↑4

12

t↓1

9

! t æ

ææ↓4

12

«|

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø↓4

Û

12

t↑1

9

! t↓4

12

t↓4

Û12

t↓3

11

!t↓1

9

t↓2

Û10

t↓1

9

! t

↑4

12

t

↓2

Û10

t

↑1

9

t

↑4

12

t æø

ææø↓2

Û10

t↑1

9

!t↑3

11

!t↓1

Û9

t↑4

12

t↓3

11

!t↑1

Û

9

t↑4

12

t↓3

11

!t↑1

Û

9

!t↑4

12

t↓1

9

! t æ

ææ↓4

12

A

A major scalefingers IX

11 1 1 1 12 2 2

33 344 4 4 4 4

A major scaleformula IX

A major arp.fingers IX1 1 1

23

4 44

A major arp.formula IX

A Major Scale andA Major Arpeggio Exercise

arpeggios fingered as subsets

fin 1.890 fin 1.890

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241

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.925

Ä 44â 44 12

13141412

AAAAA12

t15

t12

t15

t12

t14

t12

t14

t13

t15

t12

t15

t12

t15

t13

t14

t æææ3

t0

t3

t1

t2

t0

t2

t

Äâ 12

13121415

AAAAA15

t12

t14

t12

t14

t13

t15

t12

t15

t12

t15

t13

t14

t12

t14

t12

t æææ15

t12

t15

t12

t15

|

1 1

2

3 4

Am chordfingering XII

Am7/11 scalefingering XII

11 1 1 12

3 34 4 4 4

Twelfth Position C Major 6/9 Pentatonic Scale

Twelfth Position A Minor 7/11 Pentatonic Scale

Am7/11 scalealternate

fingering XII11 1 1 1

1

3 2

4 4 3 3

Am7/11 scalealternate

fingering XII11 1 1 1

1

3 2

4 4 3 3

numbered tonesof an A major scale

1

2

3

C chordfingering XII

1

4

C6/9 scalefingering XII

11 1 1 1

2

3 3

4 4 4 4

C6/9 scalealternate

fingering XII11 1 1 1

1

3 2

4 4 3 3

numbered tonesof a C major scale

Compare the fingerings below to the open position A minor 7/11 and open position C maor 6/9 fingerings you learned earlier. They have the same pattern, but the open strings are replaced with "first finger notes" and the notes fretted with second and third fingers may be changed to third and fourth fingers.

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242

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.9461

Ä " 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ øÛ

1↓

3

t4↑

6

t1↓

3

t Û3↑

5

t1↓

3

t3↑

5

t Û1↓

3

t3↑

5

t1↓

3

t Û4↑

6

t1↓

3

t4↑

6

t1

æø

ææøÛ

3

t1↓

6

t4↑

3

t1↓

Û6

"t4↑

5

t3↓

3

t1↑

Û

5

t3↑

3

t1↓

5

t3↑

Û

4

"t2↓

3

t1↑

6

t4↑

3434Ω ø

ΩΩ øt

3

1↓

t

6

4↑

t

3

1↓

t

5

3↑

t

3

1↓

t

5

3↑

t

3

1↓

t

5

3↑

t

3

1↓

t

6

4↑

t

3

1↓

t

6

4↑

æø

ææø1↓

t

3

4↑

t

6

1↓

t

3

4↑

"t

6

3↓

t

5

1↑

t

3

3↑

t

5

1↓

t

3

3↑

t

5

2↓

"t

4

1↑

t

3

4↑

t

6

Ä " 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ øÛ

1

3

t4

6

t1

3

t Û3

5

t1

3

t3

5

t Û1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t Û3

6

t1

3

t3

6

t5

Û3

8

t1

6

t3

8

1

6

t2

7

t1

5

t Û4

8

t1

5

t4

8

t Û1

5

t4

8

t2

6

t 3434Ω øΩΩ ø

1

3

t4

6

t1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t3

6

t1

3

t3

6

t æøææø

3

8

t1

6

t3

8

t1

6

t2

7

t1

5

t4

8

t1

5

t4

8

t1

5

t4

8

t2

6

t

Ä " 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ øÛ

1

3

t4

6

t1

3

t Û3

5

t1

3

t3

5

t Û1

3

t3

5

t3

7

t Û1

6

t3

8

t1

6

t9

æøææø

Û3

8

t1

6

t3

8

1

6

t3

7

t1

5

t Û1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t Û3

5

t1

3

t4

6

t 3434 1

3

t4

6

t1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t3

5

t3

7

t1

6

t3

8

t1

6

t æøææø

3

8

t1

6

t3

8

t1

6

t3

7

t1

5

t1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t3

5

t1

3

t1

6

t

Ä " 54â 54

Ω øΩΩ øÛ

1

t1

3

t3

1

t1

Û

3

t3

5

t3

3

t1

Û

5

t3

3

t1

5

t2

Û7

t2

6

t1

8

t3

Û6

t1

8

t3

10

t4

13

æøææø

Û8

t3

6

t1

8

t3

Û6

t1

7

t3

6

"t2

Û5

t1

3

t1

5

t3

Û

3

t1

5

t3

4

"t2

Û

3

t1

1

t1

3

t3

Ä " 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ ø1t1

3

t3

1

t1

3

t3

5

t3

3

t1

5

t3

3

t1

5

t2

7

t2

6

t1

8

t3

6

t1

8

t3

10

t4

8

t3

15 3434

æøææø6

t1

8

t3

6

t1

7

t2

5

t2

3

t1

5

t3

3

t1

0

t3

3

t1

1

t1

3

t3

Gm7/11 III1

4

1

4

1 1 1 1

3 3 3

4

Fingering 1

Gm7/11 III1

3

1

3

1 1 1 1

3 3 3

4

Fingering 1 Fingering 2 1

Gm7/11 V

4

112

1

24 4 3 3

1

Gm7/11 III1

3

1

3

1 1 1 1

3 3 3

4

Fingering 1 Fingering 2 1

Gm7/11 V

4

112

1

24 4 3 3

1

1

Gm7/11 III

4

11 1

23 3

Fingering 1 Fingering 2

2

Gm7/11 V

1

23 3

1

1

Gm7/11 V

1

23 3

1

Fingering 2

1

Gm7/11 III

4

11 1

13 3

Fingering 1

1

Gm7/11 III

4

11 1

23 3

Fingering 1 Fingering 2

2

Gm7/11 V

1

23 3

1

1

Gm7/11 V

1

23 3

1

Fingering 2 Fingering 1

1

Gm7/11 III

4

11 1

13 3

Linear Minor Pentatonic Scale Exercises fin 1.9461fin 1.9461

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.9462

Ä " 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ øÛ

1

10

t4

13

t1

10

t Û4

13

t1

10

t3

12

t Û1

10

t3

12

t2

11

t Û4

13

t1

10

t4

13

t17

æøææø

Û1

10

t4

14

" t4

13

2

11

t3

12

t1

10

t Û3

12

t2

11

"t1

10

t Û3

13

t1

10

t4

13

t 3434Ω øΩΩ ø

1

10

t4

13

t1

10

t4

13

t1

10

t3

12

t1

10

t3

12

t2

11

t4

13

t1

10

t4

13

tæøææø

1

10

t4

14

" t4

13

t2

11

t3

12

t1

10

t3

12

t2

11

"t1

10

t3

13

t1

10

t4

13

t

Ä " 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ øÛ

6

t1

8

t3

10

t3

Û

8

t1

10

t3

8

t1

Û10

t3

12

t3

10

t1

Û12

t3

11

t1

13

t3

21 3434Û

15

t3

13

t1

15

t3

Û18

t4

15

t3

13

t1

Û15

t3

13

t1

11

t1

æøææø

Û12

t3

10

t1

12

t3

Û

10

t1

8

t1

10

t3

Û

8

t1

10

t3

8

t1

Ä " 44â 44

Ω øΩΩ ø6t1

8

t3

10

t3

8

t1

10

t3

8

t1

10

t3

12

t3

10

t1

12

t3

11

t1

13

t3

15

t3

13

t1

15

t3

13

t1

24 3434

æøææø15

t3

13

t1

11

t1

12

t3

10

t1

12

t3

10

t1

8

t1

10

t3

8

t1

10

t3

8

t1

4

X

3

211 1 1 1

4

3

44

Fingering 4

4

X

3

2

11 1 1 1

4

3

444

2

Fingering 4

Linear Minor Pentatonic Scale Exercises (continued)

Fingering 4

4

X

3

211 1 1 1

4

3

44 4

X

3

2

11 1 1 1

4

3

444

2

Fingering 4

fin 1.9462fin 1.9462

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.993

AN OVERVIEW OF PENTATONIC SCALESPentatonic scales have five tones per octave (not counting the octave). The most common forms are the

minor 7/11 pentatonic and major 6/9 pentatonic. I name these scales after the chords which have the same notes.

The major 6/9 chord is a sixth chord with an added ninth. The major scale tones used in a 6/9 chord are1, 2, 3, 5, 6. That is, a 6/9 chord is made up of the first, second, third, fifth and sixth tones of a scale named afterthe chord root. As you can see below, those tones of a C major scale are C, D, E, G and A.

The minor 7/11 chord is a minor seventh chord with an added eleventh. A minor 7/11 chord uses majorscale tones 1, b3 (a flatted version of major scale tone 3), 4, 5, b7 (a flatted version of major scale tone 7). So,a minor 7/11 chord is made up of the first, flatted third, fourth, fifth and flatted seventh tones of a scale namedafter the chord root. Those tones (or altered tones) of an A major scale are A, C, D, E and G. Notice that theflatted third and flatted seventh each lower the original scale tone by one fret (moving to the player’s left).

The scales shown above are the most common pentatonic scales. Minor 7/11 pentatonic is the mostfundamental and common scale in blues music. Major 6/9 is common to American styles of Anglo-Saxon origin,such as bluegrass, ragtime and country music.

Both minor 7/11 and major 6/9 pentatonic scales can be enhanced with the use of chromatics, as is shownin the fingerings at the end of this chapter.

Major 6/9 pentatonic works melodically against most major type chords, but is usually most effectivewhen used against major, sixth or add nine chords (major, 6th, add 9, 6/9). Minor 7/11 pentatonic works againstmost minor type chords, but is most effective against minor seventh types (m7, m9, m11, m7/11).

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.994

MOVABLE PENTATONIC SCALE FINGERINGS

Minor 7/11 and major 6/9 pentatonic scale fingerings are both taken from the same pattern. Each of thetwo scales has its own pattern of tone centers within the pattern. Before illustrating the respective tone centersfor each scale, let’s look at the pattern which is common to both.

The pattern is movable. It can be placed anywhere on the fretboard and would be named according tothe present location of the tone centers, which will be shown later.

The thirteen fret diagram at the rightdisplays the complete twelve fret pentatonicscale pattern. The top fret on the diagram hasa note on every string, as does the thirteenthfret. If the diagrams were to continuedownward, it would repeat the entire pattern,beginning at the 13th fret on the bottom.

The smaller diagrams illustrate thetwelve fret pattern broken into five smaller,single position fingering patterns. Fingering“1” is the most common, and the others arenumbered in order up the fretboard from it.

GRAPHIC VIEW OF PENTATONIC SCALES

The Pentatonic Fingering Cycle. Notice that as you circle to the next fingering in this cycle in eitherdirection, only two or three notes in the pattern change and that the notes that change are in one of the five octaveshapes (see Chapter 2).

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.995

Pentatonic “Lines”. Connecting the notes across the fretboard, “lines” are created. Each pentatonicscale fingering is made up of two consecutive lines.

VARIATIONS ON FINGERINGS

The top row is easiest to fret without bending. The middle row is best suited for bending notes on strings1, 2 and 3 and fretting notes on the lower strings. The bottom row of fingerings work best in the higher positionsor for bending notes on all six strings.

fingering 1 fingering 2 fingering 3 fingering 4 fingering 5

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.996

RELATIVE MAJOR 6/9 AND MINOR 7/11 PENTATONIC SCALES

Compare the major 6/9 and minor 7/11 pentatonic scale fingerings below. As illustrated by the boldrectangle, they share the same pattern.

b3

1

1

1

1

b3

5

5

5 1

b3

1

1

b3

5

55

5

b3

1 1

b3

5

5 1

b3

minor 7/11pentatonic

b3

b7 b7

b7

b7

b7

b7

b7b7

b7

4

4

4

44

4

4

4

4

1

1

1

3

5

5

5 1

3

1

1

33 5

55

5 1 3

1 1

3

5

5 1

3

3

major 6/9pentatonic6 6

6

6

6

6

66

6

6

2 2

2

2

2

2

2

22

2 3

1

3

5 1

5 1

1

5

1

3

1

315

1

5

1

3

1 35

1

1 b3 5 1

5 1

1

5

b3

b3

1

b3

1

5

5

1

5

5

b3

1

b3

5

5

33

majorchord

minorchord

1 1 1 1

4

3 3

4

1

3

1

3

4

2 1

1

2

3

4

1

3

4

1

3

1

3 3

4

1

1

33

2

1

3

1 1

3

4

44

1

1

1 1

3 3

1

1

4 44

1 1

3

2 1

4 4

1

1 1 1 1

4

3 3

4

1 1

3

4

1

3

1

3

4

2 1

44

1

1

3

1

2

3

4

1

3

1

4 44

1 1

1

3

1

3 3

4

11 1

3 3

1

4

1

33

2

1

3

2 1

4 4

1

major6/9

minor7/11

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.997

To align the tone centers and play in the same key, the major 6/9 pentatonic pattern would have to beplayed three frets toward the head of the guitar in relation to the major 7/11 pattern.

b3

1

1

1

1

b3

5

5

5 1

b3

1

1

b3

5

55

5

b3

1 1

b3

5

5 1

b3

minor 7/11pentatonic

b3

b7 b7

b7

b7

b7

b7

b7b7

b7

4

4

4

44

4

4

4

4

1

1

1

3

5

5

5 1

3

1

1

33 5

55

5 1 3

1 1

3

5

5 1

3

3

major 6/9pentatonic6 6

6

6

6

6

66

6

6

2 2

2

2

2

2

2

22

2 3

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FINGERING

Fingering 1.9971

641 shape 42 shape 52 shape 53 shape 631 shapeoctave only

minor chordmake up fingeringsfrom arpeggios withat least one of each:

1, b3, 5

minorarpeggio

majorarpeggio

major chordmake up fingeringsfrom arpeggios withat least one of each:

1, 3, 5

minor 7/11pentatonic

major 6/9pentatonic

Common Scales, Chords and FormulasFormulas express a scale or chord with the numbered tones of a major scale or the chord's root or a scale's tone center.

1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 b3 5 1

b3

5 1

b3

1

1

5

5

b3

b3 b3

1

b3

1

b3

5

5

1

1

1

5

5 5

b3

b3

1

1b3

b3

5

5

1 b3 5 1

b3

5 1

b3

1

1

5

5

b3

b3 b3

1

b3

1

b3

5

5

1

1

1

5

5 5

b3

b3

1

1b3

b3

5

5

1 b3 5 1

5 1

1

5

b3

b3

1

b3

1

5

5

1

5

5

b3

1

b3

5

5

5

4 b7

4

b7 b74

4

b7 4 b7

4 b7

4

5

b7 b74

4 b7

1

3

5 1

5 1

1

1

5

53

1

315

1

1

1

5

3

15

1

3

5 1

5 1

1

1

5

53

1

1

3

5

5

1

1

1

5

5 5

3

1

1

3

3

5

5

5

3

3

3

3

1

3

5 1

3

5 1

1

1

5

53

1

1

3

5

5 1

1

1

5

5 5

3

1

1

3

3

5

5

5

3

3

32

6 2

6 2

2

6 2

6

3

2

3 6 2

6

2 6 6

3

3

6 2 6

6 2

6

2

3 3

b3

4

b7 b7

4 b7

4

fingering 2 fingering 4 fingering 5 fingering 1fingering 3

fingering 1 fingering 2 fingering 3 fingering 4 fingering 5

E formE E

E

D

D

A

A

G

G

G

C

C

D form C form A form G form

B

BD

C#

E

E

EG

EF#A

G#

B

B

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

Fingering 1.9972

1

1

1

3

3

5

5

5 1

3

1

1

33 5

55

5 1 3

1 1

3

5

5 1

3

1

1

1

1

b3

5

5

5 1

b3

1

1

b3b3

5

55

5

b3

1 1

b3

5

5 1

b3

major minor

3

b3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1

1

octaves

631 G shape

641 E shape

42 D shape

52 C shape

53 A shape

631 G shape

641 E shape

1 1 1

4

2

1

3

4

3

4

dim. 7finger numbers

2

1 1

3

1

2

4

dim. 7finger numbers

2

4

3

1 1

4

1

2

3

dim. 7finger numbers

2

3

1

1

1

1

1

b3

5

5

5 1

b3

1

1

b3b3

5

55

5

b3

1 1

b3

5

5 1

b3

minor 7/11pentatonic

b3

1

b7 b7

b7

b7

b7

b7

b7b7

b7

4

4

4

44

4

4

4

4

1

1

1

3

3

5

5

5 1

3

1

1

33 5

55

5 1 3

1 1

3

5

5 1

3

3

major 6/9pentatonic6 6

6

6

6

6

66

6

6

2 2

2

2

2

2

2

22

full fretboard arpeggios and scalesfin 1.9972 fin 1.9972

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251

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

FINGERING

4

6

7

2

3

41

7 3

1

5

4

1

2 5

63

4

7 3

1

2 5

2 15

6 2 53

4

67 3

44

6 2

1

53

67

2 5

3

15 4

6

7

3

4

67

2 5

3

6

7

315

4

7

5

6

4

6

7

3

4

1

72

15

15

6 2 5

67 3

4

7

1

2

6 2 15

67 2

5

3

1 4

6

7 3

6 2

15

3

6

7

2

3

2 15 4

7 3

2

4

1 4

2

41

7

1

1

7

1

2 7

7

6

3

6

6

5

5

4

4

( 3 )

1

1

7

1

7 3

6

6

5

5

4

7

fingering 1reach with

index finger

fingering 2reach with

index finger

fingering 3no

reaches!

fingering 4reach with

index finger

fingering 5reach with

index finger

fingering 6reach withlittle finger

fingering 7no

reaches!

4

MAJOR SCALE

2 3

2

3 2

2

IN-POSITION FINGERINGS

fingering 1/2 fingering 2/3 fingering 3/4 fingering 4/5 fingering 5/6 fingering 6/7 fingering 7/1

1

2

3

4 5

6

7

1

2

3

45

6

7

1 2

3( 5 )

6 7

7

1

1

52

5

2

3

6

23 3

4

4 4

(6)

7

1

7

1

6

6 6

2

2 5

5

3

5

3

4 4

4

( 1 )

1

7

1

7

2

6

6 6

5 5

5

4

4

2

( 2 )

7

7

6

6

1

1

5

5 52

23 3

3

4

4 4

( 7) 3

7

3

1

1

1

3

3

5

5

5 1

3

1

1

33 5

55

5 1 3

full-fretboardmajor scale

3

6 2 6

7 6 2

4

7

2 4 6 2

6 2 7

4

7

6

2

4 4

6 2 6

1 1

3

5

5 1

3

7 6 2

4

7

2 4 6 2

© 1997-1999 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

4

7

7

7

4

7 AND 8 TONE SCALE formulasIV Lydian 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7I major 1 2 3 4 5 6 7V Mixolydian 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7II Dorian 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7VI Aeolian 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7III Phrygian 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7VII Locrian 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7harmonic minor 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7Phrygian Major 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7melodic minor 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7Lydian b7 (mel min IV=13#11) 1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7Locrian b4 (mel.minVII -7b5#5b9#9) 1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 b7dimin. half/whole (13#11b9#9) 1 b2 #2 3 #4 5 6 b7

CHORD FORMULASmajor 1 3 5minor 1 b3 5diminish.1 b3 b5sus. 4 1 4 5sus. 2 1 2 5augment. 1 3 #5maj 7 (∆7)1 3 5 77 (dom 7) 1 3 5 b7m7 1 b3 5 b7m7b5 1 b3 b5 b7dim 7 1 b3 b5 6ma 9 (∆9) 1 3 5 7 9 (=2)9 1 3 5 b7 9 (=2)m9 1 b35 b7 9 (=2)

PENTATONIC SCALE formulas7/11 1 3 4 5 b7m7/11 1 b3 4 5 b7m7/11b5 1 b3 4 b5 b7m6/11 1 b3 4 5 6m6/11b6 1 b3 4 b5 66/9 1 2 3 5 6m6/9 1 2 b3 5 6

6 1 3 5 6m6 1 b3 5 6add 9 1 2 3 5m add 9 1 2 b3 5

major scale tone sevenths, up in P4: VIIm7b5 IIIm7 VIm7 IIm7 V7 Ima7 IVma7major scale tone modes, up in P4 Locrian Phrygian Aeolian Dorian Mixolydian major Lydian b73625 b7362 b736 b73 b7 #4

major scale tone triads, stepwise: I maj II min III min IV maj V maj VI min VII dimmajor scale tones to construct triads: 135 246 357 461 572 613 724formula in major scale on chord root: 1 3 5 1 b3 5 1 b3 5 1 3 5 1 3 5 1 b3 5 1 b3 b5

major scale tone sevenths, stepwise: Ima7 IIm7 IIIm7 IVma7 V7 VIm7 VIIm7b5major scale tones to construct sevenths: 1357 2461 3572 4613 5724 6135 7246formula in major scale on chord root: 1 3 5 7 1 b3 5 b7 1 b3 5 b7 1 3 5 7 1 3 5 b7 1 b3 5 b7 1 b3 b5 b7major scale tone modes, stepwise major Dorian Phrygian Lydian Mixolydian Aeolian Locrian b3b7 b2b3b6b7 #4 b7 b3b6b7 b2b3b5b6b7

13

5

72

4

6 M

M

M

m

m

m

m

thirds

THREE NOTE-PER-STRING FINGERINGS

fin 1.9973fin 1.9973

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252

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.070

AN INTRODUCTION TOREADING RHYTHM

BEATS AND METERThe beat is the regular pulse to which music is played. Meter is the measurement and grouping of

beats. The most common meter is four. Meter in four is counted “one, two, three, four, one, two, three, four, etc.”, thought or spoken at regular intervals in time. Meter in three is counted regularly “one, two, three, one, one, two, three, etc.”. In music notation, these groups are divided into measures or bars (the meanings are virtually identical) by bar lines.

In standard music notation, there are two numbers near the beginning of a piece of music, one written over the other. This pair of numbers is called the time signature. The top number defi nes the grouping of beats. When the top number is “four”, there are four beats to a bar. When it is three, there are three beats to a bar, when it is seven, there are seven beats to a bar. I'll defi ne the bottom number later. For now, I’ll give all musical examples with a four as the bottom number. Each note in music notation is represented by an oval notehead. Most notes also have a stem, which may be drawn up or down from the notehead.

notehead

stem

stem

notehead

time signature barline ending barlines

measure or bar==========Ä 44 tmmmm tmmmm tmmmm tmmmm ætmmmm tmmmm tmmmm tmmmm

In the exercises below, each note has a time value of one beat. Notice that in the 4/4 time signature, there are four beats per bar, and three beats per bar in the 3/4 time signature. In 4/4, count “1, 2, 3, 4” evenly as you play. In 3/4, count “1, 2, 3” evenly as you play.

Ä 441

t2

t3

t4

t t1

t2

t3

t4

t1

t2

t3

t4

æt1

t2

t3

t4

Ä 34 t1

t2

t3

t1

t2

t3

t1

t2

t3

æt1

t2

t3

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253

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.071

Metric AccentBeginning Accents. Most music is performed in regular groups of beats called bars or measures

(above). While performing these regular groups, we tend to emphasize the beginning of each group, beat “1”. This is an implied emphasis and is not a heavy accent, but a light, subtle one. The “>” symbol below indicates the implied metric accent.

=====================Ä 441

¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

tmmmm1¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

tmmmm1¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

tmmmm æ1¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

tmmmm

=====================Ä 341¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm tmmmm1¿

tmmmm2

tmmmm3

tmmmm1¿

tmmmm2

tmmmm3

æ1¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm

Half-Way Accents. When measures have even numbers of beats, the beat which begins the last half of the measure is given a slight accent, one lesser than that on the fi rst beat. The “≥” symbol below indicates the strongest implied metric accent, and the “>” symbol indicates the next weaker accent.

In four-beat measures, the next to the strongest metric accent is on "3", since it begins the last half of the measure:

=====================Ä 441÷tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm¿4

tmmmm1÷tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

¿tmmmm

1÷tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

¿tmmmm æ

1÷tmmmm

2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm

4

tmmmm

In six-beat measures, the next to the strongest metric accent is typically on "4", since it begins the last half of the measure:

=====================Ä 64 ÷1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3

tmmmm ¿4

tmmmm5

tmmmm6

tmmmm ÷tmmmm1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm4

tmmmm5

tmmmm6

÷tmmmm1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm4

tmmmm5

tmmmm6

æ÷tmmmm1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm4

tmmmm5

tmmmm6

Last Beat Accents. The last beat in the measure is often lightly accented to “lead-in” to the fi rst beat of the next measure.

In three-beat measures, the “last beat” accent on "3" would mean a lesser accent on “2”.

=====================Ä 341÷tmmmm

2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm

1÷tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm¿1÷tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm¿ æ1÷tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm¿

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254

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.072

In four-beat measures, the “last beat” accent on "4" would mean a lesser accent on “2”.

=====================Ä 441

¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm

4

tmmmm1¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

¿tmmmm

1¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm

4

tmmmm æ1¿tmmmm

2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm

4

tmmmm(>) (>) (>) (>)

In six-beat measures, the “last beat” accent on "6" would mean a lesser accents on “2”, “3”, and “5”.

=====================Ä 64 ÷1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3

tmmmm ¿4

tmmmm5

tmmmm6

tmmmm ÷tmmmm1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm4

tmmmm5

tmmmm6÷tmmmm1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm4

tmmmm5

tmmmm6

æ÷tmmmm1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3¿tmmmm4

tmmmm5

tmmmm6

TEMPOThe rate at which beats are played is called tempo. The tempo is commonly measured in beats per

minute. A typical dance tempo is 120 beats per minute (BPM). To pratice estimating 120 BPM, watch a clock and count twice per second. Tempo is indicated in music notation by showing the type of note that represents one beat, followed by a number representing beats per minute. This is traditionally shown at the beginning of a piece of music, and wherever there is a change in tempo.

Ä 44C = 120t t t t t t t t tC = 160t t t æt t t t

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255

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.080

SUBDIVISION OF THE BEATBeats can be subdivided. When there are two notes per beat, the rhythm is called duple time. Three notes

per beat is called triple time. Four notes per beat are usually classifed as duple time, since they are pairs of twonotes per beat.

A drummer typically plays all or most of the subdivisions of a beat on their ride or high hat cymbals. The“ride” cymbal is the large, softer sounding one. The louder crash cymbal is played on accents. The high hatcymbals are a pair of cymbals mounted on a shaft, with the bottom one upside-down. In addition to being playedwith the drumsticks, the high hat cymbals are opened and closed (moved apart and together on the shaft) witha foot pedal, making a “shoop” sound. If you listen to the ride or high hat cymbals, you’ll usually hear somethinglike a metronome (a beat-emitting device, used to practice rhythm).

In triple time, the drummer may play “one, two, three, one, two, three” on their cymbals. Or, they maythink “one, two, three, one, two, three”, and only play the “one, three, one, three” part of it (with a space in timeto represent “two”). “One, three” is called a shuffle or swing.

In duple time, the drummer may play “one, two, one, two” on their cymbals. Or, they may think “one,two, one, two”, and only play the “one, one, two, one, one, two” parts (with a space in time to represent themissing “two”). I call this rhythm the gallop, where every second of four regular parts is not played.

========================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t

0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmmmmmm mmmm

0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm

========================Ä

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ

Ûmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm0

t0

t0

tÛmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm

0

t0

t0

t0

tmmmmmm

0

tmmmmmm

0

tmmmmmm

0

tmmmmmm

Ûmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm0

t0

t0

tÛmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmmm mmmmm mmmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmm mmmm mmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmm mmmm mmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmm mmmm mmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmm mmmm mmmm

0

t0

t0

t

========================Ä 34

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 34

mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t mmmm mmmm0

t0

t

========================Ä

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ

Ûmmmm mmmm mmmm

0

t

0

t

0

tÛmmmm mmmm mmmm

0

t

0

t

0

tÛmmmm mmmm mmmm

0

t

0

t

0

t

0

tmmmm

0

tmmmm

0

tmmmm

0

tmmmmm

0

tmmmmm

0

tmmmmm Ûmmmmmm

mmmmmmmmmmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

0

t0

t0

tÛmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

0

t0

t0

t

duple subdivision (based on two notes per beat)

triple subdivision (based on three notes per beat)

duple subdivision (based on two notes per beat)

triple subdivision (based on three notes per beat)

rhy 1.080 rhy 1.080

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256

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.100

ENDINGS AND REPEATS

Repeat signs

Repeating the previous beat(s). This slash / indicates that:

(1) The previous beat should be repeated once for each slash; or

(2) The chord indicated above the staff should be played one beat for each slash.

Repeating the previous measure(s). When this slash with dots is shown in a measure, the previousmeasure is repeated. The measure may be repeated several times by repeating the slash and dots to indicate thedesired number of repetitions. See the example below.

Two bar repeats. Two measures (or bars) may be repeated as a group by writing the slash and dots (above)over the bar line and writing the number “2” over the bar line.

Left and right repeat signs. The repeat signs shown in the example below are used to indicate repetitionof everything between them. In the example below, bars four through eight would be repeated.

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257

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.101

Right repeat sign inly. When a right repeat sign is shown without a matching left repeat sign, repeat fromthe beginning.

Ending bar lines. At the end of the last bar (or measure) in a song, there is a double bar line and the secondbar line is especially thick.

First And Second EndingsFirst ending. The bracket shown over the last two bars of the example below indicates that the bars within

the bracket should be played only the first time through. Then you should go back to the beginning of the sectionto be repeated, indicated with double bar lines and dots on their right. If no double bar lines exist with dots ontheir right, repeat from the beginning of the song.

Second, third, etc. endings. Like the first ending, additional ending sections (under their numberedbrackets) should be played only once. If an ending section is completed with a repeat sign (a double barline withdots on its left), you should go back to the beginning of the section to be repeated. The beginning of the repeatedsection is indicated with double bar lines and dots on their right. If no double bar lines exist with dots on theirright, repeat back to the beginning of the song. The last numbered ending (under a bracket) will not be repeated.

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.200

INTRODUCTION TO TIME SIGNATURESAND HALVING VALUES

Most of the time values used in music notation fall into one of the following three categories:

• halving: halved and re-halved values in relation to the whole note

• dotted notes, which multiply values by one and one half (explained in a later section)

• tuplets, which change the subdivision of the beat

When the bottom number in the time signature is “4”, the whole note has a value of four beats. The halfnote is half the value of the whole note: two beats. The quarter note is one quarter the value of the whole note:one beat. Though they aren't used in the examples below, eighth notes would have one eighth the value of thewhole note and sixteenth notes would have one sixteenth the value of the whole note. The whole note is onlyassigned values that are the positive powers of two (2, 4, 8, 16, 32). or or or or

whole note value half note quarter note eighth note sixteenth note

4 beats 2 beats 1 beat 1/2 beat 1/4 beat

8 beats 4 beats 2 beats 1 beat 1/2 beat

When the top number on the time signature is “4”, there are four beats per measure. The example belowuses the first string open, “E”.

========================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 0

A4321 1

0

|mmmm32

0

|mmmm4 1

0

tmmmm2

0

tmmmm3

0

tmmmm4

0

tmmmm1

0

tmmmm2

0

tmmmm3

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tmmmm4

0

tmmmm

When the top number on the time signature is “3”, there are three beats per measure. The example belowuses the second string open, “B”.

========================Ä 34

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 341

0

tmmmm

0

tmmmm2

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tmmmm3 1

0

|mmmm32

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|mmmm3 1

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tmmmm2

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.201

Upward or downward stems indicate the same rhythmic value. They generally are drawn downwardfrom noteheads above the middle line of the staff and upward from noteheads below the middle line of the staff.Notes on the middle line are drawn either up or down.

=============Ä tmmmm tmmmm tmmmm tmmmm ætmmmm tmmmm tmmmm tmmmmExceptions are made when drawing the stem opposite the protocol will avoid collision with other music

characters.

==================Ä 44 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmt ! t tmmmmmmmmmmmmt tmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmt t t t|mmmmmm||

|mmmmmmm|| æ!|mmmmmmm||#|mmmmmmm||

Em Em C/E C/EEm6

When two instrument parts are written on the same staff, one part is usually written with all stems up andthe other with all stems down.

========================Ä d|mmmmtmmmmImmmm mmmmt t« « « d|mmmmtmmmmImmmm mmmmt t« « «

d|mmmmtmmmmImmmm mmmmt t« « « d|mmmmtmmmmImmmm mmmmt t« « « d

|mmmmtmmmmImmmm mmmmt t« « « d|mmmm

tmmmmImmmm mmmmt t« « « d

|mmmmtmmmmImmmm mmmmt t« « «d|mmmmtmmmmImmmm mmmmt t« « «

C G Am Em F C F6 G

The ornate curved line attached to the stem of eighth, sixteenth or notes of lesser time is called a flag.A single flag modifies a quarter note to make it an eighth note, two flags make a sixteenth note, three flags makea thirty-second note, and so on. Flags are never used on open-headed notes (whole nor half notes).

flag

flag

two flags

two flags

A beam is a thick line connecting the end of the stem (opposite the notehead). Beams have the same effectas flags. A single beam modifies a quarter note to make it an eighth note, two beams make a sixteenth note, andso on. Like flags, beams are never used on open-headed notes.

Page 260: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.202

Ä 44 c t t t t t t d t t t t t t b=============Ä 44 c mmmm mmmmt t mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmmt t t t d mmmm mmmmt t mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmmt t t t b

a single beam indicates eighth notes

two beams indicate sixteenth notes

Beams usually group notes by the beat. In shorter time values, beams can be connected to a group noteswhich total half a beat where the nature of the rhythm dictates that the beats are divided in half; or one third ofa beat, where the nature of the rhythm is three subdivisions to the beat.

=======================Ä 44count: 1

mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmmÛt t t t

2

mmmm mmmmt t3

mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmmÛt t t t

4

tmmmm æmmmm mmmm mmmmÛ

1

t t t2

mmmm mmmmÛt t mmmm mmmm mmmmÛt t t

3

mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmmÛtÛt t t

Ût t t mmmm mmmm

4

t t

Stems on beamed groups of notes are drawn according to the average location of the noteheads. If theaverage notehead in a beamed group is above the center line, the stems are drawn downward. If the averagenotehead in a beamed group is below the center line, the stems are drawn upward.

========================Ä 44 mmm mmmm mmmm mmmmt t t t mmmm mmmt t tmmmm mmmmm mmmm" t t tmmmm mmmm mmmmt " t tmmmm mmm mmmm mmmm mmmmt t t t mmmm mmm mmmm

mmmmmt t t t mmmmm mmmm mmm mmmmmt t t t |mmmm

Page 261: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.205

INTRODUCTION TO RHYTHMIC WORDSLike words in a spoken language, rhythmic words are groups of characters which have meaning as a unit.

When we see the word “apple” we don't think of the letters “a-p-p-l-e”, but rather of a kind of fruit or computer.A musician reads of notes in groups, which have become familiar.

Four pulse rhythmic words are groups of notes which represent a choice from four pulses. The four pulsesare of equal length in time. One choice would be to play all four of the pulses. Another choice would be to playon the first, third and fourth of the four pulses, which, as you will hear, sounds like the gallop of a horse. TheJingle Bells four-pulse rhythmic word is a choice of the first three of four parts and is the thematic rhythm ofthe familiar Christmas song. Proud Mary chooses first, second and fourth of the four pulses, and is the primaryrhythmic idea in the Creedence Clearwater rhythm guitar part.

========================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm æø

ææø0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

|mmmm æø

ææø0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

|mmmm

========================Ä

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâΩ ø

ΩΩ ø 0

|mmmm

0

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|mmmm

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ΩΩ ø 0

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|mmmm0

tmmmm æø

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tmmmm

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"all four" "Jingle Bells"

"gallop" "Proud Mary"

Here are some exercises with combinations of four pulse rhythmic words:

========================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

|mmmm0

|mmmm

0

tmmmm

0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm

========================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 0

tmmmm0

|mmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

|mmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

|mmmm æ

ææ0

tmmmm0

|mmmm0

tmmmm

combinations

Page 262: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.206

Three pulse rhythmic words are groups of notes which represent a choice from three equal pulses.Common choices are all three, first and third (called shuffle or swing), and first and second. Combinations areshown afterward for further practice.

========================Ä 34

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 34

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm æø

ææø0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 0

|mmmm0

tmmmm æø

ææø0

|mmmm0

tmmmm Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 0

tmmmm0

|mmmm æø

ææø0

tmmmm0

|mmmm

========================Ä

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

tmmmm0

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0

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0

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tmmmm0

tmmmm0

|mmmm0

tmmmm æ

ææ0

tmmmm0

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"all three" "shuffle" "first two of three"

combinations

Page 263: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

263

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.319

Ä 44

â 44

Straight Eighths

1

0

t+

0

t2

0

t+

0

t3

0

t+

0

t4

0

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Ä 44

â 44

Swing Eighths

1

0

tlettrip

0

t2

0

tlettrip

0

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0

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INTRODUCTION TO SWING EIGHTHS Eighth notes are played at a rate of two-per-beat. Straight eighth notes are played literally one have beat

each. Swing eighth notes are played two per beat, but unevenly.

The fi rst note on a beat with swing eighths gets two thirds of a beat. The second note gets one third of a beat. If you were to count “1, 2, 3” on each beat, to illustrate three parts per beat, the two swung eighth notes would occur on “1” and on “3”.

Both straight and swing eighths can be counted with “1, and, 2, and, etc.”. In swing eighths, the numbered part of the beat (“1, 2, 3, 4, etc.”) would get fi rst two thirds of the beat and the “and” (+) would get the last third. The syllables “1, and 2, and, 3, and, 4, and” must be spoken with such a rhythm to express the time relationship

Page 264: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.325

INTRODUCTION TO DOTTED NOTES

A dotted note receives one and one half times its normal value. Dotting multiplies time value of a noteby a factor of one and one half. Dotting a note adds half again the value, not necessarily adding a half beat.Dotting a one beat note changes its value to one and one half beats, but dotting a two beat note changes its valueto three beats. If a note without a dot receives four beats, dotting it would change the value to six beats.

DOTTED NOTE VALUES

FOR TIME SIGNATURES WITH “4” ON THE BOTTOM

one whole note = 4 beats

one dotted whole note = three half notes:

= 6 beats

one half note = 2 beats

one dotted half note

= three quarter notes:

= 3 beats

one quarter note = 1 beat

one dotted quarter note

= three eighth notes:

= 1 and 1/2 beats

one eighth note = 1/2 beat

one dotted eighth note

= three eighth notes:

= 3/4 beat

DOTTED NOTE VALUES

FOR TIME SIGNATURES WITH “8” ON THE BOTTOM

one whole note = 8 beats

one dotted whole note = three half notes:

= 12 beats

one half note = 4 beats

one dotted half note

= three quarter notes:

= 6 beats

one quarter note = 2 beat

one dotted quarter note

= three eighth notes:

= 3 beats

one eighth note = 1 beat

one dotted eighth note

= three eighth notes:

= 1 and 1/2 beats

Page 265: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.326

In the Dotted Whole Notes Exercise below, a dotted whole note receives six beats. The notes continueto be open strings, so you'll learn where they are written. Count “1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8” as you play, assigning onebeat to a quarter note (

) , two beats to a half note (

) and six beats to a dotted whole note ( ).

=================Ä 84

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 84 0

«A7654321

0

|mmmm8 1

0

tmmmm2

0

tmmmm0

«A876543

æ

ææ1

0

|mmmm2

0

«A876543

Dotted Whole Notes

In the Dotted Half Notes Exercise below, a dotted half note receives six beats. Count “1, 2, 3” as youplay in 3/4 time and count “1, 2, 3, 4” as you play in 4/4 time. Assigning one beat to a quarter note (

) , two

beats to a half note ( ) and three beats to a dotted half note (

).

Dotted Half Notes

========================Ä 34

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 341

0

«|mmmm32 1

0

tmmmm0

tmmmm2

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|mmmm32 1

0

«|mmmm32 1

0

«|mmmm32

æ

ææ0

|mmmm21

0

tmmmm3

========================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 0

«|mmmm321

0

tmmmm4

0

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0

«|mmmm432 1

0

«|mmmm32 4

0

tmmmm æ

ææ0

«|mmmm321

0

tmmmm4

Page 266: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.400

TIME SIGNATURESTime signatrues are shown at the beginning of a piece of music to indicate the number of beats per

measure and the value of the whole note. The top number indicates the number of beats per measure.

The bottom number indicates the value of the whole note in beats. If the bottom number is “4” the wholenote has a value of four beats, the half note is two beats, the quarter note one beat, and so on.

========================Ä 44

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 44 0

tmmmm1

0

tmmmm2

0

tmmmm3

0

tmmmm4

0

|mmmm21

0

|mmmm43

0

A4321

æææ0

«|mmmm321

0

tmmmm4

========================Ä 34

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 341

0

tmmmm

0

tmmmm2

0

tmmmm3

0

«|mmmm31 2

æææ0

|mmmm21

0

tmmmm3

24=24nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 1

0

tmmmm2

0

tmmmm æææ

1

0

|mmmm2

count:

count:

If the bottom number is “8” the whole note has a value of eight beats, the half note is four beats, the quarternote two beats, the eighth note one beat, and so on.

========================Ä 88

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 881

mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm0

t2

0

t3

0

t4

0

t mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm5

0

t6

0

t

0

t7

0

t8 1

0

tmmmm2 3

0

tmmmm4

0

tmmmm65

0

tmmmm87 1

0

|mmmm432

0

|mmmm8765

æææ

1

0

A8765432

========================Ä 68

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 68

mmmm mmmm mmmm0

t1

0

t32

0

t mmmm mmmm mmmm4

0

t0

t65

0

t0

tmmmm21 3

0

tmmmm4

0

tmmmm65

æææ

1

0

|mmmm3

mmmm mmmmt t542

0

6

0

count:

count:

Alternately, the bottom number in the time signature could be thought of as indicating the kind of notethat receives one beat. If the bottom number is “4”, the quarter note gets one beat. “8” would indicate an eighthnote getting one beat. Thinking in this manner, “3/4” indicates three quarter notes per measure, or anythingequivalent. 4/4 means four quarter notes per measure or an equivalent. 6/8 indicates six eighth notes or anyequivalent.

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267

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.401

Seemingly equivalent time signatures such as 2/2 and 4/4 or 6/8 and 3/4 may be able to contain the samenotes in a measure, but are counted differently. Four quarter notes in 2/2 would be counted “1, and, 2, and”.Since they represent half beats, only the first and third quarter note would be numbered. Four quarter notes in4/4 would be counted “1,2,3,4”, since they represent whole beats.

========================Ä 22 tmmmm1

tmmmm2

tmmmm tmmmm tmmmm1

tmmmm tmmmm2

tmmmm 44= tmmmm21

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

tmmmm tmmmm1

tmmmm2

tmmmm3

tmmmm4

Four quarter notes may occur in 2/2 or in 4/4 time, but have more “drive” in 4/4, since each one has animplied metric accent. In 2/2, the second and fourth quarter notes are less accented and contribute to a morerelaxed feeling.

========================Ä 22 tmmmm÷1

tmmmm¿2tmmmm tmmmm tmmmm

÷1tmmmm tmmmm

¿2tmmmm 44= tmmmm

÷ 21 ¿tmmmm¿3tmmmm¿4tmmmm

÷tmmmm1

tmmmm¿2

tmmmm¿3

tmmmm¿4

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268

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.410

SUMMARY OF WHOLE BEAT NOTE VALUES

WITH THE ADDITION OF RESTSA rest is a silence. It is just as important as a note. Miles Davis proved it. Begin and end a rest as acurately

in time as you would a note.

Notice that the whole rest is placed in the extreme upper portion of the second space from the top of thestaff, and the half rest is place in the extreme lower portion of the same space.

TIME SIGNATURES WITH “4” ON THE BOTTOM

dotted whole note or dotted whole note rest = 6 beats

whole note or whole note rest = 4 beats

dotted half note or dotted half note rest = 3 beats

half note

or half note rest = 2 beats

quarter note

or quarter note rest = 1 beat

TIME SIGNATURES WITH “8” ON THE BOTTOM

dotted whole note or dotted whole note rest = 12 beats

whole note or whole note rest = 8 beats

dotted half note or dotted half note rest = 6 beats

half note

or half note rest = 4 beats

quarter note

or quarter note rest = 2 beats

34 4

4

68 12

8

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269

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.411

Ä 44

â 44

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1

0

t

0

t2

0

t43

c

0

|4321

b

0

«|4321

c1

0

t0

t2

0

t3

0

t4

æø

ææø

a

a

Ä 34

â 34

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 0

t1

0

t32

c

0

t321

b

0

«|321

æø

ææø21 3

a

Ä 54

â 54

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø0

t1

0

t32

0

t54

c c

0

t1 2

0

t4

c

0

3

t

0

5

t1

c0

«|542 3

c æø

ææø2

c0

1

|43

05

c t

Ä 44

â 44

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 0

t1

0

t2

0

t3

0

t4 1 2 3 4

a

a

3434 0

t1 2 3

b æø

ææø0

t1 2

c

0

t3

count:

count:

count:

count:

Whole, Half, Dotted Half And Quarter Restsperform each rest to accurately end the previous note

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270

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.500

THE TIE ANDAN INTRODUCTION TO SYNCOPATIONA tie is a curved line which connects two written notes of the same pitch. It has three uses:

(1) To connect two notes separated by a bar line. Notice how the tie continues the note from one lineof music to the next.

(2) To produce note values that cannot be written with a single note. The first two notes below total twoand a half beats. There is no single note that has that value, so two or more notes have to be added togetherby using a tie.

(3) To connect two notes representing a continuous sound which has been divided with an “imaginarybar line.” Measures with four or more beats are easier to read when divided into groups of two orthree beats. The “imaginary bar line” shown in example 1 below with a dotted line divides themeasure of 4/4 into two sections of two beats each. Example 2 would sound exactly the same, butis more difficult to read.

Whole Beat SyncopationSyncopation is accenting of the part of the bar that is normally unaccented. Without any written

indication of a particular accent, the first beat of a bar is usually played loudest because it begins the bar. Theremaining beats are usually played louder than notes between the beats.

Sustain syncopation is where the accent on a normally unaccented part of the bar is sustained onto thenormally accented part of the bar that follows it. Rest syncopation is where the accent on a normally unaccentedpart of the bar is immediately followed by a rest on the normally accented part of the bar.

The standard hierarchy of metric accent is that the first beat is loudest, the beat halfway through the barnext loudest, then the last beat, and finally the remaining beats. If this is contradicted, syncopation has occurred.Playing the fourth of four beats louder than the first beat that follows it is syncopation. Even playing the thirdbeat louder than the first of four is syncopation.

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271

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.501

Ä 44 Ω ø t t t t t t t t t | t æøt | t

Ä 34 Ω ø t t t t t t | t æø| t

Ä 44 Ω ø t t t t t t t t t t c t æøc t c t

Ä 34 Ω ø t t t t t t | t æøc |

Ä 44 Ω ø t t t t t | t t t t t æøt | t

Ä 44 Ω ø t t t t t t c t t t t t æøt t c t

Ä 44 Ω ø c | t t | t t | t æøt | t

Ä 34 Ω ø c t t | t t t t æøt |

Ä 44 Ω ø c t c t c t c t 34 c t t b t t t t æøc |

quarter notes versus sustain-syncopated quarter notes

quarter notes versus rest-syncopated quarter notes

quarter notes versus sustain-syncopated quarter notes

quarter notes versus rest-syncopated quarter notes

sustain-syncopated quarter notes

rest-syncopated quarter notes

Quarter and Half NotesWith Sustain Syncopation and Rest Syncopation

play this exercise on any one note

rhy 1.501rhy 1.501

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272

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.510

Ä 44

â 44

æø

ææø

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 0

t0

t0

t0

t æø

ææø

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 3

t3

t3

| æø

ææø

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 2

|2

t2

t æø

ææø

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 0

t

0

|

0

t

Äâ

æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø 0

«|0

t æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø

0

t0

«| æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø

3

|3

|

Ä 34â 34

æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø 0

t0

t0

t æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø 3

|3

t æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø 2

t c

2

t æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø 2

t2

|

Äâ

æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø 1

t1

t c æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø

c0

t0

t æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø

c1

|

Äâ

æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø 2

t c c æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø

c

2

t c æøææø

Ω øΩΩ ø

c

0

ct

"all four" "Jingle Bells" "gallop" "Proud Mary"

"1 through 3 and 4" "1 and 2 through 4" "1 thru 2, 3 thru 4"

"all three" "shuffle" "first and last of 3" "first and 2 thru 3"

"first two of 3" "last two of 3" "2 thru 3 of three"

"first of 3" "second of 3" "last of 3"

The First Seven Four-Pulse Rhythmic Words in Whole Beatsthis exercise plays an E minor arpeggio

The First Ten Three Pulse Rhythmic Words in Whole Beatsthis exercise plays an A minor arpeggio

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273

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.520

Ä 44â 44 0

A

3

|

0

|

2

«|0

t

2

t0

«|2

t0

t3

|0

|3

t0

t

Ä 34â 34

2

t0

t2

t0

|2

t0

«|0

|3

t

0

t

3

| æææ0

|

2

t

Ä 44 Ω ø t t t t | t t «| t t | t

Ä t | t t t t t A æøt | t

Ä 34 Ω ø | t | t t t t «|

Ä t t t t | t | æø| t

Review With No Syncopation, No rests. This exercise plays an E minor pentatonic scale (Em7/11 pentatonic, to be exact).

Sustain SyncopationPlay this exercise on any one note.

Quarter, Half, Dotted Half and Whole NotesWith Sustain Syncopation

fin 1.520fin 1.520

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274

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.530

Ä 44â 44

3

t2

t0

t c

0

t b« b0

t c aa

Äâ 3

t c3

|

3

t c0

c t

0

|

0

t2

t æææ3

|b

Ä 44 c t c t b« t b t t c «|

Ä b t t A b c t t | t

Ä 34 c | c t t b t «|

Ä c | c t t t | æøc |

Review With Rests, No SyncopationThis exercise plays a G major arpeggio.

Rest SyncopationPlay this exercise on any one note.

Quarter, Half, Dotted Half and Whole NotesWith Rest Syncopation

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275

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.600

Ä 44

â 44count:

0

t1

3

t+

0

t2

2

t+

0

t3

2

t+

1

t4

3

t+ 1

0

t+ 2

3

t

+

0

t

3

t4+3

1

t+

2

t

0

t+1

2

t

3

t+2

0

t3

3

t+

0

t+4

Ä

âcount:

2

t1 +

0

t

2

t2

0

t+

3

t+3 4

0

t

3

t+

0

t1

3

t+

0

t2

2

t+

0

t3

2

t+ 4

1

t+

3

t+1 2

0

t

+3

t

30

t

+

3

t4

1

t+

æ

ææ2

t+1

0

t2 +

2

t

3

t+3

0

t+4

Ä 34

â 34count:

0

t1

3

t+

2

t+2

2

t

1

t+30

t15

t

+0

t+2

1

t3 +

2

t

2

t+1

3

t2

0

t+

3

t+3

0

t+1

3

t2

2

t+

2

t3

1

t+

Ä

âcount: 1

0

t

+

5

t

0

t

2

1

t+

2

t3

2

t+

3

|++ 21

0

t3

0

t+

0

t1

3

t+

2

t+2

2

t+3

æ

ææ0

«|+++ 321

this exercise plays an A minor pentatonic scale (A minor 7/11 pentatonic scale)

this exercise plays an A minor arpeggio

Pairs Of Eighth NotesIn the 4/4 and 3/4 time signatures below, eighth notes get a half beat each. These exercises use them in pairs beginning on the beat only. They should be counted EVENLY as shown below the notes: with a number

representing the first half beat and the syllable "and" (represented by "+") on the last half of the beat.

rhy 1.600rhy 1.600

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276

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.750

TRIPLETS

Triplets are groups of three notes that, as a group, take the space in time of three notes of the same kind.

count: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

The notes in a triplet may be enclosed by a bracket or a curved line. The number “3” is written eitherinterrupting the middle of the bracket or curved line; or it is written just outside the bracket or curved line. Ifthe notes are joined by a beam, the three may be written outside the beam.

Three eighth notes in 4/4 time would total one and one half beats (one half of a beat each). If the threeeighth notes were indicated as a triplet, they would total one beat (one third of a beat each). Two eighth notes(not in a triplet) would total one beat (one half a beat each). The total of the triplet is equal to the total of twoof the same note.

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277

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.751

Ä 44

â 44count:

Û1

0

ttrip

3

t

0

tlet

Û

2

ttrip2

0

t

2

tlet

Û

0

ttrip3

2

tlet

0

t4

Û3

t

trip

0

t

let

3

t

10

t

lettrip

Û3

t

2 trip

0

t

let

3

t

3

0

tlettrip 4

Û0

t

trip

3

t

let

0

t

2

tlettrip1

Û2

3

t

trip

0

tlet

2

t Û

0

t3 trip

2

tlet

0

t Û

2

t4

0

ttrip

3

tlet

Ä

âcount:

0

tlettrip1

3

tlettrip2

0

tlettrip3

Û

3

t4

0

ttrip

2

t0

tlettrip1

2

tlettrip2

0

tlettrip 43

Û

2

ttrip

0

t

3

tlet

2

tlettrip1

0

tlettrip2

2

tlettrip 43

Û

1

" ttrip

0

t

3

tlet

0

A3 421

Ä 34

â 34count:

0

t

lettrip13

t

lettrip2

Û0

t

3

0

ttrip

0

tlet

2

tlettrip1

2

tlettrip2

Û

3

t3

2

ttrip

3

tlet

0

tlettrip1

3

tlettrip2

Û

2

t3

2

ttrip

0

tlet

22

«| «|321

this exercise plays an E minor pentatonic scale (E minor 7/11 pentatonic scale)

this exercise plays an E minor arpeggio

rhy 1.751rhy 1.751 Eighth Note Triplets

In 4/4 and 3/4 time signatures, eighth notes tripets get a third of a beat each. These exercises use them in grof three beginning on the beat only. They should be counted EVENLY with a number representing the first thiof the beat and the syllables "trip" and "let"representing the last two thirds of the beat.

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278

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.755

COMPOUND TIME

COMPOUND METER

When the meter is in a larger number, such as six or seven, it is often divided into subgroups. Seven, forexample may be counted “one, two, three, four, one, two, three, one, two, three, four, one, two, three, etc.” thisis called compound meter (1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, etc., in Arabic numerals).

COMPOUND TIME SIGNATURES

Compound time signatures are used to indicate compound meter. They show the standard time signature(one number over another), followed by a combination of time signatures enclosed in parenthesis with “+”symbols between them. As the plus (“+”) symbols imply, the top numbers on the time signatures within theparenthesis should add up to the number on top of the original time signature (to the left of the parenthesis).

This is a standard 5/4 time signature.

count: 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 54

This is a compound 5/4 time signature. The dotted barline is not normally shown, but is included here toillustrate the 3/4 and 2/4 parts of each bar.

( )count: 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 3 1 2

This is a standard 6/8 time signature.

count: 1 32 4 5 6 1 32 4 65

This is a compound 6/8 time signature. The dotted barline illustrates the two parts of each bar, each of whichare equivalent to a bar of 3/8.

( )count: 1 32 1 2 3 1 32 1 2 3

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279

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.800

RHYTHMIC WORD EXERCISESPractice these exercises in order. Each rhythmic word is introduced with a new “level” number, shown in

a box at the left. The new rhythmic word will be played in every-other bar. The other bars review all previous rhythmicwords.

Down and up strumming symbols are shown below the counting symbols. The counting symbols “1, + , 2, +” are shown below the notes (“+” represents “and) to show half beats. “1, e, +, a” represent quarter beats (“one, ee, and, uh”). “1, T, L, 2, T, L” represents thirds of a beat (“one, trip, let, two, trip, let”).

Ä !1

t2+

t+

t1

|+ +2 1

t2+

t+

t1

t2+

t+ 1

t2+

t+

t t1

t+

t2

t+

æ1

t2+

t+

t

Ä !1

t+

t2

t+ 1

|+ +2 1

t+

t2

t+ 1

t2+

t+ 1

t+

t2

t+

t1

t+

t2

t+ 1

t+

t2

t+ 1

t2+

t+

t æ1

t+

t2

t+

Ä !Û

1

tT

tL

2

tT

tL

t1

|2T TL L

Ût1

tT

tLÛt2

tT

tL 1

2T L

tT

tL

tÛt1

tT

tLÛt2

tT

tL

Û1

tT

tL

t2

tT L

æÛt1

tT

tLÛt2

tT

tL

Ä !1

2T L

tT

tL

t1

|2T TL L 1

2LT

tT

tL

tÛt1

tT

tLÛt2

tT

tL 1

2LT

tT

tL

1

tT

tL

t2

tLT

æ1

2LT

tT

tL

t

Ä !Û

1

tT

tL

t2

tT L 1

|2T TL L

Û1

tT

tL

t2

tT L

Ût1

tT

tLÛt2

tT

tL

Û1

tT

tL

t2

tT L 1

2T L

tT

tL

t æÛ1

tT

tL

t2

tLT

Ä !1

tY+

t+2

tY1

|+ +2 1

tY+

t+2

tY1

t2+

t+ 1

tY+

t+2

tY t1

t+

t2

t+ 1

tY+

t+2

tY1

t2+

t+

t1

tY+

t+2

tY1

t+

t2

t+

æ1

tY+

t+2

tY

Ä !Û

1

tT

tL

t Û1

tLT

tY1

|2T TL L

Û1

tT

tL

t Û2

tLT

tYÛt1

tT

tLÛt2

tT

tLÛ

1

tT

tL

t Û2

tLT

tY1

2TL

tT

tL

1

tT

tL

t Û2

tLT

tYÛ

1

tT

tL

t2

tTL

æÛ1

tT

tL

t Û2

tLT

tY

1.7 four-pulse eighth notes

1.75 four-pulse eighth notes

1.76 three-pulse eighth note triplets

1.77 three-pulse eighth note triplets

1.78 three-pulse eighth note triplets

1.8 four-pulse eighth notes

1.8 three-pulse eighth note triplets

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280

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.801

rhy 1.801 rhy 1.801

THREE EIGHTH NOTESCOMPARED TO AN EIGHTH TRIPLET

The same three-pulse rhythmic words can occur in compound time signatures where there are groups ofthree eighth notes, such as 6/8 and 12/8, and in time signatures where there are eighth note triplets, such as 2/4and 4/4. Three eighth notes in 6/8 take up one half of a bar. Likewise, three eighth notes in a triplet take up one ahalf of a bar in 2/4. In the example below, each 3/8 section of 6/8 is counted with the three syllables “1, 2, 3.”Each beat in 2/4 is also counted with three syllables: “1, trip, let” or “2, trip, let”. Compare the 6/8 and 2/4versions below to see that each note in 6/8 is assigned the same number of syllables are the respective note in 2/4.The difference is that the 6/8 version would have more drive, since each syllable is one beat. In the 2/4 version,the first of each three syllables begins a beat. The music would generally have more “drive” in 6/8, because everybeat has the subtle metric accent. In 2/4, only the first of each triplet would have the implied metric accent.

A slow blues in 4/4 typically uses three subdivisions per beat, so the music is based on eighth notetriplets. If all of the eighth note triplets were played in a bar of 4/4, there would be twelve notes to the bar.Likewise, there can be twelve eighth notes in a bar of 12/8.

Again, the difference would be more drive in 12/8. Imagine the bass and drums playing on most or all ofthe eighth notes, making the music very active. By comparision, in 4/4 with triplets, it would be more typical forthe bass and drums to play “laid back” by play longer notes such as whole beat notes, with occasional triplets.

Example of “driving” blues bass in 12/8 versus “laid back” blues bass in 4/4 with triplets

Ä 68 (38ÀÀÀÀ38)count:

t1

t2

t3 1

t2

tY3

tY21

t3

t1

t32

t 24 Ût

trip1

tlet

t2 trip

tYlet

æÛtY1 trip

tlet

Ût2 trip

tlet

t========================Ä 68 (38À38)count:

mmmm mmmm mmmmt1

t2

t3 1

tmmmm2

tmmmmY3

tmmmmY21

tmmmm3

mmmm mmmm mmmmt1

t32

t 24= Ûmmmm mmmm mmmmt

trip1

tlet

tmmmm2 trip

tmmmmYlet

æÛtmmmmY1 trip

tmmmmlet

Ûmmmm mmmm mmmmt2 trip

tlet

t

Ä 128

â 128

æ

ææ1

0

t

0

t2 3

0

t4

0

t5

0

t6

0

t

0

t87

0

t9

0

t10

0

t11

0

t12

0

t 4444

æ

ææÛ

0

t1 trip

0

tlet

0

0

ttrip2

0

tlet

0

t3Û

0

ttrip

0

tlet

0

0

t4 trip

0

tlet

0

tcount:

========================Ä 128

nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnâ 128

æ

ææ1

mmmm mmmm mmmm0

t

0

t2 3

0

t4

mmmm mmmm mmmm0

t5

0

t6

0

t mmmm mmmm mmmm0

t87

0

t9

0

t mmmm mmmm mmmm10

0

t11

0

t12

0

t 44=44nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

æ

ææÛ

mmmm mmmm mmmm0

t1 trip

0

tlet

0

mmmm mmmm mmmm0

ttrip2

0

tlet

0

t3Û

mmmm mmmm mmmm0

ttrip

0

tlet

0

mmmm mmmm mmmm0

t4 trip

0

tlet

0

tcount:

Å 128count:

t1

t2

t3 1

!tt2

t3

t21

t3

t t1

t2

t3

æ1

t2

tI3

t1

t2

t3

t1

!t2

t3

t1

t2

t3

44Ût1 trip

tIlet

t2

t3 4

Ûttrip

tYlet

æt1

t32

Ût

trip

tIlet

t4

===========================Å128mmmm mmmmmmmmmmm

count:

t1

t2

tmmmm mmmm mmmm

3 1

!tt2

t mmmm mmmm mmmm3

t21

t3

tmmmm mmmm mmmmmt

1

t2

t3

æ1

tmmmm2

tmmmmI3

mmmm mmmmm mmmmt1

t2

t3

mmmm mmmm mmmmt1

!t2

t3

mmmmm mmmm mmmmmmt1

t2

t3

44=Ûtmmmm1 trip

tmmmmIlet

tmmmm2

tmmmm3 4

Ûtmmmmtrip

tmmmmYlet

ætmmmm1

tmmmm32

Ûtmmmm

trip

tmmmmIlet

tmmmm4

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281

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.802

Ä 68(38ÀÀÀÀ38)

â 68 (38ÀÀÀÀ38)1

3

t2

0

t3

2

t4

0

t5

2

t6

0

t1

1

t32

0

tY4

2

t5

0

t6

2

t1

0

tI2

0

t43

2

t65

2

tI æ

ææ1

0

t32

0

tI4

0

«t5 6

Ä 24

â 24

Û1

3

ttrip

0

tlet

2

2

0

ttrip

2

tlet

0

t Û

1

1

tlettrip

0

tYÛ

2

2

ttrip

0

tlet

2

1

0

tItrip

0

2let

2

tlettrip

2

tI æ

ææ

Û

1

0

tlettrip

0

tI2

0

ttrip let

Ä 98(38ÀÀÀÀ38ÀÀÀÀ38)

â 98 (38ÀÀÀÀ38ÀÀÀÀ38)1

2

t2

1

!t3

2

t4

1

t5

0

t6

1

t7

0

t8

4

!t9

0

t1

1

tY2

2

t43

0

t65

2

tI7

0

t8

1

t9

3

t1

1

t32

2

tI4

0

tI5

1

!t76

0

t98

2

tI æ

ææ1

0

t32

1

tY4

0

tY5

2

t76

0

t8

1

!t9

2

t

Ä 34

â 34

Û

1

2

t

5

trip

1

!tlet

2

2

1

ttrip

0

tlet

1

3

0

ttrip

4

!tlet

0

t Û

1

1

tYtrip

2

2let

0

tlettrip

2

tIÛ

3

0

ttrip

1

tlet

3

t Û

1

1

tlettrip

2

tIÛ

2

0

tItrip

1

!tÛ

3let

0

tlettrip

2

tI æ

ææ

Û

1

0

tlettrip

1

tY Û

2

0

tYtrip

2

3let

0

ttrip

1

!tlet

2

t

this exercise plays a C major scale

this exercise plays an A harmonic minor scale (D# is an ornament called a lower chromatic embellishment)

Eighth Note Groups of ThreeCompared To Eighth Note Triplets

rhy 1.802rhy 1.802

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282

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.805

Ä 38

â 38count:

0

«t321

3

t1

0

t32

3

t

0

t21 3

3

tY æ

ææ3

tY1

0

t32

Ä 68 (38ÀÀÀÀ38)

â 68 (38ÀÀÀÀ38)count: 1

0

t2

0

tY3

3

t1

0

t2 3

3

t1

0

«t32

2

t1 2

0

t3

3

t1

0

t32

0

tY

3

" t1

2

t2

0

t3 1

3

t

0

t32

2

t1

0

«t32

Ä

âcount:

2

t1

0

t2

2

t3

2

tI1

0

t32 1

3

t2

0

t3

3

" t

2

tI1

0

t32 1

0

t2

0

tY3

3

" t1 2

2

t3

0

t æ

ææ2

«|32131 2

!!

Ä !! 128

â 128count:

2

t1 2

0

tI3

1

" t1

0

t2

3

# t3

0

tI1 2

3

t3

0

t21

2

# tI3

æ

ææ1

1

# t2

2

tI3

0

t1

2

t2

1

" t3

0

tI1

3

# t2 3

0

«t21 3

count each bar of 6/8 below as two bars of 3/8

count each bar of 12/8 below as four bars of 3/8

The First Four Three-Pulse Rhythmic Words In Eighth Notes

rhy 1.805rhy 1.805

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283

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.900

Ä1

«t++ 2

tY1

|+ +2 1

«t++ 2

tY1

t2+

t+ 1

«t++ 2

tY t1

t+

t2

t+ 1

«t++ 2

tY1

t2+

t+

t1

«t++ 2

tY t1

t+

t2

Ä1

«t++ 2

tY1

tY+

t+2

tY æ1

«t++ 2

tY

Ä1

t Û2TL

tL

tY1

|2 1

t Û2

tLT

tYÛt1

tT

tLÛt2

tT

tL 1

t Û2

tLT

tY t1Ût2

tT

tL 1

t Û2

tLT

tYÛt1

tT

tL

t2 1

t Û2

tLT

tYÛ

1

tT

tL

t Û2

tLT

tY

Ä æ1

t Û2

tLT

tY

Ä1

tY+

«t+2 1

|+ +2 1

tY+

«t+2 1

t2+

t+ 1

tY+

«t+2

t1

t+

t2

t+ 1

tY+

«t+2 1

t2+

t+

t1

tY+

«t+2 1

t+

t2

t+

Ä1

tY+

«t+2 1

tY+

t+2

tY1

tY+

«t+2 1

«t++ 2

tY æ1

tY+

«t+2

1.85 four-pulse eighth notes

1.85 four-pulse eighth notes

three-pulse eighth note triplets1.855

1.855

1.9

three-pulse eighth note triplets

four-pulse eighth notes

1.9 three-pulse eighth note triplets

RHYTHMIC WORD EXERCISESPractice these exercises in order. Each rhythmic word is introduced with a new “level” number, shown in

a box at the left. The new rhythmic word will be played in every-other bar. The other bars review all previous rhythmicwords.

Down and up strumming symbols are shown below the counting symbols. The counting symbols “1, + , 2, +” are shown below the notes (“+” represents “and) to show half beats. “1, e, +, a” represent quarter beats (“one, ee, and, uh”). “1, T, L, 2, T, L” represents thirds of a beat (“one, trip, let, two, trip, let”).

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284

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.905

Ä !!! 44

â 44count: 1

12

«t++ 2

9

tY3

11

tY+

12

«t4 + 1

9

«t+ 2 +

d

11

d+3

«t4 +

d

9

+1

«t

10

32 +

tY+

c«4 +

æ

ææ1

912

+

tY3

«t+ 4

d+

Ä !!! 34

â 341

10

«t++ 2

9

tY3

11

t+ 1

9

t2+

12

tY+

11

«t+3

d

9

+1

«t

12

32 +

t+

æ

ææ1

12

t+

d

12

+2

«t3 +

Ä !!! 44

â 44 10

t1

9

t+

11

t2

9

t+

12

tY3

11

«t+ 1

9

tY+

12

«t32 +

12

t+

11

t4

9

t+

11

t1

9

tY+

12

«t32

9

«t++ 4

11

tYæ

ææ1

9

tY+

10

«t32 +

12

«t++ 4

12

tI

Ä !!! 128

â 1281

12

«t42 3

11

t5

9

t6

11

t7

9

«t108 9

10

t11

9

t12

10

ææ

1

9

t

32

10

tY4

9

«t75 6

11

t8

12

t9

9

t10

10

«t11 12

Dotted Quarter NotesIn 4/4, 3/4, 2/4, etc., quarter notes get one and a half beats. In 12/8, 6/8, etc. they get three beats.

rhy 1.905rhy 1.905

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285

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.910

FOUR-PULSE RHYTHMIC WORDS INEIGHTH NOTES

Like words in a spoken language, rhythmic words are groups of characters which have meaning as a unit.When we see the word “apple” we don't think of the letters “a-p-p-l-e”, but rather of a kind of fruit or computer.A musician reads of notes in groups, which have become familiar.

Four pulse rhythmic words are groups of notes which represent a choice from four regular pulses . Thefour pulses are of equal length in time. Their are eight four-pulse rhythmic words without rests:

“All four” plays all four of the pulses.

“Gallop” plays the first, third and fourth of the four pulses. The note on the first pulse sustains throughthe second pulse.

“Jingle Bells“ four-pulse rhythmic word is a choice of the first three of four parts and is the thematicrhythm of the familiar Christmas song.

“Proud Mary” chooses first, second and fourth of the four pulses, and is the primary rhythmic idea in theCreedence Clearwater Revival rhythm guitar part.

“1; 2 through 4” chooses first and second of the four pulses. The note on the second pulse sustains throughthe fourth pulse.

“Walk Don't Run” chooses first and fourth of the four pulses. The note on the first pulse sustains throughthe third pulse. It is the bass part of the main section in the Johnny Smith tune popularized as a Surf song by theVentures.

“1 through 2; 3 through 4” chooses first and third of the four pulses. The note on the first pulse sustainsthrough the second pulse. The note on the third pulse sustains through the fourth pulse. This rhythmic word playsthe first and last halves of the four pulses.

“1 through 4” plays on the first pulse and sustains through the fourth pulse.

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

all four gallop Jingle Bells

1 2 3 4

1, 2 through 4

1 2 3 4

Proud Mary

1 2 3 4

Walk, Don't Run

1 2 3 4

1 thru 2, 3 thru 4

1 2 3 4

1 through 4

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286

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.911

Ä 24 t t t t1 t t t t t t tY t tY tY «t «t tY t t æ|

Ä æt t t t9 44 æt t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t t t 24 ætY t tY

Ä æt t t14 44 æt t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t 24 æ«t tY

Ä æt t t19 44 æt t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t 24 ætY «t

Ä ætY t tY24 44 ætY t tY tY t tY tY t tY tY t tY ætY t tY tY t tY 24 ætY «t

Ä ætY «t29 44 ætY «t tY «t tY «t tY «t ætY «t tY «t

Ä 24 æ«t tY33 44 æ«t tY «t tY «t tY «t tY æ«t tY «t tY

Ä 24 æt t37 44 æt | t t | t æt | t

Ä 24 æ|41 44 æ| | | | æ| |

all four gallop Jingle Bells Proud Mary 1; 2 thru 4Walk Don't Run

1 thru 2,3 thru 4

1 thru 4

all four

gallop

Jingle Bells

Proud Mary

1; 2 thru 4

Walk Don't Run

1 thru 2,3 thru 4

1 thru 4

Four Pulse Rhythmic Words In Eighth Notes

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287

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.912

Ä 44 æt t t t t t45

æt t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t

Ä æt t t t |49

æt t t t | t t t t | æt t t t |

Ä æt t t t t t t53

æt t t t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t t

Ä æt t t t t t t57

æt t t t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t t

Ä æt t t t tY t tY61

æt t t t tY t tY t t t t tY t tY æt t t t tY t tY

Ä æt t t t tY «t65

æt t t t tY «t t t t t tY «t æt t t t tY «t

Ä æt t t t «t tY69

æt t t t «t tY t t t t «t tY æt t t t «t tY

Ä æ| t t t t73

æ| t t t t | t t t t æ| t t t t

Ä æ| t t77

æ| t t | t t æ«| t

Ä æ| t t t81

æ| t t t | t t t æ| t t t

all four and1 thru 4

all four and1 thru 2, 3 thru 4

all four andgallop

all four andJingle Bells

all four andProud Mary

all four and1; 2 thru 4

all four andWalk Don't Run

1 thru 4 and all four

1 thru 4 and 1 thru 2; 3 thru 4

1 thru 4 and Gallop

Four Pulse Rhythmic Words In Eighth Notes (continued)

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288

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.913

Ä 44 æ| t t t85

æ| t t t | t t t æ| t t t

Ä æ| tY t tY89

æ| tY t tY | tY t tY æ| tY t tY

Ä æ| tY «t93

æ| tY «t | tY «t æ| tY «t

Ä æ| «t tY97

æ| «t tY | «t tY æ| «t tY

Ä æt t t t t t101

æt t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t

Ä æt t |105

æt t | t t | æt t |

Ä æt t t t t109

æt t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t

Ä æt t t t t113

æt t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t

Ä æt t tY t tY117

æt t tY t tY t t tY t tY æt t tY t tY

Ä æt t tY «t121

æt t tY «t t t tY «t æt t tY «t

1 thru 4 and Jingle Bells

1 thru 4 and Proud Mary

1 thru 4 and 1; 2 thru 4

1 thru 4 and Walk Don't Run

1 thru 4 and all four

1 thru 2; 3 thru 4 and 1 thru 4

1 thru 2; 3 thru 4 and gallop

1 thru 2; 3 thru 4 and Jingle Bells

1 thru 2; 3 thru 4 and Proud Mary

1 thru 2; 3 thru 4 and 1; 2 thru 4

Four Pulse Rhythmic Words In Eighth Notes (continued)

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289

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RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.914

Ä 44 æt t «t tY125

æt t «t tY t t «t tY æt t «t tY

Ä æt t t t t129

æt t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t

Ä æt t t |133

æt t t | t t t | æt t t |

Ä æt t t t t t t137

æt t t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t t

Ä æt t t t t t141

æt t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t

Ä æt t t tY t tY145

æt t t tY t tY t t t tY t tY æt t t tY t tY

Ä æt t t tY «t149

æt t t tY «t t t t tY «t æt t t tY «t

Ä æt t t «t tY153

æt t t «t tY t t t «t tY æt t t «t tY

Ä æt t t t t157

æt t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t

Ä æt t t |161

æt t t | t t t | æt t t |

1 thru 2; 3 thru 4 and Walk Don't Run

gallop and1 thru 2; 3 thru 4

gallop and1 thru 4

gallop andall 4

gallop andJingle Bells

gallop andProud Mary

gallop and1; 2 thru 4

gallop andWalk Don't Run

Jingle Bells and1 thru 2; 3 thru 4

Jingle Bells and1 thru 4

Four Pulse Rhythmic Words In Eighth Notes (continued)

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290

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.915

Ä æt t t t t t t165

æt t t t t t t t t t t t t t æt t t t t t t

Ä æt t t t t t169

æt t | t t t t | t t æt t | t t

Ä æt t t tY t tY173

æt t t tY t tY t t t tY t tY æt t t tY t tY

Ä æt t t tY «t177

æt t t tY «t t t t tY «t æt t t tY «t

Ä æt t t «t tY181

æt t | t t t t | t t æt t | t t

Ä ætY t tY t t185

ætY t tY t t tY t tY t t ætY t tY t t

Ä ætY t tY |189

ætY t tY | tY t tY | ætY t tY |

Ä ætY t tY t t t t193 tY t tY t t t t tY t tY t t t t ætY t tY t t t t

Ä ætY t tY t t t197

ætY t tY t t t tY t tY t t t ætY t tY t t t

Ä ætY t tY t t t201

ætY t tY t t t tY t tY t t t ætY t tY t t t

Jingle Bells andall 4

Jingle Bells andgallop

Jingle Bells andProud Mary

Jingle Bells and1; 2 thru 4

Jingle Bells andWalk Don't Run

Proud Mary and1 thru 2; 3 thru 4

Proud Mary and1 thru 4

Proud Mary andall 4

Proud Mary andgallop

Proud Mary andJingle Bells

Four Pulse Rhythmic Words In Eighth Notes (continued)

Page 291: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

291

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.916

Ä ætY t tY tY «t205

ætY t tY tY «t tY t tY tY «t ætY t tY tY «t

Ä ætY t tY «t tY209

ætY t tY «t tY tY t tY «t tY ætY t tY «t tY

Ä ætY «t t t213

ætY «t t t tY «t t t ætY «t t t

Ä ætY «t |217

ætY «t | tY «t | ætY «t |

Ä ætY «t t t t t221

ætY «t t t t t tY «t t t t t ætY «t t t t t

Ä ætY «t t t t225

ætY «t t t t tY «t t t t ætY «t t t t

Ä ætY «t t t t229

ætY «t t t t tY «t t t t ætY «t t t t

Ä ætY «t tY t tY233

ætY «t «t tY tY «t tY t tY ætY «t tY t tY

Ä ætY «t «t tY237

ætY «t «t tY tY «t «t tY ætY «t «t tY

Ä æ«t tY t t241

æ«t tY t t «t tY t t æ«t tY t t

Proud Mary and1; 2 thru 4

Proud Mary andWalk Don't Run

1; 2 thru 4 and1 thru 2; 3 thru 4

1; 2 thru 4 and1 thru 4

1; 2 thru 4 andall 4

1; 2 thru 4 andgallop

1; 2 thru 4 andJingle Bells

1; 2 thru 4 andProud Mary

1; 2 thru 4 andWalk Don't Run

Walk Don't Run and1 thru 2; 3 thru 4

Four Pulse Rhythmic Words In Eighth Notes (continued)

Page 292: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

292

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

RHYTHM

Rhythm 1.917

Ä æ«t tY |245

æ«t tY | «t tY | æ«t tY |

Ä ætY «t t t t t249

ætY «t t t t t tY «t t t t t ætY «t t t t t

Ä ætY «t t t t253

ætY «t t t t tY «t t t t ætY «t t t t

Ä æ«t tY t t t257

ætY «t t t t tY «t t t t ætY «t t t t

Ä æ«t tY tY t tY261

æ«t tY tY t tY «t tY tY t tY æ«t tY «t tY

Ä æ«t tY tY «t265

æ«t tY tY «t «t tY tY «t æ«t tY tY «t

Walk Don't Run and1 thru 4

Walk Don't Run andall 4

Walk Don't Run andgallop

Walk Don't Run andJingle Bells

Walk Don't Run andProud Mary

Walk Don't Run and1; 2 thru 4

Four Pulse Rhythmic Words In Eighth Notes (continued)

Page 293: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

293

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.225

COUNTING STRUMMED RHYTHMS

In chord progression examples presented throughout this level 1, counting symbols are usually providedabove the tablature. Arrows above the counting symbols indicate the direction of strumming.

When there are two parts per beat, the traditional counting symbols are numbers for the first half of eachbeat, “1”, “2”, “3” “4”, etc. and “+” (pronounced “and”) for the last half of each beat. Each syllable “1, +, 2 ,+, 3, +, 4, +” represents a half beat.

Selection From A Continuous MotionMost strumming involves a continuous motion of the strumming hand. The rhythm is selected from the

continuous motion by somtimes missing the strings. Two parts per beat are strummed down on the numberedbeats and up on the “ands” (+). When there is no arrow above a counting symbol, you should still move in theappropriate direction, down on the numbers (1, 2, 3, 4 etc.), up on the “ands” (+).

In the example below, you should make the regular upward strumming movement on the “+” after “1”,but miss the strings. Likewise, on the beat “4” of the first bar and on beat “1” of the second bar, you should makethe regular downward strumming movement , but miss the strings.

Ä !!!

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø↓1

02220

ttttt↓2+

02220

ttttt↑+

02220

ttttt↓3

0232

tIttt↑+

0232

tttt↑+4

022100

tIttttt æø

ææø1

tttttt

022100

tttttt

022100

↑+

tttttt

022100

↓2

tttttt

022100

↑+

tttttt

022100

↓3

tttttt

022100

↑+

tttttt

022100

↓4

tttttt↑+

æ

ææ02220

ttttt↓1

c b4

A I

32 2

D I

3

1

1

E I

32 4

A I

324

A I

32 2

D I

3

1

1

E I

32 4

A I

32

In practicing a strummed rhythm, speak (or as least think) each counting symbol (1, +, 2, +, etc.). Youcan begin by stopping wherever you need to, but then resume counting with the correct direction. If you makea mistake, don’t go back to the beginning. Replay the part of the beat where you made the mistake, speakingthe appropriate counting symbol and continue.

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294

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.226

Resuming The Strumming After A PauseWhen strums do not occur during two or more consecutive counting symbols, the strumming hand may

rest. However, it is very important that the strumming hand is in the appropriate position to strum the correctdirection when it resumes.

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø↓1

02210

«t «t «t «t «t↑++ 2

02210

tItttt↓3

32010

ttttt↓4+

02210

ttttt+

æø

ææø1 +

ttttt

02210

02210

↓2

ttttt

32010

↑+

ttttt

2003

↓3

tItttt↑+

«t «t «t «t+4

1

Am I

32

3

2

1

C I

1

Am I

323

2

1

C I

2

G/B I

4

1

Am I

32

3

2

1

C I

1

Am I

323

2

1

C I

2

G/B I

4

Here are a few examples to practice:

¡+™+£+¢+ ¡=™+£+¢+

miss the "+" after "1"

¡+™+£+¢=¡=™=£+¢+

miss the "+" after "4" miss the "+" after "1"and miss the "+" after "2"

strum all of the "downs and ups"

miss "3" and the "+" after "4"

¡+™+3+¢=

miss the "+" after 1, miss "3"and miss the "+" after "4"

¡=™+3+¢=

Page 295: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

295

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.230

Ä !!! 44

â 441

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

2

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

3

0232

tttt↓

+

0000

t#ttt↑

4

02220

ttttt↓

+

0000

tttt↑

æø

ææø1

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

2

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

3

0232

tttt↓

+

0000

t#ttt↑

4

3

02220

ttttt↓

+

0000

tttt↑

æ

ææ022100

AAAAAA1↓

Ä !!!

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø1

02220

ttttt↓

2+

02220

ttttt↓

+

02220

ttttt↑

3

0232

tIttt↓

+

0232

tttt↑

+4

022100

tIttttt↑

æø

ææø1

tttttt

022100

tttttt

022100

+↑tttttt

022100

2↓tttttt

022100

+↑tttttt

022100

3↓tttttt

022100

+↑tttttt

022100

4↓tttttt+↑

æ

ææ02220

ttttt1↓

c b # # #

ÄâΩ øΩΩ ø

1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

33211

tItttt↓

+

33211

ttttt↑

+4

320033

tIttttt↑

æøææø

1

tttttt

320033

+

tttttt

320033

↑2

tttttt

320033

↓+

tttttt

33211

↑3

ttttt↓

+

33211

4

ttttt↓

+

æææ3

2010

ttttt1↓

c b

1

E I

32 2

D I

3

1 4

A I

32

Rock Song #2 in A

Rock Song #1

1

E I

32 2

D I

3

1 4

A I

321

E I

32

4

A I

32 2

D I

3

1

Rock Song #3 in C

1

E I

32 4

A I

32

3

2

1

C I

2

1

F I

4

1

3 2

1

G I

3 4

2

1

F I

4

1

3 3

2

1

C I

cp 1.230 cp 1.230

Page 296: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

296

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Ä ! 44

â 44022000

tttttt1↓

+

022000

tttttt2↓

+

022000

tttttt3↓

022000

tttttt+↑

022000

tttttt4↓

022000

tttttt+↑

022000

020000

tttttt1↓

+

020000

tttttt2↓

+

020000

tttttt3↓

020000

tttttt+↑

020000

tttttt4↓

020000

tttttt+↑

020000

042000

t! ttttt1↓

+

042000

tttttt2↓

+

042000

tttttt3↓

042000

tttttt+↑

042000

tttttt4↓

042000

tttttt+↑

042000

1

032000

tttttt↓

+ 2

032000

tttttt↓

+ 3

032000

tttttt↓

+

032000

tttttt↑

4

032000

tttttt↓

+

032000

tttttt↑

032000

Ä !

â022000

tttttt1↓

+

022000

tttttt2↓

+

022000

tttttt3↓

022000

tttttt+↑

022000

tttttt4↓

022000

tttttt+↑

022000

00232

ttttt1↓

+

00232

ttttt2↓

+

00232

ttttt3↓

00232

ttttt+↑

00232

ttttt4↓

00232

ttttt+↑

00232

320033

tttttt1↓

+

320033

tttttt2↓

+

320033

tttttt3↓

320033

tttttt+↑

320033

tttttt4↓

320033

tttttt+↑

21202

t!tttt1↓

+

21202

ttttt2↓

+

21202

ttttt3↓

21202

ttttt+↑

21202

ttttt4↓

21202

ttttt+↑

Ä !

â 1

022000

tttttt↓

2+

022000

tttttt↓

3+

022000

tttttt↓

+

022000

tttttt↑

4

022000

tttttt↓

+

022000

tttttt↑

1

020000

tttttt↓

2+

020000

tttttt↓

3+

020000

tttttt↓

+

020000

tttttt↑

4

020000

tttttt↓

+

020000

tttttt↑

1

042000

t! ttttt↓

2+

042000

tttttt↓

3+

042000

tttttt↓

+

042000

tttttt↑

4

042000

tttttt↓

+

042000

tttttt↑

1

032000

tttttt↓

2+

032000

tttttt↓

3+

032000

tttttt↓

+

032000

tttttt↑

4

032000

tttttt↓

+

032000

tttttt↑

Ä !

â 1

022000

tttttt↓

2+

022000

tttttt↓

3+

022000

tttttt↓

+

022000

tttttt↑

4

022000

tttttt↓

+

022000

tttttt↑

1

00232

ttttt↓

2+

00232

ttttt↓

3+

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↑

4

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↑

1

02220

ttt!tt↓

2+

02220

ttttt↓

3+

02220

ttttt↓

+

02220

ttttt↑

4

02220

ttttt↓

+

02220

ttttt↑

æø

ææø1

21202

t!tttt↓

2+

21202

ttttt↓

3+

21202

ttttt↓

+

21202

ttttt↑

4

21202

ttttt↓

+

21202

ttttt↑

æ

ææ022000

AAAAAA1↓

3

Em I

2

Em7 I

2

Em6 I

1

3

Cma7 I

12

Em I

32 2

D I

3

1

2

1

G I

3 4

2

1

B7 I

3 4

3

Em I

2

Em7 I

2

Em6 I

1

3

Cma7 I

12

Em I

32 2

D I

3

1 4

A I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 4

Em I

32

Folk Rock #1acp 1.231 cp 1.231

Chord Progression 1.231

Page 297: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

297

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Ä ! 44

â 44 1

320033

tttttt↓

2+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

320033+

tttttt

320033

↑4

tttttt

320033

↓+

tttttt↑

1

022000

tttttt↓

2+

022000

tttttt↓

+

022000

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

022000+

tttttt

022000

↑4

tttttt

022000

↓+

tttttt↑

1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

2003

tttt↓

4+

2003

tttt↓

+

2003

tttt↑

æø

ææø1

02210

ttttt↓

2+

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02210+

ttttt

02210

↑4

ttttt

02210

↓+

ttttt↑

Ä !

â 1

02210

ttttt↓

2+

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02210+

ttttt

02210

↑4

ttttt

02210

↓+

ttttt↑

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1

320033

tttttt↓

2+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

3

320033

tttttt

+

320033

tttttt↑

4

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

æø

ææø1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

0232

tttt↓

4+

0232

tttt↓

+

0232

tttt↑

1

022000

tttttt↓

2+

022000

tttttt↓

+

022000

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

022000+

tttttt

022000

↑4

tttttt↓

+

tttttt↑

Ä !

â 1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

0232

tttt↓

4+

0232

tttt↓

+

0232

tttt↑

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1

320033

tttttt↓

2+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

320033

+

tttttt

320033

↑4

tttttt

320033

↓+

tttttt↑

æø

ææø1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

0232

tttt↓

4+

0232

tttt↓

+

0232

tttt↑

Ä !

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø1

7899

tttttt↓

2+

7899

tttttt↓

+

7899

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

7899

+

tttttt

7899

↑4

tttttt

7899

↓+

tttttt↑

æø

ææø1

89

1010

ttttt↓

2+

89

1010

ttttt↓

+

89

1010

ttttt↑

3

10111212

tttt↓

4+

10111212

tttt↓

+

10111212

tttt↑

æ

ææ022000

AAAAAA1↓

2

1

G I

3 4

Em I

32

3

2

1

C I

1

G/B I

3 4

1

Am I

32

1

Am I

32

2

1

G I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

2

D I

3

1

Em I

32

3

2

1

C I

2

D I

3

1

2

1

G I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

2

D I

3

1

Em I

32

3

2

1

C I

2

D I

3

1

Em I

32

Folk Song #1cp 1.232 cp 1.232

Chord Progression 1.232

Page 298: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

298

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Ä 44

â 44 1

0

t↓

2+

0

t↓

3+

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

4

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

1

3

t↓

2+

3

t↓

3+

32210

ttttt↓

+

32210

ttttt↑

4

32210

ttttt↓

+

32210

ttttt↑

1

2

! t↓

2+

2

t↓

3+

20210

ttttt↓

+

20210

ttttt↑

4

20210

ttttt↓

+

20210

ttttt↑

1

1

t↓

2+

1

t↓

3+

12210

ttttt↓

+

12210

ttttt↑

4

12210

ttttt↓

+

12210

ttttt↑

Ä

â 1

0

t↓

2+

0

t↓

3+

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

4

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

1

3

t↓

2+

3

t↓

3+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

4

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

1

3

t↓

2+

3

t↓

3+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

4

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

1

0

t↓

2+

0

t↓

3+

022100

ttt!ttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

4

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

Ä

â 1

0

t↓

2+

0

t↓

3+

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

4

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

1

3

t↓

2+

3

t↓

3+

32210

ttttt↓

+

32210

ttttt↑

4

32210

ttttt↓

+

32210

ttttt↑

1

2

! t↓

2+

2

t↓

3+

20210

ttttt↓

+

20210

ttttt↑

4

20210

ttttt↓

+

20210

ttttt↑

1

1

t↓

2+

1

t↓

3+

12210

ttttt↓

+

12210

ttttt↑

4

12210

ttttt↓

+

12210

ttttt↑

Ä

â 1

0

t↓

2+

0

t↓

3+

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

4

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

1

3

t↓

2+

3

t↓

3+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

4

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

1

2

! t↓

2+

2

t↓

3+

200232

ttttt!t↓

+

200232

tttttt↑

4

200232

tttttt↓

+

200232

tttttt↑

æø

ææø1

0

t↓

2+

0

t↓

3+

022100

ttt!ttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

4

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

æ

ææAAAAA

02210

1

Am I

32

1

Am7/G I

32

4

1

D9/F# I

322

Fma7 I

4

1

3

1

Am I

32

2

1

G I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

1

E I

32

1

Am I

32

1

Am7/G I

32

4

1

D9/F# I

322

Fma7 I

4

1

3

1

Am I

322

1

G I

3 43

D/F# I

4

21

1

E I

32

1

Am I

32

Folk Rock #1bcp 1.240 cp 1.240

Chord Progression 1.240

Page 299: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

299

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Ä ! 44

â 4402220

|||!||1↓

02220

«t «t «t «t «t3↓

02220

tItttt+↑

02220

ttt!tt1↓

02220

ttttt+↑

02220

ttttt2↓

+

02220

ttttt3↓

+

02220

ttttt4↓

+

022000

||||||1↓

022000

«t «t «t «t«t «t

3↓

022000

tIttttt+↑

022000

tttttt1↓

022000

tttttt+↑

022000

tttttt2↓

+

022000

tttttt3↓

+

022000

tttttt4↓

+

Ä !

â32010

|||||1↓

32010

«t «t «t «t «t3↓

32010

tItttt+↑

32010

ttttt1↓

32010

ttttt+↑

32010

ttttt 2↓

+

32010

ttttt3↓

+

32010

ttttt4↓

+

00232

|||||1↓

00232

«t «t «t «t«t

3↓

00232

tItttt+↑

æøææø0

0232

ttttt1↓

00232

ttttt+↑

00232

ttttt2↓

+

00232

ttttt3↓

+

00232

ttttt4↓

+

Ä !

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø0222|||!|1↓

0222

«t «t «t «t3↓

0222

tIttt+↑

0222

ttt!t1↓

+

0422

tttt2↓

+

0522

tttt3↓

+

0522

tttt4↓

+ 1 + +2

||||

0522

0522

«t «t «t «t3↓

tIttt+↑

æø

ææø0422

ttt!t1↓

+

0222

«| «| «| «|2↓

f ine

+ 3 4+ +

Ä !

â32010

|||||1↓

32010

«t «t «t «t «t3↓

32010

tItttt+↑

32010

ttttt1↓

32010

ttttt+↑

32010

ttttt 2 +

32010

ttttt 3 +

32010

ttttt 4 +↓

00232

|||||1↓

00232

«t «t «t «t«t

3↓

00232

tItttt+↑

00232

ttttt1↓

00232

ttttt+↑

00232

ttttt

2 +↓

00232

ttttt

3 +↓

00232

ttttt

4 +↓

4

A I

32

+ 2 + + 4

Em I

32

+ 2 + + 4

3

2

1

C I

+ 2 + + 4

2

D I

3

1

+ 2 + + 4

1 1

A I

1

+ 2 + + 4

1 1

A6 I

1

3

1 1

A7 I

1

4

+ 4

1 1

A6 I

1

3

1 1

A I

1

3

2

1

C I

+ 2 + + 4

2

D I

3

1

+ 2 + + 4

Folk Rock Song #2cp 1.241 cp 1.241

Chord Progression 1.241

Page 300: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

300

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.242

Ä !

â 1

320033

||||||↓

3

320033

«t «t «t «t«t «t

↓+

320033

tIttttt↑

320033

tttttt1↓

320033

tttttt+↑

320033

tttttt

2 +↓

320033

tttttt

3 +↓

320033

tttttt

4 +↓

02220

|||!||1↓

02220

«t «t «t «t «t3↓

02220

tItttt+↑

02220

ttt!tt1↓

02220

ttttt+↑

02220

ttttt 2 +

02220

ttttt 3 +

02220

ttttt 4 +

Ä !

â00232

|||||1↓

00232

«t «t «t «t«t

3↓

00232

tItttt+↑

00232

ttttt1↓

00232

ttttt+↑

00232

ttttt

2 +↓

00232

ttttt

3 +↓

00232

ttttt

4 +↓

320033

||||||1↓

320033

«t «t «t «t«t «t

3↓

320033

tIttttt+↑

320033

tttttt1↓

320033

tttttt+↑

320033

tttttt

2 +↓

320033

tttttt

3 +↓

320033

tttttt

4 +↓

Ä !

â24432

|||||1↓

24432

«t «t «t «t«t

3↓

24432

tItttt+↑

24432

ttttt1↓

24432

ttttt+↑

24432

ttttt 2 +

24432

ttttt 3 +

24432

ttttt 4 +

24432

|||||1↓

24432

«t «t «t «t«t

3↓

24432

tItttt+↑

æ

ææ24432

ttttt1↓

24432

ttttt+↑

24432

ttttt 2 +

24432

ttttt 3 +

24432

ttttt 4 +

2

1

G I

3 4

+ 2 + + 4

4

A I

32

+ 2 +

2

D I

3

1

+ 2 + + 4

2

1

G I

3 4

+ 2 + + 4

D.C. al finerepeat from the beginning to the word "fine"

2

1

Bm II

4

1

3

+ 2 + + 4 + 2 + + 4

Folkrock Song #2(continued)

cp 1.242 cp 1.242

Page 301: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

301

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.270

Ä ! 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1

0232

tttt↓

2+

0232

tttt↓

+

0232

tttt↑

3

tttt

0232

+

tttt

0232

↑4

tttt↓

+

1

1

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

2

32010

ttttt↓

3+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

4

320033

tttttt↓

++ 1

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

2

02210

ttttt↓

+

02200

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02200

+

ttttt

02200

↑4

ttttt↓

+

æø

ææø1

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

2

02210

ttttt↓

+

02200

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02200

+

ttttt

02200

↑4

ttttt↓

+

Ä !

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø1

0232

tttt↓

2+

0232

tttt↓

+

0232

tttt↑

3

tttt

0232+

tttt

0232

↑4

tttt↓

+

5

1

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

2

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02210+

ttttt

02210

↑4

ttttt↓

+ 1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

320033

tttttt↓

4+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

1

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

2

02210

ttttt↓

+

02200

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02200+

ttttt

02200

↑4

ttttt↓

+

æø

ææø1

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

2

02210

ttttt↓

+

02200

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02200+

ttttt

02200

↑4

ttttt↓

+

Ä !

â 1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

32010

ttttt↓

4+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

10

1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

2010

tttt↓

4+

2010

tttt↓

+

2010

tttt↑

02210

ttttt1↓

02210

ttttt2↓

02210

ttttt+↑

02200

ttttt3↓

02200

ttttt4↓

02200

ttttt+↑

1

02210

ttttt↓

2++

02200

ttttt↓

+

02200

ttttt↑

3

02200

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

4

02210

ttttt↓

+

2

D I

3

1

32

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

2

D I

3

1

1

Am I

32

32

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

32

1

C I

2

1

C/B I

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

1

Am I

32

Old English Folk Songcp 1.270 cp 1.270

Page 302: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

302

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.271

Ä ! 44

â 44 1

3010

tttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

4

32010

ttttt↓

+

14

1

0232

tttt↓

2+

0232

tttt↓

+

0232

tttt↑

0232

tttt3 +

0232

tttt↑

4

0232

tttt↓

+ 1

022200

tttttt↓

2+

022200

tttttt↓

+

022200

tttttt↑

3

022200

tttttt↓

4+

022200

tttttt↓

1+ +

tttttt

02

2

022200

tttttt↓

3+

022200

tttttt↓

+

022200

tttttt↑

4

022200

tttttt↓

+

022200

tttttt↑

022200

1

022100

ttt!ttt↓

2+

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

3

022100

tttttt↓

4+

022100

tttttt↓

+ 1 +

tttttt

02

2

022100

tttttt↓

3+

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

4

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

022100

Ä !

â 1

0231

ttt#t↓

2

0231

tttt↓

+

0231

tttt↑

3

tttt

0231+

tttt

0231

↑4

tttt↓

+

20

1

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

2

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02210+

ttttt

02210

↑4

ttttt↓

+ 1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

320033

tttttt↓

4+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

1↓

02210

ttttt+↑

02210

ttttt2↓

02210

ttttt+↑

02200

ttttt3

ttttt

02200+↑

ttttt

022004↓

ttttt+ 1

02210

ttttt+↑

02210

ttttt2↓

02210

ttttt+↑

02200

ttttt3

ttttt

02200+↑

ttttt

022004↓

ttttt+

Ä !

â 1

0232

tttt↓

2+

0232

tttt↓

+

0232

tttt↑

3

tttt

0232

+

tttt

0232

↑4

tttt↓

+

25

1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

320033

tttttt↓

4+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

1

02210

ttttt↓

+

02210

ttttt↑

2

02210

ttttt↓

+

02200

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

02200

+

ttttt

02200

↑4

ttttt↓

+

æ

ææ02210

AAAAA1↓

32

1

C I

2

D I

3

1 4

E sus.4 I

32

1

E I

32

Dm I

1

2

3

1

Am I

32

32

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

2

D I

3

1

32

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32

A sus. 2 I

32

1

Am I

32

Old English Folk Song(continued)

cp 1.271 cp 1.271

Page 303: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

303

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.327

Ä !!! 22

â 22count: 1

022100

tttttt↓

2+

022100

tttttt↓

3+

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

4

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑ Lmute

1

d

022100

2

tIttttt

022100

+↑ Lmute

d

022100

tIttttt

022100

+↑

tttttt

022100

3↓

tttttt

022100

+↑

tttttt4↓

tttttt+↑

1

00232

ttttt↓

2+

00232

ttttt↓

3+

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↑

4

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↑ Lmute

1

d

00232

2+

tItttt

00232

↑ Lmute

d

00232

+

tItttt

00232

↑3

ttttt

00232

↓+

ttttt

00232

↑4

ttttt↓

+

ttttt↑

Ä !!!

â 1

0222

tttt↓

2+

0222

tttt↓

3+

0222

tttt↓

+

0222

tttt↑

4

0222

tttt↓

+

0222

tttt↑ Lmute

1

0222

d2

tIttt

0222

+↑

d

0222

Lmute

tIttt

0222

+↑

tttt

0222

3↓

tttt

0222

+↑

tttt4↓

tttt+↑

1

022100

tttttt↓

2+

022100

tttttt↓

3+

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

4

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑ Lmute

æø

ææø1

d

022100

2

tIttttt

022100

+↑ Lmute

d

022100

tIttttt

022100

+↑

tttttt

022100

3↓

tttttt

022100

+↑

tttttt4↓

tttttt+↑

Ä !!!

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø1

2444

ttt!t↓

2+

2444

tttt↓

3+

2444

tttt↓

+

2444

tttt↑

4

2444

tttt↓

+

2444

tttt↑

Lmute

1

d

2444

+ 2

tItt!t

2444

↑Lmute

d

2444

+

tIttt

2444

↑3

tttt

2444

↓+

tttt

2444

↑4

tttt↓

+

tttt↑

ééé

1

022100

tttttt↓

2+

022100

tttttt↓

3+

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑

4

022100

tttttt↓

+

022100

tttttt↑ Lmute

1

d

022100

2

tIttttt

022100

+↑ Lmute

d

022100

tIttttt

022100

+↑

tttttt

022100

3↓

tttttt

022100

+↑

tttttt4↓

tttttt+↑

é æø

ææøé

1

E I

32 2

D I

3

1

1

A I

11

1

E I

32

D.C. al finerepeat from the beginning to the word "fine"

f ine

1

3 3

B II

3

this symbol: indicates a repeat of the previous TWO measures

1

E I

32

Rock Strum With Mutescp 1.327 cp 1.327

Mute by touching the strings very gently. With a chord that involves no open strings, such a the "B" chord below, relax the fretting fingers to mute. With the "E" and "D" chords, use the little finger to mute. Keep the little finger straight and relaxed to mute. To mute the "A" chord, keep all of the free fingers straight and relaxed to mute.

Page 304: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

304

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.328

Ä 44

â 44Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1

02210

«t «t «t «t «t+ 2 +

02210

tItttt3

32210

tItttt+

d

02210

4

ttttt+

æø

ææø1 +ttttt

02210

02210

2

ttttt

32210

+

ttttt

02210

3

tItttt+

«t «t «t «t «t+4 1

2100

t!ttt+ 2

2100

tttt+ 3

2100

tttt+

2100

tttt4

2100

tttt+

0230

tttt1

tttt

0230

tttt

0230

+

tttt2 +

0230

tttt

0230

3

tttt

0230

+

tttt4 +

Ä

â 4222

!tt! t!t1 +

4222

tttt2 +

4222

tIttt3

4222

tttt+ 4

0232

tIttt+ 1

tttt

0232

tttt

0232

+

tttt2 +

0232

tttt

0232

3

tttt

0232

+

tttt4 +

02220

ttt!tt1 +

02220

ttttt2 +

02220

tItttt3

02220

ttttt+ 4

0232

tItt!t+ 1

tttt

0232

tttt

0232

+

tttt2 +

0232

tttt

0232

3

tttt

0232

+

tttt4 +

Ä

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø1

0

t2

010

ttt+

010

ttt3

32210

tItttt+

d

02010

4

ttttt+

0

t1 +

02010

ttttt2 +

0

t3

0

t+

02010

ttttt4 + 1

0

t+ 2

211

ttt+ 3

0

t+

0

t4

211

ttt+

æø

ææø0

t1 +

211

ttt2 +

0

t3

0

t+

211

ttt4 +

Ä

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø1

02210

«t «t «t «t «t+ 2 +

02210

tItttt3

32210

ttttt+ 4

02210

ttttt+

æø

ææø1 +

ttttt

02210

02210

2

ttttt

323

+

ttttt

2023

3

tItt+

«t «t «t «t+4

æ

ææ02210

AAAAA1

1

Am I

321

Am/C I

32

4

1

Am I

32

R&B Song #1

1

Am/C I

32

4

1

Am I

32

1

E I

32

D add 9 I

3

1

1 1

F#m II

3

12

D I

3

1 4

A I

32 2

D I

3

1

1

Am7 I

2

1

Am/C I

32

4

1

Am7 I

2 3

D7 I

1

2

1

Am I

32

1

Am/C I

32

4

1

Am I

32

D7/C I

4

2

4

D6/B I

4

21

1

Am I

32

cp 1.328 cp 1.328

Page 305: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

305

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.336

Ä 44

â 44p

0

ti

2

tam

31

tti

2

tp

3

ti

2

tam

31

tti

2

tp

2

ti

0

tam

33

tti

0

tp

1

" ti

0

ta

m

33

tti

0

tp

0

ti

2

tam

31

tti

2

tp

3

ti

2

tam

31

tti

2

tp

2

ti

0

tam

33

tti

0

tp

1

" ti

0

tam

33

tti

0

t

Äâ p

0

ti

2

tam

31

tti

2

tp

3

ti

2

tam

31

tti

2

t

2

tp

0

ti

33

tta

m

0

ti

3

tp

0

ti

33

ttam

0

ti

æøææø6

" tp

0

ti

66

t" tam

6

tp

8

tp

0

ti

88

tta

m

Äâ p

0

ti

2

tam

21

tti

2

tp

2

ti

0

tam

03

tti

0

t1.

3

tp

2

ti

01

ttam

2

ti

3

tp

0

ti

03

ttam

0

ti p

0

ti

2

ta

m

21

tti

2

tp

2

ti

0

ta

m

03

tti

0

t

0

tp

2

ti

20

tta

m

2

ti

0

tp

2

ti

21

ttam

2

ti

Äâ p

0

ti

2

ta

m

21

tti

2

tp

2

ti

0

ta

m

03

tti

0

t

3

tp

2

ti

01

tta

m

2

ti

3

tp

0

ti

03

tta

m

0

ti

0

tp

2

ti

21

tta

m

2

ti

2

tp

0

ti

03

tta

m

0

ti

æøææø

p

3

ti

2

tam

01

tti

2

tp

4

! ti

2

ta

m

00

tt æææ0

tp

10

ti

1010

«| «|am

2.

Dm I

1

2

4

plucking hand

Dm7/C I

1

2

431

G/B I

3 4

Gm/Bb I

3 4

1

Dm I

1

2

4

Dm7/C I

1

2

43

1

G/B I

3 4

Gm/Bb I

3 4

1

Dm I

1

2

4

Dm7/C I

1

2

43

1

G/B I

3 4 2

1

G I

3 4

2

Bb6 VI3 4 2

C VIII3 4

1

Am I

32 1

G/B I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32 1

G/B I

3 4

A sus.2 I

32

1

Am I

32

1

Am I

32 1

G/B I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

1

Am I

32 1

G/B I

3 4 3

2

1

C I

4

C#m7b5 I

2

Dm X

1 1 1

Folk Rock #3cp 1.336 cp 1.336

Page 306: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

306

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.338

Ä !!! 44

â 4410

Swing Eighths

1count:fretting:fretting:

02

tt10+

02

tt2

2

3

# t3

+

4

! t103

02

tt10+

02

tt304

04

tt10+

02

tt10

02

tt1

10

02

tt+

2

3

#t2

3

4

!t+

10

02

tt3

10

02

tt+

30

04

tt4

10

02

tt+

10

02

tt1

10

02

tt+

2

3

# t2

3

4

! t+

10

02

tt3

10

02

tt+

30

04

tt4

10

02

tt+

101

02

tt10+

02

tt2

2

3

# t3

+

4

! t103

02

tt10+

02

tt304

04

tt10+

02

tt

Ä !!!

â101count:

fretting:fretting:

02

tt10+

02

tt2

2

3

# t3

+

4

!t103

02

tt10+

02

tt304

04

tt10+

02

tt

02

tt101

02

tt10+

3

#t2

2

4

!t3

+

02

tt103

02

tt10+

04

tt304

02

tt10+

02

tt101

02

tt10+

3

# t2

2

4

! t3

+

02

tt103

02

tt10+

04

tt304

02

tt10+

02

tt101

02

tt10+

3

# t2

2

4

! t3

+

02

tt103

02

tt10+

04

tt304

02

tt10+

Ä !!!

â101count:

fretting:fretting:

02

tt10+

02

tt2

2

3

# t3

+

4

! t103

02

tt10+

02

tt304

04

tt10+

02

tt

02

tt101

02

tt10+

3

#t2

2

4

!t3

+

02

tt103

02

tt10+

04

tt304

02

tt10+ 1

020

tt#t Û2+

2

ttrip

0

tlet

2

t3

021

# ttt+

021

ttt4

021

ttt+

1.

æø

ææø1

202

t#tt Û+ 2

ttt3

3

trip

#t

0

0

let

t

2100

3

|!|||+ +4

Ä !!!

âÛ

1count:

202

t#tttrip

202

tttlet

202

ttt Û2

202

ttttrip

202

tttlet

202

ttt Û3

021

#ttttrip

021

tttlet

021

ttt Û4

021

ttttrip

021

tttlet

021

ttt

2.

æ

ææ1

202

tY#tt+

d

3434

2

!t! tt# t

4545

+ 43 + +

ttt! t ||||

A7 D7 A7

D7 A7

E7 D7

3

A7 I

2 3

D7 I

1

2 3

A7 I

21

E I

32

3

A7 I

2 3

D7 I

1

2 3

A7 I

2

2

G#9 no root III1

3 4

2

A9 no root IV1

3 4

Chicago Blues #1 In Acp 1.338 cp 1.338

Page 307: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

307

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.352

Ä ! 44

â 44+

tI

0

Swing Eighths

count:

Û4

tt

00

t

2

trip.let

t

3

#

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø1

022

ttt+ +2 3

c

000

2

d

3

+

tIÛ

4

tttrip.

tlet

t#

ç

çç

ç1

022

ttt+

0

t Û2

3

tH

trip

4

! tlet

2

t3

05

tt+

05

tt4

05

tt+

05

tt

Ä !

â 02

tt1

02

tt+

3

#t2

4

!t+

02

tt3

02

tt+

05

tt4

05

tt+

#

02

tt1

02

tt+

3

#t2

4

!t+

02

tt3

02

tt+

05

tt4

##

05

tt+

02

tt1

02

tt+

04

tt2

04

tt+

05

tt3

05

tt+

04

tt4

04

tt+

02

tt1

02

tt+

04

tt2

04

tt+

05

tt3

05

tt+

04

tt4

04

tt+

Ä !

â0

t1

3

t+

Û

31

!tt2

1

ttrip

3

tlet

2213

tttt3

0

t+

2213

tttt4

1

t+ 1

2021

tttt+

2

t2

2021

tttt+

2

t3

2021

tttt+

2

t4

2021

tttt+ 1

0222

ttt!t Û2

222

ttttrip

222

tttlet

222

ttt Û3

343

tt#ttrip

343

tttlet

343

ttt Û4

454

"t# t!ttrip

454

tttlet

454

ttt æø

ææø1

565

t!tt+

3

t#

2

0

t+

2

t3

2100

tt!tt+

0

4

00

t#ttrip

2

tlet

3

t#

æ

ææ022

ttt1

c b

cp 1.352

1

A I

1

cp 1.352

D7A

1

E7 I

32

42

D7 I1

3 1

A I

11

2

Bdim III

1

3

2

Adim7 IV

1

3

2

A7 V

1

3

1

E I

32 3 1

A I

1

Mojo/Voodoo Blues #2 in A

Page 308: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

308

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Ä 68

â 68p

0

t1↓

p

2

t2↓

i

2

t+↓

m

1

t3↓

a

0

t4↓

m

1

t5↑

i

2

t6↑

3

tp

1↑

2

tp

2↓

0

ti

+↓

1

tm

3↓

0

ta

4↓

1

tm

5↑

0

ti

6↑

0

tp

1↑

0

tp

2↓

2

ti

+↓

3

tm

3↓

2

!ta

4↓

3

tm

5↑

2

ti

6↑

p

1

3

t↑

p

2

3

t↓

i

+

2

t↓

m

3

1

t↓

a

4

1

t↓

m

5

1

t↑

i

6

2

t↑

Ä

âp

0

t1↑

p

2

t2↓

i

2

t+↓

m

1

t3↓

a

0

t4↓

m

1

t5↑

i

2

t6↑

3

tp

1↑

2

tp

2↓

0

ti

+↓

1

tm

3↓

0

ta

4↓

1

tm

5↑

0

ti

6↑

0

tp

1↑

2

tp

2↓

1

!ti

+↓

0

tm

3↓

0

ta

4↓

0

tm

5↑

1

ti

6↑

0

tp

1↑

2

tp

2↓

1

!ti

+↓

0

tm

3↓

0

ta

4↓

0

tm

5↑

1

ti

6↑

Ä

âp

0

t1↑

p

2

t2↓

i

2

t+↓

m

1

t3↓

a

0

t4↓

m

1

t5↑

i

2

t6↑

3

tp

1↑

2

tp

2↓

0

ti

+↓

1

tm

3↓

0

ta

4↓

1

tm

5↑

0

ti

6↑

0

tp

1↑

0

tp

2↓

2

ti

+↓

3

tm

3↓

2

!ta

4↓

3

tm

5↑

2

ti

6↑

3

tp

1↑

3

tp

2↓

2

ti

+↓

1

tm

3↓

1

ta

4↓

1

tm

5↑

2

ti

6↑

Ä

âp

0

t1↑

p

2

t2↓

i

2

t+↓

m

1

t3↓

a

0

t4↓

m

1

t5↑

i

2

t6↑

0

tp

1↑

2

tp

2↓

1

!ti

+↓

0

tm

3↓

0

ta

4↓

0

tm

5↑

1

ti

6↑

0

tp

1↑

2

tp

2↓

2

ti

+↓

1

tm

3↓

0

ta

4↓

1

tm

5↑

2

ti

6↑

æø

ææø0

tp

1↑

2

tp

2↓

1

!ti

+↓

0

tm

3↓

0

ta

4↓

0

tm

5↑

1

ti

6↑

æ

ææ0

tp

1↑

tp

2↓

ti

+↓

tm

3↓

«ta

456↓

1

Am I

32

3

2

1

C I

2

D I

3

1 2

1

F I

3

1

1

Am I

32

3

2

1

C I

1

E I

32

1

Am I

32

3

2

1

C I

2

D I

3

1 2

1

F I

3

1

1

Am I

321

E I

32

1

Am I

321

E I

32

1

Am I

32

House Of The Rising Sunpractice this separately picking and fingerpicking

cp 1.455 cp 1.455

Chord Progression 1.455

Page 309: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

309

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.456

Ä ! 44

â 44count:

strum:1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

0

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

0

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

22

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

1

+

t

2

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

22

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

1

+

t

2

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

Ä !

â 1

21

t!t↓

2+

21

tt↓

+

2

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

2

↑4

t

1

↑+

t↑

1

21

t!t↓

2

21

tt↓

+

2

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

2

↑4

t

1

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

0

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

0

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

Ä !

â 1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

1

↑4

!t

2

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

1

↑4

!t

2

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

22

tt↓

+0

t↑

3

t

1

+

t

2

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

22

tt↓

+0

t↑

3

t

1

+

t

2

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

Ä !

â 1

21

t!t↓

2+

21

tt↓

+

2

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

2

↑4

t

1

↑+

t↑

1

21

t!t↓

2+

21

tt↓

+

2

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

2

↑4

t

1

↑+

t↑

1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

0

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

1. æø

ææø1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

0

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

Em I

32

1

Am I

32

2

1

B7 I

3 4

Em I

32

E I

321

1

Am I

32

2

1

B7 I

3 4

Em I

32

Modern Rock Song #1cp 1.456 cp 1.456

Page 310: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

310

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.457

Ä ! 44

â 44strum:

count: 1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

0

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

2.

1

d

0232+

00232

tItttt↓

2

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↓

3

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↓

4

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↓

Ä !

â 1

320033

tttttt↓

2+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

320033+

tttttt

320033

↑4

tttttt

320033

↓+

tttttt↑

1

00232

ttttt↓

2+

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↑

00232

ttttt3 +

00232

ttttt↑

4

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↑

1

022000

tttttt↓

2+

022000

tttttt↓

+

022000

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

022000+

tttttt

022000

↑4

tttttt

022000

↓+

tttttt↑

1

21202

t!tttt↓

2+

21202

ttttt↓

+

21202

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

21202+

ttttt

21202

↑4

ttttt

21202

↓+

ttttt↑

Ä !

â 1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

32010+

ttttt

32010

↑4

ttttt

32010

↓+

ttttt↑

1

320033

tttttt↓

2+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

320033+

tttttt

320033

↑4

tttttt

320033

↓+

tttttt↑

02

tt1↓

02

tt+↓

04

tt2↓

02

tt+↓

02

tt3↓

02

tt+↓

04

tt4↓

02

tt+↓

02

tt1↓

02

tt+↓

04

tt2↓

02

tt+↓

02

tt3↓

02

tt+↓

04

tt4↓

02

tt+↓

Ä !

â 1

320033

tttttt↓

2+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

320033

+

tttttt

320033

↑4

tttttt

320033

↓+

tttttt↑

1

00232

ttttt↓

2+

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

00232

+

ttttt

00232

↑4

ttttt

00232

↓+

ttttt↑

1

022000

tttttt↓

2+

022000

tttttt↓

+

022000

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

022000

+

tttttt

022000

↑4

tttttt

022000

↓+

tttttt↑

1

21202

t!tttt↓

2+

21202

ttttt↓

+

21202

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

21202

+

ttttt

21202

↑4

ttttt

21202

↓+

ttttt↑

Em I

32 2

D I

3

1

2

1

G I

3 4

2

D I

3

1

Em I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 4

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 4

D I

3

1

2

1

G I

3 42

D I

3

1

Em I

32 2

1

B7 I

3 4

© 1998 Ji Gl All Ri h R d

Modern Rock Song #1 (continued)cp 1.457 cp 1.457

Page 311: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

311

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.458

Ä ! 44

â 44count:

strum: 1

32010

ttttt↓

2+

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

32010

+

ttttt

32010

↑4

ttttt

32010

↓+

ttttt↑

1

320033

tttttt↓

2+

320033

tttttt↓

+

320033

tttttt↑

3

tttttt

320033

+

tttttt

320033

↑4

tttttt

320033

↓+

tttttt↑

1

00232

ttttt↓

2+

00232

ttttt↓

+

00232

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

00232

+

ttttt

00232

↑4

ttttt

00232

↓+

ttttt↑

21202

t!tttt1↓

21202

ttttt+↓

21202

ttttt2↓

21202

ttttt+↓

21202

ttttt3↓

21202

ttttt+↓

21202

ttttt4↓

21202

ttttt+↓

æø

ææø1

21202

t!tttt↓

+

21202

ttttt↓

2

21202

ttttt↓

+

21202

ttttt↓

3

21202

ttttt↓

+

21202

ttttt↓

4

21202

ttttt↓

+

21202

ttttt↓

Ä !

â1

02

tt↓

2+

02

tt↓

+

0

t↑

3

t

0

+

t

0

↑4

t

2

↑+

t↑

3.

æ

ææ022000

AAAAAA1↓

3

2

1

C I

2

1

G I

3 42

D I

3

1 2

1

B7 I

3 4

Em I

32

Modern Rock Song #1 (continued)cp 1.458 cp 1.458

Page 312: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

312

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.460

Ä ! 44

â 44 1

30033

ttttt↓

2e + a

30033

«t «t «t«t «t

↓ae +

30033

ttttt↑

3

30033

ttttt↓

e

30033

ttttt↑

+

2023

tttt↓

4a

2023

tttt↓

+e

2023

tttt↓

a

2023

tttt↑

æø

ææø1

02000

ttttt↓

2e + a

02000

«t «t «t«t «t

↓ae +

02000

ttttt↑

3

02000

ttttt↓

e

02000

ttttt↑

+

32013

ttttt↓

4a

32013

ttttt↓

e

32013

ttttt↑

+

32013

ttttt↓

a

Ä !

â 1

0230

tttt↓

2+

0230

tttt↓

+

0230

tttt↑

3

tttt

0230+

tttt

0230

↑4

tttt

0230

↓+

tttt↑

1

tttt

0230

tttt

0230

+↑

tttt

0230

2↓

3

tttt

0230

+↑

tttt

0230

tttt

0230

+↑

tttt4↓

tttt+↑

32030

ttttt1↓

32030

ttttt+↑

32030

ttttt2↓

32030

ttttt+↑

3

ttttt

32010

ttttt

32010

+↑

ttttt

32030

4↓

ttttt+↑

32030

ttttt1

32030

ttttt+↑

32030

ttttt2↓

32030

ttttt+↑

3

ttttt

32030

ttttt

32030

+↑

ttttt

32030

4↓

ttttt+↑

Ä !

â 1

0230

tttt↓

2+

0230

tttt↓

+

0230

tttt↑

3

tttt

0230

+

tttt

0230

↑4

tttt

0230

↓+

tttt↑

1

tttt

0230

tttt

0230

+↑

tttt

0230

2↓

3

tttt

0230

+↑

tttt

0230

tttt

0230

+↑

tttt4↓

tttt+↑

1

32030

ttttt↓

+

32030

ttttt↑

2

32030

ttttt↓

+

32030

ttttt↑

3

ttttt

32010

+

ttttt

32010

↑4

ttttt

32030

↓+

ttttt↑

32030

ttttt1

32030

ttttt+↑

32030

ttttt2↓

32030

ttttt+↑

3

ttttt

0232

tttt3320

+↓

tttt3320

4↓

tttt+↓

Ä !

âΩ ø

ΩΩ ø1

30033

ttttt↓

2+

30033

ttttt↓

+

30033

ttttt↓

3

d3320

+

tIttt

3320

↓4

tttt

3320

↓+

tttt↓

æø

ææø1

32053

ttttt↓

2+

32033

ttttt↓

+

32033

ttttt↓

3

d

0232

+

tIttt

0232

↓4

tttt

0232

↓+

tttt↓

Ω ø

ΩΩ ø 022000tttttt1↓

022000

tttttt+↓

2 +

c

0232

0232

4 +

tttt3↓

tttt+↓

c æø

ææø1

32010

ttttt↓

+

32010

ttttt↓

2 + 3e a

c

0232

0232

a

0232

ee

tttt↑

+

tttt↓

e +a4

tttt↓

æ

ææAAAAA

300331↓

21

G I

3 4

2

D/F# I

31

Em I

32 32

1

C I

4

Dsus.2 I

31

21

C/9 I

3

Dsus.2 I

31

21

C/9 I

3

2

D I

31

32

D sus. 4 I

31

4

21

G I

3 4

Dsus.4 I

31

4 21

C/9 I

3 4

D I

31 2

Em I

32

D I

31 2

32

1

C I D I

31 2

21

G I

3 4

cp 1.460 cp 1.460Modern Rock Song #2

Page 313: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

313

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1545

Ä !!! 44â 44

57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+

57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+

57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+ 1

57

tt+

57

tt2

59

tt+

59

tt3

57

tt+

57

tt4

59

tt+

59

tt

Ä !!!â

57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+

57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+ 1

57

tt+

57

tt2

59

tt+

59

tt3

57

tt+

57

tt4

59

tt+

59

tt57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+

Ä !!!â

79

tt1

79

tt+

711

tt2

711

tt+

79

tt3

79

tt+

711

tt4

711

tt+

57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+

57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+

1.

æøææø5

7

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+

Ä !!!â

57

tt1

57

tt+

59

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt3

57

tt+

59

tt4

59

tt+

2.

æææ

1

57

tt+

57

tt2

59

tt+

57

tt+ +3 4||

pick this with all downstrokes

A7

D7 A7

E D7 A7

A7

Chuck Berry Style Blues Rhythmcp 1.545 cp 1.545

Page 314: Jim Gleason’s GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA BEGINNING GUITAR · 2013. 8. 15. · 202 defined, open-position one note-per-string arpeggio songs 204 1.322 1-2 FINGERING Arpeggios 1.351 1-2

314

© 2000 Jim Gleason. All Rights Reserved.

CHORD PROGRESSION

Chord Progression 1.575

Ä !! 44