Alicia Swart

  • Published on
    07-Apr-2015

  • View
    30

  • Download
    2

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

<p>Module 1: Self, Other and Social Context .Compiled by:</p> <p>Alicia SwartRisk Manager : Project Support Unique Number : 3999550 Tel: (011) 800 4079 / 079 270 0406 Email: Alicia.swart@eskom.co.za</p> <p>11 March 2008</p> <p>Alicia Swart</p> <p>Page 1 of 19</p> <p>Module 1: Self, Other and Social Context.</p> <p>1. 2. 3. 4. 4.1 4.2</p> <p>Introduction ..................................................................................................................... - 2 Background..................................................................................................................... - 3 Scope.............................................................................................................................. - 3 Understanding of self, in terms of learning styles and concepts of reframing................ - 3 Self analysis.............................................................................................................. - 3 Work situation application......................................................................................... - 6 Contextual setting ............................................................................................ - 6 -</p> <p>4.2.1 4.3</p> <p>Reframing ................................................................................................................. - 8 Spiral Dynamics ............................................................................................... - 8 -</p> <p>4.3.1 4.4 5.</p> <p>Conclusion .............................................................................................................. - 10 Learning and development plan for Project Support Risk Management Department.. - 11 -</p> <p>5.1 The importance of understanding yourself and your team ........................................ - 11 5.2 Team analysis......................................................................................................... - 13 -</p> <p>5.3 Way forward ............................................................................................................... - 20 6. 7. Conclusion and recommendations ............................................................................... - 20 bibliography .................................................................................................................. - 21 -</p> <p>Alicia Swart</p> <p>Page - 1 - of 19</p> <p>Module 1: Self, Other and Social Context. .</p> <p>1. IntroductionLets be creative. Let us apply a creative technique called An Army of a thousand. Just imagine we have a thousand highly skilled people to Projects Support Risk management departments disposal. They know exactly what is needed to get the job done. They have all the skills required to implement. They do not need guidance from a manager; they are self sufficient and highly intelligent. They are the best risk professionals in South Africa, no in the world. Reality? No, but the concepts is ideal. If we think about the skills crises in South Africa, is this a likely scenario? If I think about the maturity of Project Risk management in South Africa, is this a likely scenario? No, the reality looks very different. As Projects Support Risk Management department we have very specific objectives to achieve within a very short time. We need a highly skilled army. Unfortunately Project Risk management is a relatively new concept in South Africa, which did not deliver Risk Professionals in the masses. There is a very limited amount in South Africa and only stars on the rising. Where does that leave us? Reality is we need an army and nobody available. How do we move from where we are currently, where we want to be with the best Risk Professionals in South Africa and the world? We achieve this through development, coaching and intensive training. To enable us to achieve this we need to understand the dynamics of different strokes for different folks. There is a less than 5 % chance that you will react or even learn the same as the employee next to you. This assignment will be endeavouring to explain why it is important to understand the different learning styles. Understand myself in terms of learning styles and managing. From a proper understanding of the self and appropriate learning styles, it is much easier to answer the following for employees: what should the specific approach to development be for a specific employee? and what is the key concepts to keep in mind when embarking on a development road?. Once clarification is reached on the above, a manager can utilise this knowledge to empower him/herself to reach goals that are set.</p> <p>Alicia Swart</p> <p>Page - 2 - of 19</p> <p>Module 1: Self, Other and Social Context.</p> <p>2. Background1 January 2000, Millennium morning, 7 am on a misty table mountain. Breathing fresh air and standing vertically, with feet firmly on the ground. My hart is pounding so loud you can hear it on Robin Island. Top guns theme song playing in my head: Highway to the danger zone. Without thinking I let the rope go and drop 90 and gain speed, 140m abseiling horizontally down one of South Africas landmarks. A rush of adrenalin, as I think: if you are not living on the edge you are taking up to much space! Is this still me, eight years later? Do I still live on the edge at home and at the office? We will be answering this question by looking at the different learning styles and how all four styles contribute to 100% of my potential for productivity. What learning style does my current position in our organisation requires me to apply. What are the different viewing profiles or frame people take when they look at a situation or a problem? What is my current viewing profile or frame I look through when I think about a situation or problem and how comfortable am I in terms of reframing.</p> <p>3. ScopeDuring the course of this discussion attention will be given to the following aspects: Understanding of self, in terms of learning styles and concepts of reframing; Implementing key learnings from the self analysis in the work place o The understanding of self in terms of learning styles and concepts of reframing. o Understanding the team dynamics in collective learning. o Crafting a learning strategy: the way forward. Conclusion and recommendation</p> <p>4. Understanding of self, in terms of learning styles and concepts of reframing.4.1 Self analysisWhen people act according to instinct, their energy is almost inexhaustible like water running downhill. But, when people are forced to act against their instinct, their energy is rapidly depleted like water being pumped uphill. (Kolbe, K. 1999) We need to understand that people are different and that there is less than 5 % chance that you react and learn instinctively the same as the person next to you. In learning, your mind has three dimensions that constitute the way in which you assimilate information, transform it, and then apply it in such a manner that behaviour has changed. These three aspects entails: Cognitive aspects,</p> <p>Alicia Swart</p> <p>Page - 3 - of 19</p> <p>Module 1: Self, Other and Social Context.</p> <p>Affective aspects, and Conative aspects. Cognitive this is your thinking, experience or IQ. Affective relates to your emotions and personality. Conative is the way we act, react and interact with the world around us, in other words our instincts (Kolbe, K. 2001). The Cognitive and Affective part of your mind are susceptible to change over a prolonged period. You are bound to get more experience, change the way you think about things, improve your skills and further your education, which means your cognitive abilities will change. The same applies for the affective part of your mind; your emotions, feelings, preferences, motivations and even values might change over a period of time. Opposed to the aforementioned, the conative part of your mind will not change. This is your natural way of acting or reacting and bringing things into being, which flows from your natural instincts. This is not something which can be learnt. Every human being has natural instincts, which they should be aware off, understand and use to their advantage. Firstly we need to know what our instincts are. Nobody teaches us about how to understand our natural instinct and work with them to get things done, rather than against them. Does this imply some sort of instinctive learning other than just analytical and synergistic learning? The moment you start working with your instincts you will get more done, than forcing yourself to constantly operate against natural instincts. When you resist your natural instinct you will only get frustrated and induce stress because you are not striving or enjoying what you are doing. Your natural instincts are grouped into different learning styles. In order to best understand your strengths and weaknesses in terms of learning styles, it is imperative that an understanding be developed of the different learning styles and their components. The learning styles used for this essay The Kolbe Index A. It is a model which was created by Kathy Kolbe, what identifies what you actually will do, and your natural instinctive way of doing things Kolbe, identifies four distinct styles in terms of instincts and sets forth to purport how these different styles will assimilate, transform and apply knowledge in a learning environment. The different learning styles entails: Fact Finder, Follow Thru, Quick Start and Implementor. (Kolbe, K. 2001) A Fact Finder is a person whos instinct tells them to investigate before taking action. This person is good at doing research and analysis, calculating, defining, listening and observing. They think things through before they act.</p> <p>Alicia Swart</p> <p>Page - 4 - of 19</p> <p>Module 1: Self, Other and Social Context.</p> <p>The following careers usually have Fact Finders, a Judge, Researcher or Inspector. A Follow Thrus instinct calls for a sense of order or structure. This person is good at paying attention to detail, thinking analytical and rational, developing systems and seeing how they fit into one overall working system, arranging and co-ordination for implementation. The following careers usually have Follow Thrus, IT programmers, Project Planners, Theorists. A Quick Starts instinctive force is experimentation. This person is good at thinking on their feet, embracing open-ended opportunities, finding new innovative ways of doing things, brainstorming and risk-taking. The following careers usually have Quick Starts, Entrepreneur, Public Speaker, Crises Centre Director or Alternative Program Trainer. An Implementers instinct is to convert ideas into something tangible. This person is good at implementing what they have learnt, a hands-on approach, building and crafting. The following careers usually have Implementers, Builder, Craftsman, Operators and Agriculturist. As every person has aspects of all four learning elements within himself, the primary learning style will be fixed but can be flexibly applied according to how circumstances and environmental aspects change. Every single person has got a sum total of 100% conative talent, however it will be determined by your unique combination of the four learning styles. There is no right or wrong instinctive profile, you will just need to ensure that you are applying your natural instincts effectively where you are placed in life and at work. This is good news, because it means that we can move between the four learning styles. We might not always like to move towards the learning style which your profile has the lowest score in, but it can be done. The key is to ensure that you do not operate in a situation where you are going against your instinct and learning style constantly and continuously. Lets play the guess who it is game. I am an expert Jugler with ten balls in the air at once. I follow my gut feeling, call it intuition if you like. I live on diversity in life and work. I can easily think out of the box and come up with the next wild and wacky, but interesting idea. I am a last minute deliverable person, but will meet deadlines. I dont like being boxed in, focusing on one thing at a time, finishing everything I start and following a routine might it be Richard Branson? No, it is my natural instinct. If we look at the sumtotal of my conative abilities (100% ) that make up my potential for productivity, I am 45% Quick Start, 25% Fact Finder, 20% Implementor and 10% Follow Thru. (Kolbe, K. 2001) In terms of Kolbe, I was analysed to be the following: Dominant Quick Start. In general I am true to my instincts; I trust it and Go for it even though the outcome of the situation is not clear. The more pressure I experience, the more effective I become. I create challenges and opportunities for myself to ensure I stay energised. I have the ability to think out of the box, and experiment to see what will happen.</p> <p>Alicia Swart</p> <p>Page - 5 - of 19</p> <p>Module 1: Self, Other and Social Context.</p> <p>Fact Finder My Fact Finder side in just right to ensure I get the essential facts on a situation, without getting as much facts as possible. I do not simply get the overview and move on, my instincts tell me to look at least one step deeper and do the bear essential research to be able to explain a situation. I will usually spend time to research key concepts or understand certain analysis, to empower myself to understand the outcomes, but also be able to explain high level if I have to. Imprementor My Imprementor learning style is more on a maintenance side, to ensure I keep things working as they should. I would prefer to initiate and set things into motion and handover to someone to do the actual implementation. If I have to implement, I usually do not put a detailed plan in place, I implement as I go, which keeps the uncertainty and the chaos close by. I will also start to implement something, If I have not done it before and see it as a challenge, and the moment I feel I have conquered the challenge and know how to do it, I want to hand over to someone else to finish. Follow Thru My Follow Thru side is the side I resist the most. When it comes to systems the only systems and procedures I like to produce are the shortcuts to keeping all my balls in the air. I tend to think in pictures and colours rather than coulombs and logical flows. I do not give enough attention to detail and I do not like planning ahead, and then following that plan to the line. I am not very systematic and detailed which can lead to fire fighting mode. I know that I can do very good planning and procedures if I have to, but do not necessarily like to do it and will get frustrated if I do it full time.</p> <p>4.2</p> <p>Work situation application</p> <p>4.2.1 Contextual setting I am currently the Risk Manager for Capital Expansion Projects within Projects Support. I did not apply for my current position; my intention was to be a Risk Manager for one of the Projects. When I was recruited I worked on the assumption that Risk Management was already in place on the Projects and I will ju...</p>