Bangle sellers

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Text of Bangle sellers

  • 1. Bangle Sellers
    Presentation by:
    CVVMMK Dhaveji
    School Assistant Science
    Taylor High School
    Narsapur 534275
    Andhra Pradesh
    muralidhaveji@yahoo.com

2. Bangle Sellers
Sarojani Naidu
3. The poem
"Bangle Sellers"
was first published in the year 1912 by Sarojani Naidu in her collection of poems called
"The Bird of Time."
4. The wearing of bangles is considered to be very auspicious and of symbolic value bordering on the religious.
5. Bangle sellers are we who bearOur shining loads to the temple fair...Who will buy these delicate, brightRainbow-tinted circles of light?Lustrous tokens of radiant lives,For happy daughters and happy wives.
6. Some are meet for a maiden's wrist,Silver and blue as the mountain mist,Some are flushed like the buds that dreamOn the tranquil brow of a woodland stream,Some are aglow with the bloom that cleavesTo the limpid glory of new born leaves
7. Some are like fields of sunlit corn,Meet for a bride on her bridal morn,Some, like the flame of her marriage fire,Or, rich with the hue of her heart's desire,Tinkling, luminous, tender, and clear,Like her bridal laughter and bridal tear.
8. Some are purple and gold flecked greyFor she who has journeyed through life midway,Whose hands have cherished, whose love has blest,And cradled fair sons on her faithful breast,And serves her household in fruitful pride,And worships the Gods at her husband's side.
9. Bangle Sellers
10. Bangle sellers are we who bearOur shining loads to the temple fair...
We are Bangle sellers and we carry heaps (lots) of shining bangles to the temple fair...
11. Heaps of Bangles
12. Lots of Bangles
13. Who will buy these delicate, bright
14. Rainbow-tinted circles of light?
Rainbow-shaded circles of light?
15. Lustrous tokens of radiant lives,For happy daughters and happy wives
Shiny symbols of happy lives,For happy daughters and happy wives
16. Some are meet for a maiden's wrist,
Some bangles suit for the girls wrists
17. Silver and blue as
the mountain mist,
18. Some are flushed like the buds that dream
Some are rosy like the buds that dream.
19. On the tranquil brow of a woodland stream
on the peaceful ridge of a woodland stream
20. Some are aglow with the bloom that cleavesTo the limpid glory of new born leaves
21. Some are bright with the colouration that cuts
to the transparent beauty of new born leaves
22. Some are like fields of sunlit corn,
23. Some are like Sunny corn fields,
24. Meet for a bride on her bridal morn,
25. Some, like the flame of her marriage fire,
26. Or, rich with the hue of her heart's desire,
27. Tinkling, luminous, tender, and clear,
28. Like her bridal laughter
29. and bridal tear.
30. Some are purple and gold flecked grey
31. For she who has journeyed through life midway,
Middle aged woman,
32. Whose hands have cherished, whose love has blest,
33. And cradled fair sons on her faithful breast,
34. And serves her household in fruitful pride,
who has attained fulfilment by successfully rearing her sons
35. And serves her household in fruitful pride,
who has attained fulfilment by successfully rearing her sons
36. And worships the Gods at her husband's side.
37. Sarojini Naidu has foregrounded the auspiciousness and the symbolic value of the custom of wearing bangles by repeating "happy."
38. The 'happy' daughters look forward to their marital bliss while the 'happy' wivesare content and glory in thefulfilment which is a result oftheirmarital status.
39. Each of the next three stanzas deal with the three stages in the life of an average Indian woman - a virgin maiden, an expectant bride and finally a mature matriarch.
40. The bangles are of manycolours. However, each stage in an Indian woman's life is described lyrically and appropriately according to the colour of the bangle suitable to
that stage:
41. for the maiden virgin who is always dreaming of a happily married life it is a misty silver and blue,
42. for the expectant and passionate bride it is a golden yellow, and for the mature matriarch it is a "purple and gold flecked grey."
43. Similarly Sarojini Naidu very poetically describes the desires of an Indian woman according to each stage of her life:
44. thevirginmaiden is carrying in her heart countless dreams of her future married life and she is compared to a "bud that dreams."
45. The young bride is described as brimming over with passionate desire although she is nervous about what the future holds for her as she leaves her parental home - "bridal laughter and
bridal tear."
46. Finally, she describes the proud and faithful matriarchwho has attained fulfilment by successfully rearing her sons - "serves her house in
fruitful pride -"
and hence is permitted to take her rightful place by the side of her husband in all the domestic religious rituals