Click here to load reader

Virtual Coral · PDF file #14 Mollusca (Octopus Vulgaris) 1. The name octopus is derived from a Greek language and it means eight-footed. 2. There are over 200 species of octopuses

  • View
    1

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Virtual Coral · PDF file #14 Mollusca (Octopus Vulgaris) 1. The name octopus is derived from...

  • Virtual Coral Reef

  • #1 Porifera (Sponges) Sea sponges, are Sessile animals; they don’t move.

    They pick a spot on a rock, sandy ocean floor or even

    another animal, latch on and stay put.

    They have no organs or tissues. They eat by filtering

    their food from the water

  • #2 More Porifera=Pore Bearing Sponges need constantly moving water to bring food to them through pores near the bottom of their bodies. They use stringy flagellae to help move water through their internal channels, passing through various cells, where food and oxygen are filtered out of the water and digested, while waste is left in the water to be sent out through the top of the body.

  • #3 Cnidarian= stinging cells

    Cnidarians are water animals that have a simple, usually symmetrical, body with a mouth opening. Stinging cells on tentacles around the mouth catch prey. Cnidarians are either bell-shaped and mobile, like the jellyfish, or tubes anchored to one spot, like coral and sea anemones

  • #4 Portuguese man ‘o War (Cnidarian) The sting of the Portuguese man o' war and causes harm. It is a superorganism that or a colony of individual organisms which come together and function as one animal. The name comes from the 18th century Portuguese sailing vessel of the same name, which it supposedly looks like.

  • # 5 Phylum: Cnetophora

    Bolinopsis infundibulum: Is a transparent animals similar to a jellyfish but they do not sting they have sticky pads. They have 8 “combs” on their body with color bands made of tiny hairs which glow with bioluminescence. They are predators of other small animals.

    Cteno = comb Phora = carrier

  • # 6 Phylum: Platyhelminthes

    Flatworms (Platyhelminthes) are a phylum of invertebrates. They are relatively simple animals. They have soft bodies. They are free living and parasitic. The free living worm is marine shown above. The parasitic are tapeworms and flukes. Oxygen passes directly through their bodies by diffusion and they have a complex life cycle .

    Platy = flat Helminthes= worm

    https://kids.kiddle.co/Phylum https://kids.kiddle.co/Animal

  • #7 Flatworm ( Platyhelminthes)

    Marine flatworms are carnivorous. They prefer to feed on invertebrates that cannot easily move, such as sea squirts, mussels, or oysters. Many flatworms will also scavenge for their food, while other flatworms eat algae. some flatworm species form a symbiotic relationship with algae, in which the algae live inside the worm and photosynthesize, producing sugar for the flatworm to use as energy.

  • #8 Subphylum Cephalochordata=head and backbone A lancelet is not a fish, more like a worm that lies buried underground and comes out to eat. A lancelet eats bacteria and reproduce sexually. Lancelets live in the water and release egg and sperm into the water where they meet and fertilize.

    Lancelet is the species name

  • #9 Acorn worm Phylum name: Hemichordate = half backbone There are currently less than 100 known species of acorn worm. They can reach up to 5 ft in length.They spend almost all their time hidden within mucus-lined,u-shaped burrows made in soft sand near the shore and simply swallow lots and lots of sand to eat tiny bits of,dead stuff.

  • # 10 Crinoidea Crinoidea (Phylum Echinodermata- spines skin)) live in and around coral reefs, and they play the role of predator and filter for small bacteria and protozoa. They are closely related to the starfish. They are most common around the Great Barrier Reef near Australia.

    Krinon- a lily Eidos- form

  • #11 Nematoda (Roundworm) The roundworm is a parasitic worm part of phylum nematoda. These worms are often found in fish as

    parasites (especially Salmon) but can have plants hosts as well as vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. They grow to about 3/4 of an inch and live mainly in the aquatic sediment and bury themselves underneath it when they don’t have a host. Roundworms feed on each other or other aquatic organisms and detritus. By eating the detritus in the water and breaking down the organic

    matter, they also play an important role in the carbon cycle.

    Nemat- Thread

    -odes Like or resembling

  • #12 Rag worms (annelida) Annelida means wormlike animal. They Live in terrestrial, freshwater in the soil and sediment of lakes. They eat dead organisms and prey on other invertebrates. They grow to 25 cm long. Related to earthworms. They affect the quality of the water and there are over 12,000 known species.

  • #13 Coral reef sipuncula ( Golfingia) Sipunculans are worm-like animals ranging from 0.079 to 28.346 inches in length, with most species being under 3.9 in. The body consists of a narrow front section and inverts into the body. Sipunculans are related to earthworms distantly. When threatened, Sipunculids can retract their body into a shape resembling a peanut kernel – a practice that has given rise to the name "peanut worm".

    Sipuncula means little tube or siphon

  • #14 Mollusca (Octopus Vulgaris) 1. The name octopus is derived from a Greek

    language and it means eight-footed. 2. There are over 200 species of octopuses

    and all of them live in oceans around the world, usually near the coral reefs.

    3. Octopuses are invertebrates, which mean that they are boneless.

    4. Highly intelligent with the most well developed set of eyels in the Animal Kingdom.

    5. They use tentacles to get food.

  • #15 Ectoprocta (moss animals) or Bryozoans These organisms are typically about 0.5 millimeters long. They are filter feeders. There about 5000 species. They have a weird ring of ciliated tentacles, called a lophophore, for collecting food particles suspended in the water. These animals form colonies composed of thousands of connected animals. Each animals is no more than one millimetre (0.04 inch) long, although colonies of some species about 20 inches in diameter. Until the mid-18th century, bryozoans, like corals, were regarded as plants.

    https://www.britannica.com/science/colony-animal-society

  • #16 Nemertea=Ribbon Worms There are about a 1,000 species of ribbon worms most found in the ocean, and range in size from 4 inches to 160 feet!! The largest species of ribbon worm is the bootlace worm, Lineus longissimus, which can be found writhing among rocks in the waters of the North Sea. It may also be the longest animal on the planet! Despite their length they are less than an inch around. A defining characteristic of ribbon worms is the presence of a proboscis—a unique structure inside the worm’s body. When attacking prey, they compress their bodies to push out the proboscis like the finger of a latex glove turned inside-out.

  • #17 Echiuria=Spoon Worms Echiuran worms, numbering around 135 species, found in marine/brackish water. They are round, unsegmented worms with a short, stout trunk and and a proboscis

    that can be shortened and lengthened (but not retracted). The proboscis has a broad groove beneath, with the mouth at its base. Many echiurans are quite large.

    The trunk can range from a few centimeters in length to as long as 40 cm, but the proboscis can reach as much as 1 to 2 meters! Most echiurans burrow in sand or

    mud or live in surface detritus or rubble. Some species inhabit rock galleries excavated by other invertebrates. Echiurans occur from the intertidal down to 10,000

    meters in depth. Most echiurans are detritus feeders, burying their trunk and extending the proboscis (tongue/mount) with organic particles being trapped by mucus

    on the proboscis. They produce a funnel shaped mucus net which is attached to the burrow wall by the proboscis. Water is drawn through the burrow and food

    particles are captured in the mucus net, which is periodically ingested.

  • #18 Arthropoda (Marine version) Crustaceans The term arthropod means jointed foot. Most crustaceans live in the sea and include animals, such as lobsters and crabs. Two types live on land – rolie polies, also known as isopods, pillbugs or sowbugs, and crayfish. There are many many species. Their skeletons are on the outside of their bodies. Crustaceans have jointed parts so they can move. They often have many legs.Shrimp, crabs, lobsters, barnacles and hermit crabs are all crustaceans.Crustaceans have two pairs of antennae. Crabs and shrimp can swim. Lobsters just scuttle about on the bottom of the ocean. Barnacles stick themselves to a hard surface like a rock or a boat and never move. Hermit crabs can’t make their own shells. They hide in shells left behind by other animals.

    Crustaceans are arthropods. Their skeletons are on the outside of their bodies. ● Crustaceans have jointed parts so they can move. They often have many legs. ● Shrimp, crabs, lobsters, barnacles and hermit crabs are all crustaceans. ● Crustaceans have two pairs of antennae. ● Crabs and shrimp can swim. Lobsters just scuttle about on the bottom of the ocean. Barnacles stick

    themselves to a hard surface like a rock or a boat and never move. ● Hermit crabs can’t make their own shells. They hide in shells left behind by other animals. ●

    Crustaceans are arthropods. Their skeletons are on the outside of their bodies. ● Crustaceans have jointed parts so they can move. They often have many legs. ● Shrimp, cra