Strategies for Reluctant Learners

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Strategies for Reluctant Learners. Heather Peshak George, Ph.D. Carie English, Ph.D. University of South Florida. Topics. Current research Readiness Tools Better preparing schools and districts Successful activities with reluctant to change or low performers Schools Faculty. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Strategies forReluctant LearnersHeather Peshak George, Ph.D.Carie English, Ph.D.University of South Florida

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    TopicsCurrent researchReadiness ToolsBetter preparing schools and districtsSuccessful activities with reluctant to change or low performers SchoolsFaculty

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    Recent Research on ImplementationReasons for AttritionChilds, K., Kimhan, C.K., & Kincaid, D. (2007). Examining Reasons for Attrition from Implementing an Evidence Based Program in Floridas Schools, Fourth International Conference on Positive Behavior Support, Boston, MA. Barriers/EnablersKincaid, D., Childs, K., Wallace, F, & Blase, K. (2007). Identifying Barriers and Facilitators in Implementing School-wide Positive Behavior Support, Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions 9(3), 174-184.School-Wide Implementation Factors (SWIF)Cohen, Rachel (2006). Implementing School-wide Positive Behavior Support: Influence of Socio-Cultural, Academic, Behavioral and Implementation of Process Variables. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.

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    Attrition Results(Childs, Kimhan & Kincaid, 2007)High rates of Turnover in schoolsLack of TimeAdministratorTeamStaffLack of CommitmentAdministratorTeamStaff

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    Barriers(Kincaid, Childs, Wallace & Blase, 2007)Collaborating with district & other schoolsPhilosophical shiftsDeveloping effective reward systemsKnowledge of next stepsLack of implementation fidelity - demonstration of outcomesBuy-inTimeTurnoverTeacher Resistance Administrative supportConsistency of ImplementationHigh Implementing SchoolsLow Implementing Schools

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    Enablers(Kincaid, Childs, Wallace & Blase, 2007)Support from State ProjectTraining staff & students in PBSSupport from district, principal, coachesBuy-in (staff, students)A representative/cohesive/committed teamRegular team meetingsFundingStudent input

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    SWIF: Which of these factors predict SWPBS implementation? (Cohen, 2006)*In the year prior to beginning implementationSocio-cultural Factors SES School size Ethnicity Teacher: student ratio Student stability Teacher education % w/ disability % Out-of-field teachersProcess Variables Administrative supportCoachs self-efficacyEffective team functioning

    Academic Indicator*% students below grade level in reading

    Behavioral Indicators*% students who received an: in-school suspension (ISS) out-of-school suspension (OSS) office discipline referral (ODR)

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    SWIF Most Helpful Items(Cohen, 2006)

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    SWIF Most Problematic Items(Cohen, 2006)

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    5%10%20%30%50%75%90%Average retention rateHow People LearnNational Training Laboratories Bethel Maine

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    Sources of Motivationfor Adult Learners (Hieneman, 2007)Social relationships: to make new friends, to meet a need for associations and friendshipsExternal expectations: to comply with instructions from someone else; to fulfill the expectations or recommendations of someone with formal authoritySocial welfare: to improve ability to serve mankind, prepare for service to the communityPersonal advancement: to achieve higher status in a job, secure professional advancement, and stay abreast of competitors. Escape/Stimulation: to relieve boredom, provide a break in the routine of home or workCognitive interest: to learn for the sake of learning, seek knowledge for its own sake, and to satisfy an inquiring mind

    (From PRINCIPLES OF ADULT LEARNING By Stephen Lieb, Senior Technical Writer and Planner, Arizona Department of Health Services and part-time Instructor, South Mountain Community College from VISION, Fall 1991)

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    Barriers AgainstParticipating in Learning (Hieneman, 2007)lack of time, money, confidence, lack of interestlack of information about opportunities to learnscheduling problems, "red tape" problems with child care and transportation

    (From PRINCIPLES OF ADULT LEARNING By Stephen Lieb, Senior Technical Writer and Planner, Arizona Department of Health Services and part-time Instructor, South Mountain Community College from VISION, Fall 1991)

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    Optimism Training(Hieneman, 2007)Situation: Triggers to negative thinkingBelief: Unproductive thought patternsConsequences: Results of negative thinkingDisputation: Accuracy/Usefulness of beliefs (Distraction: Thought stopping)Substitution: More productive self-talkReorientation: New overall perspective Seligman, M. E. P. (1998). Learned Optimism: How to change your mind and your life. New York: Pocket Books.

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    Preliminary Results(Hieneman, 2007)Significant decreases in problem behavior for the children of all participants who complete the sessionsNo change in pessimism scores, regardless of conditionParticipants in the optimism condition are more likely to finish, and complete the sessions in less time

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    Next StepsExaminations thus far have utilized participants who are to some extent still implementing the program in question.

    A population still implementing with low-fidelity may be characteristically different from those that fail to adopt all together.

    So what seems to be working?

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    Readiness Tools

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    District ReadinessOverview DVDOverview presentationssolicit interestbuild awarenessDistrict Readiness Checklist

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    District Readiness ChecklistDistrict Coordinator identifiedAwareness presentationDistrict Leadership Team identifiedCommit to meet at least annuallyCommit to attend trainingComplete district action planning*PBS Coaches identifiedFunding securedDistrict Strategic PlanSuperintendent Letter of SupportSWIS III awarenessPermission to share data

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    District Readiness Checklist

    District: _____________________________________ Date: ________________________ Contact Person: ______________________________________________

    Documents/Evidence

    Complete?

    Items to Complete Prior to School-wide PBS Training

    YES ( NO

    1. A district representative has been identified as the PBS District Coordinator (i.e., lead contact) for all PBS initiatives within your district.

    List district representative and provide contact information (name, title, address, phone, cell, fax, e-mail)

    YES ( NO

    2. District Administrators have participated in an awareness presentation summarizing Floridas PBS Project and the School-wide PBS process.

    List date(s) of presentation, location(s) and name of presenter(s):

    YES ( NO

    3. A district Positive Behavior Support (PBS) Team is formed and has broad representation (including regular and exceptional student education, student support services, personnel preparation, curriculum and instruction, management information systems, safe and drug free schools, school improvement, transportation, etc.).

    List team members and identify roles:

    YES ( NO

    4. District PBS Team commits to attend a portion of the school-wide training and participate in annual or bi-annual update meetings to discuss progress to date.

    Describe when you meet or plan to meet (days, location, and time) throughout the school year:

    YES ( NO

    5. District PBS Team has participated and completed a needs assessment and action plan facilitated by Floridas PBS Project.

    Provide copy of action plan and list date of completion:

    YES ( NO

    6. PBS Coaches (Facilitators) have been identified by the PBS District Coordinator to receive additional training and actively participate in the school-wide initiatives (may overlap with District PBS Team)

    List PBS Coaches and roles:

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    District Readiness Checklist

    Documents/Evidence

    Complete?

    Items to Complete Prior to School-wide PBS Training (continued)

    YES ( NO

    7. District has allocated/secured funding to support the school-wide initiatives in their respective schools (e.g., School Improvement, Safe and Drug Free Schools, other school/community resources).

    Identify funding source(s) that will be utilized:

    YES ( NO

    8. School-wide discipline (i.e., school climate, safety, behavior, etc.) is identified as one of the top district goals.

    Attach a copy of district goals or letter of support from Superintendents office.

    YES ( NO

    9. The district will provide a letter from Area Superintendent(s) to participating school Principals reminding them of the training dates, requirements of attendance, stipend requirements, items needed at training, etc.

    Attach a copy of the letter.

    YES ( NO

    10. Following training, the district will provide a letter from Area Superintendent(s) to participating school Principals on the importance of data collection, the need for daily use of their database system, and encourage participation of team members in ongoing training opportunities.

    Attach a copy of the letter of support disseminated to Administrators.

    YES ( NO

    11. The district is aware that SWIS III is a school-based discipline data system that is not intended nor capable of replacing the current district database.

    Confirm: ( Yes OR ( No

    List current discipline data system utilized in your district:

    YES ( NO ( N/A

    12. If your school district agrees to adopt SWIS III for participating schools, then the district agrees to provide the participating schools computer access to Internet, and at least Netscape 6 or Internet Explorer 5.

    Confirm available Internet access: ( Netscape ____ OR ( Internet Explorer ____

    (Please remember that SWIS training is OPTIONAL and follo