Oregon Trails 2016 Oregon Trails 2016: A Vision for the Future. Forward A messAge from the Director,

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  • Oregon Trails 2016: A Vision for the Future

    2016-2025 Oregon Statewide Recreation Trails Plan

    Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

    Download the report online at: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Oregon Parks and Recreation Department 725 Summer Street NE, Suite C Salem, OR 97301-1271 503-986-0980 For the hearing impaired: 1-800-735-2900 This publication is available in alternative formats upon request. Printed on recycled paper. February, 2016

    2016-2025 O

    regon Trails 2016: A V

    ision for the Future

  • Forward A messAge from the Director, oregon

    PArks AnD recreAtion DePArtment I am pleased to present Oregon Trails 2016: A Vision For The Future. This plan is the product of more than two years of consultation and col- laboration of recreational trail providers, interest groups and citizens across the state. It is the state’s “official plan for rec- reational trail management” for the next 10 years, serving as a statewide and regional information and planning tool to assist Oregon recreation providers (local, state, federal, and private) in providing trail opportunities and promoting access to Oregon’s trails and waterways. It also identifies how the state’s limited resources will be allocated for motorized, non-motorized, and water trail projects throughout Oregon. Further, it establishes a review process for potential State Scenic Waterway corridor additions.

    Recreational trails provide many benefits to the citi- zens of Oregon. In addition to the entertainment value of recreation, trails also provide health, transportation, community, and environmental benefits. They also make a substantial contribution to the state’s economy. The plans trail expenditure and economic contribution analysis, conducted by Oregon State University, found that statewide, non-motorized boating, non-motor- ized trail, OHV trail, and snowmobile participation by Oregon residents and out-of-state visitors contributes 26,873 jobs, $1.36 billion in value added, and $826 million in labor income. While Oregon’s residents treasure and care for this trail system, they are dedicat- ed to ensuring resources are utilized with fiscal, social, and environmental responsibility, building on the past to provide for future generations.

    The OPRD has taken an innovative approach to state- wide trails planning by conducting simultaneous OHV, snowmobile, non-motorized, and water trails planning efforts. Public outreach was a key emphasis in the plan- ning effort, which included statistically reliable surveys

    of trail users and non-motor- ized boaters resulting in feed- back and opinions from 7,450 randomly selected residents. Trails plan workshops were held in 14 locations across the state, allowing additional public input on trails issues and funding need. We would to thank all citizens who took time to participate in the sur-

    veys and public workshops.

    The plan has identified three top management issues for each trail category type in the state. For OHV and snowmobile trails, closure of trails and unimproved backcountry roads on federal lands came to the fore- front as top challenges. For non-motorized trails, more trails connecting towns/ public places and need for improved trail maintenance were identified. For non-motorized boating, increased boater access and lack of funding for non-motorized boating are top challenges. Recommendations are included for ad- dressing these issues in the coming years.

    The OPRD will support the implementation of key statewide and local planning recommendations through internal and external partnerships and OPRD-administered grant programs. My hope is that all Oregonians involved in the administration of recreational trails and non-motorized boating oppor- tunities take time to read this important document and make use of its recommendations to support your strategic planning.

    Sincerely,

    Lisa Sumption Director

  • 2 Oregon Trails 2016: A Vision For The Future

    . Acknowledgements

    Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

    Terry Bergerson: Project Manager and Primary Author

    Rocky Houston Ty Conley Katie Duzik

    Ron Price Holly Morgan Sherri Laier

    Ian Caldwell Trevor Taylort Jan Hunt

    Mike Law Greg Ciannella Chris Havel

    Laurel Hillmann Curtis Smith Alex Phillips

    Laura Underhill Calum Stevenson Michele Sctalise

    Oregon State University

    Kreg Lindberg – Primary Investigator

    Eric White

    Mark Needham

    Snowmobile Advisory Committee

    Jeff Mast – US Forest Service John Vogel – OSSA Duane Miles – OSSA

    Vera Riser – OSSA Mike Choate – OSSA Ron Greb – OSSA

    Peggy Spieger – OSSA Dennis Jordan – OSSA Kelly Tanzey – Baker County

    John Spieger – OSSA T.J. Reilly – OSSA

    Note: Oregon State Snowmobile Association (OSSA)

    Off-Highway Vehicle Advisory Committee

    Wade Bryant – ATV-GS Tom Harris – Four Runners

    Tim Custer – ATV-GS Steven McIntyre – OR Motorcycle Riders Assn

    Steve Doane – ATV-GS Henry Buckalew – Hood River County

    Randy Drake– PNW 4-Wheel Drive Assn Ron Grace – Ochoco Trail Riders

    Barret Brown – OR Motorcycle Riders Assn Jeff Mast – US Forest Service

    Tyrell Hart – Motorcycle Riders Assn Chris Knauf – Bureau of Land Management

    Ed Ariniello – OR Motorcycle Riders Assn Jahmaal Rebb – OR Dept of Forestry

    Rob Thorton– Citizen Advocate Lakeview Larry Robison – Coos County

    Note: ATV Grant Subcommittee (ATV-GS)

    Water Trails Advisory Committee

    Julie Chick – Tillamook Estuaries Partnership Clyde Zeller – OR Dept of Forestry

    Geoff Frank – RTP Advisory Committee Jeff Powers – Benton County

    Jeff Mast – US Forest Service Jan Wirtz – City of Lake Oswego

    Rachael Graham – OR State Marine Board Maggie Rivers – Port of Alsea

  • Acknowledgements 3Acknowledgements 3

    Non-Motorized Trails Advisory Committee

    Nancy Enabnit – RTP Advisory Committee Jenna Marmon – Jackson County

    Jim Thayer – ORTAC Bruce Ronning – Bend Metro (Retired)

    Lauralee Svendsgaard – ORTAC Annie McVay – City of Redmond

    Steve Jorgensen – Bend Metro P&R Dist Zach Jarrett – Bureau of Land Management

    Robert Spurlock – Portland Metro Jeff Mast – US Forest Service

    Jennifer Boardman – City of Central Point Jerry Davis – Jerry Davis Consulting

    Note: OR Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC)

    All-Terrain Vehicle Grant Criteria Advisory Committee

    Wade Bryant – ATV-GS (Class I Representative)

    Tim Custer – ATV-GS (Committee Chair)

    Steve Doane – ATV-GS (Class III Representative)

    Pat Harris – ATV-GS (Class II Representative)

    Forest Bohall – ATV-GS (Class IV Representative)

    Note: ATV Grant Subcommittee (ATV-GS)

    Recreational Trails Program Grant Criteria Advisory Committee

    Rebecca Wolf – RTP Advisory Committee

    Scott Youngblood – RTP Advisory Committee

    Kent Howes – RTP Advisory Committee

    Nancy Enabnit – RTP Advisory Committee

    Harry Dalgaard – RTP Advisory Committee

    Jeff Mast – US Forest Service

    Lauralee Svendsgaard – OR Recreation Trails Advisory Council

    John Vogel – Oregon State Snowmobile Association

  • Executive Summary 5

    Executive Summary The 2016-2025 statewide trails plan, entitled Oregon Trails 2016: A Vision For The Future, constitutes Oregon’s ten-year plan for recreational trail management. The plan guides the use of the state’s Recreational Trails Program (RTP) and All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) grant funds, and provides information and recommendations to guide federal, state, and local units of government, as well as the private sector, in making policy and planning decisions. Besides satisfying grant program requirements, a primary intent of this plan is to provide up-to-date, high-quality information to assist recreation providers with trail planning in Oregon. Further, it establishes a review process for potential State Scenic Waterway corridor additions.

    Public outreach was a key emphasis in the planning effort, which included statistically reliable surveys of trail users and non-motorized boaters, resulting in feedback and opinions from 7,450 randomly selected Oregon residents. The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) contracted with Oregon State University (OSU) to conduct four separate surveys of state residents regarding their participation in four categories of trail-related recreation: motorized (ATV/OHV), snowmobile, non-motorized trail, and non-motorized boating. Statistically reliable results for the OHV, non-motorized trail and non-motorized boater surveys are provided at the statewide scale and trails planning region scale (11 planning regions in state). Results for the snowmobile trail survey are provided at the statewide scale.

    Regional trails planning workshops were held in 14 locations across the state, allowing additional public input on trails issues and funding need for each of the four trail category types. In addition, workshop attendees had an opportunity to nominate top water trail and State Scenic Waterway study corridor additions.

    OPRD also made a strong effort to involve trail providers (local, county, state, federal, non-profit) from across the state in the planning process. Trails plan collaborative efforts included:

    • Four separate trails plan advisory committees (ATV, snowmobile, non-motorized, water) to assist with the c