Ruth-Ann Styron, LRT, BCB East Carolina University

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A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CASUAL VIDEO GAMES IN IMPROVING COGNITION IN PEOPLE AGED 50 AND OLDER. Ruth-Ann Styron, LRT, BCB East Carolina University. Objectives. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CASUAL VIDEO GAMES IN IMPROVING COGNITION IN PEOPLE AGED 50 AND OLDER

Ruth-Ann Styron, LRT, BCBEast Carolina University

A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CASUAL VIDEO GAMES IN IMPROVING COGNITION IN PEOPLE AGED 50 AND OLDERObjectivesTo learn about the current state of evidence-based research surrounding video games used for health and wellness.

To understand the need for effective interventions for declines in cognition.

To learn about how casual video games could be used to maintain and improve cognition.

To understand the methodology used for this study.

Positive effects of video gamesVideo Game ResearchAnxiety(Patel et al., 2006)

Reduced anxietyin children beforesurgery, as effectiveas an oral sedative

20% reductionin pain whencompared withstandardanalgesic interventions

Burn Pain(Sharar et al., 2007)

Changes in cognition associated with Alzheimers diagnosis

Diagnostic Tool

(Jimison, Pavel, McKanna & Pavel, 2004)

Improvingpatient carein cancerunits

Training Medical Students(Fukuchi, Offutt, Sacks, & Mann, 2000).

CognitionCognitionProcessing speedMental FlexibilityMemoryAttentionInhibitionOrganizingDecision-making

Frontal Lobe

PurposeCognition deficits occur as people age.

Effective interventions to maintain and improve cognition are needed.

Current interventions have low compliance and little evidence-based research for effectiveness.

Current Interventions Serious GamesPlaying Brain Age for 4 weekscould lead to improved cognitivefunctions in older adults (Nouchi et al., 2012)

Non-quantitative reviewof cognitive interventionsshows limited support(Vidovich & Almeida, 2011)

Casual Video Games

Casual Video Games

How Video Games Improve CognitionFlow and Task EngagementFrustrationBoredomHow Video Games Improve CognitionResearch DesignMethodologyPopulation & SamplePopulationIndividuals in Eastern North Carolina aged fifty years and older.

Sample included adults over the age of fiftywho are able to give informed consent and possess at least a sixth grade reading level.

Incentives

Data Collection ProtocolPsychophysiological MeasurementsMeasurement of Electrical Brain Activity - Electroencephalography (EEG)

Measurement of Physiological Stress - Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

Measurement of Breathing Rate Respiration Strap

Next StepsParticipant RecruitmentData CollectionStatistical AnalysisPublication

ReferencesPatel, A., Schieble, T., Davidson, M., Tran, M. C. J., Schoenberg, C., Delphin, E., & Bennett, H. (2006). Distraction with a hand-held video game reduces pediatric preoperative anxiety. Pediatric Anesthesia, 16, 10191027.

Sharar, S., Carrougher, G., Nakamura, D., Hoffman, H., Blough, D., & Patterson, D. (2007). Factors influencing the efficacy of virtual reality distraction analgesia during postburn physical therapy: Preliminary results from 3 ongoing studies. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 88, s43s49.

ReferencesJimison, H.B., Pavel, M., McKanna, J. and Pavel, J. (2004). Unobtrusive monitoring of computer interactions to detect cognitive status in elders. IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, 8(3), 248-252.

Fukuchi, S., Offutt, L., Sacks, J., & Mann, B. (2000). Teaching a multidisciplinary approach to cancer treatment during surgical clerkship via an interactive board game. The American Journal of Surgery, 179, 337340.

ReferencesNouchi, R., Yasuyuki, T., Hikaru, T., Hiroshi, H., Yuko, A., Yayoi, S., Ryuta, K. (2012). Brain training game improves executive functions and processing speed in the elderly: A randomized controlled trial. Plos One, 7(1), e29676. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0029676

Vidovich, M., & Almeida, O. (2011). Cognition-focused interventions for older adults: The state of play. Australasian Psychiatry, 19(4), 313-316. doi: 10.3109/10398562.2011.579973