NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY - 2016-09-14آ  1 TRANSNET T 2016 TRANSNET T 2016 2 NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY
NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY - 2016-09-14آ  1 TRANSNET T 2016 TRANSNET T 2016 2 NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY
NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY - 2016-09-14آ  1 TRANSNET T 2016 TRANSNET T 2016 2 NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY
NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY - 2016-09-14آ  1 TRANSNET T 2016 TRANSNET T 2016 2 NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY
NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY - 2016-09-14آ  1 TRANSNET T 2016 TRANSNET T 2016 2 NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY

NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY - 2016-09-14آ  1 TRANSNET T 2016 TRANSNET T 2016 2 NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY - 2016-09-14آ  1 TRANSNET T 2016 TRANSNET T 2016 2 NATIONAL PORTS...

  • 2TRANSNET INTEGRATED REPORT 20161 TRANSNET INTEGRATED REPORT 2016

    NATIONAL PORTS AUTHORITY

    HIGHLIGHTS Construction of port operational centres at the ports

    of Durban, East London, Port Elizabeth, Saldanha and Richards Bay.

    59% completion of the tug building project (target: 49%).

    The vessel traffic services (VTS) systems upgraded at all ports.

    A new TSHD dredger delivered in January 2016 and is operational.

    Planned phases of the Integrated Port Management System (IPMS) implemented across the port system.

    A 5% reduction in port security issues during the year. Automated mooring units installed at the Port

    of Ngqura. 38 CSI learners attended the division’s GPR, course

    and 13 were enrolled for maritime studies. The division achieved a level 3 B-BBEE score.

    BUSINESS OVERVIEW The National Ports Authority operates as a port landlord managing, controlling and administering the South African ports system. Core services include the maintenance and provision of port infrastructure, as well as the provision of maritime operations, such as pilotage, towage (tug assistance), dredging, and lighthouse and navigational services. The Operating Division owns and operates Transnet’s commercial ports, which are situated in Durban, Richards Bay, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, Ngqura, Mossel Bay, Saldanha and East London. The Port of Nolloth is leased in its entirety to De Beers Consolidated Diamond Mines.

    South African ports owned by the National Ports Authority facilitate 98% of South Africa’s global trade, and service the shipping feeder network connecting the west and east coasts of Africa.

    Approximately 31% of the country’s GDP is derived from exports, and 32% is derived from imports. Major commodities handled at the ports include coal, iron ore, containers, automotives, steel, fruit, ferrochrome, petroleum and chemical products, and manganese ore.

    Port operations are key platforms for executing efficient services to customers and advancing economic activity. The National Ports Authority, in its role as regulator, is required to ensure that efficient port services are rendered to port users. As part of its oversight responsibilities, the National Ports Authority ensures compliance by port users with all of the conditions contained in operators’ agreements and licences.

    REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT National Ports Authority, as a regulated entity, is required to ensure that the execution of its strategy is in compliance with the National Ports Act (No. 12 of 2005) (Ports Act). The Ports Act requires the National Ports Authority to assume the role of a regulator of port users, whilst also being regulated by the Ports Regulator.

    There are three levels of regulation and control within the port environment: 1. Regulatory oversight and compliance; 2. Economic regulation; and 3. Efficiency of port operations.

    For the 2016 financial year tariff application, the Ports Regulator determined as follows:

    An overall increase in average tariffs of 4,8%. All cargo dues increased by 3,6%, except:

    ú Dry bulk cargo dues for coal, iron ore and manganese, which increased by 6%; and

    ú Marine services and related tariffs increased by 6%.

    PERFORMANCE CONTEXT The National Ports Authority seeks to create sustained economic value in terms of its policy mandate. It does so through its strategic role as national provider of port infrastructure capacity, and efficient and competitive port services. The execution of the Authority’s mandate is undertaken within a regulated environment, whereby the National Ports Authority assumes the role of a regulator of port users, while also being regulated by the Ports Regulator.

    As regulator of port services, the National Ports Authority controls all port facilities and services to ensure, among others, that the security, safety and efficiencies of the total port system are maintained and improved at all times. As a regulated entity, the Ports Regulator

    exercises economic regulation over the National Ports Authority and handles complaints against the Operating Division. From a strategic perspective, the National Ports Authority also assumes the role of market integrator to create value across the supply chain.

    Against this backdrop, the National Ports Authority focused its strategic efforts during the year on managing its regulatory obligations, delivering on its planned infrastructure programme, improving the integration of operational performance and enhancing customer relations as part of the total value proposition to facilitate market segment competitiveness.

    The South African port system provides services to maritime customers in five market segments, which include containers, dry bulk, liquid bulk, break-bulk and automotives. Plans are in place to enhance other value-adding services to further harness the ocean economy and, more specifically, to develop opportunities for marine engineering.

    The Operating Division continues to implement key elements of its operating strategy, which is geared towards the reduction of ship turnaround time, vessel waiting time and cargo dwell times, as well as the better utilisation of port assets and, thereby, the reduction of port costs.

    The National Ports Authority has established the necessary governance, processes and resources to exercise oversight to improve port performance.

    OPERATIONAL PERFORMANCE Core initiatives for 2016

    Introduce a phased implementation of the new pricing strategy (revised tariffs) in the tariff application for the 2017 financial year.

    Implement the capital and maintenance programme. Execute Operation Phakisa programme (oil and gas

    and ship repair facilities). Revise port development framework plans. Develop operational centres in planned phases across the

    port system, with Durban and Head Office as pilot sites. Implement port operational performance standards

    (terminal and marine). Oversee the tug building programme. Upgrade vessel traffic services (VTS) systems at all ports. Improve ‘safe manning’ procedures to allow crews to

    perform inter-port voyages. Fully implement customer interaction platforms. Develop Rail Operator Performance Standards (ROPS)

    for Transnet Freight Rail and Terminal Operators having rail infrastructure and operations within terminal boundaries.

    Figure 1: Eight operational ports under the National Ports Authority’s control

    RICHARDS BAY

    DURBAN

    EAST LONDON

    NGQURA PORT ELIZABETHMOSSEL BAY

    CAPE TOWN

    SALDANHA

    PORT NOLLOTH

  • 4TRANSNET INTEGRATED REPORT 20163 TRANSNET INTEGRATED REPORT 2016

    National Ports Authority

    2015 2016 2016 2017 Key performance area and indicator Unit of measure Actual Target Actual Target

    Dry Bulk

    – Coal (RBCT) hours 43 46 41 46 – Iron ore (Saldanha) hours 46 50 47 50 – Manganese (Port Elizabeth) hours 70 78 69 78

    Berth occupancy

    – Durban % 70 70 – 80 69 65 – 75 – Cape Town % 68 60 – 70 61 60 – 70 – Port Elizabeth % 52 65 – 75 33 30 – 40 – Ngqura % 57 70 – 80 40 50 – 60

    Berth utilisation (%)

    – Durban % 70 70 – 80 89 85 – 95 – Cape Town % 62 70 – 80 71 70 – 80 – Port Elizabeth % 42 65 – 75 67 60 – 70 – Ngqura % 56 75 – 85 84 75 – 85 – Richards Bay % – – n/a n/a – East London % – – n/a n/a

    Market segment competitiveness

    Volume and revenue growth

    Containers (000 TEUs) 000 TEUs 4 699 4 905 4 439 4 952 Break-bulk (million tons) million tons 9,46 8,60 7,57 7,30 Liquid-bulk (million kilolitres) million kilolitres 42,78 36,80 41,70 40,85 Dry-bulk (million tons) million tons 171,60 172,70 170,79 180,14 Vehicles (units) units 668 322 650 821 697 048 736 294

    Tariffs

    Average tariff increase % 6,6 4,8 0,0 6,2

    Sustainable developmental outcomes

    Human capital

    Training spend % of personnel cost 7,79 8,1 8,14 9,97 Employee turnover % 2,53 4,00 6,00 4,00 Employee headcount permanent 4 189 4 909 4 349 4 996 Revenue per employee R million 2,32 2,20 2,56 2,4

    Risk, safety and health

    Cost of risk % of revenue 2,38 3,00 3,00 3,1 DIFR rate 0,41 0,60 0,71 0,75

    Overview of key performance indicators

    Table 1: Overview of key performance indicators

    2015 2016 2016 2017 Key performance area and indicator Unit of measure Actual Target Actual Target

    Financial sustainability

    EBITDA margin % 65,0 63,1 65,4 61,1 Operating profit margin % 50,1 46,6 51,0 43,7 Gearing % 37,7 33,7 42,30 34,6 Net debt to EBITDA times 3,4 2,8 3,04 3,04 Return on average total assets – excluding CWIP % 6,77 7,2 7,61 6,9 Asset turnover – excluding CWIP times 0,14 0,2 0,15 0,16 Cash interest cover times 3,03 3,4 4,01 2,8

    Capacity creation and maintenance

    Capital expenditure R million 2 874 3 426 2 938 2 800

    Operational excellence

    Productivity

    Anchorage waiting time

    – Durban average hours 41 40 33 n/a Pier 1 new new new 32 Pier 2 new new new 40

    – Cape Town average hours 31 34 23 32 – Port Elizabeth average hours 37 33 16 30 – Ngqura average hours 32 45 20 32 – Richards Bay average hours 39 60 42 60

    Average ship turnaround time

    – Durban containers STAT hour 51 55 46 n/a Pier 1 new new new 43 Pier 2 new new new 53

    – Cape Town containers STAT hour 27 29 24 27 – Port Elizabeth containers STAT hour 26 28 17,1 28 – Ngqura containers STAT