THEME II MAKE FRIENDS WITH TIME

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  • THEME IIMAKE FRIENDS WITH TIME Jrgen Larsson PhD, of the Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, and author Fredrik Warberg, Freningen Tidsverkstaden, have had the main responsibility for designing the theme in cooperation with Professor KarinCRingsberg, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.

  • PurposeThe purpose of Theme II is to give participants the chance to learn more about the correlation between health and lifestyle and our relationship with time, while also finding time strategies that will benefit the entire family.J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Theme II is divided into four areas of discussion Discussion area 1: Time pressure.Reflection and discussion of how we experience time and time pressure. Discussion area 2: Time profile.To what extent do we find that we do not have enough time? How happy are we with the way in which we divide and use our time for the various day-to-day activities? To find the answers, the time profile is filled in by each participant.

    Discussion area 3: Expectations and norms.How are we and our use of time affected by norms?

    Discussion area 4: Strategies for increased temporal welfare.Discussion about how our own temporal welfare can benefit children and families. Strategies and initiatives for improving our temporal welfare. J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Table 1. How parents in the Nordic countries experience time pressure in day-to-day life.J Larsson, F Warberg, KC RingsbergSource: NordChild 2011

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Discussion issues Exercise 1Did any of you find there was little difference between how you felt about this and how you wished you felt about it?

    What was it like for the others among you? J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Worksheet 2(a) and (b) True or false statements76% of all those with children living at home say they often have so much to do on weekdays that they have difficulty finding time for everything that needs doing. 31% of all those without children living at home say they often have so much to do on weekdays that they have difficulty finding time for everything that needs doing.People who are under time pressure spend 36 minutes less per working day sleeping, exercising and socialising than those not under time pressure.Between 1976 and 2004, the average weekly working hours of mothers of nursery school children increased by just over 70%.Between 1976 and 2004, the average weekly working hours of fathers of nursery school children increased by 5%.Around a quarter of fathers of children aged 34 years who work full time would like to work fewer hours even with reduced pay.Mothers are ten times more likely than fathers to work part-time because they have children.In 2009, the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (Frskringskassan) paid out approx. SEK2billion directly as a result of the diagnosis stress reactions. In 2010, fathers took around 40% of parental leave.When children list whom they most want to talk to when they are upset, Dad comes in 5th place.

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.

    1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.

    TRUE FALSE TRUE FALSE TRUE 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.

    FALSE J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Table 2. Division of working hours by parents in the Nordic countries 2011.J Larsson, F Warberg, KC RingsbergSource: NordChild 2011

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Discussion issues Exercise 2How do you think children experience time pressure?

    What do you think children feel time pressure about?

    What do you think your child thinks about you when you are under time pressure?J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • I rarely or never feel rushed, stressed or pressed for timeI think I have realistic ambitions about what I will have time to do on a daily basisI find that my current day-to-day pace of life is reasonableI dont feel pressurised by the things that need to be done in the homeI devote as much time to the children as I would likeMy partner and I spend enough time together to help maintain our relationship I dont think about work when I am with my familyI can spend the necessary time on things to do them well enoughI dont feel pressurised by the things that need to be done in the homeI usually feel thoroughly rested

    I have time to recuperate whenever I am illI am happy with the way I divide my time on a day-to-day basisI make a conscious choice about which activities to spend time on, discarding those I don't want to I spend just the right number of hours a week at work (or other day-to-day activity)I have enough time for my own interests I spend just the right amount of time socialisingI find that I can influence the way I spend my time if I need toI dont spend any more time than I would like watching TV, online, playing TV, computer games, etc.I spend the time I think I need to keep my body in trimI have enough regular opportunities during the day to relax and feel calm 1. 2. 3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10.

    11.12.13.14.15.16.17.18.19.20.

    Completely agreeMainly agree Mainly disagreeCompletely disagreeMy Time Profile: How is your temporal welfare? You can reflect on this using this Time Profile. Your Time Profile can also act as the basis for interesting discussions with those close to you. The concept of temporal welfare covers both the extent to which we find we have or do not have enough time, and how happy we are with the way in which we divide and use our time for the necessary and pleasurable activities of everyday life. The Time Profile consist of 20 positively worded statements where you indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the statement. Once you have ticked off your answer, you can add one point to your current temporal welfare score. Dont compare your scores with those of others. By filling it in from time to time, however, you can compare your score with your previous results and see if there have been any changes for you. First, add up the number of ticks in each column and then multiply by 0 for each completely disagree, by 1 for each mainly disagree, by 3 for each mainly agree, and by 4 for each completely agree. Add the subtotals together to give your current temporal welfare score. Then think of anything specific you can do to change what you want and what you need. Good luck.

    The reply options can be interpreted in different ways, but what is important is your own interpretation. Certain questions contain two statements. In these cases, you must agree with both statements to choose the reply option Completely agree.Number of ticksNumber of ticks x0, 1, 3 or 4 = MY SCORE Name:.. Date .... .. 20. x 0 =x 1 =x 3 =x 4 =0 The Time Profile has been developed by the Association of Time Workshops (Freningen Tidsverkstaden) and can be downloaded from www.tidsverkstaden.se

  • Issue for discussion Exercise 2What will you be thinking of when you consider the statements in the Time Profile?J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Discussion issues Exercise 4What should a good mother and good father be like according to the expectations and norms of society today?

    What do you and your children tend to do together?

    How much time do you spend on activities with your child?J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Table 3. Children and their parents activities in the Nordic countries, divided into the age groups 26years and 717years. J Larsson, F Warberg, KC RingsbergSource: NordChild 2011

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • What are societys expectations and norms like in terms of being a successful person? Worksheet 4. Work

    Consumption

    Health and leisure time

    Relationships

    Other J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • Discussion issues Exercise 4Where do these norms come from?To what extent are we influenced by norms?What can we do so that we are influenced less?J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

    J Larsson, F Warberg, KC Ringsberg

  • 1. Reduce expectations/ambitions:Worksheet 6. Strategies for increased temporal welfare.

    Do I use my time resources and those of other people in a smart way? Which of the points below could I imagine myself thinking about in more detail/trying?Are there any other things you can try?2. Improve my use of resources:concentrating a bit less on worklowering my ambitions about keeping the house clean and tidycutting back a bit on my own leisure interests questioning the extent of the childrens leisure activitiesreducing consumption a little bit fewer holidays, gadgets, clothes and other possessionslowering my ambitions about having an attractive appearancequestioning how many friends and relatives it is reasonable to find time for socialising withnot starting off any new time-consuming projectsturning down things that take a lot of time

    ..

    ..

    ..

    reviewing how I spend my time and spending more time on things that are really important, as well as reining in the time thieves (things that take time but dont provide anything)ensuring I get enough of the things that give me strength and energyequalling out the distribution of domestic chores among the familyasking other people for help family, friends, neighbours, etc.buying services that save timediscussing flexitime/home working/part-time working fo