MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS

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MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS. They are cumulative (occur over time and not a result of a single incident):. Often occur when the physical demands of work cause wear and tear Involve soft tissues such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, nerves, blood vessels. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS

  • MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS

  • Often occur when the physical demands of work cause wear and tear

    Involve soft tissues such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, nerves, blood vesselsThey are cumulative (occur over time and not a result of a single incident):Work-related musculoskeletal disorders

  • Work-related musculoskeletal disordersBroken bonesCutsSlipsFallsTripsMotor vehicle accidentsBeing struck by or caught with objectsThey are not acute injuries such as:

  • Hazards Work operations are necessary in many industries such as welding, construction, manufacturing, maintenance, etc.

    Welding has several hazardous conditions for women and men in these jobs.

  • WMSD HazardsWorked-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) hazards such as: awkward body postures, lifting heavy equipment or materials, static postures for prolonged periods, awkward postures of the wrist, etc.

  • Common disordersBack injuriesShoulder pain/loss of range of motionTendinitis/BursitisReduced muscle strengthWhite fingerCarpal tunnel syndromeKnee joint diseases

  • By Nature of Injury

    Sprains account for more than 1/3 of the compensable claims among welders in the State of Washington.

    Some of those could be caused by hazardous WMSD exposures.WA State-funded compensable claims 1994-2004Welders, Cutters, Solderers

  • WMDS hazards most common in workRigorous manual precision requirementsHigh degree of uniformityAwkward and static posturesDifficult work positionHeavy lifting, difficult material handlingHeavy objects, heavy welding equipmentRepetitionHigh work intensityOFTEN, MORE THAN 1 RISK FACTOR IS PRESENT

  • Hazard Elements

    Duration (how long?)

    Frequency (how often?)

    Intensity (how hard?)

  • Working in front

    Working at ground level

    Working above the shouldersWorking at ground level, precision work

    Working at ground level, confined space

    Working above shoulders, confined spaceFrom: Torner et al, 1991Common postures adopted in welding

  • Awkward postures in workSevere torso flexionTorso twistingKneeling, squattingBent wrists Neck flexion/extensionShoulder flexion/abduction (separation)

  • POSTUR DUDUK

  • MANUAL HANDLING

  • HAZARD ERGONOMI & BIOLOGI

  • Hazard human error

  • MUSCULOSKELETAL DISSORDERS

    Repetition of work

    High Risk Repetition Rates by Different Body Parts

    Body Part Repetitions Per Minute Shoulder More than 2 Upper Arm/Elbow More than 10 Forearm/Wrist More than 10 Finger More than 200

    From Kilbom [1994]. Repetitive work of the upper extremity; Part II: The scientific basis for the guide. Int J Ind Erg 14:5986.

  • *Most think of workplace injuries as those that are immediate and have a visible, physical effect (e.g. broken bone, cut) and the causes are tangible, concrete (e.g. slip, hit by object)But injuries can develop over time and not be a result of a single incident. The effects are less visible (tingling, numbness, swelling) which can become more disruptive (pain, loss of function, loss of range of motion). *Most think of workplace injuries as those that are immediate and have a visible, physical effect (e.g. broken bone, cut) and the causes are tangible, concrete (e.g. slip, hit by object)But injuries can develop over time and not be a result of a single incident. The effects are less visible (tingling, numbness, swelling) which can become more disruptive (pain, loss of function, loss of range of motion). **