DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6) / Issue 5 - Royal batteries/005/  · Def Stan 61-5 (Part 6) Issue 4 dated 5 December 1984 i This Defence Standard applies to 28V dc Electrical Systems in Military

  • View
    216

  • Download
    2

Embed Size (px)

Text of DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6) / Issue 5 - Royal batteries/005/  · Def Stan 61-5 (Part 6) Issue 4 dated 5...

  • Ministry of Defence

    Defence Standard

    61-5 (PART 6) / Issue 5 19 October 1990

    ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY

    SYSTEMS BELOW 650 VOLTS

    PART 6:

    28 VOLT DC ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    IN MILITARY VEHICLES

    DSTANPlease see last pages for details of the latest amendment action.

  • DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6)/5

    AMENDMENTS ISSUED SINCE PUBLICATION

    AMD NO DATE OF TEXT AFFECTED SIGNATURE &ISSUE DATE

    Revision Note

    This Standard has been revised to align equipment tests with therequirements of Def Stan 59-41(Part 3) and has been structured to conformwith Def Stan 00-00(Part 2)/1.

    Historical Record

    INTERIM Def Stan 61-5(Part 6) - dated 19 September 1968Def Stan 61-5(Part 6) - Issue 1 dated 17 September 1973Def Stan 61-5(Part 6) - Issue 2 dated 30 November 1974Def Stan 61-5(Part 6) - Issue 3 dated 18 July 1979Def Stan 61-5(Part 6) - Issue 4 dated 5 December 1984

  • DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6)/5

    ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS BELOW 650 VOLTS

    PART 6: 28 VOLT DC ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS IN MILITARY VEHICLES

    PREFACE

    This Defence Standard supersedesDef Stan 61-5 (Part 6) Issue 4 dated

    5 December 1984

    i This Defence Standard applies to 28V dc Electrical Systems in MilitaryVehicles, for Ministry of Defence use.

    ii The 61-5 series Defence Standards comprises the following:

    Def Stan 61-5(Part 1) -Def Stan 61-5(Part 2) -Def Stan 61-5(Part 3) -Def Stan 61-5(Part 4) -Def Stan 61-5(Part 6) -

    Terminology and DefinitionsGround Generating Set CharacteristicsDistribution and Protection RequirementsPower Supplies in HM Ships28 Volt DC Electrical Systems in Military Vehicles

    iii This Standard has been prepared by RARDE(CH) in collaboration with"Defence Electrical and Electronic Standardization Committee" (DELSC) L4who will be responsible for amending or updating as the need arises.

    iv This Standard has been agreed by the authorities concerned with its useand shall be incorporated whenever relevant in all future designs,contracts, orders etc and whenever practicable by amendment to thosealready in existence. If any difficulty arises which prevents applicationof the Defence Standard, the Directorate of Standardization shall beinformed so that a remedy may be sought.

    v Any enquiries regarding this Standard in relation to an invitation totender or a contract in which it is invoked are to be addressed to theresponsible technical or supervising authority named in the invitation totender or contract.

    vi This Standard has been devised for the use of the Crown and of itscontractors in the execution of contracts for the Crown and, subject to theUnfair Contract Terms Act 1977, the Crown will not be liable in any waywhatever (including but without limitation negligence on the part of theCrown its servants or agents) where the Standard is used for otherpurposes.

    1

  • DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6)/5

    CONTENTS

    Preface 1

    012345678

    IntroductionScopeWARNINGRelated DocumentsDefinitionsClimatic ConditionsVehicle Electrical System CharacteristicsTest MethodsInfluence of Equipment on Vehicle Electrical System

    Figure 1 Illustrative Surge with Recovery TimeFigure 2 Starting DisturbancesFigure 3 Surge Limit Generator Plus Battery ConditionFigure 4 Surge Limit Generator Only Condition

    Annex A Implementation of QSTAG 307Annex B Recommended Vehicle Electrical System TestsAnnex C Recommended Utilization Equipment TestsAnnex D Recommended Generating Equipment Tests

    PAGE

    333346699

    10111213

    A-1B-1C-1D-1

    2

  • DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6)/5

    ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS BELOW 650 VOLTSPART 6: 28 VOLT DC ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS IN MILITARY VEHICLES

    0 Introduction

    The purpose of this Defence Standard is to ensure electrical compatibilitybetween military (ground) vehicular power supplies and installedutilization equipment requiring a nominal 28V supply.

    1 Scope

    This Standard defines the characteristics28V electrical systems, whether these are

    for all military vehicle nominalderived direct from a propulsive

    engine driven generator, a separate auxiliary power unit (APU), atransformer rectifier unit (TRU) or converter.

    In addition, it also defines the number of tests required to demonstratecompliance with the requirements of this Standard in annexes B, C and D.

    By application of these tests and compliance with the defined limits, theelectrical compatibility of utilization equipment, including radio andother non-automotive electronic/electrical systems, with the vehiclesupplies should be ensured.

    2 WARNING

    This Standard calls for the use of substances and/or procedures that may beinjurious to health if adequate precautions are not taken. It refers onlyto technical suitability and in no way absolves either the supplier or theuser from statutory obligations relating to health and safety at any stageof manufacture or use.

    3 Related Documents

    3.1 The following documents and publications are referred to in thisStandard:

    Def Stan 00-35 Environmental Handbook for Defence MaterialDef Stan 59-41 (Part 1) Electromagnetic Compatibility: General

    RequirementsDef Stan 59-41 (Part 3) Electromagnetic Compatibility: Technical

    Requirements, Test Methods and Limits

    3

  • DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6)/5

    3.2 Related Documents are available from the following addressees:

    DOCUMENT SOURCE

    IEC Publications BSISales DepartmentLinford WoodMILTON KEYNES MK14 6LE

    Defence Standards Directorate of StandardizationStan 1Kentigern House65 Brown StreetGLASGOW G2 8EX

    4 Definitions

    The following definitions are to be used for the purposes of this Standard,in preference to those in Def Stan 61-5(Part 1).

    NOTE: Due to common usage of the terms transient, spike and surge, asdefined in previous issues of this Standard, the term spike is still usedinstead of specifying the equivalent definition for a transient (spike) inDef Stan 59-41, Part 1.

    4.1 Military vehicle. For the purposes of this Standard a MilitaryVehicle is one intended for service with the British Armed Forces whoseelectrical distribution system has been designed for the installation ofradio and/or other non-automotive electrical/electronic equipment.

    4.2 Generating system. All equipments necessary to provide a nominal 28Vsupply at the main distribution point.

    4.3 Utilization equipment. Any individual unit, or group of units, towhich electrical power is supplied from the vehicle generating system viathe main distribution point.

    4.4 Steady state condition. The condition in which circuit parametersremain essentially constant, occurring after all initial transients andfluctuating conditions have subsided. It is the condition where, duringnormal system operation, only inherent or natural changes occur, ie nofault occurs and no deliberate change is made to any part of the system.For this reason, the steady state condition is defined by upper and lowervoltage limits in this Standard.

    4.5 Ripple. All regular and irregular variations of voltage about anominal dc voltage level during steady state operation of a dc system.

    4

  • DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6)/5

    4.6 Transient. A changing condition which departs from the steady statelimits and returns to the steady state limits within a specified timeperiod. transients are generally subdivided into surges and spikes asdefined below.

    4.6.1 Surge. A surge is any transient variation from the controlledsteady state level lasting for a period >5ms. The recovery time of a surgeis the interval between the time the voltage deviates from the steady statelimits and the time it returns to, and remains within, those limits (seefigure 1). A surge is usually the result of inherent regulation of thegenerating system and remedial action by the regulator, initiated by achange in demanded power, or power feed-back from a regenerative system.

    4.6.2 Spike. A spike is a high frequency oscillatory variation from thesurge or the steady state limits lasting

  • DEF STAN 61-5 (PART 6)/5

    4.9.6 Generator only condition. This applies as a consequence of the needto meet a generating system single fault design requirement, whichautomatically results in degradation of the electrical performance. Amalfunction of the regulator system or failure of the vehicle batteries areconsidered to be the most arduous single fault design conditions to be met.As it is difficult and impractical to specify a regulator system fault,only the second of these conditions is simulated for the tests specified inannexes B, C and D. Simulation is achieved by disconnection of all vehiclebatteries from the generating system hence, this condition is referred toas the generator only condition; rather than the single fault condition.

    NOTE: When subjected to tests simulating the above vehicle electricalsystem conditions, utilization equipment shall function as follows:

    (a) operate normally during conditions described in 4.9.1 and 4.9.2;

    (b) survive during conditions described in 4.9.3, 4.9.4, 4.9.5 and 4.9.6and continue to operate thereafter, without the need for operatorintervention.

    5 Climatic Conditions

    5.1 The characteristics defined in this Standard shall apply over therange of climatic conditions in Def Stan 00-35 as specified by the ProjectManager for the vehicle.

    5.2 It is not essential that vehicle testing (annex B) be carried out overthe full range of climatic conditions, provided that adequate utilizationand generating system equipment level tests (annexes C and D) are carriedout over an appropriate range of climatic conditions, to the satisfactionof DGDQA.

    6 Vehicle Electrical System Characteristics

    6.1 General. All equipment shall be so designed and installed