Memorial Park Tomorrow March 2015

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  • PUBLIC UPDATE MEETING 4 THE PROPOSED PLAN: A PLACE FOR ALL HOUSTONIANS Museum of Fine Arts, HoustonBrown AuditoriumMarch 9, 20156:308:30 pm

  • MEMORIAL PARK MARCH 2015 PUBLIC MEETING

    "The Proposed Plan: Memorial Park Tomorrow"

  • RECAP

    ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION

    PARKING & TRANSIT

    STORMWATER & WATER REUSE

    PROPOSED PLAN

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  • RECAP1

  • MAR APRMAY MAYJUN JUNJUL JULAUG SEP SEPOCT OCTNOV NOVDEC DECJAN FEB

    2013 20142014 2015

    Public Input& Research Master Planning

    MPC + Uptown Houston + HPARDInterview Process

    Programming& Public Input

    Des

    ign

    Team

    Sel

    ectio

    n

    MAR APRJAN FEB MAY

    We are here

    AUG

    Gui

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    Prin

    cipl

    esP

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    ntat

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    ign

    Con

    cept

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  • PUBLIC INPUT

    GUIDING PRINCIPLES

    RESEARCH

    Berg Oliver (Ecology)

    John Jacob (Soils)

    Hunt Design (Wayfinding)

    Sherwood Design Engineers

    (Civil Engineering)

    Susan Turner Associates (History)

    The Lighting Practice (Lighting)

    ETM Associates (O & M)Ecotech Panel

    Memorial Park Conservancy

    Uptown TIRZ

    Houston Parks and Recreation Department

    CLIENT INPUT

    PUBLIC INPUT

    GUIDING PRINCIPLES

    RESEARCH

    Berg Oliver (Ecology)

    John Jacob (Soils)

    Hunt Design (Wayfinding)

    Sherwood Design Engineers

    (Civil Engineering)

    Susan Turner Associates (History)

    The Lighting Practice (Lighting)

    ETM Associates (O & M)Ecotech Panel

    Memorial Park Conservancy

    Uptown TIRZ

    Houston Parks and Recreation Department

    CLIENT INPUT

    PUBLIC INPUT

    GUIDING PRINCIPLES

    RESEARCH

    Berg Oliver (Ecology)

    John Jacob (Soils)

    Hunt Design (Wayfinding)

    Sherwood Design Engineers

    (Civil Engineering)

    Susan Turner Associates (History)

    The Lighting Practice (Lighting)

    ETM Associates (O & M)Ecotech Panel

    Memorial Park Conservancy

    Uptown TIRZ

    Houston Parks and Recreation Department

    CLIENT INPUT

  • ENGAGING HOUSTONIANS IN THE MASTER PLAN PROCESS

    The master planning team has engaged 2,950 participants in public process via public meetings, online input, and focused workshops.

    860 participants Joined seven public meetings

    1,829 participants Engaged online

    258 participants Joined twenty focused workshops

  • A PARK FOR ALL HOUSTONIANS

    A recent survey of 774 runners using Memorial Park showed that people had come from 134 different zip codes, all across Houston to use the park.

  • RECONNECT...the land, waterways, trails, people, and memories.

    CONSOLIDATE...compatible uses together in appropriate areas.

    RESTORE...the ecology of the park and our connection to it.

    ENHANCE...the overall park experience and its amenities.

    TEND...the land and our cultural history, and through responsible management, maintain balance.

    GUIDING PRINCIPLES

  • 317

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    2215

    16

    1 2

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    7 8

    910

    75

    13

    1112

    14

    23

    25

    Over time, the park has been divided into many discontiguous parts.

    EXISTING CONDITION: DIVIDED PARK

  • VISION: RECONNECTED PARK

    Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates

  • EXISTING CONDITION: IMPACTED PARK

    Legend

    Water features

    Previously Impacted areas

    Altered Buffalo Bayou

    Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates

  • VISION: LIMIT AREAS OF FUTURE IMPACT TO THOSE ALTERED BY PAST DEVELOPMENT

    Legend

    Previously Impacted areas

    Cultural Resources

    Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates

  • EXISTING CONDITION: PROGRAM AREAS SMALL AND FRAGMENTED

    LegendActive recreation

    Arboretum and Nature Center

    Urban Wilderness (trail use)

    Picnic Area

    Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates

  • VISION: COHESIVE PARK PROGRAM AND EXPERIENCES

    LegendActive recreation

    Urban wilderness (trail use)

    Arboretum and Nature Center

    Relocated active recreation

    Historical Resources

    Dispersed picnic areas

    Image: 2010 Aerial Photograph; Data: aerial, Berg Oliver, Susan Turner Associates

  • EXISTING CONDITION: CORRIDOR ROADBLOCKS & SCATTERED PROGRAM

    Riparian Forest

    Pine-Hardwood Forest

    Pine-Hardwood Savannah

    Native Prairie

    Naturalized Golf Course

    Ponds and Stream Corridors

    Wet Savannah and Pairie

    Bog Areas

    LegendRiparian Forest

    Pine-Hardwood Forest

    Pine-Hardwood Savannah

    Native Prairie

    Naturalized Golf Course

    Ponds and Stream Corridors

    Wet Savannah and Pairie

    Bog Areas

    Legend

  • The design seeks to reconnect ecological corridors. Continuous flows of water, wildlife, and plant communities will be restored through restoration of four habitat types:

    1. Riparian forests

    2. Pine/Hardwood Forests

    3. Savannah landscapes

    4. Discrete Native Prairie

    VISION: PROPOSED PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION

    Riparian Forest

    Pine-Hardwood Forest

    Pine-Hardwood Savannah

    Native Prairie

    Naturalized Golf Course

    Ponds and Stream Corridors

    Wet Savannah and Pairie

    Bog Areas

    Legend

  • ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION

    2

  • The park's vegetation has changed from a dominant composition of forest to savannah.

    While this marks a radical shift from the past 50 years, it is beginning to return to a landscape that would have been familiar to the Karankawa: one that is more resilient to fluctuating weather patterns and more hospitable to a diverse mix of fauna.

    EXISTING VEGETATION - ONGOING BERG OLIVER SITE INVESTIGATION (ENVIRO. SCIENTISTS)

    Savannah

    Forest

    Prairie

    Legend

  • The design team has been working with local ecological consultant Berg Oliver Associates to refine this vision and define the steps that it would take to make the restoration a reality.

    VISION: PROPOSED PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION

    Riparian Forest

    Pine-Hardwood Forest

    Pine-Hardwood Savannah

    Native Prairie

    Naturalized Golf Course

    Ponds and Stream Corridors

    Wet Savannah and Pairie

    Bog Areas

    Legend

  • FOREST

    100-150 trees/acre

    25% shrubs

    25% herbaceous

    SAVANNAH

    50 trees/acre

    20% shrubs

    70% herbaceous

    PRAIRIE

    5-10 trees/acre

    20% shrubs

    80% herbaceous

    DISTINGUISHING FOREST, SAVANNAH, AND PRAIRIE

  • I-610

    / K

    aty

    Free

    way

    Buffalo Bayou

    Buffalo Bayou

    River Oaks Country Club

    ADVANCED ECOLOGY'S INITIAL VEGETATION ASSESSMENTOverstory canopy trees over 6" diameter trunk at breast height

    Old Archery Range (OAR) Hogg Bird Sanctuary

  • Midstory Species 12 - 25

    Understory Species < 12 feet

    exotic invasives

    native invasives

    natives

    Overstory Species > 25

    native invasives

    exotic invasives

    native

    exot

    ic

    inva

    sive

    s native invasives

    natives:

  • NaturalAreaPreservationAssociation

    PRINCIPAL AUTHORS: Glenn E. Griffith (Dynamac Corporation), Sandra A. Bryce (Dynamac Corporation), James M. Omernik (USGS), Jeffrey A. Comstock (Indus Corporation), Anne C. Rogers (TCEQ), Bill Harrison (TCEQ), Stephen L. Hatch (Texas A&M University), and David Bezanson (Natural Area Preservation Association).

    COLLABORATORS AND CONTRIBUTORS: Philip A. Crocker (USEPA), Art Crowe (TCEQ), Micheal Golden (NRCS), Susan Casby-Horton (NRCS), James Greenwade (NRCS), Conrad Neitsch (NRCS), Shannen S. Chapman (Dynamac Corporation), Augie De La Cruz (TCEQ), Kevin Wagner (Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board [TSSWCB]), Richard Egg (TSSWCB), Alan J. Woods (Oregon State University), Clark Hubbs (University of Texas), David L. Certain (The Nature Conservancy) and Thomas R. Loveland (USGS).

    REVIEWERS: Charles T. Hallmark (Texas A&M University), Gordon Linam (Texas Parks and Wildlife Department [TPWD]), Milo Pyne (NatureServe), Judy Teague (NatureServe), and Raymond C. Telfair II (TPWD).

    CITING THIS POSTER: Griffith, G.E., Bryce, S.A., Omernik, J.M., Comstock, J.A., Rogers, A.C., Harrison, B., Hatch, S.L., and Bezanson, D., 2004, Ecoregions of Texas (color poster with map, descriptive text, and photographs): Reston, Virginia, U.S. Geological Survey (map scale 1:2,500,000).

    This project was partially supported by funds from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region VI, Regional Applied Research Effort (RARE) and Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) programs.

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