OPMBCS

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Table of ContentsForeword Acknowledgment Part I I. Introduction II. Assessment of the Operational Plan for the Manila Bay Coastal Strategy (OPMBCS) III. Updating of the OPMBCS A. Process Flow B. Strategy Framework C. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) of Stakeholders Agencies IV. Management Action Plan Targets A. Issue-Based Action Plan 1. Water Pollution 2. Degradation and Overexploitation of Habitats and Resources 3. Partnership and Governance B. Area-Based/ Major River Basin Action Plan V. Financial Strategy VI. Implementing Arrangements VII. Appendices A. List of Acronyms and Abbreviations B. Definition of Terms VIII. References Part II I. Issue-Based Action Plan A. Water Pollution Action Plan B. Habitats and Resources Action Plan C. Partnership and Governance Action Plan II. Area-Based/ River Basin A. Pampanga River System B. Marilao - Meycauayan - Obando River System 54 83 93 118 119 164 1 3 7 7 10 13 18 18 18 22 25 28 29 32 34 34 40 50 i ii

OPERATIONAL PLAN FOR THE MANILA BAY COASTAL STRATEGY (OPMBCS)

UPDATED VERSION 2011

FOREWORD

The Process of saving Manila Bay from further environmental degradation is accelerating. As the latest output, we are launching the Operational Plan for the Manila Bay Coastal Strategy (OPMBCS) 2011-2015. This Operational Plan is the product of collaboration among the 14 agencies mandated by a Supreme Court decision (G.R. Nos. 171947-48, December 18, 2008) to clean, rehabilitate and preserve our historic and scenic Manila Bay. This Plan focuses on addressing the three most urgent concerns: informal settlers along the waterways, solid waste management, and liquid waste management. The Plan is a step up from the 2005 OPMBCS and draws inspiration from success stories and lessons learned from the past. Thus, it goes beyond the biological aspects of mangroves, fisheries, forests and agriculture. The Plan maps the activities that will effectively arrest the degradation of Manila Bay and yield immediate results. The collaborative approach adopted is not just among the 14 agencies, but encompasses public-private partnerships. It is through this approach that we shall surmount the obstacles ahead. We are now primed to implement the Plan. The stage is set for participatory solutions to unfold. And so, without further ado, let us get moving together, and start converting our vision of a clean and vibrant Manila Bay to a living reality. Mabuhay!

RAMON J. P. PAJEDENR Secretary/ Chairman, Manila Bay Coordinating Committee

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OPERATIONAL PLAN FOR THE MANILA BAY COASTAL STRATEGY (OPMBCS)

UPDATED VERSION 2011

ACKNOWLEDGMENTThe updated Operational Plan of the Manila Bay Coastal Strategy is a product of concerted effort of the following mandamus and cooperating agencies and technical working groups, in close collaboration with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), through the Manila Bay Coordinating Office (MBCO): The Mandamus Agencies Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) Department of Interior and Local Government and its Regional Offices (R3,NCR,R4A) Department of Agriculture (DA) Bureau of Soils and Water Management (BSWM) Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority (FPA) National Fisheries Research Development Institute (NFRDI) Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) Agricultural Training Institute (ATI) Department of Budget and Management (DBM) Department of Education (DepEd) Department of Health (DOH) Philippine Ports Authority (PPA) Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System (MWSS) Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA) Philippine National Police - Maritime Group (PNP Maritime Group) The Cooperating Agencies: National Housing Authority (NHA) Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA) Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) Philippine Navy (PN) Maynilad Water Services Incorporated (MWSI) Manila Water Company Incorporated (MWCI)

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OPERATIONAL PLAN FOR THE MANILA BAY COASTAL STRATEGY (OPMBCS)

UPDATED VERSION 2011

DENR offices and attached agencies : DENR NCR and MBCO-Site Management Office DENR-Region 3 and MBCO-Site Mgt. Office DENR Region 4A and MBCO - Site Mgt. Office Laguna Lake Development Authority (LLDA) Protected Area and Wildlife Bureau (PAWB) National Water Resources Board (NWRB) Mines and Geo - Sciences Bureau (MGB) Forest Management Bureau (FMB) Pasig River Rehabilitation Commission (PRRC) Environmental Management Bureau and Regional Offices (NCR, R3, and R4A) River Basin Control Office (RBCO) National Solid Waste Management Commission (NSWMC) Partnerships for the Environmental Management of the Seas of East Asia (PEMSEA). Special mention is given to the all out support of the DENR officials

Hon. Ramon J. P. Paje, Secretary Demetrio L. Ignacio, Jr. - Undersecretary for Policy and Planning Atty. Analiza Rebuelta - Teh - Undersecretary and Chief of Staff Corazon C. Davis - Assistant Secretary, Administration and Finance Angelito V. Fontanilla - Director Finance and Management Services

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OPERATIONAL PLAN FOR THE MANILA BAY COASTAL STRATEGY (OPMBCS)

UPDATED VERSION 2011

I. IntroductionThe Manila Bay, a maritime inlet of the West Philippine Sea formerly South China Sea, is situated within the administrative boundaries of three (3) regions of the Philippines- the National Capital Region (NCR) on the eastern coast, Region 3 or Central Luzon on the northern and western coast, and Region 4A or Southern Luzon on the southern coast (see Figure 1: Map of Manila Bay area). The basin covers an area of around 17,000 sq. km., and is about 11 times the area of the bay, which is approximately 1,800 sq. km. The coastline is 190 km. (Manila Bay Area Environmental Atlas, 2007).Figure 1: Map of Manila Bay Area

Manila Bay is strategically located, and serves as the gateway to the main political, economic, and social centre of the country. This area contributes about 54.6 % of the countrys gross domestic product (GDP) (NSCB-2010, August). However, though an important economic resource, it has multiple and conflicting uses. Major environmental problems include degradation of habitats, deterioration of water quality, coastal erosion and siltation, overexploitation of fishery resource, and loss of biodiversity. The lack of facilities for the treatment of domestic and industrial wastes, magnifying health risks, has become an increasing concern for the government. Even the aesthetic value of Manila Bay, famous for its sunset and beach, can no longer be enjoyed like what people have been accustomed to due to pollution, aquaculture structures and reclamation. Moreover, the management of Manila Bay is hampered by socio-political and inter-agency conflicts. As such, more than 27.6 million of people living in the basin area and the rest of the country have been affected by this condition (NSO 2007 Population Census). The Philippine Environment Monitor 2003 reports that the water quality of the three regions covering the Manila Bay is considered critical and unsatisfactory (U) in rating. The indiscriminate disposal of domestic wastewater is the main cause of the degradation of water quality in Manila Bay. Other sources of pollution come from the industrial and commercial establishments. The non-point sources of pollution, such as the sediments or nutrients from catchment/basin run offs, also significantly contribute to the continuing deterioration of the bays water quality and ecosystems. These sources of pollution discharge harmful substances directly into the bay and its waterways. These pollutants will affect human health due to the spread of water-borne diseases1

OPERATIONAL PLAN FOR THE MANILA BAY COASTAL STRATEGY (OPMBCS)

UPDATED VERSION 2011

and subsequently lead to economic losses. These threats have resulted to increasing infrastructure and rehabilitation cost as well as social expenditures. Addressing the causes of pollution through the implementation of appropriate actions would help in improved health, increase agricultural and fishery productivity, and thereby achieve a better quality of life. The Manila Bay Coastal Strategy (MBCS), a guiding instrument with a vision of Manila Bay - reflective of Gods glory - is a clean, wholesome, and productive ecosystem, a center for socio-economic development, and a natural heritage nurtured by Filipino values towards a better quality of life for present and future generations, was produced through a unified effort of various stakeholders of the Manila Bay region.

Vision: Manila Bay - reflective of Gods glory - is a clean, wholesome, and productive ecosystem, a center for socio - economic development, and a natural heritage nurtured by Filipino values towards a better quality of life for present and future generations.

In 2005, the MBCS was translated into action plans and programs based on the identified priority areas of concern, is entitled Operational Plan for the Manila Bay Coastal Strategy (OPMBCS). The Plan entails the integration of practical lessons learned in the course of the implementation of the Manila Bay Environmental Management Project (MBEMP), which was completed in 2006 and was set for full implementation upon signing of the MBCC Resolution in February 2006. The Operational Plan has addressed priority issues/areas of concern on water pollution, habitats and resources, and partnership and governance. Each of these issues has a set of objectives and action plans with measurable targets, timeframe, and budgetary requirements. It also contains implementing arrangements - responsible agency/sector/partner, enabling policies and laws, and financing strategy. This Plan, as intended f