Click here to load reader

Tornado coverage

  • View
    225

  • Download
    2

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Here are some pages I designed for The Tuscaloosa News related to the April 27, 2011, tornado. Our newsroom won the Pulitzer Prize for breaking news for our coverage of the tornado.

Text of Tornado coverage

  • 04-03-

    74

    02-23

    -75

    04-08-98

    12-16-

    00

    03-03-666

    11-10-8411-10-810-11

    03-29-74

    01-10

    -08

    04-01-74

    03-03-93

    44

    01-28-97

    11-18-57

    30

    11-1

    5-83

    -033-0

    01-10

    -75

    02-2

    2-61

    2211

    222222-622-6-6616161611

    22-6

    22-662

    01-24

    -97

    03

    -83

    -811

    -15-

    111

    11-

    3

    11-02-02

    09-06-77

    03-2

    7-94

    1-24241-221-200000010101

    -201000101000001

    -21-2100101010101001010

    03-13-

    75

    11-2

    4-01

    12-0

    8-78

    7575555555

    27-9

    427

    -9 04-1

    3-00

    03-13-06

    12-08

    -7812-

    13-75

    02-03-90

    07-04-95

    03-07-95

    4444 9595

    05-09-98

    03-1

    0-00

    04-30-05

    02-03-90

    03-10

    -00

    03-01-07

    02-13-07 02-13-07

    04-1

    2-09

    07

    01-10-

    08

    111101101111

    05-06-09

    09-06-

    77

    12-11-83

    12-03-83

    11-20

    -88

    02-13

    -52

    7-950005-06-09

    03-03-070

    09

    7--95

    03-0

    4-08

    02-23

    -753-7 12-16

    -006-000000

    02-22

    02020202022

    2-2

    022222

    022

    2-2222

    222-2222222222-2 00000033033030303000000030303003030303000

    020808080808080888

    -788 7877878 75

    11112121211121213131322222 1313131312-13

    121212212-12-113-7

    513-

    7513-

    753 75

    13-755555

    13

    12-08

    12-08

    12-08

    120

    1

    0-00000

    202020000000000000202

    111111-21 2

    001 2

    011

    -2011

    -222020-88

    202020111

    0-88-8-8880-88888880-88888

    04-15

    -11

    F5 261-318 mph

    F4 207-260 mph

    F3 158-206 mph

    Spawned by Hurricane Rita Sept. 25, 2005: levels F0 - F1

    F2 112-157 mph

    F1 73-112 mph

    F0 40-72 mph

    Fugito Scale

    Tornadoesby month62 since 1950

    J F M A M J J A S O N D

    510.2%

    510.2%

    612.2%

    1224.4%

    714.2%

    714.2%4

    8.1%

    1(2%

    )

    (4%)

    132

    Hurricane Rita (13)

    * Percentages are based on a

    total of 49 tornadoes,

    which is the total minus the

    13 spawned from Rita.11 fatalities and 144

    injuries. The Dec. 16, 2000, tornado left an

    18-mile path of severely damaged neighborhoods, mobile

    home parks and businesses. Some structures completely disintegrated.

    April 8, 1998: The tornado ripped through Tuscaloosa

    County as an F3, destroying 5 homes and

    11 mobile homes. It strengthened to an F5 as it

    entered Jefferson County, killing 32 and

    injuring 256.

    March 3, 1966: Candlestick Park Tornado, named after the shopping center that it destroyed in Jackson, Miss., crossed over three states. The tornado, killed 58, including one in Buhl. 518 injuries were recorded.

    1950-2011Tuscaloosatornadoes

    5920

    10 miles

    11

    82

    82

    43

    69

    216

    171

    69

    JeeffffersonJ ffJCoununtyt

    Bibb Countyibb

    PiPiPickckckk

    enenenees s

    Coun

    tytye

    BrookwoodBuhl

    Echols

    Tuscaloosa

    Northport

    Samantha

    By Adam JonesStaff Writer

    TUSCALOOSA

    When Gary Honeycutt tells people from out of town that hes from Samantha, they know one thing about it.

    They say, Yall live where all the torna-does are in Tuscaloosa County, said Hon-eycutt, chief of the Samantha Volunteer Fire Department.

    But on April 15, Samantha was spared when a line of severe storms across the Southeast spawned a twister in another fa-vorite haunt for tornadoes south of down-town Tuscaloosa.

    I was glad that it wasnt Samantha, be-cause it usually is, Honeycutt said.

    Data from the National Weather Service and the National Climatic Data Center was used to map 61 known tornadoes since 1950, revealing what folks here have long suspect-

    ed: Tuscaloosa County has two tornado al-leys, one north of the cities of Northport and Tuscaloosa and another south.

    But the data also reveals tornadoes can spin most anywhere, and meteorologists are skeptical that the topography of the land has any correlation to the thunderstorms that breed tornadoes.

    If there is, its really weak, said Harold Brooks, head of the Modeling, Observa-tion and Analysis Team Forecast Research and Development Division National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Okla.

    There may be some physical aspect that we just dont understand, but proving it is incredibly diffi cult.

    After decades of research, a lot is known

    Tuscaloosa Countys deadliest recorded tornadoesJAN. 22, 1904: F4 tornado kills 36, injures 150MARCH 21, 1932: F4 tornado kills 37, injures 200MARCH 3, 1966: F5 tornado kills 1, injures 518DEC. 16, 2000: F4 tornado kills 11, injures 144 Source: Alabama SKYWARN Foundation, Inc.

    STAFF FILE PHOTO

    BELOW: Terry Boggs walks through the rubble of what was once his home in the Bear Creek Trailer Park in Tuscaloosa after an F4 tornado ripped through on Dec. 16, 2000.

    STAFF G

    RA

    PHIC

    | AN

    THO

    NY B

    RATIN

    A

    TUSCALOOSA TORNADOES FOLLOW TWO MAIN TRACKSWhile data reveals tornado alleys in Tuscaloosa County, weather experts say the twisters paths are unpredictable

    Smartphone tracking has users uneasy

    By Jordan RobertsonThe Associated Press

    SAN FRANCISCO | If youre worried about privacy, you can turn off the function on your smartphone that tracks where you go. But that means giving up the services that probably made you want a smartphone in the fi rst place. After all, how smart is an iPhone or an Android if you cant use it to map your car trip or scan reviews of nearby restaurants?

    The debate over digital privacy fl amed higher last week with news that Apple Inc.s popular iPhones and iPads store users GPS coordinates for a year or more. Phones that run Google Inc.s Android software also store users location da-ta. And not only is the data stored allowing anyone who can get their hands on the device to piece together a chillingly accurate profi le of where youve been but its also transmitted back to the companies to use for research.

    Now, cellphone service providers have had cus-tomers location data for almost as long as there have been cellphones. Thats how they make

    Coolest job ever vanishing as space program shrinks

    By Kenneth ChangN.Y. Times News Service

    What happens when you have the right stuff at the wrong time?

    Members of NASAs astronaut corps have been asking just that, now that the space shuttle pro-gram is ending and their odds of fl ying anywhere good anytime soon are getting smaller. The En-deavour is scheduled to launch this week, and the Atlantis is supposed to fl y the last shuttle mission in June and all the seats are spoken for.

    Morale is pretty low, said Leroy Chiao, a for-mer astronaut who now works for a company that wants to offer space fl ights for tourists. This is a time of great uncertainty.

    Under President Barack Obama, NASAs hu-man spacefl ight program has been curtailed. The Ares I and Constellation programs, which were meant to succeed the space shuttles and take astronauts to the moon, were canceled, and NASA is instead hiring outside companies to de-vise alternatives.

    $61

    IN TODAYS PAPER

    COUPONS WORTH

    In most areas

    TUSCALOOSA, NORTHPORT, WEST ALABAMA SU N D A Y , AP R I L 24 , 2011 $1.50

    SEE PHONE | 13A

    THE NEW YORK TIMES

    Garrett Reisman left NASA last month for SpaceX, a private company in Colorado Springs, Colo. Being an astronaut is the coolest job ever, Reisman said. It was very, very difficult to voluntarily leave.

    High 84 Low 61

    INSIDE: VOL. 193 | NO. 114 | 8 Sections

    0 990994 32007

    Bridge 13FBusiness 1DClassifieds 2FCrossword 3E

    Dear Abby 2EHoroscope 2EIdeas & Issues 6DLend A Hand 11B

    Movies 10BOutdoors 9CTelevision 1HToday 1E

    SEE SPACE | 13A

    SEE TRACKS | 12A

    To see more on Tuscaloosas tornado history, check out our interactive graphic at www.tuscaloosanews.com.

    3 FIRST-ROUND PICKS?Tides Jones, Ingram, Dareus expected

    to be prime choices in NFL Draft | 1C

  • A very surreal day

    APRIL 27, 2012

    PHOTO | JAMIE CICATIELLO

    Rescue and recovery teams sift through the wreckage in Alberta and Holt after the April 27 tornado.

    Minutes after storm, emergency responders rushed to rescue

    By Stephanie TaylorStaff Writer

    Surreal is a word that comes up often when emergency responders talk about April 27, 2011.Its tting.The deadly winds of the tornado left be-

    hind an eerie silence and sunny skies that seemed an impossible backdrop to de-struction that stretched for miles.

    The sounds of sirens and chain saws soon pierced the silence. The evening sun settled into a harrowing night that marked the beginning of Tuscaloosas

    new reality.It was a very surreal day, said Tusca-

    loosa County Sheriff s Of ce Cpl. Mark Weaver. But after a while, it just became the norm.

    Weaver was one of hundreds of rst re-sponders who arrived in the most devas-tated areas just minutes after the storm. Many of them remained there for days, go-ing home only long enough to shower and force sleep to overcome adrenaline.

    Very few, if any, police of cers, re ght-ers and paramedics here had ever experi-enced a disaster on such a large scale. In-stinct and training kicked in, many said,

    and helped create some kind of order dur-ing the chaos. Rescuing some victims be-fore it was too late countered some of the helplessness of not bei