TRADE: GROWTH WAS COMMON EVERYWHERE

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<ul><li><p>FACTS &amp; FIGURES </p><p>TRADE: GROWTH WAS COMMON EVERYWHERE The value of chemical exports and imports increased, but U.S. trade deficit ballooned </p><p>WORLDWIDE TRADE IN </p><p>chemicals posted good, and sometimes very good, increases last year as the value of both exports and </p><p>imports in major producing countries rose. In the U.S., total chemical exports rose </p><p>9.1% from the previous year to $123.1 bil-lion, while imports increased 13.6% to $128.3 billion. </p><p>Inorganic chemical exports showed the largest increase among the chemical sectors, rising 22.0% to $7.9 billion. Plastics and fer-tilizers also scored double-digit growth in 2005. Exports of plastics in primary form rose 15.9% to $21.5 billion, while exports of plastics in nonprimary form increased 10.2% to $8.0 billion. Fertilizer exports rose 12.5% to $3.2 billion. </p><p>The organic chemicals sector, which has the largest export value among the nine chemical sectors, saw an export increase of just 1.7% to $26.8 billion. </p><p>The growth in chemical imports last year was widespread throughout the indus-try, with all but one of the sectors showing increases greater than 10%. The organic chemicals sector was the exception, with only 8.3% growth to $38.1 billion. </p><p>Fertilizers saw the largest import growth, rising 46.2% to $3.7 billion, followed by plastics in primary form, which increased </p><p>28.0% to $11.1 billion. Imports in the larg-est importing sector, pharmaceuticals, rose 11.2% to $39.0 billion. </p><p>The disparity between import and ex-port growth rates in 2005 led to a huge increase in the U.S. chemical trade deficit. After dropping to just $82.0 million in 2004 from the previous year, the deficit swelled to $5.2 billion last year. As in the past, deficits in both the organic chemicals and pharmaceuticals sectors were greater than the sum for all sectors. Pharmaceuti-cals posted the largest deficit, $13.1 billion, up from $11.1 billion in 2004. The organic chemicals deficit of $11.3 billion was well above the $8.8 billion seen in 2004. </p><p>In Canada, overall chemical exports increased 10.4% to $22.1 billion, while im-ports rose less than half that rate, 5.1%, to $30.8 billion. The result was a trade deficit of only $8.7 billion, lower than the $9.3 bil-lion deficit in the previous year. </p><p>Basic chemical exports from Canada jumped 15.6% to $7.7 billion, after round-ing, while imports increased 6.4% to $7.7 billion; the actual deficit fell to $72.6 mil-lion from $642.2 million in 2004. Agricul-tural chemical exports increased 18.7% to $1.4 billion as imports rose only 2.4%. This sector thus realized a trade surplus of $125 million, compared with a deficit of $63.5 million the year before. </p><p>In Europe, six countries showed posi-tive export and import growth, but in most cases, imports rose faster than exports. Within the group, Germany, as usual, had the largest exports, $129.2 billion, up 4.4% from the prior year. Imports rose 9.6%, to $91.2 billion. </p><p>Belgium achieved the largest growth in both exports and imports. Exports rose 12.0% to $104.3 billion, and imports in-creased 15.4% to $87.9 billion. Spain fol-lowed closely, recording an 11.7% increase in exports to $22.0 billion and a 7.0% rise in imports to $32.5 billion. The Netherlands did not provide trade data this year. </p><p>In Japan, chemical exports for 2005 rose 9.0% from the previous year to $68.2 billion. Imports of chemicals into Japan in-creased 10.4% to $45.2 billion. The result was a 6.3% rise in the county's chemical trade surplus to $22.9 billion. </p><p>The largest growth in both chemical exports and imports was in the synthetic resins sector. Japanese exports of resins rose 13.3% to $17.4 billion, while imports increased 13.9% to $8.6 billion. The organic chemicals sector, which sends more product abroad than any other sector, saw exports improve by 8.3% to $17.9 billion, but imports also went up, by 73% to $11.5 billion. </p><p>South Korea reports that total chemical exports rose 20.0% to $27.7 billion and im-ports increased 18.6% to $24.5 billion. </p><p>China's chemical exports increased 29.6% last year to $31.9 billion, and imports increased 18.7% to $50.6 billion. This trade produced a deficit of $18.7 billion, up from $18.0 billion in 2004. </p><p>Exports of organic chemicals, China's largest chemical trade sector, increased by 33.2% to $12.1 billion, and imports rose 17.5% to $28.0 billion. </p><p>U.S. TOTAL TRADE Chemical industry kept the number two spot among exporting sectors </p><p>u.s. EXPORTS U.S. IMPORTS $ BILLIONS </p><p>Machinery &amp; transport equipment Miscellaneous manufactures Chemicals Manufactured goods classified by material Food &amp; live animals </p><p>2002 </p><p>$349.7 82.1 83.6 65.1 40.3 </p><p>2003 </p><p>$351.8 84.9 94.2 67.7 43.3 </p><p>2004 </p><p>$393.3 95.7 </p><p>112.9 78.7 45.5 </p><p>2005 </p><p>$433.7 103.8 123.1 89.2 48.3 </p><p>2002 </p><p>$505.6 205.2 86.1 </p><p>126.9 39.2 </p><p>2003 </p><p>$523.6 218.9 101.1 132.9 42.9 </p><p>2004 </p><p>$596.8 241.2 112.9 170.2 47.0 </p><p>200S </p><p>$649.9 259.8 128.3 190.8 51.4 </p><p>Crude materials, inedible (except fuels) Mineral fuels &amp; lubricants Beverages &amp; tobacco Animal &amp; vegetable oils, fats &amp; waxes Other </p><p>28.1 11.7 4.7 1.9 </p><p>26.0 </p><p>33.5 14.0 4.8 2.0 </p><p>27.5 </p><p>37.0 18.9 4.8 2.0 </p><p>29.1 </p><p>41.2 26.4 4.5 1.8 </p><p>32.5 </p><p>19.8 117.1 10.8 1.3 </p><p>51.5 </p><p>20.0 155.6 12.0 1.6 </p><p>50.8 </p><p>26.3 205.9 </p><p>12.7 2.3 </p><p>54.3 </p><p>28.6 286.4 </p><p>13.9 2.4 </p><p>59.5 </p><p>TOTAL $693.2 $723.7 $817.9 $904.5 $1,163.5 $1,259.4 $1,469.6 $1,671.0 </p><p>SOURCE: Department of Commerce </p><p>W W W . C E N - 0 N L I N E . O R G C&amp;EN / JULY 10, 2006 6 9 </p><p>http://WWW.CEN-0NLINE.ORG</p></li><li><p>TRADE </p><p>U.S. CHEMICAL TRADE, BY REGION Both imports from and exports to China and Latin America rose sharply </p><p>2002 2003 2004 2005 CHANGE, 2004-05 $ MILLIONS Europe Canada Latin America Japan China-Vietnam </p><p>EXPORTS $26,312 </p><p>16,344 16,464 6,501 3,043 </p><p>IMPORTS $52,683 </p><p>12,108 4,297 7,008 2,426 </p><p>EXPORTS $30,796 </p><p>17,891 18,030 6,804 3,731 </p><p>IMPORTS $61,304 </p><p>13,492 5,220 8,013 3,029 </p><p>EXPORTS $36,896 </p><p>20,053 22,484 </p><p>7,702 4,831 </p><p>IMPORTS $67,267 </p><p>16,674 6,901 8,325 3,770 </p><p>EXPORTS $39,853 </p><p>22,413 25,459 8,166 5,549 </p><p>IMPORTS $73,136 </p><p>19,727 8,616 8,500 5,216 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>8.0% 11.8 13.2 6.0 </p><p>14.9 </p><p>IMPORTS 8.7% </p><p>18.3 24.9 2.1 </p><p>38.4 </p><p>Rest of Asia Australia Middle East Africa Other </p><p>10,957 1,637 1,157 </p><p>859 319 </p><p>4,951 367 </p><p>1,788 368 61 </p><p>12,587 1,809 1,392 </p><p>736 377 </p><p>6,259 526 </p><p>2,249 496 462 </p><p>15,442 2,189 1,789 </p><p>910 564 </p><p>6,276 587 </p><p>2,481 558 103 </p><p>15,904 2,435 1,848 </p><p>983 508 </p><p>8,023 620 </p><p>3,602 747 100 </p><p>3.0 11.2 3.3 8.0 </p><p>-9.9 </p><p>27.8 5.6 </p><p>45.2 33.9 -2.9 </p><p>TOTAL $83,593 $86,057 $94,153 $101,050 $112,860 $112,942 $123,119 $128,288 9.1% 13.6% </p><p>NOTE: Totals may not sum because of rounding. SOURCE: Department of Commerce </p><p>EUROPE CHEMICAL TRADE Belgium, Italy, and Spain had double-digit export growth </p><p>2002 2003 2004 2005 CHANGE, 2004-05 $ MILLIONS </p><p>Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands Spain U.K. </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$83,908 64,710 </p><p>101,455 33,431 47,758 18,059 57,006 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$68,690 52,077 72,250 43,815 31,170 27,353 47,222 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$84,769 65,127 </p><p>107,601 32,467 48,385 18,794 56,684 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$68,557 52,537 73,392 44,633 31,169 28,986 46,637 </p><p>EXPORTS $93,170 </p><p>68,614 123,740 33,854 54,655 19,718 58,453 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$76,163 55,091 83,227 47,424 35,627 30,415 50,211 </p><p>EXPORTS $104,319 </p><p>72,761 129,200 37,502 </p><p>na 22,031 59,884 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$87,861 60,177 91,200 50,708 </p><p>na 32,548 52,150 </p><p>EXPORTS 12.0% 6.0 4.4 </p><p>10.8 na </p><p>11.7 2.4 </p><p>IMPORTS 15.4% 9.2 9.6 6.9 na 7.0 3.9 </p><p>NOTE: Monetary statistics for all years were converted from local currencies to U.S. dollars on the basis of the 2005 average exchange rates of $1.00 U.S. = 0.803 euros and 0.549 pounds sterling, na = not available. SOURCES: European Chemical Industry Council, national agencies </p><p>NORTH AMERICAN CHEMICALS U.S. trade gap opened up again ... </p><p>$ Billions </p><p>1995 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 </p><p>SOURCE: Department of Commerce </p><p>... while Canada's shrank </p><p>$ Billions </p><p>1995 96 </p><p>NOTEi $1.00 U.S. = $1,212 Canadian SOURCES: Industry Canada, Statistics Canada </p><p>GOT A THING FOR DATA? If you're itching to do your own calculations with all these numbers, let yourself go... to www.cen-online.org, that is, where you can access downloadable versions of these tables. </p><p>7 0 C &amp; E N / JULY 10, 2006 W W W . C E N - O N L I N E . O R G </p><p>Exports </p><p>^Import </p><p> rade balance </p><p>Imports Trade balance </p><p>Exports </p><p>http://www.cen-online.orghttp://WWW.CEN-ONLINE.ORG</p></li><li><p>U.S. CHEMICAL TRADE, BYPRODUCT Led by fertilizers and plastics, chemical imports rose more than exports did in 2005 </p><p>2003 2004 2005 CHANGE, 2004-05 </p><p>$ MILLIONS 2002 </p><p>EXPORTS IMPORTS EXPORTS IMPORTS EXPORTS IMPORTS EXPORTS IMPORTS EXPORTS IMPORTS </p><p>Organic chemicals Plastics in primary form Medicinals &amp; pharmaceuticals Inorganic chemicals Plastics in nonprimary form </p><p>$16,839 13,896 16,150 5,612 5,993 </p><p>$30,213 6,425 </p><p>24,719 6,018 4,336 </p><p>$20,451 15,127 19,209 5,756 6,504 </p><p>$32,876 7,366 </p><p>31,516 7,419 4,794 </p><p>$26,377 18,512 23,982 6,440 7,252 </p><p>$35,212 8,654 </p><p>35,105 8,273 5,570 </p><p>$26,836 21,458 25,952 7,854 7,992 </p><p>$38,140 11,078 39,039 10,169 6.34 </p><p>1.7% 15.9 8.2 </p><p>22.0 10.2 </p><p>8.3% 28.0 11.2 22.9 13.4 </p><p>Perfume, toilet &amp; cleaning materials Dyeing, tanning &amp; coloring materials Fertilizers Other </p><p>6,135 3,976 2,262 </p><p>12,730 </p><p>4,195 2,358 1,619 6,174 </p><p>6,857 4,282 2,552 </p><p>13,415 </p><p>5,611 2,481 2,130 6,857 </p><p>7,745 4,690 2,846 </p><p>15,016 </p><p>6,951 2,669 2,530 7,978 </p><p>8,409 5,018 3,203 </p><p>16,398 </p><p>7,926 2,970 3,699 8,952 </p><p>8.6 7.0 </p><p>12.5 9.2 </p><p>14.0 11.3 46.2 12.2 </p><p>TOTAL $83,593 $86,057 $94,153 $101,050 $112,860 $112,942 $123,119 $128,288 9.1% 13.6% </p><p>NOTE: Totals may not sum because of rounding. SOURCE: Department of Commerce </p><p>CANADA CHEMICAL TRADEP BY PRODUCT Exports boomed and imports climbed in 2005 </p><p>2002 2003 2004 2005 CHANGE, 2004-05 </p><p>$ MILLIONS </p><p>Basic chemicals Resins, synthetic rubber &amp; fibers Pesticides, fertilizers &amp; other agricultural chemicals Pharmaceuticals &amp; medicine Other chemical products </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$5,450.3 5,075.5 </p><p>1,003.7 2,106.5 3,045.0 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$6,429.2 5,420.6 </p><p>1,212.5 6,662.0 7,454.4 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$5,091.2 5,018.6 </p><p>948.4 2,807.3 2,971.5 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$6,255.1 5,212.5 </p><p>1,261.2 7,457.7 7,276.9 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$6,620.7 5,653.3 </p><p>1,161.4 3,310.8 3,299.2 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$7,263.7 5,522.9 </p><p>1,224.9 7,872.1 7,458.5 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$7,656.6 6,196.5 </p><p>1,378.5 3,578.2 3,319.0 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$7,729.3 6,057.0 </p><p>1,253.8 8,242.7 7,546.8 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>15.6% 9.6 </p><p>18.7 8.1 0.6 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>6.4% 9.7 </p><p>2.4 4.7 1.2 </p><p>TOTAL TOTAL WITH U.S. U.S. SHARE </p><p>$16,681.0 $27,177.9 $16,837.0 $27,462.6 $20,045.4 $29,342.1 $22,127.9 $30,829.6 $14,168.4 $19,196.0 $14,002.5 $18,829.6 $16,245.2 $19,625.3 $17,654.1 $20,148.6 </p><p>84.9% 70.6% 83.2% 68.6% 81.0% 66.9% 79.8% 65.4% </p><p>10.4% 8.7% </p><p>5.1% 2.7% </p><p>NOTE: Monetary statistics for all years were converted to U.S. dollars on the basis of the 2005 average exchange rate of $1.00 U.S. = SOURCES: Statistics Canada, Industry Canada </p><p>; $1,212 Canadian. </p><p>ASIA CHEMICAL TRADE, BY PRODUCT Chemical trade surpluses grew in both Japan and South Korea </p><p>2002 2003 2004 2005 CHANGE, 2004-05 $ MILLIONS EXPORTS IMPORTS EXPORTS IMPORTS EXPORTS IMPORTS EXPORTS IMPORTS EXPORTS IMPORTS </p><p>JAPAN Organic chemicals Inorganic chemicals Synthetic resins Photographic materials Fertilizers Dyes &amp; pigments Cosmetics Rubber Other TOTAL </p><p>$11,493 1,936 </p><p>10,495 3,766 </p><p>84 2,046 </p><p>712 5,981 7,948 </p><p>$44,461 </p><p>$8,085 2,952 5,425 </p><p>372 523 801 </p><p>1,519 1,839 8,720 </p><p>$30,236 </p><p>$13,458 2,295 </p><p>12,197 4,104 </p><p>86 2,430 </p><p>785 6,879 9,101 </p><p>$51,335 </p><p>$9,323 3,468 6,311 </p><p>403 530 950 </p><p>1,809 2,259 9,923 </p><p>$34,976 </p><p>$16,508 2,708 </p><p>15,385 4,605 </p><p>103 2,996 </p><p>928 7,875 </p><p>11,412 $62,520 </p><p>$10,710 4,339 7,518 </p><p>325 642 </p><p>1,037 2,121 2,834 </p><p>11,434 $40,960 </p><p>$17,883 2,954 </p><p>17,428 4,681 </p><p>110 3,135 </p><p>977 8,584 </p><p>12,405 $68,157 </p><p>$11,489 4,754 8,566 </p><p>319 711 </p><p>1,084 2,129 3,219 </p><p>12,964 $45,235 </p><p>8.3% 9.1 </p><p>13.3 1.7 6.8 4.6 5.3 9.0 8.7 9.0% </p><p>7.3% 9.6 </p><p>13.9 -1.8 10.7 4.5 0.4 </p><p>13.6 13.4 10.4% </p><p>SOUTH KOREA Chemicals &amp; chemical products Petrochemicals3 </p><p>$13,762 9,625 </p><p>$14,156 4,745 </p><p>$16,936 11,917 </p><p>$13,482 5,821 </p><p>$23,126 17,015 </p><p>$20,655 8,015 </p><p>$27,745 20,811 </p><p>$24,502 9,507 </p><p>20.0% 22.3 </p><p>18.6% 18.6 </p><p>NOTE: Totals may not sum because of rounding, a Defined as synthetic resins, synthetic fiber raw materials, and synthetic rubber. SOURCES: Japan Chemical Importers &amp; Exporters Association; National Statistical Office, Republic of Korea; Korea Petrochemical Industry Association </p><p>W W W . C E N - O N L I N E . O R G C&amp;EN / J U L Y 10, 2006 7 1 </p><p>http://WWW.CEN-ONLINE.ORG</p></li><li><p>TRADE </p><p>CHINA CHEMICAL TRADE, BY PRODUCT Deficit grew only slightly as exports rose faster than imports </p><p>2002 2003 2004 2005 CHANGE, 2004-05 $ MILLIONS </p><p>Inorganic chemicals Organic chemicals Pharmaceutical products Fertilizers Dyes &amp; pigments Other3 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$3,030 5,568 </p><p>790 350 </p><p>1,390 3,490 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$1,949 11,156 </p><p>1,130 2,354 2,088 5,626 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$3,595 7,131 </p><p>918 800 </p><p>1,526 4,557 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$2,729 16,006 </p><p>1,392 1,763 2,583 7,316 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$4,840 9,092 1,100 1,309 1,927 6,312 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$3,961 23,846 </p><p>1,572 2,288 2,975 7,960 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>$6,944 </p><p>12,11-2 1,364 1,011 2,483 7,939 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>$4,815 28,020 </p><p>1,959 3,051 3,081 9,652 </p><p>EXPORTS </p><p>43.5% 33.2 24.0 </p><p>-22.8 28.9 25.8 </p><p>IMPORTS </p><p>21.6% 17.5 24.6 33.3 3.6 </p><p>21.2 </p><p>TOTAL $14,618 $24,303 $18,527 $31,789 $24,580 $42,602 $31,853 $50,578 29.6% 18.7% </p><p>a Calculated by C&amp;EN. SOURCE: Customs General Administration of the People's Republic of China </p><p>U.S CHEMICAL TRADE BALANCE, BY PRODUCT Large deficits in trade of organic chemicals and pharmaceuticals pushed total trade balance deep into the red </p><p>$ MILLIONS </p><p>Organic chemicals Plastics in primary form Medieinals &amp; pharmaceuticals Inorganic chemicals Plastics in nonprimary form Perfume, toiletries &amp; cleaning materials Dyeing, tanning &amp; coloring materials Fertilizers Other </p><p>1995 </p><p>$3,070 6,425 1,010 </p><p>-74 1,516 </p><p>1,634 </p><p>541 1,834 4,463 </p><p>1996 </p><p>$192 6,539 </p><p>254 -205 </p><p>1,699 </p><p>1,995 </p><p>606 1,676 5,305 </p><p>1997 </p><p>-$86 7,220 -507 292 </p><p>2,114 </p><p>2,343 </p><p>869 1,696 6,560 </p><p>1998 </p><p>-$3,119 6,476 </p><p>-1,224 -276 </p><p>1,834 </p><p>1,995 </p><p>1,058 1,714 6,132 </p><p>1999 </p><p>-$6,106 6,330 </p><p>-2,295 -472 </p><p>1,529 </p><p>1,863 </p><p>1,055 1,618 6,261 </p><p>2000 </p><p>-$9,632 7,439 </p><p>-1,572 -582 </p><p>1,983 </p><p>2,005 </p><p>1,529 796 </p><p>6,944 </p><p>2001 </p><p>-$12,680 7,189 </p><p>-3,203 -463 </p><p>1,715 </p><p>2,278 </p><p>1,399 357 </p><p>6,857 </p><p>2002 </p><p>-$13,373 7,471 </p><p>-8,570 -406 </p><p>1,656 </p><p>1,940 </p><p>1,619 643 </p><p>6,556 </p><p>2003 </p><p>-$12,425 7,761 </p><p>-12,307 -1,663 1,710 </p><p>1,246 </p><p>1,801 422 </p><p>6,558 </p><p>2004 </p><p>-$8,835 9,858 </p><p>-11,123 -1,833 1,682 </p><p>794 </p><p>2,021 316 </p><p>7,038 </p><p>2005 </p><p>-$11,304 10,380 </p><p>-13,087 -2,315 1,678 </p><p>483 </p><p>2,048 -496 </p><p>7,446 </p><p>TOTAL $20,419 $18,061 $20,501 $14,590 $9,783 $8,910 $3,449 -$2,464 -$6,897 -$82 -$5,169 </p><p>NOTE: Totals may not sum because of rounding. SOURCE: Department of Commerce </p><p>CANADA CHEMICAL TRADE BALANCE, BY PRODUCT Chemical trade deficit decreased for the second consecutive year </p><p>$ MILLIONS </p><p>Basic chemicals Resins, synthetic rubber &amp; fibers Pesticides, fertilizers &amp; other agricultural chemicals Pharmaceuticals &amp; medicine Other chemical products </p><p>1995 </p><p>-$27.2 </p><p>77.6 </p><p>-106.5 -1,508.1 -2,524.1 </p><p>1996 </p><p>-$346.7 </p><p>-190.7 </p><p>-75.9 -1,640.1 -2,551.4 </p><p>1997 </p><p>-$695.8 </p><p>-69.3 </p><p>-94.9 -1,626.9 -2,960.8 </p><p>1998 1999 </p><p>-$1,245.6 -$1,545.2 </p><p>-479.6 -577.8 </p><p>-340.9 -110.6 -2,174.2 -2,810.6 -3,498.1 -3,869.6 </p><p>2000 </p><p>-$832.0 </p><p>-307.1 </p><p>-148.6 -3,391.7 -4,038.0 </p><p>2001 </p><p>-$1,040.9 </p><p>-47.9 </p><p>-287.2 -3,910.0 -3,991.7 </p><p>2002 </p><p>-$979.0 </p><p>-345.0 </p><p>-208.0 -4,555.5 -4,...</p></li></ul>

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