American Protest Songs in the 20th Century

  • Published on
    22-Nov-2014

  • View
    14.557

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Histo II Group Project

Transcript

  • 1. American Protest Songs in the 20th Century
    Alex Krenz
    Willie Gotmer
    Tom Buckley
    Shoe An
    Victoria Neil

2. Goals:
1. Protest songs have been present in American Culture throughout the entirety of the 20th Century affecting the American psyche by challenging pre-established views.
2. Protest songs provide a space for social movements, politicalexpression, and a way ofjoining people together for a common cause.
3. Protest songs are instruments of progressive form that throughout the century have built on one another to implement social change.
3. What is a Protest Song?
A song to protest current economic, political, or social problems.A protest song highlights popular struggles against an idea, group, or individual figurehead.These songs are associated with all styles and genres of music, though they have historically been found in folk music.
4. Important Events 1900-1950s:
Labor Movements
World War I
Great Depression
Dust Bowl
Labor Movements
World War II
Anti-nuclear weapons
5. Protest songs of the first half of the 20th century
About
Social/Economic Justice
Anti-war sentiments
6. "I Didn't Raise My Boy to Be a Soldier"
American anti-war: associated with pacifist movement of pre-WWI
Reflects the ideas that America should stay out of European affairs
Witten in 1915 by Lyricist: Alfred Bryan and Composer: Al Piantadosi
Teddy Roosevelts Response: foolish people who applaud a song entitled 'I Didn't Raise My Boy To Be A Soldier' are just the people who would also in their hearts applaud a song entitled 'I Didn't Raise my Girl To Be A Mother'"
7. Lyrics:
Ten million soldiers to the war have gonewho may never return again.Ten million mother's heartsmust break for the ones who died in vainHead bowed down in sorrow in her lonely years,I heard a mother murmer through her tears:
"I didn't raise my boy to be a soldier,I brought him up to be my pride and joy.Who dares to place a musket on his shoulderto shoot some other mother's darling boy?
Let nations arbitrate their future troubles.It's time to lay the sword and gun away.There'd be no war today if mothers all would say,"I didn't raise my boy to be a soldier"
What victory can cheer a mother's heartwhen she looks at her blighted home?What victory can bring her backall she cared to call her own?
Let each mother answer in the year to be,"Remember that my boy belongs to me!
"I didn't raise my boy to be a soldier,I brought him up to be my pride and joy.Who dares to place a musket on his shoulderto shoot some other mother's darling boy?
Let nations arbitrate their future troubles.It's time to lay the sword and gun away.There'd be no war today if mothers all would say,"I didn't raise my boy to be a soldier"
8. Woody Guthrie: Dust Bowl Troubadour
Born: July, 14 1912 in Okemah, Oklahoma
Died: October 3, 1967 (Age 55) in New York City
Known for his realism: His music is considered as being snapshots of America social and economical life during the 1930s and 1940s
His knowledge of the hard life was because he had to look for work as a struggling musician
Although there are a wide majority of his songs that deal with social injustice most speak about economic inequality and the disparagement with capitalism
Most Famous for writing This Land is Your Land
Mentored: Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Bob Dylan
9. This Land is your Land An American Protest Song?
Written in 1940; melody based on gospel songs Oh my Loving Brother
Original title: God Bless America for Me
Originally written as a protest against Irving Berlins God Bless America
The song draws upon all of his experiences traveling around the country as a struggling artist and as a solider
Main idea of the song: wealth should be made available to everyone (communist ideals).
When the song was written in 1944; published in 1951 (Guthrie left out many of the original stanzas controversial stanzas)
Later it would be purposed that this become our national anthem
10. 1944 Song:
Original Lyrics:
This land is your land This land is my landFrom California to the New York island;From the red wood forest to the Gulf Stream watersThis land was made for you and Me.

As I was walking that ribbon of highway,I saw above me that endless skyway:I saw below me that golden valley:This land was made for you and me.

Ive roamed and rambled and I followed my footstepsTo the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts;And all around me a voice was sounding:This land was made for you and me.

When the sun came shining, and I was strolling,And the wheat fields waving and the dust clouds rolling,As the fog was lifting a voice was chanting:This land was made for you and me.

As I went walking I saw a sign thereAnd on the sign it said No Trespassing.But on the other side it didnt say nothing,That side was made for you and me.

In the shadow of the steeple I saw my people,By the relief office I seen my people;As they stood there hungry, I stood there askingIs this land made for you and me?

Nobody living can ever stop me,As I go walking that freedom highway;Nobody living can ever make me turn backThis land was made for you and me.
This land is your land This land is my landFrom California to the New York island;From the red wood forest to the Gulf Stream watersThis land was made for you and Me.

As I was walking that ribbon of highway,I saw above me that endless skyway:I saw below me that golden valley:This land was made for you and me.

I've roamed and rambled and I followed my footstepsTo the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts;And all around me a voice was sounding:This land was made for you and me.

When the sun came shining, and I was strolling,And the wheat fields waving and the dust clouds rolling,As the fog was lifting a voice was chanting:This land was made for you and me.

This land is your land This land is my landFrom California to the New York island;From the red wood forest to the Gulf Stream watersThis land was made for you and Me.
11. Protest Songs: 1960s
Major anthem of the 60s Civil Rights movement
Lyrics-1901 gospel song
Published in 1947
Associated with Civil Rights in 1959 and gained popularity through the 60s
Referenced throughout the 60s
We'll walk hand in hand, we'll walk hand in hand,
We'll walk hand in hand someday;
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We'll walk hand in hand someday.

We shall live in peace, we shall live in peace,
We shall live in peace someday;
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We shall live in peace someday.
12. Bob Dylan-Blowin in the Wind
1962
Anthem of 60s Civil Rights Movement
Marks a change to a more contemporary era of protest songs
Biblical Reference: "The word of the Lord came to me: 'Oh mortal, you dwell among the rebellious breed. They have eyes to see but see not; ears to hear, but hear not."
Yes, how many years can a mountain exist
Before it's washed to the sea ?
Yes, how many years can some people exist
Before they're allowed to be free ?
Yes, how many times can a man turn his head
Pretending he just doesn't see ?
The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind.
13. Protest Songs: 1970s
Beginnings:KentState Shootings (May 4, 1970):
Kent State University in Kent, Ohio- students protesting the invasion of Cambodia (start of the Vietnam war)
67 Ohio National Guard members fired67 rounds over 13 seconds wounding nine and killing four unarmed students.
All was in response to President Nixons televised announcement on April 30
14. Artists of the 1970s
Chicago- It Better End Soon
Crosby, Stills and Nash- Ohio
Soul music taking over folk music
Marvin Gaye- Whats Going On?Gil Scott-Heron- The Revolution will not be Televised
15. Late 1970s
Womens rights/protest song make an appearance
Helen Reddy- I am Woman (1972)- anthem for the womens liberation movement
Rock turns over into punk rock.
Came from Britain- bands such as Sex Pistols and The Clash influenced American punk bands like The Ramones.
16. Protest Songs: 1980s
CD players
MTV and start of Music Video
Michael Jackson, Prince and Queen
Protest Songs focus on:
Anti-Racism
Anti-Regan
17. Billy Joel- Allentwon
Well we are living here in Allentown
And theyre closing all the factories down.
Out in Bethlehem theyre killing time
Filling out forms, standing in line.
Well our fathers fought the Second World War.

Well were waiting here in Allentown for the Pennsylvania we never found
For the promises our teachers gave if we worked hard, if we behaved
So the graduations hang on the wall but they never really helped us at all
No, they never taught us what was real

18. Bruce Springsteen- Nebraska
Well they closed down the auto plant in Mahwah late that month
Ralph went out lookin' for a job but he couldn't find none
He came home too drunk from mixin'Tanqueray and wine
He got a gun shot a night clerk now they call'm Johnny 99
Ford Motor plant in New Jersey
19. Tompkins Square Park Riot of 1988
The dopers sent a message to the cops last weekend
they shot him in the car where he sat
And Eleanor Bumpers and Michael Stewart
must have appreciated that
There's a rampaging rage rising up like a plague
of bloody vials washing up on the beach
It'll take more than the Angels or Iron Mike Tyson
to heal this bloody breach, hey, hey
You better hold on
something's happening here
You better hold on
I'm gonna meet you in Tompkins Square
20. Protest Songs: 90s-Present Day
Anti-Bush:
"Bushnomics" TalibKweli And Cornel West
Sharon Jones and Dap Kings "What if We All Stopped Paying Taxes?"
Pink Dear Mr. President
Decembrists 16 Military Wives
Pearl Jam World Wide Suicide Marker in the Sand
Eminem Mosh White America We as Americans
21. Present Day
American avant-garde singer Bobby Conn wrote an album of anti-Bush songs with his 2004 collection The Homeland. Conn has stated that "[a]ll the records that I've done are a critique of what's going on in contemporary America
Bobby Conn on being a Protest Singer
Im more of a vaudevillian than I am a political commentator. I dont think people should turn to music for their serious information. People should read the newspaper.[51]
John Mayer Waiting on the World to Change
22. Bright Eyes: Landlocked Blues
And theres kids playing guns in the streetAnd ones pointing his tree branch at meSo I put my hands up I say enough is enough,If you walk away, Ill walk awayAnd he shot me dead
We made love on the living room floorWith the noise in the background of a televised warAnd in the deafening pleasure I thought I heard someone sayIf we walk away, theyll walk awayBut greed is a bottomless pitAnd our freedoms a joke Were just taking a pissAnd the whole world must watch the sad comic displayIf youre still free start running awayCause were coming for you!
23. When the President Talks to God
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFot6SE0MCI&feature=related
24. Obama praises Protest Songs
The civil rights movement was a movement sustained by music, lifted by Spirituals and was sharpened by protest songs that sang ofwrongs" Obama said as he welcomed his audience. Performers: Smokey Robinson, Bob Dylan, and Joan Baez Natalie Cole, Jennifer Hudson, John Legend, John Mellencamp, Seal, and the Blind Boys of Alabama. Morgan Freeman read.
Newserhttp://www.newser.com/story/80549/obama-salutes-protest-songs-with-concert.html
http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/video/obama-sings-at-civil-rights-concert-9793969
President Obama speaks at a Black History Month event celebrating the music of the Civil Rights Movement in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2010. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
25. Discussion
Do you think that music is the proper place for politics including use by political leaders?
How do you feel about songs that are catchy and popular when you do not necessarily agree with the message?
How do you feel protest songs change peoples views of our country and the Government?
26. Bibliography
Associated press. (2010, February 10). Obama salutes protest songs with concert. Newser, article. Retrieved from http://newser.me/aQYBbi
Center for History and New Media. (2005). I didnt raise my boy to be a soldier: Singing against the war. In History matters. Retrieved April 5, 2010, from George Mason University website: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/4942/
Denisoff, R. S. (1970, Winter). Protest songs: Those on the top forty and those of the streets. American Quarterly, 22, 807-823. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2711871
Dunaway, D. K. (1992, Summer). Review: Folk protest and political music in the United States [Review of the book My song is my weapon]. The Journal of American Folklore, 105, 374-379. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/541769?seq=1
Jackson, M. A. (202, Fall). Is this song your song anymore?: Revisioning Woody Guthries this land is your land. American Music, 20, 249-276. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/1350126
Phillips, E. (n.d.). Anatomy need not be destiny. In The womens liberation movement [Descriptive article]. Retrieved April 5, 2010, from University of Maryland website: http://otal.umd.edu/~vg/jpf96/jp08/womenlib.html
Phull, H. (2008). Story behind the protest song: A reference guide to the 50 songs that changed the 20th century. Westport, CT: Greenwood.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia. (2007). The late 1970s to the presentPunk rock, the music video, and middle-aged rockers. In Rock music [Article]. Retrieved April 5, 2010, from Columbia University Press website: http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0860767.html