Preparing to Teach 2: Learning Outcomes

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Summer Graduate Teaching Scholars Program University of Californina, San Diego Peter Newbury 5/9/2014

Text of Preparing to Teach 2: Learning Outcomes

  • 1. Summer Graduate Teaching Scholars Preparing toTeach 2: Learning Outcomes May 6 and 8 1sgts.ucsd.edu
  • 2. sgts.ucsd.edu 2 Image: Slalom course inspection by jonwich04 on flickr CC-BY See if you can follow this analogy: Learning outcomes are like the gates the skiers go through on a downhill slalom course.There are many gates in sequence. Some gates are easy to pass through, some are hard. Together, they contribute to the course-level outcome, getting to the bottom of the hill. Unlike a slalom course, though, if you miss a learning outcome in class, you can go back and try again.When you miss a gate, youre out of the race. Sure, you can get back on the course but you cant climb back uphill. (P.S. If youre going to use an analogy, know when youve pushed it too far.) Peter
  • 3. Learning outcomes complete the sentence,By this end of this lesson/unit/course, you will be able to begin with an action verb (deduce) (more below) tell the students what they must do to demonstrate they understand the concept sgts.ucsd.edu 3
  • 4. Learning outcomes are valuable to the students reveals what the instructor is looking for (no guessing what understand means.) big picture of the next part of the course allows student to check that s/he has mastered the concept (especially when studying later) the instructor crystallizes what the instructor actually cares about helps the instructor select resources like peer instruction questions and exam questions sgts.ucsd.edu 4
  • 5. several LOs giving big picture, attitudes, behaviors (likely) cant be assessed with a single exam question supported by many topic-level LOs (if not, why not?) many LOs defining what it means to understand at this level (freshman, etc.) can be (should be) repeatedly assessed on homework, exams support one or more course-level LOs (if not, why not?) sgts.ucsd.edu 5 Course-level LOs Topic-level LOs
  • 6. Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic- level LO Course-level LO #4 sgts.ucsd.edu 6 Course-level LO #2 Course-level LO #3Course-level learning outcome (LO) #1 Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LOTopic-level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic-level LO
  • 7. Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic- level LO Course-level LO #4 sgts.ucsd.edu 7 Course-level LO #2 Course-level LO #3Course-level learning outcome (LO) #1 Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LOTopic-level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO
  • 8. Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic- level LO Course-level LO #4 sgts.ucsd.edu 8 Course-level LO #2 Course-level LO #3Course-level learning outcome (LO) #1 Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LOTopic-level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO
  • 9. Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic- level LO Course-level LO #4 sgts.ucsd.edu 9 Course-level LO #2 Course-level LO #3Course-level learning outcome (LO) #1 Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LOTopic-level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic- level LO Topic-level LO Topic-level LO sync your LOs see ASTR 310 handout
  • 10. Writing topic-level LOs Writing learning outcomes is hard because you have to recognize declare (admit) what you want your students to be capable of doing. A good start is picking the verb describing the action the students will perform to demonstrate their mastery of the concept. sgts.ucsd.edu 10
  • 11. BloomsTaxonomy of the Cognitive Domain (Levels of Learning) Adapted from CarlWieman (2007) www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/learn_goals.htm 6 Create: transform or combine ideas to create something new develop, create, propose, formulate, design, invent 5 Evaluate: think critically about and defend a position judge, appraise, recommend, justify, defend, criticize, evaluate 4 Analyze: break down concepts into parts compare, contrast, categorize, distinguish, identify, infer 3 Apply: apply comprehension to unfamiliar situations apply, demonstrate, use, compute, solve, predict, construct, modify 2 Understand: demonstrate understanding of ideas, concepts describe, explain, summarize, interpret, illustrate 1 Remember: remember and recall factual knowledge define, list, state, label, name, describe sgts.ucsd.edu 11 higherorderthinkinglowerorderthinking
  • 12. Learning outcome: How to read Many instructors want their students to learn to read primary literature, like journal articles, original writings of Marx, magazine/newspaper articles, watch videos, etc. In pairs, write 13 learning outcomes on your whiteboard about learning to read primary literature, written for students at the level youll be teaching this Summer. sgts.ucsd.edu 12
  • 13. Learning outcome: your course By yourself, write 13 learning outcomes on your whiteboard for the course youll be teaching this Summer. Discuss and critique with your table-mate when youre both done. sgts.ucsd.edu 13 back-engineered from good exam, essay, homework questions back-engineered from previous instructors course notes bottom up: pick a topic and declare what you want students to learn
  • 14. Writing LOs Challenges: sgts.ucsd.edu 14
  • 15. Share your LOs with your students publish them as a document along side your syllabus publish them with your syllabus AND include relevant learning goals in your lecture slides at the beginning of each topic, even each class. Be wary of reading them aloud: the students may not yet have the knowledge (or jargon) to appreciate the LOs.The LOs will be there when they study. Dont worry about spoon-feeding them help the students do exactly what you feel demonstrates understanding sgts.ucsd.edu 15
  • 16. Next week: best practices for running peer instruction sgts.ucsd.edu 16 What should students learn? What are students learning? What instructional approaches help students learn? CarlWieman Science Education Initiative cwsei.ubc.ca
  • 17. sgts.ucsd.edu BloomsTaxonomy of the Cognitive Domain (Levels of Learning) Adapted from CarlWieman (2007) www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/learn_goals.htm 6 Create: transform or combine ideas to create something new develop, create, propose, formulate, design, invent 5 Evaluate: think critically about and defend a position judge, appraise, recommend, justify, defend, criticize, evaluate 4 Analyze: break down concepts into parts compare, contrast, categorize, distinguish, identify, infer 3 Apply: apply comprehension to unfamiliar situations apply, demonstrate, use, compute, solve, predict, construct, modify 2 Understand: demonstrate understanding of ideas, concepts describe, explain, summarize, interpret, illustrate 1 Remember: remember and recall factual knowledge define, list, state, label, name, describe higherorderthinkinglowerorderthinking