Engaging Early Learners

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Engaging Early Learners. SESSION. 1. Overview. Becoming an Independent Reader is a professional learning resource with four sessions : Engaging Early Learners Making Thinking Visible Supporting Student Inquiry Reflecting on Learning. Overview. Key Messages. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Engaging Early LearnersSESSION1

#Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader1MATERIALS FOR SESSION 1

Monographs and Curriculum DocumentsAll available online in PDF. To link to Ministry of Education web addresses, go to Resources at the end of this session.A Guide to Effective Literacy Instruction, Grades 4 to 6 Volume One, Foundations of Literacy Instruction for the Junior Learner, 2006 Student Identity and Engagement in Elementary Schools, Capacity Building Series monograph, 2011Collaborative Teacher Inquiry, Capacity Building Series monograph, 2010 Research ArticlesAll available online in PDF to members of the Ontario College of Teachers. To link to the Members Area of the Margaret Wilson Library, go to Resources at the end of this session.Philosophy in Primary Schools: Fostering Thinking Skills and Literacy (Fisher, 2001)Organizing Literacy Classrooms for Effective Instruction (Reutzel & Clark, 2011)The Classroom Environment First, Last and Always (Roskos & Neuman, 2011)The Ecology of Learning: Factors Contributing to Learner-centred Classrooms Cultures (Crick, McCombs, Haddon, Broadfoot, & Tew, 2007)

HandoutsAll available in Word on this DVD. To access files, go to the Resources at the end of this session.Checklist for an Inclusive Classroom Community Learning Environment Document Statements Four Roles of the Literate Learner Thinking about Inquiry1OverviewBecoming an Independent Reader is a professional learning resource with four sessions:Engaging Early LearnersMaking Thinking VisibleSupporting Student InquiryReflecting on LearningOverview#Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader2Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader is a PowerPoint presentation with four sessions designed to support the exploration of literacy and the development of higher-order thinking skills in the early years. It introduces teachers to inquiry processes and offers practical instructional strategies for helping young children to think about text and to develop their own strategies for becoming independent readers and writers. Although the sessions build upon one another and are meant to be used sequentially, they can also be used independently according to learning needs. Each concludes with suggestions for reading several related research articles which may be used in professional learning communities to engage participants in further inquiry or action research.

The Four SessionsEngaging Early Learners introduces an inquiry stance to teaching and learning and explores the classroom conditions that foster student engagement.Making Thinking Visible examines student engagement in learning opportunities that provoke talk about substantive topics and integrate the four roles of the literate learner.Supporting Student Inquiry investigates the repertoire of strategies that educators use within an integrated approach to student learning. Reflecting on Learning examines listening and questioning strategies that support students in thinking and talking independently about their learning and connects an inquiry approach to learning to the four roles of a literate learners. (learner)Key MessagesThe purposeful integration of the four roles of the literate learner supports higher-order thinking and student independence in early primary classrooms.An inquiry approach to teaching and learning leads to student and teacher efficacy and supports the development of independence in reading.Ongoing reflection on research findings and classroom practices deepens the professional knowledge of educators and informs their teaching practices.Ministry resources (e.g., monographs, webcasts and curriculum documents) support early primary teachers in planning effective literacy instruction. Overview#Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader3SLIDE NOTESBecoming an Independent Reader is a companion to Setting the Stage for Independent Reading.It has been designed to provide several options for professional learning. It can be used as: - a planning framework (e.g., Summer Institute Program)- an inquiry cycle (e.g., learning collaboratively with colleagues)- a learning study (e.g., selecting one session, such as Supporting Student Inquiry, for an in-depth study)All four sessions share the same key assumptions about effective literacy instruction some are given more emphasis in particular sessions than others. All four sessions promote the importance of: - the integration of the four roles of the literate learner across strands with higher-order thinking skills built into the process of learning how to read, write, listen and speak- an inquiry stance, for both students and teachers- scaffolded and intentional teaching with suggestions for how to offer appropriate support so that students learn to articulate their thinking and come to know themselves as learnersThe resource shows how teachers model thinking for students by articulating the strategies that they use in problem solving, critically thinking about text and reflecting upon themselves as readers and writers; it also highlights student sharing of their thinking and learning strategies with one another. The Ministry of Educations Capacity Building Series, What Works? Research into Practice and Guides to Effective Literacy Instruction, Grades 4 to 6 support teachers in planning effective literacy instruction; they provide current, concise research summaries and identify evidence-informed practices to support learning throughout the grades. Becoming an Independent Reader demonstrates that higher-order thinking is not about a series of events or lessons, but rather is developed as a habit of mind; it is planned and created intentionally by teachers in collaborative classroom environments where student voice and choice matter.

A Childs Perspective on ReadingView a video on the web:

A Childs Perspective on Reading#Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader4SLIDE NOTESThis is a clip of a Grade 2 child talking about reading an example of a child sharing his thinking and making it visible, both to himself and others. This session introduces the importance of student voice, student engagement and an inquiry stance in supporting early learners.Teaching is not about finding the magic answer and applying it. We can only be really good teachers if were always questioning what were doing. Great teaching is a constant quest. Carol RolheiserQuoted in A Contest Quest University of Toronto Magazine, 2006#Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader5DISCUSSIONRead the quote and share a connection to your own teaching.

Setting the PurposeThis session probes the conditions for student engagement by asking the following questions: What classroom conditions characterize learning communities that foster engagement?How might students and teachers co-construct learning to deepen thinking? How does taking an inquiry stance support student engagement? How does it foster independent learning?#Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader6OVERVIEW OF THIS SESSIONThis session explores the learning conditions that foster engagement and lead to independence. More specifically, it: - analyzes the classroom conditions that support engagement and independence by involving students as partners in learning.- examines the evolution of the gradual release of responsibility model and the connection between responsive teaching and student independence. - connects research to practice through analysis and comparisons of monographs and classroom teaching/learning video clips.The session extends understanding of classroom conditions for teaching, learning and student engagement by examining the following resources:- A Guide to Effective Literacy Instruction, Grades 4 to 6 Volume One, Foundations of Literacy Instruction for the Junior Learner, 2006 - Student Identity and Engagement in Elementary Schools, Capacity Building Series monograph, 2011- Collaborative Teacher Inquiry, Capacity Building Series monograph, 2010The session examines a professional inquiry cycle for reflective thinking on teaching and learning in classroom practice. It considers the research for moving thinking forward by suggesting research articles for further study which a) support an inquiry approach to learning and b) provide evidence for the importance of creating learning conditions that foster student engagement.

In adopting an inquiry stance, we push our beliefs out of their resting positions and engage in a cycle where new knowledge provokes new questions and where new questions generate new knowledge. Mitzi Lewison, Christine Leland, Jerome HarsteCreating critical classrooms: K 8 Reading and Writing with an Edge (2008, page 17)#Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader7DISCUSSIONWhat does this statement mean to you? What professional experiences have you had that reflect this statement? Discuss your thinking.Student Identity and Engagement

Ensuring students are listened to and valued and respected for who they are leads to greater student engagement which, in turn, leads to greater student achievement. Student Identity and Engagement in Elementary Schools Capacity Building Series, 2011, page 1#Thinking about Thinking: Becoming an Independent Reader8MATERIALSStudent Identity and Engagement in Elementary Schools, Capacity Building Series monograph, 2011Checklist for an Inclusive Classroom Community

TASKRead the monograph to find descriptions of the characteristics of classroom learning environments that support student engagement. Review the Checklist for an Inclusive Classroom Community and discuss: - How does the checklist reinforce the messages in the monograph about student engagement? - Choose one or two clusters on the checklist (e.g., Atmosphere, Language, Teaching Practices, etc.) and discuss what these look like