Instructor Guide: Unit 9 NROC Developmental logical fallacies in the writing of others and avoiding…

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<ul><li><p>NROC Developmental EnglishAn Integrated ProgramInstructor Guide: Unit 9</p><p>Unit 9: Applied Critical Analysis</p><p>INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................................2LEARNING OBJECTIVES.............................................................................................2FOUNDATIONS ALIGNED WITH UNIT 9 .....................................................................3NECESSARY BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE .............................................................3</p><p>ABOUT THE READING ASSIGNMENT ...........................................................................4READING SELECTIONS...............................................................................................4INSIGHT INTO THE READING SELECTIONS .............................................................4VOCABULARY IN CONTEXT FOR UNIT 9 READINGS...............................................5TIPS...............................................................................................................................6ENRICHMENT...............................................................................................................8</p><p>INTEGRATING GRAMMAR, PUNCTUATION, AND USAGE (GPU)...............................8INSIGHT INTO THE UNIT GPU FOUNDATIONS .........................................................8TIPS...............................................................................................................................9ENRICHMENT.............................................................................................................12</p><p>ABOUT THE WRITING ASSIGNMENT ..........................................................................12WRITING ASSIGNMENT ............................................................................................12INSIGHT INTO THE WRITING ASSIGNMENT ...........................................................12UNIT 9 WRITING ACTIVITIES ....................................................................................14TIPS.............................................................................................................................15ENRICHMENT.............................................................................................................16</p><p>COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS ........................................................................16EXTENSION ACTIVITIES ...........................................................................................16</p><p>ACCESSIBILITY .............................................................................................................17CLOSED CAPTIONS...................................................................................................17SCREEN READERS ...................................................................................................18ADDITIONAL RESOURCES .......................................................................................18</p><p>UNIT ASSESSMENT SAMPLE ANSWERS AND SCORING GUIDES..........................19UNIT 9, FORM A AND FORM B, CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE ..................................19SCORING GUIDES .....................................................................................................20</p><p>MEMBER SUGGESTED SUPPLEMENTS .....................................................................22JOIN THE COMMUNITY.................................................................................................22</p><p>Developed by The NROC Project. Copyright 2015 Monterey Institute for Technology and Education</p></li><li><p>v2.1 page 2</p><p>IntroductionIn this unit, students will closely examine a reading for its effectiveness. They will be required to consider more than just what the author is statingthey will be asked to question whether or not the author is stating it effectively. By exploring two articles that discuss how passion and happiness influence ones academic and career choices, students will ask important questions about what makes a successful and memorable argument. </p><p>They will then consider their personal reactions to the way the authors construct their statements. Did each author prove what he needed to prove? Does the reasoning make sense? Are you, as a reader, convinced? Students will also look for the presence of bias and logical fallacies to ensure that the authors stay grounded in their message and construct sound arguments with rational evidence and controlled emotions. Students will consider ways to avoid fallacies in their own arguments as they conduct a critical analysis asserting how successful one author wasor wasntat expressing his opinion. </p><p>LEARNING OBJECTIVES Identify the main idea expressed in a complex reading with multiple viewpoints. Recognize bias within a reading. Identify opinions disguised as facts. Identify sources cited in a reading. Determine if credible sources were used in a reading. Write a thesis statement for a multi-page critical analysis essay that presents an </p><p>opinion about a texts effectiveness. Outline a multi-page critical analysis essay that examines how successful a text </p><p>is at conveying its message and purpose using evidence from the readings as support.</p><p> Identify the most effective portions of a text to use as evidence in an essay or written response.</p><p> Use attributive phrases and in-text citations appropriately in an essay or written response.</p><p> Understand when to paraphrase and when to directly quote a source. Identify logical fallacies relating to analysis. Write a multi-page critical analysis essay using at least one direct quote and one </p><p>paraphrased citation. Employ editing techniques that lead to more concise and effective sentences. Develop sentences that effectively incorporate source material. Identify citation elements in MLA format. Identify citation elements in APA format. Use context clues to define unknown vocabulary in a reading. Use word parts to define unknown vocabulary in a reading.</p><p>Essential College Skills: Using the Voice of OthersInformation Literacy and Credible Sources</p></li><li><p>v2.1 page 3</p><p>FOUNDATIONS ALIGNED WITH UNIT 9You can locate the Foundations for each unit by clicking on the Resources button in the top right-hand corner of the screen. We have also provided this separate list of links for the Unit 9 Foundations:Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/recognizing-the-main-idea-and-source-bias-in-a-complex-reading.html </p><p>Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/evaluating-credible-sources-used-within-a-reading.html </p><p>Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/creating-a-thesis-and-an-outline-for-a-critical-analysis-essay.html </p><p>Using Effective Evidentiary Support</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/using-effective-evidentiary-support-.html </p><p>Paraphrasing vs. Direct Quotations</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/paraphrasing-vs-direct-quotations.html </p><p>Logical Fallacies and Analysis</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/logical-fallacies-and-analysis.html </p><p>Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/writing-a-multi-page-critical-analysis-essay.html </p><p>Creating Concise Sentences</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/creating-concise-sentences.html </p><p>Blending Source Material into an Essay</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/blending-source-material-into-an-essay.html </p><p>MLA Citation Styles</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/mla-citation-styles.html </p><p>APA Citation Styles</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/apa-citation-styles.html </p><p>Using Context Clues</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/using-context-clues.html </p><p>Identifying Word Parts</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/identifying-word-parts.html </p><p>Essential College Skills: Using the Voice of OthersInformation Literacy and Credible Sources</p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/essential-college-skills-using-the-voice-of-others-information-literacy-and-credible-sources.html </p><p>NECESSARY BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGEReview these concepts with students prior to starting this unit: </p><p> Gaining computer access and navigating in an online environment Identifying the author, topic, implied main idea, major/minor details, intended </p><p>audience, point of view, cultural context, and purpose of a reading </p><p>http://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/recognizing-the-main-idea-and-source-bias-in-a-complex-reading.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/recognizing-the-main-idea-and-source-bias-in-a-complex-reading.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/evaluating-credible-sources-used-within-a-reading.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/evaluating-credible-sources-used-within-a-reading.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/creating-a-thesis-and-an-outline-for-a-critical-analysis-essay.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/creating-a-thesis-and-an-outline-for-a-critical-analysis-essay.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/using-effective-evidentiary-support-.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/using-effective-evidentiary-support-.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/paraphrasing-vs-direct-quotations.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/paraphrasing-vs-direct-quotations.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/logical-fallacies-and-analysis.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/logical-fallacies-and-analysis.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/writing-a-multi-page-critical-analysis-essay.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/writing-a-multi-page-critical-analysis-essay.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/creating-concise-sentences.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/creating-concise-sentences.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/blending-source-material-into-an-essay.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/blending-source-material-into-an-essay.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/mla-citation-styles.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/mla-citation-styles.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/apa-citation-styles.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/apa-citation-styles.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/using-context-clues.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/using-context-clues.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/identifying-word-parts.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/identifying-word-parts.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/essential-college-skills-using-the-voice-of-others-information-literacy-and-credible-sources.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/essential-college-skills-using-the-voice-of-others-information-literacy-and-credible-sources.htmlhttp://content.nroc.org/DevelopmentalEnglish/unit09/Foundations/essential-college-skills-using-the-voice-of-others-information-literacy-and-credible-sources.html</p></li><li><p>v2.1 page 4</p><p> Understanding how different disciplines and contexts shape texts and an authors purpose in creating them</p><p> Annotating, summarizing, paraphrasing, and outlining a text Identifying subtext in a reading by making inferences and drawing conclusions Recognizing and using figurative language Identifying logical fallacies in the writing of others and avoiding fallacies in ones </p><p>own writing Crafting and supporting a thesis statement, both stated and implied Working through the writing process from choosing a topic and developing an </p><p>outline to employing effective transitions in a multi-paragraph essay supporting a position</p><p> Creating successful introductions and conclusions Using MEAL to produce body paragraphs Writing summaries, opinion-based responses, narratives, and analysis essays </p><p>using Standard English Creating functioning sentence structures; using verbs effectively; using the </p><p>appropriate punctuation, conjunctions, adverbs, adjectives, pronouns, and modifying words; using active voice when appropriate; and choosing the correct word</p><p> Recognizing and creating definitional arguments, including the language (formal, informal, extended, subjective, and objective) and the terms (denotative and connotative) often paired with them</p><p> Identifying and creating comparative arguments, including patterns of comparison (point-by-point and subject-by-subject) and types of thesis statements (evaluative and explanatory) that denote them</p><p> Recognizing causal relationships in readings and producing a cause and effect essay in response to a college-level writing assignment</p><p>About the Reading Assignment READING SELECTIONSIs Happiness the Beginning or the End? by Jamie Anderson (commissioned)Your College Major May Not Be As Important As You Think, by Zac Bissonnette</p><p>(An alternate APA version of Is Happiness the Beginning or the End? has also been created and can be used for enrichment activities: https://gradeservice.montereyinstitute.org/courses/DevelopmentalEnglish/files/U9_reading_AlternateAPAversion.pdf)</p><p>INSIGHT INTO THE READING SELECTIONSWhy they were chosen: For this unit, we wanted students to explore and evaluate multiple readings in depth to mimic the college experience. Specifically, students should be able to identify the argument within two articles on a similar topic and evaluate their success at achieving their purpose, while recognizing the impact of ethos, bias, and analytical logical fallacies on message effectiveness. We wanted an approachable topic, one that might also give them practical, directly applicable insights, so we selected "Your College Major May Not Be As Important As You Think," by Zac Bissonnette. This article should resonate with students as it discusses the importance of allowing ones passions to guide academic choices. We needed to find a companion piece for students to </p><p>https://gradeservice.montereyinstitute.org/courses/DevelopmentalEnglish/files/U9_reading_AlternateAPAversion.pdfhttps://gradeservice.montereyinstitute.org/courses/DevelopmentalEnglish/files/U9_reading_AlternateAPAversion.pdf</p></li><li><p>v2.1 page 5</p><p>co...</p></li></ul>

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