Practical Strategies to Engage Learners - VDC ZWhen we shift from compliance to engagement we transform

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  • Practical Strategies to Engage Learners

    VDC Teaching and Learning Conference

    Karen Dymke

  • Engagement

    Expectations

    Performance

    THE GAP

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  • What’s not engaging?

    ‘ The numbing effect of feeding dry facts to students not only takes an experiential toll but undermines a students love of learning.’ Rathunde 2009

  • RE-STRUCTURING CLASSROOM PRACTICE

    Teacher as Instructor

    • Gives instructions

    • Supervises students as they work through the book.

    • Questions

    • Lectures

    • Praises

    • Discipline

    • Summative evaluation

    Teacher as ACTIVATOR

    • Supporting and encouraging students

    • Working as a coach

    • Giving formative feedback.

    • Facilitating student communication.

    • The gradual release of responsibility to students.

    • Activating group learning.

  • ‘When we shift from compliance to engagement we transform learning. When we shift from engaged to empowered learners we transform lives.’ Andrew Fuller

    Success will be engaged learners!

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  • Make it….

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  • • Students engage in tasks when they feel they can perform well (attainment value).

    • Students engage in tasks that bring them enjoyment (intrinsic value).

    • Students engage in tasks they feel serve a useful purpose or meet an end goal that is important (utility value).

    "This work has value for me."

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  • The Knowledge is in the Room Adult learners have a foundation of life experiences and knowledge.

  • The Bell!

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  • Strategy : Pair/Share

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  • What works best? The Research Base

  • WHAT WORKS, WHAT DOESN’T? What has the greatest effect in learning?

    Prof. John Hattie.

    25 plus Years of research

    800 studies on achievement in education

    250 MILLION students..and counting..!

    A meta-synthesis of all the research on what progresses learning and achievement.

    All ages.

  • John Hattie research on student achievement.

    195 influences on student progress and achievement.

    What has the greatest effect?

    13

  • 0.4

    Statistically, the tipping point of what makes a difference is………..!

  • Teachers as Evaluators

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  • You’re engaged when you learn!

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  • • Classroom discussion 0.82

    • Reciprocal teaching ( Group work) 0.74

    • Feedback 0.73

    • Teacher - student relationships 0.52

    • Meta-cognitive ( thinking) strategies 0.53

    What works best!

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  • The SLD-Inclusive Learning Environment

    18© LD Network 2016

    What has a low effect? Student control over learning 0.04

    Teacher subject knowledge 0.09

    Ability grouping 0.12

    Web-based learning 0.18

    Inquiry-based teaching 0.31

  • 1. Culture/Community Building

    2. Discussion

    3. Group work

    4. Feedback

    5. Thinking skills

    Strategies for an engaging learning environment.

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  • What suprises you? Interests you?

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  • Map your class time Could it be different?

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  • 1. Identify a STRATEGY . 2. APPLY it to your situation.

  • 1. Culture/Community Building

    2. Discussion

    3. Group work

    4. Feedback

    5. Thinking skills

    Strategies for an engaging learning environment.

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  • Relationships Matter More Than Rules

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  • • Music on arrival.

    • Check in/Check out.

    • Saying of the week.

    • Share/Pair opportunities.

    • Identify and discuss student interests.

    • Find out what people have in common.

    Build a learning community/tribe

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  • Strategy : Quote for the day

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  • UMBUNTU – I am because we are.

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  • Go out of your way to talk to them about their lives and their interests outside of class. Share their excitement, empathize with their sadness/fears, and be present with them when you do.

    So, if you want to increase your teacher credibility, try nurturing even better relationships with your students.

    Teacher credibility

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  • • Emphasize effort over ability.

    • Encourage students to practice self-compassion when they fail.

    • Build positive relationships with students.

    “… the path to a growth mindset is a journey, not a proclamation.” Dweck

    Overcoming the Fear of Failure

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  • How do you build community and culture?

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  • Make it….

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  • The power of humour

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  • 1. Culture/Community Building

    2. Discussion

    3. Group work

    4. Feedback

    5. Thinking skills

    Strategies for an engaging learning environment.

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  • Effective Discussions Double the speed of learning!

  • Please write your name on a pop stick

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  • Rehearsal for Response Think/Pair/Share

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  • Learning is not a spectator sport.

    The more actively engaged the learner is, the more learning takes place.

    Movement and Learning.

    From Teaching with the Brain in Mind, 2nd Edition by Eric Jensen

    Active Learning, Applied Learning

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  • • Provides opportunity for students to deepen and clarify their understanding of an issue or topic through movement, shared talk and individual reflective writing.

    THINK- WALK -PAIR-SHARE -WRITE

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  • Which discussion strategy could work for you? Does work for you?

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  • 1. Culture/Community Building

    2. Discussion

    3. Group work

    4. Feedback

    5. Thinking skills

    Strategies for an engaging learning environment.

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  • Use collaborative learning approaches.

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  • • Plain or patterned clothes.

    • Side you got out of bed (as you are lying in facing the ceiling.)

    • Last digit of your phone number – odds, evens and 0.

    • Season in which you were born.

    • Certificate level you teach.

    Getting into Groups Categories – ‘No Props.’ Mark Collard

  • 80 % of the time students learn from each other

    80% of the time they are wrong!

    Graeme Nuthall

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  • 1. Group goals.

    2. Individual accountability.

    3. Collective responsibility.

    EFFECTIVE COLLABORATION NEEDS:

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  • • Tent cards

    • Jigsaw Learning.

    Building skills

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  • What’s the best group activity you have tried?

  • "Only four to eight minutes of pure factual lecture can be tolerated before the brain seeks stimuli, either internal (daydreaming) or external (Who is walking outside?) If a teacher is not providing the novelty, the brain will be elsewhere.” How the Brain Learns Bruce Perry

    The power of novelty

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  • Break up the day/lesson

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  • Keep cognitive overload in mind

    Keeping your students attention.

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  • Strategy : Brain Breaks

  • 1. Culture/Community Building

    2. Discussion

    3. Group work

    4. Feedback

    5. Thinking skills

    Strategies for an engaging learning environment.

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  • FEEDBACK

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  • Feedback Strategy : ADMIT AND EXIT responses

    Admit Slips Ask questions that provide you with information about what students are retaining from their previous learning experience “What is the most important thing that you learned in our last lesson?” “What is one question you have that you hope will get answered today?” Or..identify what students know, want to know or think they know about an upcoming topic “What does the term ‘engagement’ mean to you?”

    Exit Slips Write the question or prompt on the board for students to refer to as they are writing .

    “What