Module 6 grief and loss part a 30.4.13

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Text of Module 6 grief and loss part a 30.4.13

  • 1. CHCCS426B Provide support and carerelating to loss and griefModule 6:Learning about Grief and LossPartA
  • 2. 2What is grief? Grief is the experience wehave after a loss. There are many differenttypes of losses. Death isonly one form of loss. Grief is the adjustment to aloss is experienced as aprocess. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 3. 3Overview Grief experiences Models of grief Strategies to support normalgrief Complicated grief Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 4. 4The Grief Experience Many people have tried todescribe and understandwhat happens to peoplewhen they lose someone orsomething of great value tothem in their life. Grief is an experience thatwe all know in varyingdegrees and will know overa lifetime. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 5. 5What are some of the things we can lose in life? Family through separationand divorce Friends Girlfriends and boyfriends Locations Precious possessions Hopes Health People through death Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 6. 6What is impacted by grief? Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13 Body sensations? Emotions Thoughts Behaviour
  • 7. 7Activity As a group divide into 4.Each group should list asmany things that they canunder each of the followingheadings that might beexperienced following aloss. Body Sensations. Emotions. Thoughts. Behaviours. As an individual. Divide anA4 sheet into 4 with theheadings. Body Sensations. Emotions. Thoughts. Behaviours. Try and list as many as youcan of each category thatmight be experienced bysomeone following a loss. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 8. 8What are some of the body sensations that mayaccompany loss? Difficulty going to sleep, orwaking in the middle of the night Weight loss or gain; over- orunder-eating Low energy or fatigue Headaches, chest pain, orracing heart Upset stomach or digestiveproblems Agitation Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 9. 9What are some of the emotions that mayaccompany loss? Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13 Sadness Shock Anger Insecurity/fear/anxiety Relief Depression Loneliness Numbness Yearning
  • 10. 10Overall Mental State/Cognition Confusion Interrupted thoughtprocesses Lack of concentration Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 11. 11What are some of the thoughts that mayaccompany loss? Its my fault. Its not fair. I cant go on. I have been abandoned. Life sucks. There is no God. This always happens to me. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 12. 12Behaviours Recklessness Snappiness/kicking the cat Withdrawal/social isolation Crying Sighing Overspending Gambling Sexual promiscuity Talking incessantly aboutthe event/or not at all Putting on a brave face Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 13. 13Grief reactions are individual and depend upon Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13 Personality factors Previous family history inreacting to loss Previous losses, multiplelosses Shock Other complicating factors
  • 14. 14Guilt When people lose a partneror child or someone closethrough death, they mayfeel guilt about having dayswhen they feel good orhappy. They are fearful that to behappy means that theperson they have lost didntcount much, or they dontcare anymore. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 15. 15Sometimes a guilt trip is put on by others Children can be especiallyvulnerable to this. Kids move in and out of sadfeelings and cannot stay indepression for long periodsof time. They may be happy andplaying and then at othertimes the reality of their losshits them. Be aware of theparticular support neededfor children. Adults mightmisjudge this behaviour andthen the children might feelshame or guilt over theirvery normal reactions. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 16. 16Trying to get out of the pit of despair Sometimes people aredesperate to feel normalagain and try to hasten itsarrival by feigning normality. Im alright, yes, managingfine. Thank you. However, at night time,when the pretence is gone,the pain of the loss catchesup. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 17. 17Trying to be strong for others Many of us feel responsiblefor young children or otherpeople we consider to bemore vulnerable thanourselves. We can sometimes put on abrave face in order to bestrong for others, but deepinside we may becrumbling. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 18. 18Strategies to support others in grief1. Education the framework2. Letting go, sayinggoodbye in ceremony3. Keeping connected in anew way (and usingquestioning techniques)4. Micro-losses as a way tobuild a future5. Support search6. Introduce new supports7. Check for complications Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 19. 191. Education the framework Providing a framework forsomeone who is grieving ishelpful. In the middle of intense painand misery to understandthat the process has beenlived through by others andwhat to expect can give anindividual bearings. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 20. 20Models of grief: ideas about the stages or wayspeople go through a loss Kubler Ross Stages theory (1969) William Worden Task theory (1982) Margaret Stroebe and Henk Schut (1999) Dual processmodel Seasons Butterfly Broken leg Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 21. 21Afeminine framework Elisabeth Kubler-Ross observedgrief in her patients and in theirfamilies. She saw grief as a journey which hadstages. She felt that the griever waspulled by an invisible thread throughthe darkness of loss towards the light. She put forward her theory of grief in1969 in her book On death and dying. This trusting framework will be veryhelpful for some individuals. Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 22. 22Stages theory The stages she observed were:o Stage 1: Shock and denialo Stage 2: Anger/bargainingo Stage 3: Depression and detachmento Stage 4: Dialogueo Stage 5: AcceptanceElisabeth Kubler-Ross - On Death and Dying 1969This model has been widely adopted by grief counsellors, psychologists andsocial workers. Visit the link below to hear a Psychologist briefly explain thegrief stages.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fG6gJRPuW8w Copyright CTA CHCCS426B, MODULE 6 Version Date: 30.4.13
  • 23. 23Afluid movement Her theory was not rigid,however. It was understood that inmoving forward at times peoplewill move backwards andforwards between stages. Forexample a person may movebetween the stages of angerand depression but