Chapter 18: Intellectual Property, Academic Integrity, and Avoiding Plagiarism.

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  • Slide 1
  • Chapter 18: Intellectual Property, Academic Integrity, and Avoiding Plagiarism
  • Slide 2
  • Historical Basis for the Concept of Intellectual Property What has value? How has the concept of assigning value evolved?
  • Slide 3
  • Agricultural Age This has value:
  • Slide 4
  • Industrial Age This has value:
  • Slide 5
  • Information age this has value:
  • Slide 6
  • and, oh yeah, these paper things have value, too:
  • Slide 7
  • How do we protect the value of an idea?
  • Slide 8
  • We operate in a world that values intellectual property.
  • Slide 9
  • Why credit sources in my essays?
  • Slide 10
  • Makes you and your argument trustworthy? (audience appeal)
  • Slide 11
  • Why credit sources in my essays? Makes you (and your argument) trustworthy? (audience appeal) Proper citation illustrates that you have done your research.
  • Slide 12
  • Why credit sources in my essays? Makes you (and your argument) trustworthy? (audience appeal) Proper citation illustrates that you have done your research. Thinking through sources leads to closer self-analysis of your writing.
  • Slide 13
  • Citing Sources and Recognizing Plagiarism. Consider What well be writing about this semester: essays from the book.
  • Slide 14
  • Citing Sources and Recognizing Plagiarism. Consider What well be writing about this semester: essays from the book. The responsibility of the writer
  • Slide 15
  • Citing Sources and Recognizing Plagiarism. Consider What well be writing about this semester: essays from the book. The responsibility of the writer The societal view of plagiarism
  • Slide 16
  • Citing Sources and Recognizing Plagiarism. Consider What well be writing about this semester: essays from the book. The responsibility of the writer: student or professional The societal view of plagiarism You dont want to run afoul of the Academic Integrity policy
  • Slide 17
  • Plagiarism can be:
  • Slide 18
  • A paraphrase too close to the original source.
  • Slide 19
  • Plagiarism can be: A paraphrase too close to the original source. Example: Original: But certainly, the Monroe Doctrine fueled an unparalleled period of American colonialism. Paraphrase: some scholars feel that the Monroe Doctrine fueled an unmatched era of American colonialism.
  • Slide 20
  • Plagiarism can be: Omission of the parenthetical reference
  • Slide 21
  • Plagiarism can be: Omission of the parenthetical reference. Example: But it is certain it caused an unparalleled period of American colonialism.
  • Slide 22
  • Plagiarism can be: Omission of the parenthetical reference. Example: But it is certain it caused an unparalleled period of American colonialism. Corrected: But it is certain it caused an unparalleled period of American colonialism (Melancon).
  • Slide 23
  • Plagiarism can be: Failure to acknowledge the source of an idea not your own.
  • Slide 24
  • Plagiarism can be: Failure to acknowledge the source of an idea not your own. Example: Original: But certainly, the Monroe Doctrine fueled an unparalleled period of American colonialism. Failure to acknowledge: I would argue that American colonialism was fueled to a large degree by the Monroe Doctrine.
  • Slide 25
  • How to acknowledge a source
  • Slide 26
  • Quotation marks around the words youre directly quoting.
  • Slide 27
  • How to acknowledge a source Quotation marks around the words youre directly quoting. But Dunbar-Ortiz asserted that the realization of my own insignificance did not depress or frighten me.
  • Slide 28
  • How to acknowledge a source Quotation marks around the words youre directly quoting. Cite source in the appropriate style (MLA, APA, Chicago).
  • Slide 29
  • How to acknowledge a source Quotation marks around the words youre directly quoting. Cite source in the appropriate style (MLA, APA, Chicago). But Dunbar-Ortiz asserted that the realization of my own insignificance did not depress or frighten me (216).
  • Slide 30
  • How to acknowledge a source Quotation marks around the words youre directly quoting. Cite source in the appropriate style (MLA, APA, Chicago). Include sources in Works Cited page.
  • Slide 31
  • How to acknowledge a source Quotation marks around the words youre directly quoting. Cite source in the appropriate style (MLA, APA, Chicago). Include sources in Works Cited page. Works Cited Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxie. Red Dirt. Norman OK: Univ of Oklahoma Press, 2006. Print.
  • Slide 32
  • Things you should acknowledge: Direct quotations Facts that are not widely known Arguable statements Judgments, opinions, claims made by others Images, statistics, charts, illustrations Collaboration Source: Everythings an Argument, 544
  • Slide 33
  • Exceptions (when you dont have to cite) Facts that are common knowledge Facts available from a wide variety of sources Your own findings
  • Slide 34
  • Internet Sources
  • Slide 35
  • You still have to cite them
  • Slide 36
  • Internet Sources You still have to cite them Fair use applies in this class
  • Slide 37
  • Internet Sources You still have to cite them Fair use applies in this class Instances you should still ask for permission:
  • Slide 38
  • Internet Sources You still have to cite them Fair use applies in this class Instances you should still ask for permission: Personal communications Graphics, images, and photos if its going to be published outside of class. (Exception: pictures published under open license, e.g., Creative Commons)
  • Slide 39
  • And finally.collaboration: Give credit to your collaborators.
  • Slide 40
  • Photos: "Corn at the Union Sq Farmer's Market" by Jeff Pierce. Creative Commons License. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffpearce/254520406/. Web. "Eagle and Phenix Mills 1914" by Raymond Dukes Creative Commons License.. http://www.flickr.com/photos/57702050@N03/5443345378/. Web. "Bill Gates - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting New York 2002" by World Economic Forum [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bill_Gates_- _World_Economic_Forum_Annual_Meeting_New_York_2002.jpg. Web. "Steve Jobs Co-founder of Apple Computer". Annie Banannie.Creative Commons License. http://www.flickr.com/photos/35798605@N05/4310088820/. Web. "Mark Zuckerberg f8 Keynote" B.D. Solis. Creative Commons License. http://www.flickr.com/photos/briansolis/2696198607/. Web.