Romantic idea of poetry and its role Second generation of romantic poets

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  • Romantic idea of poetry and its role Second generation of romantic poets
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  • The second generation of poets (since 1812): George Gordon Noel Byron 1788-1824 George Gordon Noel Byron 1788-1824
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  • BIOGRAPHY Lord Byron was born as George Gordon on January 22, 1788 in London, England. As the son of Captain John "Mad Jack" Byron and his second wife, Lady Catherine Gordon. Lord Byron was born as George Gordon on January 22, 1788 in London, England. As the son of Captain John "Mad Jack" Byron and his second wife, Lady Catherine Gordon. Lord Byron received his education at the Grammar School in Aberdeen until 1801, when he was sent to Harrow and remained there until 1805. After, he proceeded to Trinity College, Cambridge and became fascinated with history, fiction and extravagant life. Lord Byron received his education at the Grammar School in Aberdeen until 1801, when he was sent to Harrow and remained there until 1805. After, he proceeded to Trinity College, Cambridge and became fascinated with history, fiction and extravagant life. On February 27, 1812 Lord Byron took his seat at the House of Lords and made his first speech there. On February 27, 1812 Lord Byron took his seat at the House of Lords and made his first speech there.
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  • Scandalist? Love Affairs? Byron then became the most popular person in Regency London, writing poetry and carrying on illicit affairs, most notably with Lady Caroline, wife of future Prime Minister, William Lamb.
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  • William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne Prime Minister (1834 and 1835 1841). Prime Minister (1834 and 1835 1841).Prime MinisterPrime Minister
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  • Incestuous relationship There are also rumors of Byron's involvement with a choir boy and an incestuous relationship with his half-sister, Augusta Leigh, however many scholars dispute this.
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  • Travelling Lord Byron began spending much of his money on the Greek rebellion. He later met a Greek boy, Loukas Khalandritsanos, and employed him as a page and possibly had a sexual relationship with. Lord Byron began spending much of his money on the Greek rebellion. He later met a Greek boy, Loukas Khalandritsanos, and employed him as a page and possibly had a sexual relationship with.
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  • Good husband? To help avoid scandal, Byron chose to marry Anne Isabella Milbanke (Annabella), cousin of Lady Caroline who refused him a year earlier. The two married at Seaham Hall, County Durham on January 2, 1815. As a stipulation in her mother's will, Annabella's beneficiaries must take her family name. Lord Byron then became known as George Gordon Noel Byron in 1822. To help avoid scandal, Byron chose to marry Anne Isabella Milbanke (Annabella), cousin of Lady Caroline who refused him a year earlier. The two married at Seaham Hall, County Durham on January 2, 1815. As a stipulation in her mother's will, Annabella's beneficiaries must take her family name. Lord Byron then became known as George Gordon Noel Byron in 1822.
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  • Anne Isabella Milbanke (Annabella) Her portrait
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  • Bad father The marriage was an unhappy one, mainly due to the birth of a daughter, Augusta Ada, instead of a son. On January 16, 1816 Lady Byron left George and took Ada with her. On April 21, the two were legally separated. George then left England, due to pressure by his creditors leading him to sell his library, forever. The marriage was an unhappy one, mainly due to the birth of a daughter, Augusta Ada, instead of a son. On January 16, 1816 Lady Byron left George and took Ada with her. On April 21, the two were legally separated. George then left England, due to pressure by his creditors leading him to sell his library, forever.
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  • Unwanted daughter, but later famous Her portrait
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  • In literature sphere the great English romantic poet, epic, the great English romantic poet, epic, dramatist, radicalist, affairs, scandalist. liberal - influence for Polish Romanticism - poet with foreign face and called Napoleon of poets - lyrical poetry and satire - lyric mask technique in literature
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  • WORKS: Childe Harolds Pilgrimage Childe Harolds Pilgrimage Childe Harold, a young English nobleman, became despondent, because the only young woman he loved would not return that love. He had long been engaged in drinking and general idleness, and was generally seen as a very unpleasant character by almost everyone, including his parents. Desperate, he decided to embark on a journey in an attempt to find happiness, or at least to give some meaning to his life. He left England by ship, with no clear destination. As he left, he sang a mournful song, bidding farewell to his homeland, to his parents, and especially to his...
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  • The Giaour The tale which these disjointed fragments present is founded upon circumstances now less common in the East than formerly; either because the ladies are more circumspect than in the "olden time," or because the Christians have better fortune, or less enterprise. The tale which these disjointed fragments present is founded upon circumstances now less common in the East than formerly; either because the ladies are more circumspect than in the "olden time," or because the Christians have better fortune, or less enterprise. The story, when entire, contained the adventures of a female slave, who was thrown, in the Mussulman manner, into the sea for infidelity, and avenged by a young Venetian, her lover, at the time the Seven Islands were possessed by the Republic of Venice, and soon after the Arnauts were beaten back from the Morea, which they had ravaged for some time subsequent to the Russian invasion. The desertion of the Mainotes, on being refused the plunder of Misitra, led to the abandonment of that enterprise, and to the desolation of the Morea; during which the cruelty exercised on all sides was unparalleled even in the annals of the faithful. The story, when entire, contained the adventures of a female slave, who was thrown, in the Mussulman manner, into the sea for infidelity, and avenged by a young Venetian, her lover, at the time the Seven Islands were possessed by the Republic of Venice, and soon after the Arnauts were beaten back from the Morea, which they had ravaged for some time subsequent to the Russian invasion. The desertion of the Mainotes, on being refused the plunder of Misitra, led to the abandonment of that enterprise, and to the desolation of the Morea; during which the cruelty exercised on all sides was unparalleled even in the annals of the faithful.
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  • The Corsair was a semi-autobiographical tale in verse by Lord Byron in 1814, which was extremely popular and influential in its day, selling ten thousand copies on its first day of sale. Its poetry, divided in cantos (as Dante's Divine Comedy), narrates the story of the corsair Conrad, how he was in his youth rejected by society because of his actions and his later fight against humanity (excepting women). The opera Il corsaro by Giuseppe Verdi, the overture Le Corsaire by Hector Berlioz and the ballet Le Corsaire by Marius Petipa were based on this work. was a semi-autobiographical tale in verse by Lord Byron in 1814, which was extremely popular and influential in its day, selling ten thousand copies on its first day of sale. Its poetry, divided in cantos (as Dante's Divine Comedy), narrates the story of the corsair Conrad, how he was in his youth rejected by society because of his actions and his later fight against humanity (excepting women). The opera Il corsaro by Giuseppe Verdi, the overture Le Corsaire by Hector Berlioz and the ballet Le Corsaire by Marius Petipa were based on this work.
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  • The Corsair The cover of book
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  • Don Juan Don Juan is a satiric poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan, which Byron reverses, portraying Juan not as a womanizer but as someone easily seduced by women. It is a variation on the epic form. Byron himself called it an "Epic Satire" (Don Juan, c. xiv, st. 99). Modern critics generally consider it Byron's masterpiece, with a total of over sixteen thousand individual lines of verse. Byron completed 16 cantos, leaving an unfinished 17th criticized for its 'immoral content', though it was also immensely popular. Don Juan is a satiric poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan, which Byron reverses, portraying Juan not as a womanizer but as someone easily seduced by women. It is a variation on the epic form. Byron himself called it an "Epic Satire" (Don Juan, c. xiv, st. 99). Modern critics generally consider it Byron's masterpiece, with a total of over sixteen thousand individual lines of verse. Byron completed 16 cantos, leaving an unfinished 17th criticized for its 'immoral content', though it was also immensely popular. canto before his death in 1824. Byron claimed he had no ideas in his mind as to what would happen in subsequent cantos as he wrote his work. canto before his death in 1824. Byron claimed he had no ideas in his mind as to what would happen in subsequent cantos as he wrote his work. When the first two cantos were published anonymously in 1819, the poem was criticized for its 'immoral content', though it was also immensely popular. When the first two cantos were published anonymously in 1819, the poem was criticized for its 'immoral content', though it was also immensely popular.
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  • Song For The Luddites The term