Maori Food Culture. The Maori of New Zealand They Maori a Polynesian people, like native Hawaiians, and came to New Zealand in several waves of canoe.

  • Published on
    22-Dec-2015

  • View
    215

  • Download
    2

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • Slide 1
  • Maori Food Culture
  • Slide 2
  • The Maori of New Zealand They Maori a Polynesian people, like native Hawaiians, and came to New Zealand in several waves of canoe (waka) voyages between 1250 and 1300 AD.
  • Slide 3
  • http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/map/1585/theories-of-maori-origins
  • Slide 4
  • The Maori of New Zealand Maori lived in tribes, called iwi. Each tribe had a chief. There was a lot of inter- tribal warfare. The center of a tribe is their Marae, or meeting house Pictures: Marae (interior, exterior, Maripi (aha) and Taiaha
  • Slide 5
  • The Maori of New Zealand In the 17 th century, Captain Cook from Great Britain discovered New Zealand, which changed Maori ways of life forever. There are still Maori in New Zealand today, still holding on to their culture They make up about 15% of the population
  • Slide 6
  • Food Culture of the Maori The Maori of New Zealand, before European contact, were semi-agriculturalists. They got some food from hunting and gathering, and some food from agriculture.
  • Slide 7
  • Food Culture of the Maori Their staple crop was Kumara, which is similar to our sweet potato Kumara was prepared through pit-cooking, in what is called a Hangi.
  • Slide 8
  • Food Culture of the Maori Maori were known to collect and eat certain kinds of fern as well as other wild edible plants when kumara was not in season. New Zealand is an island, so a major resource for the Maori was the ocean. They ate fish, shellfish, crayfish, crabs, and certain kinds of seaweed. They would use fishing line, nets, and traps to catch fish.
  • Slide 9
  • Notes Maori = Polynesian. Arrived in canoes 1250-1300 Lived in tribes, warlike, center = Marae (meeting house) Captain Cook discovered New Zealand. Still Maori today (15% of population) Traditionally were semi-agricultural: hunting, gathering, AND agriculture Staple = Kumara (sweet potato) Also ate wild edible plants (ferns) Ocean = VERY important resource
  • Slide 10
  • Resources http://www.genuinemaoricuisine.com/Folders/foodhistory. html http://www.genuinemaoricuisine.com/Folders/foodhistory. html http://www.doc.govt.nz/documents/science-and- technical/sap235.pdf http://www.doc.govt.nz/documents/science-and- technical/sap235.pdf http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=11858&l=en The Adaptation of the Kumara by the New Zealand Maori, by D.E. Yen Fern Consumption in Aotearoa and its oceanic precidents, by Helen Leach Sea, Land, and Fish: Spatial Relations and the Archaeology of South Island Maori Fishing, by Ian Barner Changing Maori Agriculture in Pre-Waitangi Mew Zealand. By R.P. Hargreaves

Recommended

View more >