What is poetry?. Famous Poets Famous Poets Taylor SwiftThe Black Eyed PeasDr.Seuss

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  • What is poetry?
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  • Famous Poets
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  • Famous Poets Taylor SwiftThe Black Eyed PeasDr.Seuss
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  • Poetry Terms COMPLETE YOUR HANDOUT NOTE SHEET BY FILLING IN THE MISSING TERM OR DEFINITION! YOUR NOTES SHOULD MATCH THE POWER POINT! START TO STUDYTHESE WORDS AND DEFINITIONS FOR HOMEWORK. YOU WILL HAVE A QUIZ AT THE END OF THE UNIT!
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  • Poetry Any writing that uses words for their sound and rhythm, as well as meaning. Expressing ideas and feelings in compact, musical language. Emphasizes the artistic elements of: Rhythm Rhyme Repetition Examples: Songs Nursery Rhymes Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are. Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky. Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are!
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  • Alliteration using the same consonant sounds at the beginning of words Mike's mean mother meant well.
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  • Analogy A comparison between two apparently dissimilar things, to show the ways in which they might be similar Water is to liquid as ice is to solid.
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  • Assonance Repetition of vowel sounds I made my way to the lake. All share the long a sound.
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  • Concrete Poem poetry that has a shape
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  • End Rhyme Rhyming at the end of a line Hector the Collector Collected bits of string. Collected dolls with broken heads And rusty bells that would not ring.
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  • Figurative Language Details and descriptions to help readers picture ordinary things in new ways. an ocean would never laugh if clouds werent there to kiss her tears from The World is Not a Pleasant Place to Be By Nikki Giovanni
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  • Form Structure or organization of words and lines on a page. A word is dead When it is said, Some say. I say it just Begins to live That day.
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  • Free Verse Poetry without a regular pattern, meter or rhyme. Autumn Wind Blowing briskly Leaves fall From The Trees We rake Colored leaves In A Big Pile. And jump.
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  • Haiku three line Japanese poem usually about nature A giant firefly: that way, this way, that way, this and it passes by. -By Issa (1762-1826)
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  • Hyperbole an obvious exaggeration or overstatement Example: I have a ton of homework tonight!
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  • Idiom An expression that has a different meaning as a phrase, than as individual words. Its raining cats and dogs. Hold on a minute!
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  • Imagery Words and phrases that appeal to the readers senses. The hamburgers sizzled on the grill
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  • Limerick humorous, rhyming five-lined poem T here was an Old Man with a beard, Who said, 'It is just as I feared! Two Owls and a Hen, Four Larks and a Wren, Have all built their nests in my beard!' By Edward Lear
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  • Metaphor comparison of 2 seemingly unrelated things, without using the words like or as The first week was all pain, steel claws ripping at his shoulder muscles, raking his arms.
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  • Meter Pattern of stressed (strong) and unstressed (weak) syllables in a line of poetry. The Sloth by Theodore Roethke In moving-slow he has no Peer. You ask him something in his Ear, He thinks about it for a Year; And, then, before he says a Word There, upside down (unlike a Bird), He will assume that you have Heard-- A most Ex-as-per-at-ing Lug. But should you call his manner Smug, He'll sigh and give his Branch a Hug; Then off again to Sleep he goes, Still swaying gently by his Toes, And you just know he knows he knows.
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  • Mood a feeling the literary work expresses to the reader Days By Karle Wilson Baker Some days my thoughts are just cocoons--all cold, and dull and blind, They hang from dripping branches in the grey woods of my mind; And other days they drift and shine-- such free and flying things! I find the gold-dust in my hair, left by their brushing wings.
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  • Onomatopoeia words that imitate sounds and sound like their meanings
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  • Personification giving human qualities to an object or animal The house glowed with happiness. My dog smiles at me.
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  • Repetition using sound, word, phrase or grammatical structure more than once I like popcorn! I like candy! I like chips! I like ice cream! I need to brush my teeth!
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  • Rhyme repetition of similar sounds usually at the ends of the lines of poetry The Germ by Ogden Nash A mighty creature is the germ, Though smaller than the pachyderm. His customary dwelling place Is deep within the human race. His childish pride he often pleases By giving people strange diseases. Do you, my poppet, feel infirm? You probably contain a germ.
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  • Rhythm Pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in the line The beat created by the sounds of the words in a poem.
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  • Sensory Images words and phrases that appeal to the senses
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  • Simile comparison of 2 things using the words like or as But by the fourth, his muscles began to get warm, like a car engine heating up on a cold morning.
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  • Speaker The voice that talks to the reader- like the narrator in a work of fiction. Bad Hair Day I looked in the mirror with shock and with dread to discover two antlers had sprung from my head.
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  • Stanza group of lines within a poem What Bugs Me By Bruce Lansky When my teacher tells me to write a poem. When my mother tells me to clean up my room. When my sister practices her violin while Im watching TV. When my father tells me to turn off the TV and do my homework. When my brother picks a fight with me and I have to go to bed early. When my teacher asks me to get up in front of the class and read a poem I wrote on the school bus.
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  • Structure The way in which the poem is put together- the arrangement of words and lines to produce a desired effect. I Cant Write a Poem By Bruce Lansky Forget it. You must be kidding. Im still half asleep. My eyes keep closing. My brain isnt working. I dont have a pencil. I dont have any paper. My desk is wobbly. I dont know what to write about. And besides, I dont even know how to write a poem. Ive got a headache. I need to see the nurse. Times up? Uh oh! All I have is this dumb list of excuses. You like it? Really? No kidding. Thanks a lot. Would you like to see another one?
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  • Voice a writer or narrators unique style of expressing his or her own personality, beliefs and attitude
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  • Poetry Reading Strategies 1)Preview the poem and read it aloud a few times. 2)Visualize the images (create a mental picture). 3)Try to clarify the words and phrases that make you wonder. 4)Ask: What is the point of this poem? What is the authors message? 5)Think about how you can relate/connect to the poem.
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  • The Tiger By William Burke Tiger! Tiger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
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  • The Red Wheelbarrow By William Carlos Williams so much depends upon a red wheel barrow glazed with rain water beside the white Chickens.
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  • dog By Valerie Worth Under a maple tree The dog lies down, Lolls his limp Tongue, yawns Rests his long chin Carefully between Front paws Looks up alert; Chops, with heavy Jaws, at a slow fly, Blinks rolls On his side, Sighs, closes His eyes: sleeps All afternoon In his loose skin.
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  • Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening By Robert Frost Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sound's the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.
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  • The Pasture By Robert Frost I'm going out to clean the pasture spring; I'll only stop to rake the leaves away (And wait to watch the water clear, I may): I sha'n't be gone long. You come too. I'm going out to fetch the little calf That's standing by the mother. It's so young, It totters when she licks it with her tongue. I sha'n't be gone long. You come too.