ARBITRATION AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS

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    ARBITRATION AMONG AMERICAN INDIANSSource: The American Advocate of Peace and Arbitration, Vol. 51, No. 4/5 (SEPTEMBER ANDOCTOBER, 1889), p. 106Published by: World Affairs InstituteStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27897795 .Accessed: 21/05/2014 05:30

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  • 106 THE AMERICAN ADVOCATE OF PEACE AND ARBITRATION.

    PEACE SOIREE IN LONDON.

    On Tuesday, July 9th, Mr. Walter Hazell, the Treas urer of the Peace Society, kindly threw open his resi dence, in Russell Square, for the reception of the Ameri can and other friends of Peace, who happened at that time to be in London, and some of whom had just re turned from the Paris Peace Congresses. The guests were entertained to tea and supper by Mr. and Mrs. Hazell, and spent a very pleasant evening. Amongst the com

    pany present were Rev. R. B. Howard (Secretary of the American Peace Society), Rev. Edward C. Hood and

    Mrs. Hood (of Massachusetts), Mr. F. B. Gilman (of Cam

    bridge), Mr. J. Carvell Williams (late M. P.), Mr. Wm. Evans Darby (Secretary of the Peace Society), Rev. F. B. Meyer, Rev. J. P. Gledstone, Mrs. and Miss Gled

    stone, Mr. Hazell, jun., Miss Hazell, Miss Peckover, Miss Phillips (of Tottenham), Mrs. Lucas (sister of the late John Bright, M. P. S Mr. Alfred W. Bennett, M. A., and Mrs. Bennett, Mr. Frederick G. Cash, Mr. William

    Holmes, Mr. Felix Moscheles and Mrs. Moscheles, Mr.

    William Tallack (Secretary of the Howard Association), Mr. Howard Evans and Mrs. Evans, Mrs. Southey, Miss

    Peppercorn, Miss Braithwaite, Mr. George Gillett, Mr.

    Henry Catford, Mr. James Henderson, Mr. Gill and others.

    Several of the party, and in particular Mr. Hazell, Rev R. B. Howard, Mr. W. E. Darby, Miss Peckovei} and

    Mr. Howard Evans, made some interesting observations

    respecting the recent Congresses in Paris, and on the im

    pressions which they had severally received there. The

    evening was chiefly devoted to conversation, and was

    very enjoyable.? London Herald.

    AMERICA AND THE AFRICAN SLAVE-TR?DE.

    Professor Henry Drummond makes an earnest appeal in the June Scribner, for the United States to join in the work of suppressing slavery in Africa. He says :

    "America has never been provincial. She must not

    become so. So manifold and pressing are now the in

    terests of her own country that she might also be pardoned if she did. But the world will be bewildered and disappointed if she separates herself now from the rest of mankind in facing those great wrongs of humanity from which seas cannot divide her and which her poorer brethren in every part of Europe are giving them selves to relieve. America does well in refusing the

    entanglmeents of European politics. Let her be careful lest she isolate herself from its humanities. None who know her will fear for a moment that the breadth of her

    sympathies and the greatness of her national heart will not continue to be shown in her sustained philanthropies, in her joining hand to hand with the advanced nations of the earth in helping on all universal causes which find their appeal in the world's great need and tribulation."

    ARBITRATION AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS. The contending factions for the governorship of the

    Chickasaw nation reached an agreement January 9, 1889. Each chief agreed to submit his claims to the governor ship, to Secretary Vilas, and allow him to decide, both

    agreeing to abide by his decision. The contest had been in progress for three months, and has caused bloodshed and hard feelings throughout the nation,?Messenger of Peace.

    THE PARIS PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE.

    The remarkable Parliamentary Conference which has )een in session during the past few days at the Hotel Continental was the first attempt to bring together unoffi cially the officially chosen representatives of different lations to consult upon the mutual interests of those ?ations. It owes its existence to certain members of the

    English and French legislative bodies which met in Paris ast winter and issued a call for this Conference, which W2LS especially intended to promote international arbitra tion. The Conference consisted of over one hundred men who impressed all outsiders by the seriousness and lignity of their deliberations. They appointed able com mittees at their first session, held on June 29. These com mittees reported in favor of permanent treaties of arbitration between civilized nations, and advocated immediate action by the United States of America, France, Italy and Great Britain for the adoption of such treaties, adding that the same policy would doubtless commend itself ulti

    mately to other nations of the world. They also depre cated overgrown armaments as threatening the peace of

    the world, and counselled their mutual and proportionate reduction. In these measures the Conference was largely in sympathy with the Universal Peace Congress which preceded it, but with which it had no connection. At the closing session the propositions mentioned were discussed, and, as we stated yesterday, modified in some particulars and adopted. An annual Conference of Legislators was advised, for the expense of which it was proposed to raise ?10,000. There have been at intervals general peace congresses since 1848. Governments often meet

    by their diplomatic representatives. Sovereigns have frequently visited each other on subjects of mutual inter est to themselves and their people. But this successfully inaugurated scheme for an annual conference of persons

    representing in their own Parliament large bodies of people, for the express purpose of shaping international policy in the interest of peace, is something new.

    [The last is the most significant point. Governments are growing to be more and more governments of the people by their chosen representatives. This movement contemplates the united action of those representatives in the interest of Peace.]

    "I do not see," said the Secretary of the American Peace Society, a representative at the Congress, speaking to one of our editors yesterday, uhow peace in Europe can be disturbed for a very long period to come. With the formidable peace alliance of Germany, Austria and Italy holding France at bay?supposing, for argument's sake, that France is actuated, or is likely to be actuated, by any bellicose intentions?it would be perfect madness on the part of this country to attempt a breach of the peace. As to the supposed impending alliance between France and Russia, it is inconceivable to an American, like myself, that a liberty-loving people like the French could regard any such entente with an autocratic Power with other than a feeling of misgiving, net to say repug nance. My only hope for a permanently wholesome and ultimately triumphant current of opinion in favor of international arbitration on the European Continent is based on the prospect that the democracy of Germany and France may be alike successful in achieving their undoubted aims in favor of that great principle. They are already allied in that, as in some other principles that are showing slow but certain signs of progress."? Galignani's (Paris) Messenger.

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    Article Contentsp. 106

    Issue Table of ContentsThe American Advocate of Peace and Arbitration, Vol. 51, No. 4/5 (SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER, 1889), pp. 89-124Front MatterTHE WORLD'S PEACE CONGRESS [pp. 91-92]THE PARIS AND AMERICAN EXHIBITIONS AND PEACE [pp. 92-92]RUSSIAN PRISONS [pp. 92-92]IN FOREIGN LANDS.ITINERARY [pp. 93-96]THE INTERNATIONAL MARITIME CONFERENCE [pp. 96-96]THE UNIVERSAL PEACE CONGRESS. PARIS, 1889 [pp. 97-101]A STEP TOWARDS DISARMAMENT. Address before the Universal Peace Congress at Paris [pp. 102-102]LOUIS KOSSUTH IN OLD AGE [pp. 102-102]PARIS.THE INTERNATIONAL PARLIAMENTARY PEACE CONGRESS [pp. 103-104]THE PARIS PEACE CONGRESS AND THE PROSPECTS OF WAR [pp. 105-105]THE TWO CONGRESSES AT PARIS [pp. 105-105]PEACE SOIREE IN LONDON [pp. 106-106]AMERICA AND THE AFRICAN SLAVE-TRADE [pp. 106-106]ARBITRATION AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS [pp. 106-106]THE PARIS PARLIAMENTARY CONFERENCE [pp. 106-106]AN APPEAL [pp. 107-107]THEODORE DWIGHT WOOLSEY [pp. 107-107]MR. GLADSTONE IN PARIS [pp. 107-107]WOMEN'S PEACE PAPERS [pp. 107-107]WAR ALWAYS TO EXIST [pp. 108-108]IMPORTANT ACTION [pp. 108-108]THE OPENING IN ITALY [pp. 108-108]THE CONGREGATIONALISTS AND PEACE [pp. 108-108]THE WEDDING ANTHEM OF THE PRINCESS OF WALES [pp. 109-109]A BRIER ROSE [pp. 109-109]PROFESSOR GOLDWIN SMITH ON "PROGRESS AND WAR." [pp. 109-109]THE PEACE REIGN [pp. 110-110]THE FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND AND ARMAMENTS [pp. 110-110]ENGLAND AND AMERICA [pp. 110-111]THE FRANCO-GERMAN DISPUTE [pp. 111-111]INTERNATIONAL PEACE AND ARBITRATIONS [pp. 111-111]QUESTIONS [pp. 112-112]FATHER DAMIEN, THE HERO OF CHARITY [pp. 112-112]A PACIFIC HERO [pp. 112-112]PROF. BRYCE ON THE "AMERICAN COMMONWEALTH." [pp. 113-113]A DEFENCE OF MISSIONARY WORK [pp. 113-113]TO LORD TENNYSON: On his Eightieth Birthday, August 6, 1889 [pp. 113-113]OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES. Born in Cambridge August 29, 1809 [pp. 113-113]THE INTERNATIONAL MARINE CONFERENCE [pp. 113-113]A PRAYER FOR PEACE [pp. 114-114]LETTERS FROM THE HOLY LAND. No. I. [pp. 114-115]DUCHESS CO. (N. Y.) PEACE MEETING [pp. 115-115]THE GREAT PEACE CAMP MEETING [pp. 115-115]POVERTY AND PROHIBITION IN MAINE [pp. 116-116]THE CONFERENCE OF AMERICAN STATES [pp. 116-116]BISHOP NEWMAN AND GENERAL GRANT [pp. 117-117]THE FRENCH PRESS ON ARBITRATION [pp. 117-117]FORBEARANCE [pp. 117-117]TO A PEACE CONGRESS [pp. 118-118]BISMARCK'S WAR OF 1890 [pp. 118-118]BOOK NOTICEReview: untitled [pp. 118-119]

    CHILDREN OF THE SUN [pp. 119-119]THE FIRST WORLD'S PEACE CONGRESS IN THE UNITED STATES, TO BE HELD IN 1892 [pp. 120-120]CHINA AND ARBITRATION [pp. 120-120]SOUTH AMERICAN DELEGATES TO THE PAN-AMERICAN CONFERENCE [pp. 120-120]GERMAN MILITARY POLICY [pp. 120-120]TAKEN [pp. 121-121]A SEPTEMBER FLOWER [pp. 121-121]Back Matter

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