Get Ready, Get Set, Refresh!

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Winter 2013. Issue 3, Volume 13. Produced by UCLA's Student Wellness Commission.

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  • a ucla student wellness commission publication

    total wellness

    winter 13 | vol 13 | issue 3

    how to conquer bad breath

    get ready, get set,

    refresh!+

    contactsin focus

    bathe your way to

    better health

    tips for a

    healthier heart

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    the workout plus some examples you can try on page 23.

    Even as we work or study, we can utilize methods to refresh ourselves. Undoubtedly, for most of us, using the computer or other electronic devices is a part of our daily lives. In fact, according to The Vision Council, more than a third of U.S. adults spend approximately a sixth to a fourth of the day in front of electronic devices. However, prolonged use can result in many discomforting side effects, such as eye strain. As a result, its not a surprise that theres a rise in the number of individuals suffering from latent computer vision syndrome (CVS). But, even with all the studying to do, papers to write, or Facebook posts to browse, you dont have to be afflicted with this syndrome. Discover how to refresh your eyes and avoid CVS on page 8.

    Although life may seem busy and health can often times fall to the bottom of our never ending to-do lists, we challenge all our readers to Get Ready, Get Set, Refresh! as an effort towards improving overall wellness and wellbeing.

    Cheers to your health,

    Shannon WongvibulsinDirector and Editor-in-Chief

    editors note

    Time to refresh!

    At any stage of life, it can be difficult to keep our health in focus in the midst of all our activities, whether it be school, work, extracurriculars, sports, or just life in general. Especially in college (the time to explore, excel, and develop academically as well as make new

    friends and have life experiences), maintaining the balance necessary for our wellness can seem like a secondary task or sometimes even an unrealistic goal with midterms, papers, and finals on top of everything else.

    In fact, I remember that during Freshman Orientation, one of the peer counselors informed us that in college, there are three Ss: sleep, socialize, study, but you can only choose two. As a junior now, I certainly realize how this simple statement captures the struggle to find balance between these three important aspects of college. Yet, this lack of balance can lead to a damaging toll on health. Certainly, with finals just around the corner and the quarter coming to an end, most of us are probably drained, stressed out, and ready for some time to refresh. But, we dont have to wait until Spring Break vacations to recharge ourselves. Instead, doing small things to refresh during our daily routines can help keep us relaxed and energized enough to continue thriving in this fast-paced world without getting burnt out.

    In this issue of Total Wellness, we highlight some unique ways to refresh under the constraints of limited time and hectic schedules. Striving to gain from the refreshing boost and health benefits that exercise can provide, but dont want to or cant afford to spend an hour at the gym? Try out a Tabata workout, which lasts only four minutes, but has the potential to provide you with better results than an hour of moderate intensity exercise. Learn more about

    Total Wellness is a division of the Student Wellness Commission that is dedicated to spreading awareness of and sharing knowledge on issues of student health and health care. By providing an understanding of health and lifestyle issues, elucidating health concepts, providing recommendations for physical, mental, and social well-being, and making visible and accessible various health resources, programs, and events occurring at UCLA, Total Wellness seeks to empower students with up-to-date and accurate knowledge on the appropriate management of their health.

  • total wellness

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    leadership

    kArIn YUEnCo-Art Director

    CInDY LAManaging Editor

    AngELA HAOAssistant Finance Director

    nABEEL QUrESHIFinance Director

    JUDY JEUngCo-Outreach Director

    FrITz BATILLErWebmaster

    kEVIn SUng Assistant Webmaster

    BrIAn kHOA ngUYEnCo-Outreach Director

    JULIE ESCOBArCopy Editor

    BArBArA WOngCo-Art Director

    CHALISA PrArASrIAssistant Editor-in-Chief

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    Hello Bruins! This latest issue of Total Wellness focuses on freshening up for thesake of your health, and it reminds me of the fresh new things that SWC has been working on this year! recently, a new week of programmingthat SWC had never taken on before took the campus by storm, and left an impact on the campus culture surrounding body image. SWCs inaugural I

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    IN EVERY ISSUE 2 Editors Note 4 Words From the Commissioner 6 In the News 7 Q&A46 Decoding the Nutrition Label47 Credits

    DEPARTMENTSbody in focus 8 iStrain: rise of Latent Computer Vision Syndrome

    11 Hocus Pocus Halitosis!

    15 Understanding Your Stool

    eat right19 Fishing for Your Health

    get active23 The Tabata Workout

    mythbusters25 Cracking Down on the Truth

    FEATURES28 Bathe Your Way to Better Health with Epsom Salts32 Health Coaching35 Beat the Burn38 Seeing Eye to Eye With Contact Lenses41 Dont Miss a Beat: Understand the Risks for Heart Disease and How to Step up Your Cardio Health!

    ON THE COVER

    11 Bad Breath41 Heart Disease28 Epsom Salts38 Contact Lenses

    contents

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    a ucla student wellness commission publication

    total wellness

    winter 13 | vol 13 | issue 3

    how to conquer bad breath

    get ready, get set,

    refresh!+

    contactsin focus

    bathe your way to

    better health

    tips for a

    healthier heart

  • THE NEW UCLA HEALTHY CAMPUS INITIATIVEIn an effort to support a culture of mental and physical health and wellness on campus, the UCLA Healthy Campus initiative is providing resources for students, staff, and faculty to live healthier lives. Philanthropists Jane and Terry Semel are supporting this initiative in the hope of reducing preventable diseases. UCLA experts in nutrition, physical activity, mental health, and environmental health have been chosen to lead this program within their areas of expertise. Healthy events are already taking place. The four-day I
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    q&a

    Washing your hands with soap and water and using hand sanitizer serve two different functions. Water and soap removes the germs from your hands; on the other hand, the alcohol in hand

    sanitizer is able to kill bacteria and inactivate some types of viruses. If your hands are visibly soiled, it is recommended that you wash your hands because hand sanitizer cannot cut through grime, while water and soap can remove oil and dirt.

    is there harm in overusing hand sanitizers?

    Yes. A 2009 study from Northwestern University found that ultra clean children tend not to have fully developed immune systems. Underdeveloped immune systems can lead to a wider range of diseases in adulthood. Additionally, there is a potential danger of exposure to triclosan, an unregulated and widely used antibacterial ingredient. Triclosan breaks down when exposed to chlorinated water and forms toxic chemicals, including chloroform. According to a 2012 study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, animals exposed to triclosan experience problems with muscle activity (impaired muscle and heart function), which could contribute to cardiovascular problems. However, the research is based on tests on mice and fish, and the effects of triclosan on human muscles have not been tested.

    how effective are hand sanitizers in killing germs and bacteria?

    To effectively eliminate bacteria and viruses, you should use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. The alcohol content in a hand sanitizer must be over 60% in order to effectively kill bacteria. Alcohol kills bacteria by softening the bacterial membrane. Be careful of some hand sanitizers sold in stores that have less than 60% alcohol content, and make sure to check the active ingredients before purchasing. If the alcohol content in a hand sanitizer is under 60%, bacteria will not only survive, but the hand sanitizer gel will increase their mobility, which may increase bacterial growth. Also, any grime on the hands must be wiped away before alcohol can be effective. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the use of hand sanitizers (with an alcohol content of 60% or more) on hands that arent visibly soiled can help curb the spread of stomach and intestinal bugs.

    Q: How does using hand sanitizers compare with hand washing?A:

    is the claim that hand sanitizers kill 99.9% of all bacteria true?

    This claim made by producers is based on tests they perform on inanimate objects in a laboratory setting. It is difficult to carry over the claim and be certain that it applies to hands as well. Hands are much more complex, with pits and grooves that can hide and trap germs. Additionally, people may wear jewelry or watches, which have bacteria on them as well. Hands also come into contact with many surfaces and transfer germs from one place to another.

    what are the different types of hand sanitizers?

    triclosan-based gels These hand sanitizers work because they co