Timesaving Tools TEACHING ?· Chapter 24 Resources Timesaving Tools ... the Popular Front ... World…

  • Published on
    06-Jul-2018

  • View
    217

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • 748A

    Chapter 24 ResourcesTimesaving Tools

    Interactive Teacher Edition Access your Teacher Wraparound Edition andyour classroom resources with a few easy clicks.

    Interactive Lesson Planner Planning has never been easier! Organize yourweek, month, semester, or year with all the lesson helps you need to maketeaching creative, timely, and relevant.

    Use GlencoesPresentation Plus!multimedia teacher tool to easily present

    dynamic lessons that visually excite your stu-dents. Using Microsoft PowerPoint you can customize the presentations to create your ownpersonalized lessons.

    The following videotape programs are available from Glencoe as supplements to Chapter 24:

    The Great Depression (ISBN 0767008596) Mussolini: Italys Nightmare

    (ISBN 1565018184) Joseph Stalin (ISBN 1565018206)

    To order, call Glencoe at 18003347344. To findclassroom resources to accompany many of thesevideos, check the following home pages:A&E Television: www.aande.comThe History Channel: www.historychannel.com

    R

    R

    TEACHING TRANSPARENCIESTEACHING TRANSPARENCIESChapter Transparency 24 L2

    Graphic Organizer StudentActivity 24 Transparency L2

    CHAPTER TRANSPARENCY 24

    The West Between the Wars (19191939)Main Idea

    Supporting Detail Supporting Detail Supporting Detail

    Supporting Detail Supporting Detail Supporting Detail

    Graphic Organizer 1: Main Idea Chart

    Map OverlayTransparency 24 L2

    Nazi-Fascist Expansion, 19361939

    Overlay Set 22 NaziFascist Expansion, 1936-1939 Transparency 22.1 1998 West Educational Publishing/I PT

    Germany, 1936Adriatic Sea

    Rhine

    R.

    Elbe R.

    Oder R.

    DANZIGMEMEL

    LATVIA

    GREECE

    Corsica

    Sardinia

    Danube

    ITALY

    (ALBANIA)

    TURKEY

    BULGARIA

    YUGOSLAVIA

    SOVIET

    UNION

    Rome

    Moscow

    Sicily

    B l a c k S e a

    DnieperR.

    Mediterranean Sea

    0 200 400 Miles

    0 200 400 600 Kilometers

    R.

    DniesterR.

    ESTONIA

    LITHUANIA

    ROMANIA

    POLAND

    Warsaw

    PoR.

    FRANCE

    LUX.

    BELGIUM

    NETH.

    NORWAY

    SWEDEN

    DENMARK

    GERMANY

    HUNGARY

    (AUSTRIA)

    (CZECH.)SLOVAKIA

    SWITZ.

    GERMANY

    Stockholm

    Berlin

    Vienna

    PragueNuremberg

    N o r t hS e a B

    alti

    cSe

    a

    Map Overlay Transparency 24

    Enrichment Activity 24 L3

    Copyright

    by The M

    cGraw

    -Hill C

    ompanies, Inc.

    Name Date Class

    Whether you are reading todays news-paper or researching history, political car-toons can help you understand thearguments surrounding an issue.Cartoonists illustrate their point of view

    Enrichment Activity 24

    through satirical drawings rather thanlengthy editorials. Sometimes their cartoonsdepict actual people involved in an issue;other times the characters symbolize ideas,groups, or nations.

    No Laughing Matter: Interpreting Political Cartoons

    5. What is interrupting the ceremony?________________________________________________

    6. Why is the ceremony being interrupted? ___________________________________________

    7. Around what year might this cartoon have appeared? _______________________________

    8. Where do you think the cartoonist stands on this issue? Why do you think so?__________

    DIRECTIONS: Look at the following politicalcartoon and answer the questions in thespace provided.

    1. What type of ceremony is beingdepicted by the cartoon?______________

    2. Who is the bearded man, and what doeshe represent?________________________

    3. What does the woman represent? ______

    4. What does the ceremony symbolize? ___

    Primary Source Reading 24 L2

    Name Date Class

    Cop

    yrig

    ht

    by

    The

    McG

    raw

    -Hill

    Com

    pani

    es, I

    nc.

    Mein Kampf

    Soon after he joined the obscure far-right National Socialist party, AdolfHitler tried to use his gang of Brownshirts to seize power in Munich.The unsuccessful putsch, or small-scale revolt, that started in a Munichbeer hall sent Hitler to jail. There he wrote a long political essay describing hisphilosophy of a master race, his belief that the Jews were responsible forGermanys problems, and his visionary goals for himself, the Nazis, and a newGerman Reich, or empire. The book, titled Mein Kampf (My Struggle), waspublished in 1925 and 1927.

    Guided Reading In this selection, read to learn Hitlers opinion of and use for propaganda.

    Ever since I have been scrutinizing politicalevents, I have taken a tremendous interest inpropagandist activity. I saw that the Socialist-Marxist organizations mastered and applied thisinstrument with astounding skill. And I soonrealized that the correct use of propaganda is atrue art which has remained practicallyunknown to the bourgeois parties. . . .

    But it was not until the War [World War I]that it became evident what immense resultscould be obtained by a correct application ofpropaganda. . . .

    For what we failed to do, the enemy did,with amazing skill and really brilliant calcula-tion. I, myself, learned enormously from thisenemy war propaganda. . . .

    . . . Is propaganda a means or an end?It is a means and must therefore be judged

    with regard to its end. It must consequently takea form calculated to support the aim which itserves. . . .

    . . . To whom should propaganda beaddressed? To the scientifically trained intelli-gentsia or to the less educated masses?

    It must be addressed always and exclusivelyto the masses.

    What the intelligentsiaor those who todayunfortunately often go by that namewhat theyneed is not propaganda but scientific instruction.The content of propaganda is not science anymore than the object represented in a poster isart. The art of the poster lies in the designersability to attract the attention of the crowd byform and color. . . .

    The function of propaganda does not lie inthe scientific training of the individual, but in

    calling the masses attention to certain facts,processes, necessities, etc., whose significance isthus for the first time placed within their field ofvision.

    The whole art consists in doing this so skill-fully that everyone will be convinced that thefact is real, the process necessary, the necessitycorrect, etc. . . . [Propagandas] effect for themost part must be aimed at the emotions andonly to a very limited degree at the so-calledintellect.

    All propaganda must be popular and itsintellectual level must be adjusted to the mostlimited intelligence among those it is addressedto. Consequently, the greater the mass it isintended to reach, the lower its purely intellec-tual level will have to be. . . .

    . . . The more exclusively it takes into consid-eration the emotions of the masses, the moreeffective it will be. . . .

    The receptivity of the great masses isvery limited, their intelligence is small, buttheir power of forgetting is enormous. In conse-quence . . . , all effective propaganda must belimited to a very few points and must harp onthese in slogans until the last member of thepublic understands what you want him tounderstand by your slogan. . . .

    For instance, it was absolutely wrong tomake the enemy ridiculous, as the Austrian andGerman comic papers did. It was absolutelywrong because actual contact with an enemy sol-dier was bound to arouse an entirely differentconviction, and the results were devastating; fornow the German soldier . . . felt himself swin-dled by his propaganda service. His desire to

    P R I M A R Y S O U R C E R E A D I N G 24

    APPLICATION AND ENRICHMENTAPPLICATION AND ENRICHMENTHistory SimulationActivity 24 L1

    Name Date Class

    Copyright

    by The M

    cGraw

    -Hill C

    ompanies, Inc.

    HANDOUT MATERIAL

    The Postwar WorldWorksheet

    1. Setting: The United States in the 1930sSubject: direct relief from the federalgovernmentPosition:Means of Expression: song, poem, oressay

    2. Setting: Italy in 1924Subject: Mussolinis dictatorshipPosition:Means of Expression: poem, short story,one-act play, or song

    3. Setting: the United States in 1919Subject: membership in the League ofNationsPosition:Means of Expression: song or essay

    4. Setting: Germany in 1923Subject: inflationPosition:Means of Expression: song, poem, oressay

    5. Setting: Great Britain in 1926Subject: general strikePosition:Means of Expression: poem, song, one-act play, or short story

    6. Setting: Germany in the late 1930sSubject: Hitlers policies toward GermanJewsPosition:Means of Expression: poem, short story,one-act play, or song

    7. Setting: France in 1936Subject: the Popular FrontPosition:Means of Expression: song, poem, oressay

    8. Setting: the Soviet Union in the late1920sSubject: collectivizationPosition:Means of Expression: song, poem, shortstory, or one-act play

    9. Setting: Italy in 1921Subject: actions of the BlackshirtsPosition:Means of Expression: song, poem,essay, one-act play, or short story

    10. Setting: Germany in the 1930sSubject: a German artists lifePosition:Means of Expression: song, poem,story, or one-act play

    24H I S T O R YS I M U L A T I O NAC T I V I T Y

    Historical SignificanceActivity 24 L2

    Cop

    yrig

    ht

    by

    The

    McG

    raw

    -Hill

    Com

    pani

    es, I

    nc.

    Name Date Class

    On October 29, 1929, the stock market inNew York City crashed. In one day, stockprices plummeted. Businesses and individ-uals suddenly found themselves bankrupt.Many people lost their jobs. Some defaultedon taxes and mortgages, and lost theirhomes. How could people have money oneday and be broke the next? How can such a disaster be prevented?

    The years prior to the 1929 crash wereeconomic boom years. There were morepeople who wanted to buy stocks than therewere stocks to sell, so the prices went up.Some people, however, began worrying thatthese prices were too high. They started sell-ing their stocks to ensure their profits. Littleby little, more people realized that stockprices were beginning to fall. They too triedto sell their stocks. As the number of sellersexceeded the number of buyers, prices con-tinued to fall. Then panic set in, and theprices tumbled.

    In the aftermath of the crash, during the Great Depression, the governmentestablished the Securities and ExchangeCommission to ensure that such a disasterwould never happen again. The commis-

    sion monitored the stock market, providedinvestors with access to accurate informa-tion, and prevented unfair use of nonpublicinformation in stock trading.

    Despite the Securities and ExchangeCommission, however, stock market crasheshave occurred since the Great Depression.On October 19, 1987, for example, the stockmarket dropped 500 points. It lost about $1trillion in a single day due to circumstancessimilar to those in 1929. Today, millions ofstocks are traded by computers, often with-out human input. The computers have beenprogrammed to detect when stock pricesbegin to fall. If the prices fall to a lowenough level, the program directs the com-puter automatically to sell those stocks. Youcan imagine what could happen now thatmillions of computers around the world areprogrammed in this way! In response, thegovernment and New York Stock Exchangehave enacted rules to prevent rapid sellingof stocks by computer. For example, if thestock market average falls by 50 points intoo short a time, computer stock tradingmust be suspended until the trading slowsand the price level begins to rise.

    Historical Significance Activity 24

    Stock Market Crashes: Then and Now

    !

    DIRECTIONS: Answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper.

    1. What happens when there are more people who want to buy an item than there are itemsavailable to sell?

    2. Describe a financial panic.

    3. How might the Securities and Exchange Commission help prevent another stock marketcrash?

    4. How has technology changed stock trading today?

    5. What danger did this technological change introduce?

    6. What safeguard has been established to counteract this danger?

    Cooperative LearningActivity 24 L1/ELL

    Cop

    yrig

    ht

    by

    The

    McG

    raw

    -Hill

    Com

    pani

    es, I

    nc.

    Name Date Class

    The West Between the Wars Showdown Challenge

    Cooperative Learning Activity 24

    BACKGROUNDWorld War I and its aftermath brought political and territorial changes to many areasof the world. Some countries were created, others changed names or territories. Manynations of the West also faced severe economic problems after 1929. Dictatorialregimes sprang up in Italy, Germany, and across Eastern Europe. In this activity, youwill work in groups to create questions for a history game show based on the WestBetween the Wars, and then compete in a showdown challenge team competition.

    GROUP DIRECTIONS1. Use Chapter 24 of your textbook to collect facts about famous people, events,

    and places in the countries of the Western world between 1919 and 1939. Youmay also create bonus questions (with answers and sources) from libraryresources or the Internet, based on information not contained in your textbook.Make notes about what you find and record your sources.

    2. Use your facts to write questions and answers for a history game. You will alsoneed to know these facts to answer questions during the game.

    3. Sort through the questions created by team members as a group and determinethe best ones for the team to use in the game.

    4. The following categories must be used. All of the questions your team createsmust fit one of the categories and your team must have five to ten basic ques-tions and at least one bonus question for each category.

    World War I Peace Treaties The Great DepressionDemocratic States After the War The Rise of DictatorsHitler: The Man and His Views The Nazi StateMass Culture and Leisure Literature and Science

    ORGANIZING THE GROUP1. Group Work/Decision Making Assign two categories to pairs of group mem-

    bers or individuals. Review what kind of information to use for bonus questions.

    2. Individual Work Write questions and answers on note cardsquestions on oneside, answers on the otherfor the categories assigned. Label your card as tothe category assigned. Use resources beyond your textbooks contents only forbonus questions and cite your sources.

    3. Group Work/Decision Making Meet with your group. Share your questionsand answers with your group. Take turns asking each other your questions andchecking that the answers given are correct. You are now ready to play yourgame.

    0748A-0748D C24 TE-Nat/FL05 3/15/04 8:18 AM Page 748

    http://www.aande.comhttp://www.historychannel.com

  • 748B

    Chapter 24 Resources

    ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

    INTERDISCIPLINARY ACTIVITIESINTERDISCIPLINARY ACTIVITIES

    REVIEW AND REINFORCEMENTREVIEW AND REINFORCEMENT

    Vocabulary PuzzleMaker CD-ROMInteractive Tutor Self-AssessmentCD-ROMExamView Pro Testmaker CD-ROMAudio ProgramWorld History Primary SourceDocument Library CD-ROM

    MindJogger VideoquizPresentation Plus! CD-ROMTeacherWorks CD-ROMInteractive Student Edition CD-ROMThe World History Video Program

    MULTIMEDIAMULTIMEDIAThe following Spanish language materialsare available:

    Spanish Guided Reading Activities Spanish Reteaching Activities Spanish Quizzes and Tests Spanish Vocabulary Activities Spanish Summaries Spanish Reading Essentials and Study Guide

    SPANISH RESOURCESSPANISH RESOURCES

    Linking Past and PresentActivity 24 L2

    Cop

    yrig

    ht

    by

    The

    McG

    raw

    -Hill

    Com

    pani

    es, I

    nc.

    Name ____________________________________ Date ________________ Class __________

    Then After World War I, the Paris PeaceConference adopted President WoodrowWilsons p...

Recommended

View more >