Technical Feasibility Study of an Aquaculture Facility for ... ii Colophon Title: Technical Feasibility

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  • Technical Feasibility Study of an Aquaculture Facility for

    Common Cockle Species in the Netherlands

    A Preliminary Design, which includes a Functional and Physical Architecture of a Land-based Aquaculture Facility for Common

    Cockle (Cerastoderma edule L.) Species in the Netherlands

    S. Deen University of Twente Enschede, November 2006

  • ii

    Colophon Title: Technical Feasibility Study of an Aquaculture Facility for Common Cockle Species in the

    Netherlands

    Subtitle: A Preliminary Design, which includes a Functional and Physical Architecture of a Land-

    based Aquaculture Facility for Common Cockle (Cerastoderma edule L.) Species in the

    Netherlands

    Author: S. Deen

    University of Twente (UT)

    Study: Civil Engineering (CIT)

    Department: Water Engineering and Management (WEM)

    Contact: s.deen@alumnus.utwente.nl

    Committee: Dr. ir. D.C.M. Augustijn University of Twente (supervisor) (department: Water Engineering & Management)

    Dr. A.C. Smaal Wageningen IMARES

    Ir. K.Th. Veenvliet University of Twente

    (department: Construction Management & Engineering)

    State: Final

    Pages: 92 (exclusive appendixes)

    Location: Enschede, the Netherlands

    Date: 23 November 2006

    2006 University of Twente

    P.O. Box 217; 7500 AE Enschede; The Netherlands Phone: +31 (0)53 489 9111; fax: +31 (0)53 489 2000; e-mail: info@utwente.nl Wageningen IMARES P.O. Box 77; 4400 AB Yerseke; The Netherlands Phone: +31 (0)113 672300; fax: +31 (0)113 573477 No part of this publication may be reproduced or published in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system without the written permission of the University of Twente or Wageningen IMARES.

  • iii

    Technical Feasibility Study of an Aquaculture Facility for

    Common Cockle Species in the Netherlands

    Figure: Land-based aquaculture facility for ragworms in the Netherlands

    (www.topsybaits.nl).

    A Preliminary Design, which includes a Functional and Physical Architecture of a Land-based Aquaculture Facility for Common

    Cockle (Cerastoderma edule L.) Species in the Netherlands

    S. Deen University of Twente Enschede, November 2006

  • iv

    Preface This report is written in the context of a master thesis at the University of Twente (UT), study Civil Engineering (CIT), department Water Engineering and Management (WEM). The report describes a preliminary design of a land-based aquaculture facility for Common Cockle species (infaunal bivalve species) in the Netherlands. Although, this preliminary design is designed for Common Cockle species it can also be used as a format for land-based aquaculture facilities for other infaunal bivalve species. This report provides technical information of aspects that must be considered before starting designing a land-based aquaculture facility for infaunal bivalve species. In the report case material is used of Common Cockle species for a land-based aquaculture facility in the Netherlands. This case material is mainly based on available literature. Some case material is gathered by making use of extensive contacts with potential stakeholders. However, stakeholders are not explicitly involved during the gathering process of the requirements. This consideration is made to suppress the complexity of the research. The report is written according to a systematic design approach. This approach is selected due to the early development stage of the project1. In this early development stage it is important that the requirements, at which the functional architecture is based, are described in a flexible way. The flexibility is needed, because the requirements can change in the future2. In behalf of the flexibility there is chosen to generate a report in which there is much attention for the requirements and its analysis. The requirements are considered as the foundation of the preliminary design. The requirements are described in a way they can be considered as standalone clusters. These clusters have the advantage that they can be easily transformed into clusters with other requirements. Moreover, some of the clusters can also be reused in similar aquaculture facilities. Besides the requirements, and its analysis, there is also attention for the functional analysis and the allocation of requirements to functional components. The functional analysis and allocation are turned into a functional architecture. The functional architecture is considered as a translation of the requirements into an architecture in which the functionality, including the relations between the different functionalities, of the preliminary design are described. The functional architecture can be considered as a blue print for several physical (or spatial) architectures. Based on the functional architecture an example of a physical architecture is described in this report. This report is meant for entrepreneurs who consider starting land-based aquaculture facilities for infaunal bivalve species. The report provides information of technical issues which need to be considered before constructing such facilities. Furthermore, the report provides a description, and a foundation (technical requirements), of a functional and a physical architecture. However, the data on which the functional- and physical architecture are based, are not simulated, modeled, experimented, or tested. Therefore, for future research it is recommended that the requirements, which are described in this report, are taken to a next level of development, after which the requirements are added or adjusted. After the addition- and adjustment process the functional- and physical architecture, which are described is this report, need to be updated.

    1 The report describes a preliminary (or so-called feasibility) study. After this study it is recommended to simulate, model, experiment, or test the results. 2 Next development stages will provide new requirements, which implicates that certain requirements need to be added or adjusted. The flexibility of the report helps to add or adjust requirements into the design, after which the design can be easily updated.

  • v

    The preparation of this report has been a long and interesting project that would not have been possible without the help and encouragement of my family, friends, supervisors, and all other people who were involved in this project. I would like to thank the following people in particular for their contributions: my supervisor Denie Augustijn for his encouragement, enthusiasm and constructive criticism; and the other members of the graduation committee, Aad Smaal and Karel Veenvliet, for their valuable remarks and suggestions. Furthermore, I want to thank: Pauline Kamermans, Tom Ysebaert, Patrick Bliek, Mindert de Vries, René Wijffels, Bert Meyering, and the ladies of secretary of the department of Water Engineering & Management for their insights and support. And last, but certainly not least, I want to thank my girlfriend Karen for being there and for listening to my stories about this graduation project. Stefan Deen November, 2006

  • vi

    Table of contents

    COLOPHON............................................................................................................... II

    PREFACE ................................................................................................................. IV

    SUMMARY................................................................................................................ IX

    1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................. 1

    1.1 Problem analysis ...................................................................................................................................... 2 1.1.1 Legal conflicts ....................................................................................................................................... 2 1.1.2 New market demands ............................................................................................................................ 2

    1.2 Objective ................................................................................................................................................... 4

    1.3 Stakeholders ............................................................................................................................................. 4

    1.4 Scope of the project.................................................................................................................................. 4

    1.5 Strategy of research ................................................................................................................................. 5 1.5.1 Research model ..................................................................................................................................... 5 1.5.2 Research questions ................................................................................................................................ 9

    1.6 Structure of the report........................................................................................................................... 10

    2 REQUIREMENTS CONSTRAINTS ...............................